RPGNow.com
Browse
 Publisher Info













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Pulp Zombies
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/08/2017 07:47:53

Pulp Zombies, like Enter the Zombie, looks at a movie-fusion approach, this time mixing classic zombie films with the pulp genre. It opens with a fairly massive piece of fiction, The Night Chicago Died, which unleashes the undead amidst mobsters on Chicago's streets. Chapter 1: Setting the Stage then chips in with an attempt to define what 'pulp' actually means, looking at the concept of larger-than-life adventures in the style of those of the 1920s to 1940s... while it's hard to pin it down in words, most people have a general idea of what pulp means. Precise chronology is not important, double-fisted action and excitement are.

Chapter 2: Pulpy Flesh continue in this vein, continuing to define, or at least give an impression of, what 'pulp' actually means - high stakes, thrilling locations and above all, action and high adventure. Heroes are, well, heroic and never hesitate, they just know what is right without agonising over ethical choices... and villians are just evil, not misunderstood. There's some background about the Pulp Era, based firmly in America, with everything from sample prices to favourite entertainments and daily life being discussed (and a reminder that although ethnic minorities and women had a rough deal in real life, there's no need to replicate that in your games). Franklin D. Roosevelt is in the White House, the radio is a common form of entertainment in the home, movies were booming and the railroad is already declining in the face of the automobile... and everyone's fascinated by aircraft. That done, attention is turned to the all-important business of creating Pulp Hero characters, with a new Character Type to facilitate this. There are also suggestions for building a party - in the movies, most heroes act alone, or at most have a few sidekicks, but this doesn't work so well in a role-playing game. Gadgets and supernatural powers are also covered and the chapter ends with a few Archetypes ready to be played or to be used as a source of inspiration.

Next, Chapter 3: Hollow Earth presents the first of three fully-developed settings. This is interesting in that there's a distinct campaign arc, beginning with the party involved in seeking out ancient artefacts... without a zombie in sight! They emerge later in a series of devastating earthquakes, and then the fight is on to get rid of them and set things straight, which involves a journey to the centre of the earth. There's a lot of background explaining not just what is going on but why, and plenty of NPCs from archaeologists to members of a mysterious society that keep popping up - but are they a hinderance or a help? Loads of resources here concerning artefacts and where to seek them out and much, much more... but although it's not mentioned, the thought occurs that this might best be run with the players unaware that you're running All Flesh Must Be Eaten: present it as a pulp adventure run using the Unisystem ruleset and let the emergence of zombies come as a complete surprise!

In Chapter 4: Zombies Inc. we get a completely different setting: here a criminal mastermind has worked out how to raise zombies and then organised them to create an unprecidented crimewave, with the heroes working to put an end to the undead crime spree across America (and indeed the world). There's an abundance of information of the (on the face of it) unlikely crime lord behind the zombies and several location-based scenario outlines to get you going, as well as notes for further adventures and on how to wrap things up in a satisfactory manner once the crime lord is brought down. Classic stuff in a Doc Savage vein.

Chapter 5: They Want Our Women takes a different tack yet again. Basically, the Martians have landed. It's very much Mars Attacks! in style, and should only be played tongue-in-cheek... with Martians being classified by head size (the larger the more important, of course) what do you expect? Strictly speaking, this isn't a 'zombie' setting, but the Martians are bizarre enough and more importantly pulp enough for that not to matter too much.

Finally, Chapter 6: Scattered Pulp provides a host of other setting outlines, in far less detail than the preceeding three, which you may explore at your leisure. All piulp in style, there's plenty to keep you happy whether Chinatown is crawling with undead, film noir detective stories and more.

The fusion of zombies and pulp is a marriage made in heaven, or at least in some deranged place that makes for excellent role-playing ideas. There's something for just about everyone here.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pulp Zombies
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Enter the Zombie
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/07/2017 12:53:36

This sourcebook for All Flesh Must Be Eaten takes the 'Hong Kong Action Theatre' approach to zombies. Diving straight in with Chapter 1: Corpses Rising, we begin with ominous fiction that sets the scene - a corpse used in a foul ritual to unleash a demon assassin to wreak vengeance. It's an excellent story, perhaps a shade long if you are itching to get to the meat of the book.

