RPGNow.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse
 Publisher Info









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Lords & Priests
by christopher W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/06/2011 14:13:00
A good value since it is basicly 6 source books in one.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Lords & Priests
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
by Francis S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/07/2010 09:22:25
AWESOME! If you like science-fiction and gothic role-playing, then this adventure is for you! Set in the aftermath ofa great cataclysm, mankind, having reached the stars is trying to expand their own territories. To do so, they have found enourmous technological rings on the outskirts to the solar system, these rings allow passage to other systems. Wars have been fought over these rings since, and humanity has fallen into three castes: Nobility, the Orthodox Church, and the Merchant Guilds. Each one vying for power over the others and the Known Worlds. Players take on the roles of individuals from amongst these three, each of which is broken down into smaller factions. I really enjoyed playing this game, the system is well organized, and makes an excellent source of inspiration for other works. My thanks, Holistic, I hope that you can make a comeback soon!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Lord Erbian's Stellar Bestiary
by Francis S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/07/2010 09:16:12
An excellent product! Sorry to see that the company no longer has it in actual hardcopy. I really enjoyed this volume, as it provided me with prime examples and even a few good laughs. Anyone whom has seen the film: Bucket List will actually get the reference from reading this book. Would not surprise me if this particular text was related to the film (indirectly).
Overall, I really enjoyed the book. Well worth purchasing!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lord Erbian's Stellar Bestiary
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns: d20 roleplaying game rulebook
by Ron M. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/12/2009 10:56:21
Fading Suns: d20 Roleplaying Game Rulebook
From: Holistic Design
Reviewed by:  Ron McClung

Fading Suns: d20 Roleplaying Game Rulebook is a new Role Playing Game Core Book from Holistic Design.
I have already expressed my passion for this game setting in my review of the Fading Suns Role Playing Game Core Rulebook, but simply said, this is my favorite setting of all time. Every aspect of it fascinates me, and there are so many facets to it. 

However, when I tried playing the Victory Point system, I struggled with it. I tried and tried to make the system work with my style of running and the style of my players. However, it simply didn't fit. The system seemed (to us) "anti-character" as one of my players put it. The system seemed to work against the player and not for the player. My players complained about how useless their characters felt in the game. They felt quite inadequate no matter how simple the task. They did not like the black-jack style of dice mechanic - role under but not too to high. It seem counter intuitive to many.

I admit that my style of running is a little more cinematic and heroic. I don't like to quibble over the most simple tasks when peace in the galaxy is at hand. I want my PCs to be effective and feel like the have accomplished something because the character they created - concept and numbers together - are effective and have a role to play in the campaign I have created. My players and I did not get that feeling out of the Victory Point system. I was on the verge of moth-balling my Fading Suns stuff entirely.

From page #5:
“It's not easy to think straight with a gun pointed at your head.”
Then along came the d20 version of Fading Suns, and I took a long deep breath of relief. I was already a big fan of d20 from d20 Star Wars. As far as I am concerned, d20 saved Fading Suns. Or at least that is what I thought at the time.

Content: For the most part, this book is a reprint of the text from the original rulebook. The only things that are different are the rules, of course. When the book deviates into the d20 content, it changes font. This book all but requires at least the 3.0 version of the D&D core rulebook, because it does not include essential information like character generation basics (ability score table) or the level progression chart. Also note that this was released before 3.5 version of d20. However, with a little work, it can be worked into 3.5. 

After a short introduction, the book takes you into Chapter One: The Universe - which is basically word for word the text from the original Victory Point rule book.  

Chapter Two: Characters is the start of the d20 content, with the conversion of all the core races to d20 and the character generation system. Each race is converted, followed by the classes available in the game setting which include Beastfriend, Brother Battle, Knight, Knave, Soldier, Theurgist, Psychic and a few others. What people will notice right away is that the core three faction-related classes - Priest, Guilder and Noble - are basically the same structure. Each have their factional bonus ability at 1st level and then bonus feats at specific levels afterwards. Some would say it is not very imaginative, but really that leaves a lot of customization open to the player.

The other classes are more traditional, with specific special abilities at certain levels. The biggest and perhaps most controversial change was the occult classes - Theurgist and Psychic. Nothing like the spell casters of D&D, the occult classes are a little more structured and limited in what they can do. However, once you get into the powers, you see that they are not so limited.  

Another additional option they supply for characters is the Armor Class Bonus based on Level. Because the setting can be a little more deadly than your traditional fantasy setting, the game supplies an option for an AC bonus at every 3rd level.

Chapter Three: Skills does two things - it modifies existing 3e Skills and adds a few new skills. The skill modification is simply to add sci-fi related setting stuff, like a variety of Craft subskills as well as Knowledge subskills. It adds several new skills - Academia, Arts, Drive, Occultcraft, Starship Gunnery, Use Artifact, and Use Think Machine. In some cases, like Arts, I had to ask why, because in this case, Knowledge or Perform skills should have covered that.

Chapter Four: Feats is where the designer tried to be innovative but fell a little bit short. Along with the base feats in d20, a character can choose from a variety of feats that are setting specific in this chapter. It introduces a new feat type called a Social Feat, which primarily deals with social titles and networks of the game. There is a serious intrigue side of this game setting, and these feats attempt to enhance that.  
Unfortunately, I found that it is hard to build mechanics around intrigue. I love intrigue in a game, probably more so than my players. The Social feats try to add more mechanics to the social aspects of the game when it really does not need it. There are some very cool feats in there, but some are simply too clunky. I liked the idea of the Social feats, and in fact went through the old Victory Point books and found more Benefits and Blessing I could use to make more, but I kept them as simple as I could. I suppose this is the nature of d20 in general.

Chapter Five: Equipment takes some of the equipment from the original book and converts it to d20. The disappointment in this was that Cybernetics were all but left out. There were a few items converted but there was a whole system of creating a cybernetic device that was left out. Also, a big disappointment to many was the Starship combat, which was given a short treatment but not enough to satisfy most people.
Also, there were several game mechanics related to modern weapons that should have been compiled into a Combat chapter rather than placed sporadically throughout the weapons sections, like autofire and shield mechanics.

Chapter Six: Occult Powers is the area that is the most controversial and where, for some, the biggest disappointments come. For me, I found that some of these powers were simply broken. Those that are used to the long spell lists of D&D will be disappointed because of the lack of variety, but I do not mind that. This actually helps the system in that it makes it easy to create house rules and rules tweaks to fix some of the problems. The problem is that you have to know about them ahead of time before your players exploit them.

Both Psychic and Theurgists powers are explained in this chapter, the author leaving Antinomy for future books (which they do later in Aliens & Deviltry sourcebook). Psychics have Paths and Theurgist have Rites. Each Path or Rite has 3 or 4 levels of degrees. The occultist classes are leveled out so that the character will learn at least 4 Paths or Rites. The limiting factor to either is Wyrd points, but as I found out, it is not all that limiting. Perhaps I gave out too many as rewards or maybe my Wyrd Point house rule allowed to many but the GM needs to keep tabs on the number of Wyrd points each occult player has.

The interesting factor in either case is the down side of occult powers. In the case of Psychic Powers it is Urge, and for Theurgists it is Hubris. These are great concepts but hard mechanics to enforce in game. Once a player starts down that path, it's hard to get them back. However, it does have great plot device potential and, if treated right, can be something of a power-gaming limiter. Overall, I liked this conversion.
The Chapter Seven: Gamemastering is far shorter than I would have liked. It converts some of the NPCs and creatures from the core book, but it needed to do more. Many other d20 core books supply base stats for a low level, mid level and high level NPCs. While running this, I needed that.  

The Appendix: Planets section gives a short list and descriptions of each of the major worlds in the setting, which is a direct copy from the Victory Point system core book.

In conclusion, I ran this game for over 2 years. My characters made it to 12th level (or somewhere around there). I feel that I have enough experience to comment on how it plays. I love the setting and I loved the potential it had, but I ran into too many problems with this conversion. Many times, it simply felt like D&D in space because I was using creatures out of the Monster Manuel and dungeon maps from some D&D adventures. There was just not enough, in my opinion.

I feel that this was put out simply to cash in on the d20 craze back when it was hot. I do not feel that Holistic Design (HDI) gave it due focus and simply wanted to rope in some other gamers who were not attracted to the original system. Although I do feel that the game setting disserves to be played, I do not feel that HDI put enough work into this rules set to give it justice. And because I really do feel that the original game system is not entirely sound, the setting remains lost in a sea of pour rule mechanics design.
This book gives a good foundation for any d20 fan to play in this setting but it needs some tweaking, especially in the Occult area. Perhaps the whole occult system could be thrown out, but coming up with an alternative that is balanced is hard. I would only recommend this book to someone that is comfortable enough with d20 to recognize the imbalances and is able to customize the game to make it work.

I think they would have been better off waiting for d20 Modern/d20 Future. A conversion to that system is long overdue and probably would have fixed some of the problems.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns: d20 roleplaying game rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns Players Companion
by Txabier A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/11/2009 02:02:36
Well, Fading Suns is one of the best Space Opera settings out there, and this is a really useful tool for all the players wanting to find out more about this universe and wanting to make the most out of the experience.

The first section of the book offer the various points of views of the participants in the Universe, from Houses to Serfs, humans an Vorox, which is a great tool to get into the "mind" of each and use them towards creating a more defined in game persona... Nice way to keep creating a well-rounded character.

The second section deal with the tow groups that thrive in this universe: the Questing Knights and the Church Knights. All the esssentials are there, along with a few remarkable individuals. For those wondering, this is a very cruch-lite section.

The third chapter is all about what many enthusiasts call the "main powerplayers": the Religious Orders. History and structure for three such groups are covered in a concise way, and one that is crunchier than the one mentioned above, as this is where the main rites and powers, as well as new skills are presented.

The fourth section deals with guilds. And it's eight of them. Plenty of career oportunities for the players' characters and some very interesting ones... such as the Guild of Vagabonds.

Chapter five deals with the quite necessary and ever-present military. Great information about Orders of Battle, groups and even sects!, with their structure, elements and crunchy details.

6 is for Aliens. If you are into this game, and love roleplaying challanges, you are going to love the Shantor. Still great for anyone who likes the "typical atypical", the Gannok or the Hironem offer interesting opportunities in and of themselves. Finally, I believe that many will be charmed by the diversity of the Etyri--for the first time I found an Avian species that I really wanted to use more than just occasionally on my games. Then there's the Ascorbites, and the fantastic Oro'ym, races you will seeing a lot given the potential they have for GMs and players a lot.

Seven men came then,
of these the seven
all had change in them.

Mutants, mutations and mayhem. very good, crunchy section.

Section eight is all about rules. Damage, martial artes, firearms, fencing, traits, knacks, skills, psychic paths, the moolah, the chrome, the hardware, the rides... all you need to detail a character is here.

This rounds up the 211 pages of goodness you get from this book. A veritable source of great ideas, inspiration and game opportunities, this is one download you just know you don't want to miss. especially if you have the same luck I had and get it on sale (or as was my case, for free as part of an effort to promote the game system. Really, I was among the lucky and, while late, it's due: Thank you, very, very much, guys! You made a fan for life with this increadible game and this great book!)

P.S.: The splash pages by Bill Bridges are fantastic. Full of character, dramatic enough and certainly illustrative of the citizens of the Known Worlds' ways of life. I truly believe these should be all compiled into a portfolio, or better yet, made into miniatures.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns Players Companion
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns Players Companion
by Marcus G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/19/2009 15:52:10
The Good: this is an original digital copy so it is perfectly clean and searchable. It is one of the few PDF books that is not locked, so you can add your own bookmarks if you like. So as far as Drivethrus responsibility... it is perfect.
_/br__/br_
The Bad: this book is junk. The information in it is redundant - covered in the 2nd ed core book. The book is filled with setting "flare" which amounts to random ramblings about tedious aspects of the universe. It is not useless, but if you have the time to read this book... just re-read the core book and you'll be better off.
_/br__/br_
Don't purchase this book unless you are just a Fading Suns collector. In which case, I think there is a nice bundle that Drivethru offers which has this one and several of the other players suppliments.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
Worlds of the Realm
by christopher W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/15/2008 18:17:52
A great book if you are looking for more information about the many diffrent planets. It offers almost everything you need to know about the noble houses holdings.

However at times someof the discriptions come accross as a little long winded. Also this only realy covers the noble houses and 2 planets controled by the empire. there is almost nothing about league or church worlds here.

