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Blood Games
by Karl K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/16/2005 00:00:00
The game is alright, nothing innovative but a good alternate perspecive to you fans of White Wolfs Vampire.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Blood Games
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Psihammer - Psychic Fantasy Rules
by Mike B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/12/2005 00:00:00
PsiHammer is much like the original AD&D psionic system in that it is designed to be added to existing classes, but now using feats to do so. According to the author, it will also be supported by a new setting. It is 49 pages and has color and B&W illustrations. There was a print version added shortly after its release, so if you got an early version, you should have got an update. If not, let the author know.

It is a Feat based system, the only skill you need is Concentration. The system uses an average of your Int, Wis and Cha to determine your Power level. The feats are a chain of psychic abilities that are based on one of five types of psychic power; Forcer, Sixsenser, Energetic, Shifter and Telepath. There is a sixth category for ?general? power feats that don?t fit in the other categories. There is also Clashing, or psychic combat that all psychics can do. The damage done is based of the areas of the brain damaged. Some of the Energetic power feats would make great new powers for Psions.

It also has Psifacts, or psionic artifacts as well as several psionic organizations that can be used in any setting and a few monsters as well as templates for the five types of psychic feats.

LIKED: It uses Miniature-type art to show how some of the powers work and provides some very nice NPCs as examples. For a Psionics-lite system, this one is the best I have seen yet.

DISLIKED: The Power level here is much less than the Psionic Handbook. A psychic created with these rules is never going to have Realm shattering power. Also, the number of power feats is very limited, so different psychics will tend to look alike.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Psihammer - Psychic Fantasy Rules
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Book of Jalan RPG
by Richard P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/03/2005 00:00:00
The Book of Jalan -

A fantasy RPG published by Flying Mice LL, written by Alex Bailey, Clash Bowley, and Klaxon Bowley. Fictional work by Ryan A. Span.Copyright 2004.

Reviewer?s Note - I first stumbled across the name ?Flying Mice? in an RPG forum. There was a post by some guy called Clash Bowley who went by that Nick. I wondered who this Clash person was and what the hell flying mice had to do with anything? Aren?t flying mice just bats? Apparently not. Apparently, they are the creators of roleplaying games too - lots of roleplaying games. And so I became acquainted with the wonders of Flying Mice and their Star Cluster world.

LAYOUT - This book is a hefty tome, being 251 pages in length. Yes, 251 pages is hefty, despite how people are getting used to 300+ pages of glossy fluff that looks and reads like a Sears catalogue. I also purchased it as a PDF, and viewing 251 pages on screen is akin to getting your eyeballs waxed.
All in all, Jalan is well written and the writing is functional, with only the occasional spelling (and grammatical) error. It?s an easy read with very rare exceptions where the writing gets a touch clumsy.
Yes, there is white space, which in itself isn?t a problem. Gamers are so used to horrible layout, which has been passed off as good layout because it?s become the standard, that they forget that many graphic designers would look at the grandiose RPGs and vomit. Too many people in the RPG community see white space and they see red. They want flourishes, illustrations, splats, fart boxes, borders, urine stains, whatever, to busy the page. The problem with white space arises when it?s principally due to poor management and there are moments in The Book of Jalan when this is the case. Aside from that the white space is a breath of fresh air and gives you some room to breath.
The illustrations are classic Clash Bowley fare. Lots of pics of frolicking , youngish looking women, dudes in tights or similar attire, and the occasional freakish mutant. They are crisp, clear, concise, and well done. What more can you ask for? This isn?t a picture book, it?s an RPG.

Introduction of the overall setting - Jalan, like most Flying Mice LL products (Blood Games aside), is set in Star Cluster world. This ?world? consists of a remote cluster of stars and the worlds they support. Humans fled to this cluster to escape the explosion of our sun. Yahoo! Jalan is supposed to be a fantasy game, however, not a sci-fi game. So, how does this all play out?
Following a four page Table of Contents the actual text opens with Ryan Span?s fiction which is dotted throughout the manual itself. The fiction is entertaining and is sprinkled throughout the manual, complimenting the setting nicely. It?s a nice touch to the book and something which the big name publishers have essentially abandoned in their quest to crank out another widget, done in a pedestrian manner, to sell to the dull masses.
After the fiction we fall into the study part. The opening paragraph will prove to be as confusing as hell to the common pleb. ?Seeders?? ?DNA transferring?? Sci-fi? Fantasy? I?m confused, let?s move on . . . eventually there?s an explanation on how psionics (mind powers) are magic and vice versa.
Read on further and you discover that the world of Jalan is a kind of nature preserve for primitive cultures. The fear of ?magic? by the tech-wielding overlords of the Star Cluster (called the SaVaHuTa) has led to Jalan becoming a kind of zoo. The zoo?s inmates, the people of Jalan, are frequently monitored. Whenever the Jalanites start to improve their Tech Level, the SaVaHuTa have a cull, eradicating the more brilliant minds of Jalan to ensure there?s never a zoo break.
Never fear though, if you?re a Jalan native you don?t know you?re in a ?zoo?. You go about your daily life in your magical world, maybe wondering why Egbert the Inventor mysteriously disappeared one dark and stormy night, or maybe not.

MAGIC
This section follows the Introduction. It?s a baptism by fire for the uninitiated and inexperienced and I felt it was rather out of place. It should have come further into the text but as a magical/fantasy world, perhaps the authors wanted to reenforce the fact that this is supposed to be a fantasy game.
The way that magic is explained is that it?s essentially mind over matter (i.e. PSIONICS, or PSI, for short). Everyone has some inherent PSI, how much depends on a number of factors. The effects of your PSI power are determined by your Affinity. An Affinity is set towards one of the four basic elements (earth, water, wind, fire) and light. Whatever your Affinity is will effect the outcome of your spells. For example: someone with affinity for earth would create a hail of stones for an energy attack while someone with an affinity for water would create a gout of live steam.
A person?s Skill Level determines the precision of spell?s desired effects and a caster can ?burn? points to boost them.
There?s a neat thing called ?Weaving?, which allows players to generate all sorts of cool spell effects of their own.
All of this is followed by a series of charts. You can expect lots of these (it?s the Flying Mice LL way) but the charts tend to augment what you?ve learned so it?s all good.

CHARACTER GENERATION
This should have went before the MAGIC section but that?s just me. It doesn?t really matter, however, as any green horn will find himself catching a one-two punch as soon as he starts to read.
Characters in Jalan are developed like they are in Star Cluster. If you know what this means you can skip this bit and move onto SPECIES.
The basic assumption is that playing groups aren?t playing day-to-day campaigns. Rather, they are playing ?old style? - where the character goes about his/her mundane life, hears about an adventure, goes off on said adventure, comes back and returns to his/her mundane life. It?s assumed that a character goes on one good adventure a year, aging in the process. When you age, you get Skills. So getting old isn?t as bad as it sounds.
A character in Jalan starts learning new Skills at 10 (probably well before they are brought into play unless it?s the Jalan version of Harry Potter). In addition the 10 year old will already have four Mother?s Milk Skills already in the bag. You wander through the Skill generation process to determine all the Skills your character learned before he/she is brought into play.
A character has eight characteristics - five of which are basically physical in nature (Strength, Coordination, Agility, Endurance and Charisma) and are determined by rolling two six sided dice and the other three (IQ, PSI, and Rank) that are generated with percentile rolls. You can also distribute point totals, if you don?t want to try your hand at the dice.
The book then explains how you generate all the stuff you need to fill your character out (specie selection - there are four races, in total, excluding sub-races; schooling and/or apprenticeship; college education; employment, etc). This is followed by a bit on Physical Deterioration, which starts when your character is 34 years old. All of this is proceeded by 5 million miles of charts, specific to the character types or professions.
The Skills and Meta-Skills are also listed, each with a brief, to-the-point description.
The Character Generation Charts and Skills/Meta-Skills section are lines of type surrounded by large fields of white space. It?s broken up by the occasional pic but it could have been laid out more efficiently. Perhaps, the white space is meant to provide gamers with a place to jot down notes. I don?t know.

SPECIES - There are basically four different species in Jalan - Humans, Alari, Khali, and Bani. While humans gain bonus skills through their specific cultural backgrounds, the other three races get bonus skills according to race only.
There are three distinct human uber-cultures, sub-divided into 19 various not-so-uber cultures.
Don?t want to play a human? Who does in a fantasy game?
Jalan has three other races to choose from. If you?re sick and tired of the elf, dwarf, hobbit alternatives then you won?t be disappointed, sort of. Jalan offers up humanoid races that are unique to the system.
The Alari (elves) - are human-like in appearance (identical, I assume) but they have elephant memories, require little or no sleep, and take up art. They acquire skills through their long memories as they need them.
Khali/Half-Khali (friendly orcs?) - No real description is provided but the accompanying artwork shows something that is rather orc-like in appearance. Humans think they are dumb and brutish (like orcs) but they?re not. Instead, they simply choose to ignore being highly civilized and live a simple, clan oriented lifestyle. Their clans have names like Heart Eater, Throat Ripper, and Gut Splitter so you can hardly blame the humans for thinking they?re savage brutes.
Bani (a hobbit like exterior with a dwarf filling) - They look like human children but dwell in caverns and mines, loving all things that have to do with mining and rocks.

Equipment List - stuff and more useless white space. Plus a preamble on weapons and their particulars and how they apply to combat and then some more charts.

Playing Guide - This is a kind of Game Master?s guide as we draw away from character generation and enter into the mechanical guts of The Book of Jalan.
The goal of the game, by the way, which is clearly stated, is to survive. The longer you survive, the more skilled and god-like oyu become.
After touching the surface at the end of the Character Generation guide, the Player?s Guide wades into combat. Initiatives (yeah, there?s more than one) play a large role in combat and combat resolution is determined through percentile rolls. Various factors can play on your chances to increase or decrease your chances of success. Oddly enough, other forms of action resolution are intermingled with the combat text that aren?t necessarily combat specific.
NPCs - There is a meaty bit (11 pages long, including charts) about generating important and not-so-important non-player characters. NPCs can be created quickly or methodically so the sack of scumbags can be kept full all the time.
The Peoples of Karai - is a detailed world section, complete with historical information, maps, gods, beasts, more beasts, and ways to generate your own beasts. Running fast on the heels of this is another thorough world section on Barkas. Both of these preambles provide solid source material for Game Masters and settings for their campaigns.

Things close out with Appendices A and B.
A) Consists of a series of optional rules that can be adopted by the playing group and . . .
B) Consists of a detailed money section and a hodge-podge of world section info.

The Character Sheet is more like a Character Pamphlet (consisting of 5 sheets in total).

People like a lengthy index for some reason and if indexes are your thing then The Book of Jalan won?t dissappoint. You may want to buy the game solely because it has an index and then stare at the index and go, ?Ooo, an index.? Yes, there?s an index already.

SUMMARY - The Book of Jalan offers a great deal of opportunities for the experienced gamer along with a unique fantasy setting. Like most RPG systems, save the simplest, some study will be required to thoroughly understand the game. It?s nice that the races are new (yet somehow still familiar) and there?s the edition of gunpowder weapons to broaden the horizons of the thud n? blunder set.
Having said that, don?t expect an extreme departure from your typical fantasy game. There?s nothing that will make your jaw drop but there?s nothing that will make you cringe either. Jalan is simply a solid fantasy roleplaying game.

LOWS - ?Complexity? - a joy for some, a misery for others. Just how complex a game is, is not a problem. But when a game is written with the understanding that the person who purchased it is an experienced veteran and not a humble layman then there?s cause for concern. I don?t have a problem with the this, I?m an experienced gamer. Nor do I have a problem with the ?crunchiness? of the rules. Others, however, might.
As a personal pet peeve, I have to say that I?m disappointed with the fact that Jalan is yet another Star Cluster world. It lends to Game Masters being tempted to bring in oafs bearing machine guns and black ops. killing squads. When I sit down to play a fantasy RPG I don?t want some silly GM screwing it all up when he introduces his new NPCs Johnny Datapad and Victor KillLaser from the world of Gadgets Galore. But hey! That?s just me.
Another low was a misuse of white space and the fact that a few of the sections seemed out of place to me. But these are minor points and trivial in reality.

THE FINAL WORD - I?d seriously recommend The Book of Jalan for any gaming group who are growing tired of the usual Fantasy RPG suspects and are looking for a hardcore alternative. All the tools are in this kit to build yourself a solid campaign. It isn?t for the casual gamer or the lazy, however, as time and thought will be required eto extract the elemental goodness out of it. All in all, well worth the money - if your serious about how you spend your money.



LIKED: A unique, fantasy system. A wealth of information. The potential to be a rich, campaign setting for the serious gamer.

DISLIKED: The complexity of the text and the fact that it's yet another Star Cluster world.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Book of Jalan RPG
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Point Buy Numbers
by zeb w. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/21/2005 00:00:00
I think that the point buy system is something that is badly needed to make the d20 system even better. The rule set is exceptionally strong, just not open enough make customized characters. However, for most people I have talked about using this system in our games, the key phrase is "complicated".

LIKED: This a great way to get the customized type of character you want in the d20 system.

DISLIKED: Though the math is not a big deal to me (being an avid HERO system fan), the math computations to utilize the system was a bit much for my group. This is an system for the "thinking man", not a level builder.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Point Buy Numbers
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Aquavita RPG
by Derek H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/16/2005 00:00:00
3 words- Watery Dyson's Sphere. It is set in the year 5000 and the population of the sphere is 490 quadrillion with 240,000 nations. There are 3 surfaces that humans dwell on- the outside (which isn't that cold), the inside and on a hemisphere of stone that circles around the star to provide a day and night to the inner surface. Technology is not very advanced due to limited resources.

The F20 rules, in a condensed form, are included.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Aquavita RPG
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d4-d4 Main Book
by Richard P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/06/2005 00:00:00
First of all it's important to note that d4-d4 is extremely well written. Dispensing with the geak speak this manual delivers its message in a clear, concise, and easy-to-read manner. There are touches of humour and nuggets of wisdom tucked into between the pages. The overall presentation and layout are a clear illustration that the author and developers didn't slap this book together on a lonely night while sipping coffee, wolfing down pizza and watching re-runs on TV. There's a nice flow to d4-d4 which accommodates the reader. d4-d4 is a solid gaming system, offering up a decent mechanic, but it's nothing new or revolutionary (even if the word "crap" is used to describe one of the trait levels on the performance ladder) . Instead, the beauty of this product lies in the meaty character creation section and the overall general knowledge dispensed throughout. There's a great bit on roleplaying, troublesome players, and gaming tips at the end of the book that is a must read for any roleplayer. A lot of what is in d4-d4 could (and probably should) be incorporated into other systems. As much as it is a stand alone product, it is just as strong as gaming aid.

LIKED: 1. It's readibility - Schuant has a way of making even the most mundane things seem interesting.
2. The overall knowledge contained in d4-d4 is immense. Again, Schuant has summarized in 89 pages what many authors fail to do in 400.

DISLIKED: 1. d4-d4 isn't for everyone. If you're a casual gamer who wants to simply roll dice, hack your way through some flimsy scenario, and collect XP at the end, all over a few beers, then I'd avoid this product - unless you want to expand your horizons.
This system is definitely suited for the avid roleplayer.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
d4-d4 Main Book
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Point Buy Numbers
by Michael W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/20/2004 00:00:00
This is an easy to understand, easy to use alternative for the mess that D20 modern is. While Mutants and Masterminds has a simple point system, you really can't make non-powered characters with it. Point Buy Numbers, on the other hand, allows you to make pretty much everything from the gritty cop to the powerful psychic, with very little effort required.

LIKED: Easy to understand, easy to use, not so easy to abuse.

DISLIKED: Could've been a little more innovative than the Buy the Numbers alternative.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Point Buy Numbers
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F20 Gamers Against Cancer Edition
by Craig D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/21/2004 00:00:00
At first glance, this game appears to borrow heavily from several other systems. Many others probably say the same. Even so, this lends the system an enormous degree of flexibility and adaptability, making it a system not to be underestimated.

LIKED: The customisable points system.

DISLIKED: Nothing

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
F20 Gamers Against Cancer Edition
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Blood Games
by Thomas P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/05/2004 00:00:00
A good survival horror game overall, with a fairly complete gaming mechanic. The overall feel of the game is good and scary (though the poor continuity, see below, takes away from the overall feel of the game.

LIKED: A nice setting with multiple styles of play available. the introduction of Path characters adds a kind of BUFFY feel to the game while the monsters are sufficiently varied and creepy enough to keep players on their toes.

DISLIKED: My biggest gripe about this game is it's half-assed organization. The page numbers are all screwed up, jumping back and forth and duplicating themselves like some bizarre mind game. The whole thing seems to have been assembled at random without any editing for continuity.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Blood Games
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Publisher Reply:
Hi Thomas: Mea Culpa. I reorganized and re-generated the book after the proofreader had finished with it, and never noticed that the page numbers never changed. I'm glad you brought it to our attention! I've just uploaded a revision which fixes that problem, and will update all our customers as soon as it clears the guys at rpgnow. Thank you again for noticing it! clash bowley Flying Mice LLC
Conflict, and A Person's Place In It
by Sarah P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/13/2004 00:00:00
Conflict, and A Person's Place In It, is a commentary on violence and how difficult it really is, compared to how it is normally portrayed in an RPG.

Part One
On Killing in Roleplaying Games
* This section repeatedly makes the point that the primary purpose of a weapon is to intimidate the enemy, not to kill the enemy. If the enemy breaks and runs, he is just as defeated for that battle as if you killed him face to face. Plus, it's easier to stab someone when they're running for their lives and not fighting back. At the end of this section, the GM-Player anecdote was amusing and illustrative.

'We're all animals!'
* This section details the "fight or flight" response, and adds two more: posture and submit. At the end of the section he details a behavior present in humans that isn't in animals: "evasion" (not the d20 rogue ability). This section is a short and very basic overview of those behaviors.

"Really, sir, I'm just a bad shot"
* This section deals with numbers and statistics of who fired how often in different wars, and how likely a soldier is to really kill another person in wartime activities.

"Can't fight, too busy!"
* A section explaining the "evasion" behavior in a little more detail. This section is very short, but it doesn't need to be long to get the point across.

Bang! ?Leave us alone, you sods!?
* This section details the intimidating power of guns. The example given deals with the Napoleanic military, and how they were used rather than longbows (which were more accurate than firearms at the time).

"Target to your front, fire!?
* So soldiers generally don't fire at their fellow humans. This section gives a short history of how soldiers were trained to do just that, and makes relevant observations about modern problems.

"This is all very well, Kyle, but what?s it got to do with the game??
* A house rule that can be adapted to pretty much any system to simulate the difficulty of murdering a fellow human being (or your sentient species of choice). Perhaps more useful for realistic games. It could be hard to adapt for d6 based systems, since it's based off a percentile. It isn't meant to be a ready rule, as far as I can tell, just a starting point for a GM to customize for his own game.

"Aw, geez, but that?s no fun??
* A short commentary on the third aspect of killing (besides the technical "with what" and the legal "how am I going to be punished for this?"): the moral.

Part Two is a load of information. It starts out with the aspects of killing (technical, skill, purpose, psychological, social), and quickly explains the stages of grief. It goes into detail on how both of those relate to different acts of killing: suicide, homicide, serial/mass homicide, civil insurrection, guerilla conflict, state war and great war, atrocities, and peacekeeping..

LIKED: The author obviously did a lot of research, as there are many studies that are referenced, and the anecdotes are amusing an informative. The familiar tone makes it easy to read and keeps it from being too dry.

The material flows well, and makes sense.

DISLIKED: The information in this product is sound, but the author doesn't have a bibliography for any of the statistics used, studies references, or anecdotes told.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Conflict, and A Person's Place In It
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F20 Gamers Against Cancer Edition
by Steven R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/13/2004 00:00:00
Any Product that goes to help with the fight against cancer gets 5 stars in my book. Nice little system to.

LIKED: Good little OGL system

DISLIKED: Needs some art and a front cover. There must be someone who would give some free art for a good cause. I would also like to see some adventure to go with it.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
F20 Gamers Against Cancer Edition
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F20 Gamers Against Cancer Edition
by Eric P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/25/2004 00:00:00
Good... not great.

The bad: Lacks a system to build point based characters for other D20 games. Why cant we have a point system to build d20 Fantasy or d20 Modern characters.

The good: A working point based system compatible with the basic d20 combat rules! Always a good thing.

Bottom line: Lots of work to adapt games to this, but its only three bucks and the money goes to a good cause. Buy it, help those who need it, and show that you are interested in the expansion of this item.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
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F20 Gamers Against Cancer Edition
by Chris J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/25/2004 00:00:00
First off I have to admit some bias in looking at this product. It's for a cause that's close to my heart, and I would probably encourage every RPGNow customer to tack this on to their next order, even if the PDF was just twenty pages of unintelligible gibberish.

Fortunately, that's not what you get. What you get is a pretty nice generic little RPG system. As the name suggests, F20's roots lie partly in D20, but it's got a bit of a Fuzion/Action flavour in places (and to be fair, the author credits the games he's used as inspiration)

F20 has four stat-groups, Body, Mind, Grace and Spirit, each divided into three substats. Now I'm not a big fan of tightly focussed game stats (although I understand the appeal) and F20 has an option to just use use the four groups as stats instead. There's the usual Skills, Advantages and Disadvantages sections, with a good selection in each. The base game mechanic is Stat + Skill Vs Difficulty as in core D20, and F20 even ports across the Taking 10 and 20 rules. Combat is similarly stripped down D20, except damage is based on multiples of D6, and spread between Stun, Hits and Mortal damage. The PDF rounds off with a Powers system, which allows you to tailor a set of stock powers with modifiers.

There is one, staggeringly glaring omission however. There is no equipment or weapon table, so the author gives us no clues as to how much damage various sorts of weapons would do. You could argue that since this is an entirely generic ruleset, it's up to the GM to tailor weapons to suit the game style, but even so we really need some sort of guideline to work off. (Judging by the Electricity & Fire damage table, weapon damage ranging between 2d6 and 8d6 would be about right, and other stats like range increments and crit ranges could be lifted from D20 games)

The layout of F20 is two columns of plain black text on a white background, with no artwork; very minimalistic but very clear and easy to read. The writing is good; solid and concise for the most part with a couple of lighter passages. Overall, F20's a much better job than any homebrew I've seen, and better than quite a few "professional" PDFs out there.

F20's biggest weakness is that there's nothing about it that makes it stand out and scream "play me". I think it would make a good, simpler replacement for D20 in a lot of cases, but there are other systems out there that do the same thing. I can't see myself running F20 in the near future, but it's an interesting fusion of game systems and I wouldn't begrudge the cost even if it hadn't been for a good cause.

The second biggest weakness is that it really isn't finished. It's listed as version 0.9, and true enough it would require that 0.1 of GM input (statting up weapons and armour etc) in order to produce a playable game. If like me you always do that 0.1 work anyway to adapt commercial games to your campaign, this shouldn't be a problem.

In summary, a professionally presented, crunchy bit of homebrew game design with its roots in a couple of mainstream games. Worth looking at, both for interests sake and also as a way to support a good cause.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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StarCluster 2
by Andy S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/11/2004 00:00:00
Summary: Some nice colour artwork. Complex and uninspiring rules.

What You Get: 8 PDF files covering character generation, races, equipment, playing the game, star travel.

Pro: Nice-looking starmaps.

Con: Complex character generation using multiple types of dice (Strength on 2d6, Intelligence on 1d100, etc) and many, many tables. Uninteresting text layout with no page numbers. (sooner or later if I were using this, I would print it out, and drop the pile of paper...) Uninspiring equipment lists.

Comments: The obligatory "mediaeval technology world where psionics have developed into true magic" has been overdone IMHO. I liked the look of the starmap and the teaser material on the Flying Mice website, but sadly the rest of the product doesn't live up to those.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
StarCluster 2
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Publisher Reply:
Andy's opinion is his own, but I should point out that was a very old version of the system - at least 3 revisions ago if it was in separate pdfs. Much has changed since then.
StarCluster 2 Vehicle Design Guide
by Stephane R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/23/2003 00:00:00
Not bad. You have a lot of details that you can compile to construct your own vehicule, calculate its speed.
That means a lot of tables in these 15 pages, few illustrations (one of them is interesting) and very few text.
Needs to be developped.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
StarCluster 2 Vehicle Design Guide
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