Then comes the Introduction, which explains how this book mixes up the themes of monster movie (especially, of course, the zombie ones) and 'chop-sockey' style martial arts movies. These remarks are followed by Chapter 2: Tao of the Dead, which provides the necessary game mechanics to mix in martial arts and more esotetic stuff like chi powers, with an eye to both the living and zombies having access to them. Most people probably pick up this book expecting to have their characters destroy zombies with dramatic kung-fu moves... but what if the zombies know them as well? Here we find resources for building martial artist characters from the ground up - for remember, Grasshopper, that these skills must be learned and practised - and also for practitioners of gun-fu. Thus we have two new Character Types, the Martial Artist and the Shooter, along with new skills than enable them to do their thing. There's a note that Martial Artists created with these rules are pretty powerful, so much so that they would out-fight most characters created in other Unisystem variants in a stand-up, knock-down confrontation. Fine, of course, if that's what you want, but you may prefer to confine them to your All Flesh Must Be Eaten game. There's a whole array of Chi Techniques, cinematic in the extreme, which both Martial Artists and Shooters can access. For those wishing to play a zombie Martial Artist, there are further notes on how to create zombie characters with sufficient brains (in their heads, I mean... not on the menu) to be capable of using these skills and techniques. The chapter ends with a fine selection of martial arts weapons.

Next comes Chapter 3: Hard Boiled Corpses. We're now into Zombie Master territory, because this chapter describes the alternate Hong Kong in which this game is set. Now ruled by mainland China (as in the real world), it displays distinctive features: an obsession with making money, a sleazy underbelly of strip clubs and massage parlours and gambling dens, and organised crime in the shape of the Triads. Under Communist rule, however, the police have more leeway to deal with trouble and... well, shall we say that one idea they came up with resulted in zombies. Not on purpose, I hasten to add. This makes for a compelling backstory, something the party might wish to investigate inbetween just trying to stay alive. The particular kind of zombies are discussed, along with the four distinct groups who are involved in the situation: the cops, the Triads, drug dealers and the zombies themselves (these ones are quite smart, you see). There are sample NPCs and plenty of notes about each group. A couple of outline scenarios are provided based on this concept, and it's easy to think of how to expand on them - or the situation in general - to create a whole campaign. The chapter ends with a few archetypes all ready to jump into the fray...

Next, Chapter 4: Flesh Eaters in Little China moves across the Pacific to San Francisco and presents a quite different setting that mixes sorcery and zombies into a heady underworld amongst Chinese immigrants. There's a lot going on in Chinatown and it's not all restaurants and laundries. Plenty of background explaining precisely what is happening and why. Secret societies, triads and martial arts brotherhoods abound, with examples of each being provided with plenty of detail to get them up and running in your game. And then there are sorcerers and mystics as well... and the outline of an adventure involving hordes of zombies and an underground lair presided over by a decidedly ancient sorcerer. There's an outline of how magic works here (but if you want a detailed magic system you are better off looking at Witchcraft, another Unisystem game), and another couple of scenario outlines, including one where the party start out as a bunch of tourists that find far more than they expected... Again, the chapter ends with some Archetypes.

Then Chapter 5: Once Upon a Corpse in China takes yet another angle on the whole Chinese action/zombie fusion. This takes us back roughly a thousand years to historic China, where squabbling kung fu schools have accidentally created zombies when brawling with each other. With rival schools, Imperial magistrates and the Shaolin Temple itself trying to sort the problem out, there's plenty of scope for cinematic martial arts action. Two scenarios are provided, one has the party working for the Imperial authorities and the other sets them as the ones who spawned the zombies in the first place...

Finally, Chapter 6: Undead Kombat starts with the premise that a soldeir's soul gets mystically entangled with those he has killed in battle, and ends with what happens when ancient Persian Magi start meddling. The Magi wanted to live forever, but their undead cohorts were both quarrelsome and hungry. The solution involves a massive contest between the zombies called the Tournament of Souls... only now they've decided to include human beings on the card. Set up a range of situations in a massive stadium on a remote island and let combat commence! A couple of scenario outlines are provided that take this setting beyond a simple 'arena' game.

Overall, this puts a delightful spin on the whole zombie concept, and should provide sufficient interest for even those players in your group who don't really fancy a zombie game. The martial arts rules are excellent and give you the tools to create cinematic action with or even without zombies added in. A refreshing look at zombies, a brilliant fusion of two exciting movie styles, well worth a look!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Enter the Zombie
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Zombie Master's Screen
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/05/2017 09:30:30

The actual screen part of this product is fairly standard, a four-panel screen with a fairly gory and dramatic painting on the player side and a whole bunch of useful charts for the Zombie Master. This has an Outcome Table supporting levels of success (or failure) in task resolution, fear effects, explosive damage charts, how much protection body armour or other cover gives you, damge tables, a chart showing turn progression during combat and other useful stuff that it's far easier to have right in front of you than have to look up.

There is also an adventure, Coffee Break of the Living Dead. Opening with a piece of fiction that sets the scene - and the nature of this particular scenario's zombies - the adventure is set in the opening hours of a zombie outbreak with the party trapped in a high-rise office building. The background is yet another reason for having zombies over and above the range of suggestions in the core rulebook, but if you've already started a campaign using one of them it's reasonably easy to adapt this to fit in.

Although it will be quite difficult to pull off, especially if the players know they are playing All Flesh Must Be Eaten, the adventure begins with the characters trundling off to a normal day at work. They don't know each other, but all work in the same building which they shortly will discover is just outside the containment zone set up around a suspected terrorist incident at a research laboratory. After a typically boring start to the day at the office, everyone just coincidentally decides it's time for a coffee break and goes down to the lobby coffee shop... and that's when the lift breaks down. By the time they emerge, the place is crawling with zombies, and things go downhill from there.

The adventure is well-supported with floor plans and descriptions of the chaos in various parts of the building. Eventually, surviving party members may try to leave the building. That's when they meet the authorities outside, who are expecting zombies to come out and are armed and waiting...

The booklet also contains notes on using the Zombie Master's Screen to good effect, pre-generated characters to use with the adventure (these are honed to the adventure, but you could use other characters although some modification might be necessary), some new rules and a discussion of zombie and other survival horror as portrayed in film. Excellent for inspiration and for helping you create the right atmosphere in your games.

The adventure is a solid horror-survival scenario, which works well as an introduction to the game and the beginning (if you wish) of a whole campaign. The essay on horror is good, too, starting with the need to ascertain what scares your particular group... and throw it at them combined with the loss of control of your surroundings inherent in a zombie game. Loads of ideas and concepts to play with as you develop your own adventures.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Zombie Master's Screen
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

CJ Carrella's WitchCraft
by Ian F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/04/2017 05:34:02

A classic modern-supernatural game you can run from a single book.

I picked up Witchcraft (2nd ed) around 1999, and played with the book so often I had to get it rebound. While the supplements are useful (especially Mystery Codex), the core book could keep you playing for years on its own. The system is very easy to figure out, and has card and diceless variants included that I've used with success as well. The setting has the right amount of interesting groups to use in play, and you can re-skin them trivially to fit your own vision of an occult conspiracy setting.

And (at the time of this writing, and for quite some time) it's free.

This game features an interesting magic system, some great artwork, and a very usable dice engine. You will likely want to moderate how the experience system works (I found characters advancing way too quickly in some games), and also remember that guns are deadly in this game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CJ Carrella's WitchCraft
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeons & Zombies
by Aaron W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/31/2017 20:01:49

Dungeons & Zombies is probably the closest thing we'll get to a generic fantasy Unisystem book. This book, along with Witchcraft or (preferrably) Armageddon and the AFMBE corebook (which add up to either $12, $27 or $42 depending on which ones you buy), are all you need to run and play a fantasy game far greater than D&D.

Dungeons & Zombies adds 2 character types, the Adept Hero and ther Talented Hero. Talented Heroes are nonmagical fantasy heroes such as rogues, fighters and rangers, while Adept Heroes are mages, psychics and necromancers. For cleric-type characters, it would be best to use the Inspired stats in the AFMBE corebook.

There are quite a few great Qualities and Drawbacks for both magical and nonmagical characters, but the best Qualities in D&Z (in my opinion) are the Racial and Profession Qualities. They are Quality, Drawback and Power packages that reflect the strengths and weaknesses of various fantasy races and classes such as elves, dwarves, rangers and paladins. Some even allow characters to exceed Attribute maximums or maximum ranks of Hard to Kill.

D&Z adds a Skill for shields (and stats for a few different types of shields), alchemy, rune carving (for magic item creation), and taunting. It also includes Armageddon's Magic Bolt Skill, allowing mages to progress faster with single-target spells than with other types of magic.

D&Z comes with some Invocations, Necromancy powers, and magic item creation rules. There are a few new uses for currently existing Invocations (Induce Sleep for Affect the Psyche, Sheet Lightning for Elemental Air, and Soulfire Burst for Soulfire. I may have forgotten a few). For necromancy, there is the Death Raising power, which allows you to raise zombies and give them extra powers. Magic item creation is based on the Rune Carving Skill, and requires Inspired powers. Magic items can be given bonuses to Armor Value, damage and accuracy. Some items can also be "charged" with Invocations or Necromancy powers.

I won't go into detail on the book's Deadworlds, but they are all great. The book also provides the stats for various fantasy monsters such as a dragon, goblins, orcs, minotaurs, and a griffon. It ends with a dungeon crawl adventure: The Tomb of Doom. Unlike the dungeon from which it got its name, you will find no save-or-die traps (or no-save deathtraps) but it can still be quite deadly, especially with the lethality of Unisystem combat.

This book is great on its own, but much better when supplemented by other Unisystem books. My first suggestion is Armageddon for both Lesser and Greater Invocations, as well as Primal Powers (which work well as powers for Clerics or Paladins of different gods), and Psychic and Necromancy powers. My second suggestion is Terra Primate, which has what amounts to a monster manual in the Appendix. The stats for monsters in Terra Primate are variable and most of them use a different formula for speed Endurance Points and Life Points, so there will be a bit of math for the ZM, but it is well worth the money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeons & Zombies
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

One of the Living
by Aaron W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/26/2017 17:42:35

It's no secret that All Flesh Must Be Eaten was made for one-shots. While the core rulebook certainly does have more than enough information to run an extended campaign, it doesn't have specific rules for all of the problems you'll encounter in the long run. That's where this book comes in. It has rules for scavenging, jury-rigging, and farming. It also has new Miracles for the Inspired. The Deadworlds seem shorter than in other AFMBE books, but still contain useful information for your game. One of the Living has no short supply of items to use in your game either. Chapter 4 has items like iodine tablets for water, spear guns for killing zombies, and even Necronomicon Ex Mortis: The Book of the Dead.

Unlike most other AFMBE sourcebooks, where if you take out the zombies you have yourself a genre book, One of the Living works best for survival horror campaigns. That is actually what makes it my favorite AFMBE sourcebook. It feels more like an extension of the corebook than any other book out there.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
One of the Living
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Armageddon the End Times
by Aaron W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/26/2017 16:19:54

I originally bought the book for the Primal Powers it has, but as it turns out, this book offers so much more than that. If you use the Unisystem at all, this book is a must-have. Along with the setting-specific stuff (which I will admit I hardly even read, but I'm sure is great), it comes with a few Greater Invocations, Spirit Patrons (Boons granted by spirits, demons, and basically anything else more powerful than humans, as well as Obligations which you can take to lessen the cost of the Boons. Think Qualities/Drawbacks), rules for magic item creation (Much different from the magic item creation rules provided in Dungeons & Zombies), and of course Primal Powers (Powers granted by Old Gods, think Divine Inspiration in Witchcraft/AFMBE, but way more badass and with significantly more options to choose from). The rules, like in all other Eden Games, can be used in basically any setting you want.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Armageddon the End Times
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Book of All Flesh
by Charles E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2017 14:41:41

There are some okay moments, but it's aged really badly.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Book of All Flesh
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

All Flesh Must be Eaten Revised
by Aaron W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/07/2017 13:41:42

The rules are fairly simple. 9 is the target number to roll for all actions, after modifiers. There are three types of characters. The first, and my personal favorite of the three, is Norms. They are average people such as you or me. They will probably survive if they're smart, but shouldn't run headfirst into the zombie hordes expecting to survive like in zombie movies. The second type is Survivors. They're essentially the main character in a zombie video game. They're tougher than Norms , with 5 extra points for Attributes (Your basic stats), Skills (No explanation required) and Qualities (Somewhat similar to feats in D&D). They don't have to be as careful as Norms, but will still probably die if they're stupid about it. The third type is the Inspired. They have the same Attribute points as Norms if I remember correctly, with fewer points for Skills and the same points for Qualities. What makes the Inspired special is Metaphysics, which are basically magic. In AFMBE, the rules for Metaphysics only cover divine type magic, but you can easily replace it with magic from Witchcraft (Another great Eden game, this one's free also). Some may find the Inspired out of place in a zombie game, but because this is an Eden game, they're there anyway. I don't personally like to play in games with Inspired, but they are very balanced compared to Survivors if you do want to play them. There are also detailed rules for creating zombies, and a bunch of campaign settings, called Deadworlds, to use in the game as well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
All Flesh Must be Eaten Revised
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Army of Darkness Corebook
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/18/2016 05:50:02

Thoughts:

  • The biggest problem the book has is that it's shackled to Army of Darkness. It strains to convince you that playing the Blacksmith would really be fun. Well, the bench just isn't as deep in this setting as it is in Buffy or Angel. The true highlights are the other time periods, the archetypes (and what they mean for a potential game),
  • The Mass Combat rules may not sound like much, but I have used the Savage Worlds version of them quite a bit, and adapted the Army of Darkness rules into D&D5e to good effect. The core conceit behind these rules are my favorite mass combat rules of all time, and my players actually get excited when they realize I'm wheeling them out. I actually like these rules better than the Savage Worlds version because the Savage Worlds rules have a Knowledge (Battle) prerequisite that almost none of my players ever take, while the AoD rules are based on Intelligence and Influence.
  • The production values on licensed Eden Studios books were always on point, and this is no exception. Everything about the book screams Army of Darkness, from the screen caps to the layout to the quotes peppered all over it. The writing is similarly evocative. This isn't a dry rulebook, this is a book laden with pop culture references and snark. Now, you will have to decide how much or how little that bothers you. Personally, I hate rulebooks that read like textbooks.
  • The nature of the setting, and the portrayal of Deadites, makes it so that adapting new monsters in is not only easy, but fitting. Demons seem to come in all shapes and sizes, especially if you take the canon of Ash vs Evil Dead into account. The various monsters in the Army of Darkness book, plus the list of monster abilities, give you a good start on creating your own.
  • While the book was "one and done", it is completely compatible with the Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel RPGs (rules wise...a little work would be needed to reconcile the settings, but monsters, Qualities and mechanics like magic can be swiped at will), expanding your options. Taking it a step further, and Classic Unisystem games like All Flesh Must Be Eaten and Witchcraft use the same base system, just a bit more complex (more Skills, the Essence mechanic and so on).
  • Army of Darkness was a movie, and pretty well wrapped up its story in 90 minutes. The GM section recommends structuring your game like a "season", which Ash vs Evil Dead does a nice job of demonstrating. In fact, it feels much more appropriate now, ten years later, than it did then. Similarly, the structure of groups filled with Heroes and Primitive Screwheads is demonstrated much better in the Ash vs Evil Dead show than it is in the Army of Darkness movie.

So if you've been watching Ash vs Evil Dead and decided to start looking for something that could emulate that style of game, you don't necessarily have to reinvent the wheel. Army of Darkness covers most of the ground that you would need, in a solid and unobtrusive system (Cinematic Unisystem just does not get in the way). I mean, it even has a rule for extreme gore. Even better, it's not nearly as out of print as I thought it was. Obvious labor of love from all involved, which now seems strikingly more relevant than it did when released, thanks to the Ash revival tour on Starz.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2016/10/tommys-take-on-army-of-darkness.html



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Army of Darkness Corebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Conspiracy X 2.0 GM Screen
by Neil P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/26/2016 14:04:35

It is exctly what you think: all the tables you need to run the game.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Conspiracy X 2.0 GM Screen
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

All Flesh Must be Eaten Revised
by John H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/24/2015 14:05:05

Easy and fun to read. The chapter intros allow you to have a little fun while searching for rules. Would very much recommend this purchase.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
All Flesh Must be Eaten Revised
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

All Flesh Must be Eaten Revised
by Daniel P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/31/2015 01:07:20

Impressive as I expected it to be from the reviews... slightly tongue in cheek at times, but overall: very good gaming system.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
CJ Carrella's WitchCraft
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/30/2015 21:38:10

This is less of a review and more of a testimonial.

WitchCraft is the best game ever made. At least, for me.

WitchCraft is, hands down, my favorite game. Period. Picking up a copy of this book back in 1999 was just like picking up a copy of the Monster Manual in 1979. Everything I ever wanted in a game was right there. Everything.

WitchCraft had such a profound effect on my gaming that I can draw a rather clean line between what came before and what came after it. Granted a lot was going on in 1999/2000 both gamingwise and personal that may have added to the this effect, it was an effect all the same.

Back in 1999 I was really burned out on D&D. I was working on my own Witch netbook and reading a bunch of different games when someone, I forget where, must have been the old RAVENLOFT-L that TSR/WotC used to run, told me I really need to check out WitchCraft. At first I balked. I had tried Vampire a couple years ago and found I didn't like it (and I was very much out of my vampire phase then), but I was coming home from work and the my FLGS was on the way, so I popped in and picked up a copy. This must have been the early spring of 2000.

I can recall sitting in my office reading this book over and over. Everything was so new again, so different. This was the world I had been trying, in vain, to create for D&D but never could. The characters in this book were also all witches, something that pleased me to no end, it was more than just that. Plus look at that fantastic cover art by George Vasilakos. That is one of my most favorite, is not my favorite, cover for a game book. I have it hanging in my game room now.

WitchCraft uses what is now called the "Classic" Unisystem system. So there are 6 basic attributes, some secondary attributes (derived), skills and qualities and drawbacks. Skills and attributes can be mixed and matched to suit a particular need.

WitchCraft uses a Point-Buy Metaphysics magic system, unlike Ghosts of Albion's levels of magic and spells system. Think of each magical effect as a skill that must be learned and you have to learn easier skills before the harder ones first. In D&D for example it is possible to learn Fireball and never have learned Produce Flame. In WitchCraft you could not do that. WitchCraft though is not about throwing around "vulgar magics". WitchCraft is a survival game where the Gifted protect humanity from all sorts of nasty things, from forgotten Pagan gods, to demons, fallen angels and the Mad Gods; Cthulhoid like horrors from beyond. WitchCraft takes nearly everything from horror and puts all together and makes it work.

The Eden Studios version was the Second Edition, I was later to find out. The first one was from Myrmidon Press. I manged to find a copy of that one too and it was like reading the same book, from an alternate universe. I prefer the Eden Edition far more for a number of reasons, but I am still happy to have both editions.

The central idea behind WitchCraft is the same as most other Modern Supernatural Horror games. The world is like ours, but there are dark secrets, magic is real, monsters are real. You know the drill. But WitchCraft is different. There is a Rekoning coming, everyone feels it, but no one knows what it is. Characters then take on the roles of various magic using humans, supernatuals or even mundane humans and they fight the threats. Another conceit of the game (and one I use a lot) is that supernatural occurances are greater now than ever before. Something's coming. (dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria).

It is most often compared to World of Darkness, but there are things WitchCraft does that I just like better. Unlike (old) Mage there is no war between the (good) Mages and the (evil) Technocracy. There is a war certainly, but nothing so cut and dry. Unlike new Mage there are rarely clean divisions between the factions. Yes, yes Mage players, I am being overly simple, but that is the point, on the simple levels new Mage dives everything into 5 because that is how the designers want it. There are factions (Associations) and there are different metaphysics for each, but also overlap, and sometimes no clear and defined lines are to be found or given. It feels very organic.

In my opinion C. J. Carella may be one of the best game designers out there. WitchCraft is a magnum opus that few achieve. I took that game and I ran with it. For 2000 - 2003 it was my game of choice above and beyond anything. The Buffy RPG, built on the Cinematic Unisystem took over till I wrote Ghosts of Albion, which also use the Cinematic Unisystem. I mix and match the systems as I need, but WitchCraft is still my favorite.

WitchCraft paved the way for so many other games for me, not just in terms of playing but in writing. If it were not for WitchCraft then we would not have had Buffy, Angel or Army of Darkness. Conspiracy X would have remained in the it's original system. There would be no Terra Primate or All Flesh Must Be Eaten and certainly there would be no Ghosts of Albion. The game means that much to me.

But you don't have to take my word for it, Eden Studios will let you have it, sans some art, for free. Download it. If you have never played anything else other than D&D then you OWE it yourself to try this game out.

My thing is I wish it was more popular than it is. I love the game. If I was told I could only play one game for the rest of my life then WitchCraft would be in my top 3 or 2 choices.

You can read more here: http://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2015/06/why-i-love-rpgs-c-j-carellas-witchcraft.html



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CJ Carrella's WitchCraft
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Conspiracy X 2.0
by David L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/17/2015 04:47:47

A great campaign setting ruined by a terrible rule system.

The good: There is not many conspiracy games to choose from, but even if there were Conspiracy X stands out. In particular it is a lot more focused and has a more cohesive world then most conspiracy fiction. One thing that I did like about the rules were the pulling string qualities that allowed the players to call on the power of the big bad federal government. In most roleplaying games the players have no outside resources and the DM is encouraged to prevent all attempts for players to try and use such resources even if it makes no sense for the players to be lonewolfing it. Nice to see a game that allows and provides rules for the players to actually act like government operatives.

The bad: good god is Unisystem awful. I think the central premise of the rule system is: "Why resolve an action in one roll when you can resolve it in 5 rolls. Why have hit points when you can have Life points, Endurance points and Essence points." You will spend more time rolling dice and keeping track of your 3 different kinds of hit points then you will roleplaying. Also the skill system is badly handled (like the fact that driving a truck is a different skill then driving a car).



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Conspiracy X 2.0
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 16 to 30 (of 155 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG