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Daemornia: The Role-Playing Game
by Jeffrey V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/02/2005 00:00:00
I bought this product for the setting, rather than the mechanics.

The setting is a interesting, so I was satisfied.

LIKED: The quantity of artwork - most creatures, weapons etc. get a picture.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Daemornia: The Role-Playing Game
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Point Buy Numbers
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/30/2005 00:00:00
Point Buy Numbers is an accessory for Modern d20 games (marketed here under the OGL directly, since they altered the experience/leveling rules). It points out that under the familiar class/level system, various aspects of characters are tied together, and may deny you the combinations you want to build your ideal character. For example, in normal Modern d20 each class gains only a specific size hit die, only so many skill points, has a certain base attack and save progression, only certain talents, etc. If you want a character with the best base attack progression, good Reflex saves, and access to the Charm talent tree, you?re basically out of luck, since no multiclass combination would give you that. Point Buy Numbers says should be able to make a character that?s exactly what you want, and tells you its new system that makes it possible.

The product opens by explaining how it undoes the existing class/level system, without going into a straight point-buy. Characters still adventure for XP (experience points), but now those points are used to buy character features. The big twist is that features don?t have a flat cost. Rather, they all have a formula that makes their cost scale upward the more of them you have. For example, buying your first point of base attack bonus is 150 xp. Buying the second point is 300 xp more. Buying the third point is 450, and by now you?ve spent a total of 900 xp to get BAB +3. This sliding scale prevents a loss of balance as PCs gain more XP at higher levels.

To reiterate, this system assigns a cost to everything. Literally. The first chapter tells you the costs for attribute points, races, hit dice, base attack bonus, defense, saving throws, feats and talents, skills, reputation, wealth, and action points. If you want any of these, you need to spend XP, and the more you have of anything, the more the next one costs. Note that each section has purchasing methods listed, which, given the relatively modular nature of the various sections, allow for a great deal of freedom. Virtually all sections have tables to easily break down the cost of each feature at each increment.

The second chapter, the bulk of the product, is the listing of almost all feats, talents, and class abilities into the form of feats. This is purely as a standardization method, since, as outlined above, you can then purchase as many or a few as you like, presuming you meet the ever-rising costs (and the prerequisites).

The third chapter is similar to the second, save that it deals with special abilities that are too expensive to be rewritten as feats. The only real difference here is that the costs tend to be higher, and scale slightly differently.

The last chapter covers spellcasting (and psionics). Similar to chapter one, each aspect of spellcasting is broken down as a separate cost. Caster level, spell slots, and spells known are each purchased individually. The only major difference is that there are some restrictions placed on certain purchases (such as requiring a number of spells slots of a certain spell level you must have before buying spell slots of a higher level).

The last page (before the OGL) is a quick-and-dirty character generator. It sacrifices a level of detail by quickly listing an amount of building XPs (depending on how strong a character you want) and reiterates the charts from chapter one without the explanations and variants.

All in all, I was impressed with this product. The mechanics are solid, and it manages to give Modern characters a large degree of freedom without sacrificing balance or reinventing the wheel to the point where it feels like we?re playing a completely new game. That said, despite the brilliance of the system, the lack of artwork (notwithstanding the cover), and continual discussion of mechanics can wear down the reader, making the product fairly dry, despite the enormity of possibilities it opens up. Point Buy Numbers is indeed all about the numbers, but while it does hit you over the head with that fact, that only detracts slightly from the elegance of the mixture of freedom and balance that it presents.


LIKED: This product was absolutely brilliant in how it broke down all the mechanics of Modern gaming. Every aspect was presented in a modular fashion, using a sliding point-buy system that preserved game balance.

DISLIKED: The presentation comes off as somewhat clinical, lacking in artwork and having only a few examples of its system. Sometimes the involved math can be slightly difficult to comprehend.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Point Buy Numbers
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Point Buy Numbers
by Mark C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/30/2005 00:00:00

This is a good solid product. It could use a little polish around the edges but the ideas are there. This is the future (and past) of d20 Modern. I say the past because we saw modular systems with Skills and Powers way back when for D&D. It?s the sort of thing we can expect to see again. It?s a good idea, but highly abuseable and requires a careful touch to balance.

The math looks good. Instead of gaining levels, characters purchase abilities with their experience piecemeal. This means you can just purchase Hit Dice if you want, or really work up your defense bonus. It?s a min/max?ers dream but it also offers fantastic flexibility.

There are two things I would really like to see in this product (and since Shanya Almafeta is still working on the product there is the possibility of seeing them). First, I would like to see a way to make this system compatible with classic d20 Modern. If there was a way to combine levels and point buy, it would appeal to a larger market. IMHO this is something we might look forward to seeing in 4th edition. Perhaps characters could be granted a ?level? if they purchase everything needed for a level. By making it compatible it opens up the door to classes and prestige classes which aren?t reworked for point buy.

Second, I would like to see a comparison on the costs. Does it cost about the same XP to buy a ?level?s? worth of abilities with the point buy system? It seems that spellcasters are going to have higher costs but I did not check the numbers to be sure. You could go so far as to build the system so that once you have spent a ?level?s? worth of xp you can pick up the rest of the class abilities for a level in a class.

It?s a very intriguing system. I really want to try playing using this system.




LIKED: I like the way the d20 Modern character is disassembled into chunks and pieces which you can buy as you see fit. This gives you a chance to focus on different areas of your character and does not restrict you to taking elements you do not want.

DISLIKED: Point system are difficult and I want a better understanding of the numbers (why are the xp costs as they are?). While it may be handy, the list of feats is redundant and I would chop it before printing this product to save on ink. I would love to see the art, but that is not what I consider really important for a product like this. The many ?variants? and ?optional? systems suggest to me that there are still a few bugs to work out of the system. I would prefer a strong primary system with variants tucked away for higher power campaigns.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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Point Buy Numbers
by James H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/30/2005 00:00:00
Point Buy Numbers by Chine Games starts off on a somewhat sour note, with the author dismissing class and level-based character creation as ?rusting with age, as well as encouraging min-maxing? in the second paragraph of the preface. He then goes on to proclaim that such character creation systems are ?hardly heroic, not to mention frustrating? in the third paragraph of the preface which, in fact, consists only of those words (i.e., it is one sentence fragment long). The preface then goes on to claim that Point Buy Numbers isn?t merely a point-buy character creation system, but a new genesis in design that combines the freedom of point-buy character creation with the balance of those levels and classes earlier denigrated as ancient relics.

This is all somewhat unfortunate, as the basic idea behind Point Buy Numbers seems to be a good one - opening the product with a preface that simultaneously attacks the validity of other commonplace designs while promoting itself as an entirely new and unique evolution of character creation systems is not, in my opinion, a good way to endear a large number of people to what you have written. That said, I won?t begrudge the author his convictions - but I will use them as a measuring stick when reviewing the product. Does the Point Buy Numbers live up to its preface?

Experience Points are used to purchase, well . . . everything in Point Puy Numbers. From basic attribute ratings to feats, if you can conceive it, your character can buy it (providing that they have enough experience points). This is where the first signs of mechanical imbalance start creeping in - despite a claim of walking a road that ?balances the need for balance [sic] and the need for flexibility,? Point Buy Numbers places no restrictions on how or when experience points may be spent, past not allowing players to purchase something until they have the necessary experience points to do so.

While this doesn?t sound like a problem in theory, in practice it throws mechanical balance out of the window. If your character has the requisite amount of experience, they may purchase anything they like (e.g., more attribute points, new feats, different types of hit dice, etc.) whenever they like. There are no mechanical checks or balances to ensure that a character who slays a bunch of monsters in one afternoon doesn?t suddenly become more handsome that very night, for example. In and of itself, this wouldn?t be a huge problem, except that in the preface, the author clearly states that Point Buy Numbers was designed to sidestep these pitfalls that the author claims are a product of level and class-based character creation systems.

Now, that said, it is true that higher ability ratings and/or more powerful feats do have higher costs in Point Buy Numbers. That said, this does not necessarily facilitate balance, as the pricing scheme is obviously based upon a very specific experience progression system that the author has worked out in their head - and opted not to present within the pages of Point Buy Numbers. It?s pretty much a given that the chances of every Game Master in the world awarding experience in this specific manner are effectively nonexistent - and unfortunately, any departure from this assumed progression system will throw the tenuous balance imposed by the pricing scheme in Point Buy Numbers entirely out of whack.

Finally, note that characters who begin play at Level 1 in a game that utilizes the Modern OGL rules (which Point Buy Numbers is designed to supplement) has no experience points by default - not a one. They have to adventure before they earn any. This sheds some light on the fact that a beginning character in Point Buy Numbers is not at all the same thing as a beginning character in the set of rules that it is designed to supplement. Not only does this again raise a question of exactly what experience progression system the author has based the point costs in Point Buy Numbers on, but emphasizes the discrepancies between what the system purports to accomplish and what it actually *does* accomplish.

Overall, Point Buy Numbers is an admirable attempt at crafting a balanced point buy character creation system, but one that stumbles over itself in more than a few places. First, the haughty preface hampers the product - it attacks other popular character creation systems as being flawed, while simultaneously boasting of a vastly superior approach to character creation. This would be forgivable if the product itself lived up to that boasting - unfortunately, it doesn?t.

Due to the exclusion of its own experience progression scheme and some flawed assumptions about how people other than the author will award experience, Point Buy Numbers falls prey to the same kind of potential for abuse and mechanical imbalances that the author claims are solely the realm of class and level-based character creation systems. Short of awarding experience in exactly the same (undisclosed) manner as the author assumes that you do, the only thing that will provide balance in a game that utilizes Point Puy Numbers is a lot of hand waving.

Now, all of that having been said, I think that Point Buy Numbers does have the potential to be a very nice point buy character creation system - but it needs a lot of work. First, there needs to be some defined system for experience progression that meshes with the cost structure presented therein. Second, as the system is supposed to serve as an alternative method of defining characters for Modern OGL games, the glaring discrepancy [of how experience is awarded] between the two systems should be eliminated, or at least reined in. Finally, some restraints on how and when character traits may be purchased, past the pricing scheme, need to be implemented to maintain mechanical balance after it has been established.



LIKED: The basic idea of using experience points to purchase character traits, rather than automatically gaining them as the result of 'leveling up'.

DISLIKED: The scathing attack on class and level-based character creation systems contained in the preface, or the self-congratulatory boasting also contained threin. The failure of the product to live up to much of that preface, both mechanically and conceptually.

QUALITY: Disappointing

VALUE: Disappointed

[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
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Book of Jalan RPG
by Josh B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/26/2005 00:00:00
Sorcery & Swashbuckling. Not being familiar with the universe or rules of StarCluster, it was the promise of these things which led me to The Book of Jalan. Described as a world in the Star Cluster, Jalan has been cut off from the other worlds by a quarantine. This has left it at a roughly Renaissance era level of development; with the largest exception being the existence of magic. You don't need to be familiar with the StarCluster game to play - The Book of Jalan contains all the necessary rules.

The layout of the book is simple and easy to read, with occasional art added in. I'm not sure what medium the artist used for the pictures, but most of them are vividly colored, and on the whole seem to fit the book quite well. This product is also extensively bookmarked, and features a fully hyperlinked table of contents and index to make browsing even easier.

The Book of Jalan opens with the first section of a multi-part story titled Due West. I'm not usually a fan of fiction in my gaming books. I didn't mind in this case. It's kept short, and is presented as a story; rather than trying to tell us what a section is about, or reading like someone recounting last night's gaming session. My biggest complaint is that during one of the early sections the first-person narrator directly addresses the audience. This causes later elements to lose some of their dramatic potential.

From there we segue directly into the magic section - a transition that was jarring to say the least. Having no experience with the game's rules at all, I'm suddenly left trying to puzzle my way through a very in depth magic system. This is our first glimmer of one of the major issues with The Book of Jalan: the organization of the book is terrible. This isn't the last time the reader is confronted with game terms or rules mechanics, and then forced to wait for an explanation. In this case it would be a bit before I even found out how skills work; which is an important part of casting magic. While this may not present a problem for those already familiar with the rules, and I was able to generally figure things out; the organization still leaves far too much room for potential confusion.

That aside, the magic system itself is of the open ended variety, rather than a predefined list of spells. Featuring a number of categories, which allow for a variety creative effects, the system does have fairly complex rules. Its number of options is a potential weakness as well as a strength; potentially slowing the game as players try and decide what elements need to go into producing the desired effect.

Character generation is the next section, and two different methods are offered: random or point buy. Five of the attributes are handled one way, while Intelligence and PSI (the attribute which governs magic) are handled another. Rank, and consequently money, are also determined in the same way as Intelligence and PSI. Initial skill selection and character advancement are handled in the same way - a per year choice based on a school or profession. At the conclusion of each adventure, characters age one year; which earns them an additional skill point, or a metaskill along with the potential for a career promotion. This section concludes with an extensive list of schools and professions.

Following character generation is the chapter on skills. It presents a large listing of individual skills, and explains what each one is for and how they are used. We also learn about metaskills: skills which can be used in conjunction with other skills. There is some math involved in translating your skill level into a percentage chance of success under the game's d00 resolution method; while calculating the percentage chance for a metaskill is a bit more difficult. The default method of performing a task with no points in the skill strikes me as a bit harsh, though a later chapter gives some suggested modifications.

The next two chapters provide descriptions of the various human cultures, as well as the four non-human species available for use as player characters. Humans receive a bonus skill based on their overall cultural grouping, and then receive additional bonus skills based on which specific subgroup of that culture the character hails from. This gives humans a wider variety to pick from regarding their bonus skills; the other character types tend to receive their bonus skills based on species, with lesser emphasis placed on the area they hail from.

The next chapters focus on armor and weapons. Again, these are chapters where the lack of organization is an issue. The reader is plunged into charts and numbers with little to no explanation of what it all means until arriving at the next chapter.

A chapter on rules comes next. Most of the information is combat related; attack and damage rolls, constitution and healing etc. Additional rules cover the effects of higher skill levels, degrees of success, alternate methods of making unskilled attempts and a note about general knowledge levels and languages.

There is an excellent GM-oriented chapter about non-player characters. It not only gives a brief description of what an NPC is, but provides an excellent series of tables for putting together these characters on the fly. Containing listings not only for determining such things as skills and attributes, there are also tables to provide NPCs with behaviour hooks and missions; perfect for when you need that little extra something, but are a bit short on ideas. Also included are preconstructed statistics, and templates suitable for use as PCs or NPCs.

Despite its claim to lack depth, the chapter giving us an overview of the history and peoples of Karai is quite informative. A great deal of work and attention to detail seem to have gone into developing the world and it shows.

A brief chapter on the gods of the world shows this same attention to detail. Not only are we introduced to the gods and what their area of influence is, but information about the forming of the Purani church, the origin of gods and the nature of worship is also provided.

The bestiary introduces us to some of the various beasties just waiting for their chance to turn PCs into snacks. In addition to the mechanical information, this chapter features an overview of the six stages of lycanthropy as one of its highlights. A companion chapter features information for putting together creatures to round out the world, or more likely with which to bedevil your PCs.

Opened and closed with some very attractive maps comes information on the city of Barkash. Like most such profiles, it covers the general composition, notable districts, politics and people of the city. My favorite portion of this chapter was a listing of the names of taverns and inns, along with their reputation for danger or excellence. While I would have preferred to see more detailed profiles of the establishments, even a brief profile for each place mentioned by name would significantly increase the book's page count.

Appendix A features various optional and advanced rules, many of them making combat more detailed. Appendix B mentions different types of currency, an overview of the Green River Valley and a chart which related real-world cultures to their counterparts on Karai.

Rounding this out is an attractive character sheet, along with various worksheets to help keep track of all your information and the already mentioned hyperlinked index.

LIKED: The magic system. Well-developed and interesting setting.

DISLIKED: Poor organization. The magic system.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Book of Jalan RPG
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StarCluster 2 Vehicle Design Guide
by Jim C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/17/2005 00:00:00
Not using the StarCluster ruleset, I bought this as a sourcebook for vehicle systems but didn't find a great deal that was new in that way. I don't have a good feeling about the way that the vehicle statistics scale or the range of technology and vehicle types that they try to cover with unified mechanics. There seem to be almost no manoeuvring rules. I think I'd get more from a widely supported system that has had a lot of designers picking apart, pushing to the limit and adding as needed to the vehicle rules.

QUALITY: Disappointing

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
StarCluster 2 Vehicle Design Guide
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Cold Space RPG
by Michael S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/16/2005 00:00:00
This is a very cleverly written and conceived RPG based on the Starcluster engine by the same authors. I especially enjoyed the period songs, which help to put you in the mood of the various eras much the same way that television shows like Cold Case accomplish. This concept will be especially attractive to players who enjoy retro scifi and simple space opera.
The Starcluster game engine is appropriatly modified for Cold Space and works well enough. I found only superficial problems and the publisher seems most willing to work with customers on resolving these. Should the gamer not wish to use Starcluster, however, the concept is so well-conceived that it may be played with any other appropriate game engine- such as GURPS or Action!.

LIKED: I think the art enhances the game.

DISLIKED: Not enough on period vehicles.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cold Space RPG
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Point Buy Numbers
by joel s. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/04/2005 00:00:00
Nicely done. we needed something like this for modern. It shows a lot of ingenuity.

LIKED: Everything

DISLIKED: nothing

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Point Buy Numbers
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Psihammer - Psychic Fantasy Rules
by Victor D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/31/2005 00:00:00
Good alternate rules for Psionics. I am going to use some of the powers and rules for my games. Great ideas...

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Psihammer - Psychic Fantasy Rules
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Welcome to HAEL
by Victor D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/31/2005 00:00:00
Unique world, very well organised and creative alternative to standard WOTC campaign worlds.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Welcome to HAEL
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The Centre of the Universe - Special Edition
by Edmund W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/27/2005 00:00:00
The Center of the Universe is best described as a science fantasy game in which the creator allowed reality to infringe upon no level of the game where it did not belong to his concept. It isn't "wild" or even really "bizarre", but it is very different (gun fighters standing next to sapient suits of armor, looking across from a sorceror and a wandering vagabond... you do the math).

For all of that, it is extremely well-founded, and there's no aspect of the game that is bizarre to the rest of it and no aspect of the game that just doesn't fit. In other words, there's nothing in there that doesn't belong or doesn't quite fit. Anybody wanting good

LIKED: It literally creates a whole new world, which plays by a coherent but totally new set of rules. The game system is nicely coneptual, giving you a set of concrete ideas from which to deviate rather than leaving you in the cold in a world that doesn't ever quite fit our expectations. The rules set is also fairly simple (but read the didn't likes).

DISLIKED: The rules are a bit difficult to grasp, and there are some organization issues in the book. While it's nice having all the quick reference charts in the back, some things just weren't explained well enough untill I read through them a third or fourth time.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Centre of the Universe - Special Edition
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The Chosen - Keepers of the Faith
by James W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/24/2005 00:00:00
Great Product with orginal concept. I give it a 4 of 5 stars and recomend buying it. The Game mechanics are simple which means easy to learn, however more experienced roleplayers may wish to tweak it as they see fit. To sum up the RPG concept think 1 part Shadowrun plus 1 part Left Behind.
Those who enjoyed Celestius Ex and other Christian Roleplaying Games will definately enjoy this RPG.

There are two supplments for this game : Justicairy & Holy Rollers, Armegeddon.


LIKED: Outstanding graphics and very well writing.

DISLIKED: Game Mechanics are a little on the simple side but can be easliy modified to the game masters desire.

I would like to see more supplements but the game is realatively new.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Chosen - Keepers of the Faith
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d4-d4 Main Book
by Jee L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/26/2005 00:00:00
D4-d4 has often been compared to Fudge, another(among quite a few others, really) game with adjective ladders. But for me D4-D4 has the feel of GURPS done right, with all its associative traits and such--but without the excessive crunch in chargen. I also like how the author included his insights from "Conflict, and a Person's Place in It" into the combat system, which adds a psychological and very human dimension to combat. That's a whole lot more interesting and meaningful for me than mindless killing. Goshu Otaku has worldbooks in the works as well, and I'm waiting eagerly for them.

LIKED: It's a very solid system. I like the idea of character traits being expressed as a step in a continuum rather than on/off. Instead of buying "X-ray vision" or "poor vision" by themselves you simply decide how good the character's sight is.

DISLIKED: I want them worldbooks, dammit! :D

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
d4-d4 Main Book
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Point Buy Numbers
by Jack K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/24/2005 00:00:00
Solid product. Very crunchy. Good rules for making D20 Modern a point buy system. Seems well thought out and balanced. Helpful tables. If you are looking for a way to trule customize your D20 modern and modern srd games, this is it.

LIKED: Great concept, novel idea. Why limit yourself to set classes and certain feats. Take what you want when you want it (at a cost)!

DISLIKED: Very crunchy. One or two sections can be a little confusing on the first read through, but it all becomes clear. A few more examples would have been nice.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Point Buy Numbers
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StarCluster-Guaru
by Eric A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/07/2005 00:00:00
This addon gives a lot of detail into the Guaru species.

LIKED: Has a unique, well done, and simple character trait design system which I found could be very easily adapted to any other role playing game system. The few illustrations are very detailed. Also, this document is very printer friendly (no useless frill borders that use up all of your printer ink). I also found this document very easily used in other systems (GURPS, Alternity, Star Frontiers, even Dungeons and Dragons).

DISLIKED: Nothing really, this was a very well thought out product.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
StarCluster-Guaru
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