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Esper Genesis 5E Sci-fi - Core Manual
by Joseph D. B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/21/2018 08:50:39

This book is fantastic and very well done, with great art, layout, and clear, understandable rules. It borrows heavily from D&D 5e's Player's Handbook, but with a sci-fi theme throughout. Though there are only 8 classes, there are more archetypes for some comparable classes than in the PHB. The best part in my opinion is that EG is totally compatible with D&D 5e rules, and monsters are totally interchangeable between both systems. There's absolutely no reason why you can't have a D&D 5e barbarian fighting along side a Warrior, while your party's Melder and Cleric and slinging spells in the back. My players and I switched over to EG from Starfinder and it's not a decision we regret. Space combat even makes sense because it's treated very similarly to regular combat. I can't wait for the other two core rulebooks to release (Master Technician's Guide--i.e. the DMG--and the Threats Database--i.e. the MM). Overall, great fun!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Esper Genesis 5E Sci-fi -  Core Manual
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Esper Genesis 5E Sci-fi - Core Manual
by Linda W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2018 03:59:29

I played a couple games using this setting and I was impressed by how refreshingly different it felt from standard D&D stuff, while retaining the accessibility and flexibility of the D&D 5e rules system. The writing flows well and is incredibly cohesive, and the artwork and layout are pretty great. The art is arguably a lot better than other sci-fi stuff that's out there. I would recommend this for people both new and used to science fiction settings - you can't go wrong with this one.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Esper Genesis Basic Rules
by Alexander B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/13/2018 00:21:46

This is an excellent take on D&D 5e. With just some re-flavoring it feels like a completely new Science Fiction game, but is incredibly easy to play if you are familiar with 5e. After reviewing the basic rules, I immediately purchased the full version that will give you more races, classes, and rules to take your campaign to 20th lvl. I highly recommend it.



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
Esper Genesis Basic Rules
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Esper Genesis 5E Sci-fi - Core Manual
by Robert R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2018 19:17:06

Esper Genesis - A Science Fantasy/Fiction game based on the 5th ed D&D rules.

You get all new races and classes, though it's not too hard to see how some of them were derived from the originals to fit this setting. A setting where discovery of the Cauldrons, mysterious planetoid/planetary scale artifacts from an unknown source, have spawned new technologies and new powers, Esper Genesis.

Ok, it's a star spanning sci-fi romp with it's own fantasy components. Psionics and Esper powers are definitley a fantasy component that is very common in scifi. The game lends itself very well to a nice range of settings that could easily include Star Wars, Mass Effect, or even the Retief series of books if you are so inclined, though it does have it's own setting included.

I've found the writing clear and easy to understand, and the artwork astounding! In my opinion, I've rarely seen artwork of this caliber in sci-fi games, or even games in general.

It even has a good spaceship combat system that gives people things to do other than wait for the pilot or gunner to win or get everyone spaced.

If you're curious, why not take a look at the Basic Rules, that file is free. Esper Genesis Basic Rules

I own or have otherwise looked at a variety of scifi rpg rulesets for star romping, and this is one is my favorite.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Esper Genesis 5E Sci-fi -  Core Manual
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Esper Genesis: Fall of the Eos Keldor
by Newton P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/12/2017 16:09:09

Esper Genesis is essentially D&D 5e with a sci-fi skin applied to it.

This free starter adventure requires the 5e rules to play. Most of the gameplay from 5e remains the same. Indeed, it seems like arcane spells (renamed channeling) and divine spells (renamed forging) remain almost the same, but with different names (e.g. Firebolt is now "force bolt"). Healing potions are now healing elixirs, etc. Weapons and Armor have close equivalents to their D&D counterparts. The authors explain that while future weapons would be far more deadly than their fantasy counterparts, but armor has also advanced as well, so instead of introducing a cumbersome "mega" damage or multiplier, they had just scaled them down to match each other for ease of play. It works. There are additional rules for modern weapons like shotguns (cone effect), spraying (burst) autofire, and recoil. It is all quite eloquent.

The re-skinning of the D&D rules makes it easy for anyone familiar with the 5e rule-set to jump right into the game. However, this starter book lacks some elements that one might expect in a sci-fi game (e.g. no mention of cybernetics, robotics, etc). The book also gives a brief taste of starship combat.

The majority of the book is a starter adventure "Fall of the Eos Keldor" which adequately shows off the new rules and flavor of the Esper Genesis universe. It has 4 pre-gen characters to quickly get you into the action (the equivalents of a Fighter, Rogue, Mage and Cleric). The adventure has a good mix of combat, investigation and star-ship battle.

Because this book seems to be a condensed or play-test version of the rules, it is not without its problems. For example, when playing through the adventure the 'Specialist' (rogue) wanted to pick up some of the guards weapons. While we know which fantasy weapons a 5e rogue has proficiency in, we were uncertain what the sci-fi equivalent would be from the weapon chart. Star-ship combat requires lots of rolls against a ship's "maneuver defense", yet that stat was not listed on the enemy's ship's stat block. And there were some blatant errors, like the channeling talent (spell) "Lightning Whip" which has a duration of 1 round, but the description clearly says "...for each of your turns for the duration..." (it probably should have a duration of 1 minute).



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Esper Genesis: Fall of the Eos Keldor
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Creator Reply:
Hi, Newton! Thank you for your detailed, concise review of our product. It's nice to see someone take the time out to provide a thorough review. We want to create a robust sci-fi universe and rules without stepping on or changing what makes 5E enjoyable. For this reason, the starter adventure contains all the basics that are familiar to 5E players. The remaining classes will be branching out in different directions. Sadly, yes, we did not have room for rules on robotics and cybernetics. These do exist in the EG ruleset and are fully detailed in the upcoming Master Technician's Guidebook. As for the adventure itself, it has been updated to reflect the changes that were made during the playtest phases we've had over the past 6 months. This would most likely account for the new terminology that didn't carry over to stats, or the differences in the talent description. We apologize for this and will make sure it is corrected. We look forward to making this game fun and adaptable for all 5E players. Thank you again!
Curse of the Demon Stone
by Chris N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/14/2016 10:55:32

This adventure starts off with a bang that keeps PCs and players hopping. The addtional optional material like Sorcerous Origin: Spirit Caller, new Bonds, new Backgrounds and the Sanity rules gives you stronger ties between the module and your party. Anything that can make your game feel unique with just a few tweaks is a big plus in my book.

Production values are pretty good too.

Can't wait for the next episode.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Curse of the Demon Stone
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Witch Hunter: 2nd Edition
by TiMar L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/14/2013 23:40:28

This was a book that I was looking forward to since I found out there were doing a second edition during the summer. Sadly I missed out on the Kickstarter for it but they released it before Christmas so I fairly amused. Made for good reading over the Thanksgiving break. It also helps that I enjoy games in which you hunt down and kill supernatural critters. It’s why Hunter the Vigil is one of my favorite games. Witch Hunter is a game in which you play as well … witch hunters, tracking down and eliminating the minions of the Adversary. The book has a very Judeo-Christian overtones, making use of such stories as King Solomon. If you’re not a fan of religious overtones then you may not like the game. Though to the games credit it does leave room for interpretation on the exact nature of God and Satan (who is referred to as the Adversary).

The Setting: Witch Hunter takes place during the late 17th century, around the year 1689. They’ve made several changes to the setting to make it a unique take on an alternate history. In the game vampires, werewolves, witches and other assorted creatures are real. The everyday man is semi aware of this fact. There is also a little bit of magic left in the world. You play as a witch hunter, a mortal who knows the truth and takes up the challenge of protecting others from the supernatural and hunting them down. It all starts with the biblical king Solomon. He is aware of the dark forces in the world and he decides he’s going to protect future generations. He gathers up the most wisest and skilled magicians in the world and begins to work on a ritual called the Great Seal. However one of the magi is fooled by the Adversary and the seal is flawed. The forces of the Adversary are able to get through, though at a reduced rate than before. There is also a little bit of magic leaking through which allows for the continuation of magic (in its various forms). Fast forward a few centuries and we arrive to the dark ages and the black plague. The disease kills more men than women. This creates an opportunity for women to step up and fill in for roles that they previously weren’t allowed in. Even after the plague women still continue in their new roles. Kinda like the 1940’s and WWII. Well the plague was devastating the effects of European diseases wasn’t as deadly as it historically was. Especially for the Aztec empire, who use their dark and evil magic’s to mitigate the damage done to their population. This leaves them in a position to fight Spain’s claims in the New World. If this is your first time with the game then I highly recommend going back and finding at least a copy of the Aztec Empire. While the rules are first edition the setting info in it is amazing. Now the PC’s are members of the Orders, a group of organizations that developed to fight the minions of the Adversary. The book outlines several major ones with notations about there being smaller ones and more info on those in an upcoming book. The Orders have come together and formed a loose alliance as it were, so that they can better fight the Adversary and also to offer up aide and protection from the Church. Adventures can occur anywhere in the world, though the setting material mostly focus on Europe and the New World. The biggest changes to the New World is the Aztec Empire which stretches into parts of what is now the western southern states and down through central México.

The Rules: The second chapter covers most of the rules you need to play the game. It uses a d10 system, and if you’re familiar with games like Legend of the Five Rings (L5R) or the World of Darkness games then you’re going to have a smooth transition into Witch Hunter. Even if you are not familiar with either of those games the rules are pretty straightforward and easy to pick up on. To resolve an action you are typically going to roll a dice pool created from an Attribute + Skill. Much like in L5R you can’t have a dice pool greater than 10 dice. So for every two dice over 10 you gain an automatic success. And much like the World of Darkness games you need to roll a 7 or higher to succeed at an action. Depending on the difficulty of the task you’ll need anywhere from 1 success to 5 or 6. You can garner better effects on a role by making a wager, which is similar in application to making a raise in L5R. If you roll a 10 then you get to re roll that dice until it stops coming up 10. On the flip side if you roll more 1’s than you did success then the action suffers a complication of some sort. This isn’t like a botch in other games, as you can still succeed at the action and still have more 1’s than you did actual success.
For combat they have a series of style talents. Think of these as being like combat special moves feats. There are three basic level for talents (both the combat fighting style and the non combat skill based type); Basic, Great and Heroic. These mechanics are rounded out with a True Faith state that measures your belief in a higher power and a Damnation trait that shows how far you’ve fallen from the path of the righteous. You also have Hero Points which you can use to do a variety of things from gaining access to talents your character doesn’t normally have to saving your characters life. Finally your character has a Virtue and a Vice. Veterans of World of Darkness games will be very accustomed to how these work. A vice is a weakness that a character has. Something that may draw him away from the path of the righteous. They can be activated by the GM if he feels it’s appropriate for that situation. So a character who has a vice in say greed may have it activated by the GM if while on a mission the character spots something that peeks his interest. On the flip side characters also have virtues, and as the name implies it’s a characters strength, a means of showing how righteous the character may be. There is also a system for magic. There are six types of magic with in the setting. You have your three good ones of Prayer, Animism, and Hermetic. Then you have three villainous ones of Diabolism, Necromancy and Witch Craft.

The Good Witch Hunter is an easy game to transition into. I games centered around hunting down the things that go bump in the night. As I mentioned earlier Hunter the Vigil is one of my all time favorite games (and is still my favorite of the nWoD). It’s alternate history is pretty good. One of the most interesting aspects of the game is its use of the Aztecs and how depraved they are. I like how the game allows for more gender equity than was truly present at that time. I love the way they handled fighting styles. It adds a nice variety and spin to combat. The emphasis in the book on swashbuckling makes taking a combat style even more fun. We’re talking about action from movies like Pirates of the Carrabin and the Three Musketeers. While I’m mentioning the Three Musketeers, the notation on making Cardinal Richelieu a lich is just highly amusing. Finally I liked the rules they created for mob combat scenes and the use of minions. It makes it fairly seamless to toss hordes of bad guys at the PC’s for them to chop down in an equally heroic fashion.

The Bad There were really only two things that kinda annoyed me. The first is from the magic section. There is a mention of using a Grimoire in spell casting. The notation indicates that rules will be provided for in another book, but for me I like to have all the core rules in one spot. Thus the magic section feels somewhat incomplete until they release Rites and Relics. Finally I am somewhat miffed at the lack of diversity in the game. Outside of being Native American there isn’t much mention of anything that isn’t European. Native Americans have one Order that is truly all their own, but there isn’t one for people of African or Asian descent. I also was not pleased with the few references to Africa describing the continent as barbaric. When you see how well they handled bringing women into the setting and creating a better environment for female PC’s to play in, the lack of any real insight into other non-European cultures just leaves one wanting.
Considering the games more religious bent it would have been nice at least to feature an African Christian nation. Ethiopia has strong roots in Christianity after all and an Order from there would have opened the game up a bit more in my opinion. In future books I hope they work a bit harder in painting non Europeans in a positive light.

The Wrap Up My feelings on the matter of race aside, I find the game to be intriguing. Overall I’d give it a 4 out of 5 Fro’s. The setting is interesting enough to want to play in and I feel that the other matters are something that future supplements could fix and address.

http://blackroleplayersorganization.blogspot.com/2013/12/thou-shalt-not-suffer-witch-to-live.html



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Witch Hunter: 2nd Edition
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Creator Reply:
Thank you for the review. The initial setting information for Witch Hunter: the Invisible World has not headed that far South, nor to the East. References present in the book are written in the voice of various Witch Hunters, most notably D.G. of Cambridge in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. There is an Ottoman order of Witch Hunters already presented, but not in the core book. We intend to give Europe (including the Balkans) much greater attention in a forthcoming setting product tentatively titled \"Old World.\" Some more Orthodox, Slavic, Turkish and Tartar flavor will find its way into the setting as a result. We plan on providing Africa in its own source book as well. 17th Century African history is fascinating and has the appeal of not being very well known to most Western readers - so everything will feel new. Various tribal faiths, variant Judaism, Christianity and Islam would feature prominently throughout. I hope you enjoy our forthcoming supplements!
Witch Hunter: A Child's Game
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/24/2012 07:20:03

Designed as an introductory adventure to start both players and characters off playing Witch Hunter, the book begins with some sage advice on building groups of characters who will be able to work together credibly from the outset, as this is what you'll need for a game such as this. There are also suggestions for how, once you have built a group of individual characters that can cooperate, you get them together as a party.

Next comes the adventure background and details of the main adversary that the characters will face. They are going to be thrown right into the world of Witch Hunter, dealing with an acolyte of one of the Twelve Penitents whose visions will start their mission off, visions that draw the characters from wherever they are to the Court of Whispers beneath Westminster Abbey in central London! An NPC to help get them there is included, as is a wealth of background detail about London in 1689. This covers all manner of topics giving a good feel for life and society, both covert and overt, as well as notable places and people.

We then move on to the adventure proper, with the characters visiting the Court of Whispers. There's lots of detail that will enable you to set the scene, now or any other time your characters visit the Court. From then on in, events follow fast and furious all over London, culminating in discovering the need to journey to the New World.

Here again the scene is set vividly, highlighting the sheer difficulty of establishing a foothold in unknown, unexplored country and the many superstitions held by those attempting to do so. Throughout, there is information to gather and people to interact with, as well as supernatural dangers (and mere mortals) to combat. Whilst there is a lot to get through, it's tightly linked and flows well. By the time the adventure is done, the characters will have a good knowledge of several notable locations and some of the more important - at least as far as witch-hunting is concerned - people to be found there... and should have defeated (at least for now) a major threat.

Overall, it is an exciting and informative adventure, tightly scripted and indeed providing a good introduction to this game and setting. There are a few typos but little to complain in what is a clear presentation of a great deal of information. You'll need to read it all through several times to have it at your fingertips when it is time to play... but if the players are not begging for more, well, this isn't the game for them! An excellent campaign starter, never mind introductory adventure. Happy witch-hunting!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Witch Hunter: A Child's Game
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Witch Hunter: the Invisible World
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/02/2011 12:46:55

I have a real love-hate relationship with this game. I played it right after it first came out at Gen Con and thought the game was great. The rule system was easy to pick up in game and I liked the dark history feel of it. It felt like one of the modern horror games that I loved to play set in the 17th century. I bought a copy then and there and took it home. Once I started reading through it all I was less enamored with it. The funky alt-history never worked for me, and as a player that likes to play witches in many games I disliked the vibe of the game that all witches were evil and had to be hunted. Also on future playing I began to dislike the system. I sold the book to a friend about 6 months later. I wanted to give it another chance so I picked it up here. I have given the game it due attention (bought it twice in fact) and still could not make it work for me. To be 100% fair I think that has much more to do with me than this game.

I think there is a lot of really good material here. A lot of things I would love to use elsewhere, maybe running it under WitchCraft or True20. The book itself is well laid out and just a cool book to look at. The PDF here comes in both the full version and a printer friendly one. There is a vague World of Darkness feel about it and it does remind me a bit of Mage the Sorcerers Crusade. I do like the magic system here and I do keep coming back to the game wanting to do more with it.

Character creation is very good, I like the spells and the magic system. The overview of the world is very nice and I like the background information on the Orders of Solomon.

There is an odd mix of new and old thought in this book, some of them contradictory. Examples: The Sumerlands are mentioned (from Wicca) but witches are supposed to be all evil. Werewolves are shown with a pentagram etched into their hand/paw but that is something that only came out in the movies. The Aztecs are still around, even if other parts of history depicted here could not have happened unless the Spanish had had a firm hold on the New World.

The book has a ton of atmosphere, and you know right away what this game is all about.

A few things I like:

  • Atmosphere. Like I said it has oodles and gobs of it. Solomon Kane left feeling "eh", but this one, you know right away what you are doing.
  • Closest thing I get to a WoD-like game set in a period I really wanted to try.
  • Support, the Paradigm Concepts website has tons of cool things, in fact seeing the website made want to seek this game out when it was first available at GenCon (2007 was it?) I bought a book there and then later bought the PDFs.
  • Solomonic-based magic systems always rock.
  • Beautiful book.
  • The Orders, I can see why the exist, what they do in the world and why someone (the PC) would be part of one.

Things I didn't like, but could easily live with:

  • Very WoD in feel and execution.
  • Dice pools. Don't like them, but I can live wit them.
  • Talents seem very "Feat" like. I like feats mind you, just not everywhere.
  • would have liked more monsters.
  • "Satanists". Too many modern conotations. I would have prefered to see "Diaboloists" (which the book does also use) or "Luciferians".

Things I didn't like:

  • Some of the alt history doesn't make sense, even with magic. But that can be an opinion.
  • I dislike the entire black & white-ness of the good and evil here. If it were just that I would say it is an artifact of the times they are trying to emulate and be fine with it. But I like to play "good" witches also and the rules (or my interpretation of them) didn't support that. And by good witches I don't mean spiritualists or animists or alchemists. I mean witches. That practice witchcraft, worship the Goddess and all that. Granted that is MY bias and maybe this is not really the game for this.
  • Along with good witches (and the spells for them). I'd would have liked to see evil members of the Church. Sure their are "foils" in the shape of the Jesuits. But I work for a couple of Jesuit universities, I was not buying it as a real attempt to make them evil. Rather just overly dogmatic in their views.

In the end, I am going to give it 4 stars out of five. I think it does what it does well, even if it leaves me scratching my head at times. It is an attractive book and the online support and community for it is really top notch.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Witch Hunter: the Invisible World
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Witch Hunter: On Silver Wings
by erik f. t. t. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/10/2010 18:50:07

First and foremost, I do not own a copy of the RPG rules, so I'm keeping my review to the story itself. I was immediately drawn in by the cover, which I find to be an amazing piece of artwork. It fits the story very well.

It is a very compelling story, which read very well even without me having a grasp of the system underneath it. It's hard to go into without giving up some of the story (and this adventure would suffer if the story were leaked). It is deep in roleplay with a nice horror angle to it and little is as it seems... if bugs make your players squirm this is a good fit.

Most of the paths the party make take seem to be covered pretty well. The Witch Hunters should have their hands full, but smart play should rule the day for them. I highly suspect a decent GM could convert this to run with the Solomon Kane RPG without too much effort.

As for the (virtual) physical presentation of the adventure, the layout is spot on, the artwork is professional and evocative of the story and I didn't notice any editing issues. A lot of adventure is packed into 32 pages (plus front and back covers)



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
Witch Hunter: On Silver Wings
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Witch Hunter: the Blessed and the Damned
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/22/2010 08:57:35

The Introduction opens with the comment that while there's plenty been published about the Adversary, precious little has been produced - bar the core rules - to support Witch Hunters themselves. This book sets out to change all that, a tome designed to aid Witch Hunter characters, honing them into potent and effective forces for good. To put things in context, there's a brief summary of the way things are - the war between the supernatural and the protectors of mankind, the Orders of Solomon and their operatives the Witch Hunters. A war now waged in secret, although once, in times of legend, more open.

Chapter 1: The Orders of Solomon takes a look at some additional Orders which characters may prefer to the ones in the core rulebook. It begins with an analysis of what sets Witch Hunters apart from anyone else who enters the war against dark supernatural forces, the powers that they are granted and the 'mark' that grants instantaneous recognition of a fellow Witch Hunter being the most obvious. And then to the Orders, such as the Dream Walkers who are Native Americans who choose to remain amongst their tribes and work subtly and behind the scenes rather than risk being cast out, speaking to each other and to other Witch Hunters through dreams. The Order of the Rose and Cross has its origins in Germany, and bring arcane knowlege and skills to the fight. Then there is the fiercely independent (if rather feminist) Order of the Sainted Mothers. While the Mothers focus on the protection of children, the Seekers of Emet specialise in the protection of the Jewish community and in the search for relics lost in the destruction of the Second Temple. Notes cover how Witch Hunters of these new Orders think and conduct themselves, any special benefits or rituals they have and how they get along with other Witch Hunters of different traditions.

Next, Chapter 2 looks at Backgrounds, launching straight into a series of descriptions of new backgrounds available to Witch Hunters and the specific abilities that they confer. All serve to give depth to your character and an idea of what he did before he took up Witch Hunting. This is followed by Chapter 3: Skills and Talents which again without further ado lists the new ones available for you to choose. A wide range they are too, from fighting abilities and professional skills to talent at various rituals and even the ability to cook a gourmet dinner!

Chapter 4: The Circles of Sorcery looks at the different traditions followed and naturally provides lots of rites for adepts of each to study and employ. For those who like solid background the description of each ritual not only explains the effects but a bit about how it was originally invented and by whom. New traditions presented here are Alchemy, Kabbalah and Voodoo; while there are also new rites for traditions described in the core rulebook.

Those of a more physical bent are not left out, as Chapter 5: Fighting Traditions explores additional fighting styles to those in the core rulebook, enabling characters to develop their fighting skills in various new directions. So whither flashy moves with a cloak or brutal blows with a 2-handed greatsword catch your fancy, there are new techniques to master here. There are also wholly-new combat traditions to study, such as Capoeira (yes, that's a real one, I used to amuse the faculty lounge by practising with the dance teacher who'd also studied it!), the Devil's Wager, a style based on the use of whips, flails and chains and a style based on the moves of a matador during a bullfight. Native Americans prefer a more holistic approach, seeing combat as just one of the things you do along with tracking, hunting, gathering and ritual - all parts of normal daily life, done when necessary. This does not prevent them from learning specific talents - even if they do not view them in the same way as a practioner of a Western sword style might view learning a new manoeuvre.

Chapter 6: Annapolis-Royale describes a settlement in the Acadia colony, complete with history and legends and notable local personalities. Visits can be pleasant and welcoming - but there is more to this community than meets the eye. While it is not written as an adventure, Witch Hunters calling here while about their travels will find plenty to investigate and evil to vanquish.

Chapter 7 deals with Indian Tribes of the Eastern New World, mentioning how surprised Western explorers were to discover that the New World was by no means empty! The culture and society of Native Americans are explored, in particular the Haudenosaunee, a confederation of tribes that to Western eyes classes as a nation. There's a wealth of material here on many tribes, fruitful resources whether your characters are Westerners trying to figure them out or Native Americans seeking a sound background in which to base themselves. Finally, Chapter 8: New Relics presents a collection of relics of various levels which may feature in your games.

Overall this is a thoughtful addition to the game system, providing well-considered additions to any Witch Hunter character's background, skills and knowledge. I'm not quite sure as to the purpose of Annapolis-Royal: considerable work would be needed to run a visit as an adventure, and this book is supposed to be player-friendly so GMs may feel that they'd know too much about the place. Otherwise the depth and traditional feel is excellent and should provide new and existing Witch Hunter characters with plenty to consider.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Witch Hunter: the Blessed and the Damned
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Witch Hunter: the Invisible World
by Martin S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/27/2008 20:32:43

witchhunter is a fine system and well worth your time, give it a chance and you will be rewarded with a lot of fun and some shivers



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Witch Hunter: the Invisible World
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