But if you want a fully fleshed out world then tis is your book.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Worlds of the Realm
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Vorox
by Christian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/16/2007 10:57:12
Well... If you want your character to be a Vorox, then this is a must. It offers a great deal of background information (concerning the Vorox culture, their society, their homeworld (interesting stuff) and their role in the Known Worlds), but I think it lacks a bit of details concerning the Vorox themselves - specific information about appearance (things like size, weight - mostly detail stuff) for example. You'll have to use your imagination there for the most part, or use the numerous drawings in the book as examples/inspirations. Also, the "stats"-chapter is a tad short, so fans of statistics and numerical values will be a bit disappointed. Still, I find that these are only minor issues, since the most important part - fleshing out the Vorox race - was done well. A good buy.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vorox
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
by Marcus G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/02/2007 15:25:50
What a fantastic setting! There is so much going on in this "world" that you could really take the game in any direction and have TONS of story lines to play with.

The system is fairly flexible which will be enjoyed by more advanced players but may be a little frustrating at first for the novice players.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns: d20 Character Codex
by John G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/01/2005 17:22:55
Anyone who's read my review of the d20 FS core rulebook will know I love this system ... I think it helps this setting come into its own. You get some excellent prestige classes--the True Knight and the Manifest Light Commando are particularly interesting. New equipment and new feats help round out the package (ready to fly some Marauder armor?). The art is consistent and of good quality (mostly B & W). For those of you who like the setting, there is plenty of material to flesh it out even more ... one of the final sections includes "Day in the Life" stories for several different character types. All in all, a great addition to the FS d20 core book. I got more than enough information, and didn't feel like I needed to go scrambling for more supplements.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns: d20 Character Codex
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns: d20 roleplaying game rulebook
by John G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/01/2005 17:16:39
I've always been a fan of the Fading Suns universe, but never enjoyed the clunky mechanic of the 2nd edition system. The d20 adaptation is so much better! It takes the 2nd edition rules and helps to make them so much more playable and interesting.
The setting is very intriguing. Think Dark Ages/Medieval sensibilities merged with Space-Age technology. It's a fascinating universe to play in--very well fleshed-out even if you don't buy the supplements. As a bonus, if you don't like the d20 Modern/Future class system (which I don't), you essentially get new core classes and prestige classes. The Magic system is modified, too, and fits in well with the setting. The only gripe I have with the universe is that only Charioteers (guild pilots) know how to pilot ships--this isn't Star Wars where everyone gets a ship!
Anyone who owns the original rules will notice that most (if not all) of the art is the same ... except for the excellent Brom cover.
I would have appreciated some starship combat rules, but I have played Noble Armada (Fading Suns' starship combat game) and didn't like it. I'm figuring out how to integrate Starmada and Silent Death rules, which are much more streamlined.
All in all, among d20 Sci-Fi core rulebooks, this one stands out as the best I have seen so far ... compared to the revised Star Wars d20 core book, the only thing it is missing is starship rules and combat. Buy this!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns: d20 roleplaying game rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
by Lionel R. Date Added: 07/11/2005 18:52:56
Fading Suns is a force unto itself. It blends popular science fiction elements and fantasy into a cohesive whole that will keep you facinated like few other games. A quick, intuitive mechanic and source material that sends your imagination flying make it one of my best RPG investments ever.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Worlds of the Realm
by Wiliam N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/22/2004 08:37:47
After you've purchased the "essential" books for the game (for me, that means rulebook, GM's screen), I would suggest taking a good, long look at this item.

As described, it gives you info on all of the Houses' planetary holdings; the planet's history, current situation, exports, etc. You also get names of notable personsages which populate their respective planets. All in all, one gets a pretty darn good amount of stuff by which to create games by.

Oh, and you also get listings of Imperial holdings as well as d20 info for animals, classes, and so on.

The down side to this work, if you could call it that, is that it does not cover the non House and Imperial planets (so perhaps the title of the book is a bit off), but I suppose Holistic couldn't just give out everything at one time.

My opinion: A pretty good buy.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Worlds of the Realm
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
by david s. j. Date Added: 08/14/2004 10:18:15
What makes this game so captivating is the very vivid universe setting. Character creation and game mechanics are easy. The best part of the game is the "Roleplaying" versus the "Rollplaying" that one gets in so many games. Humanity stands on an knife edge between hope and darkness. Its an epic game worth playing.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fading Suns (Second Edition)
by Jeff M. Date Added: 07/19/2004 12:56:18
One of greatest epic space opera games. A rich back ground with medieval civilisation, space ships, xenomorph and mystical power. A great work for great adventures with a good Dune taste.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
Displaying 1 to 15 (of 17 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG