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Hedge Mazes Set 2: Terminals
by Wayne W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/28/2014 15:33:26
This is a very nice set of maps/playing area that can be used for role playing games. While designed for fantasy RPGS, this set of hedge mazes could easily be used in a modern setting, everything from a horror setting trying to find, or get away from a madan, to a modern Spy setting as agents try to find and even kill each other.

The pages are nice and crisp. the set up is modular and the pages can be set up in a lot of different ways to give a GM lots of layouts and designs to pick from. The pages look nice on the playing table and most size minis should fit in the squares. I used a black and white printer and got ok results. the maze pops when using color, but a serviceable look can be achieved with black and white.

If I have a minor fault with the set, its that printing at home could be a bit expensive. Many of these pages are very ink intensive and could cost quite a bit printing at home.. A suggesting would be to print one or two pages and see how well your home computer printer will print it out....I had the local office supply store print out mine. It was not cheap, but I have them on cardstock paper and it was worth the investment.....a few of the edges are a bit fuzzy, but its not a deal breaker....

If printing at home, I would use cardstock paper....its not cheap, but worth the extra cost for the durability

For the cost of a soda and bag of chips, the budget GM can get a nice set of mazes that is resuable and would be a lot of fun to fight in or try to solve a nice puzzle .......
l;

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hedge Mazes Set 2: Terminals
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Game Retailer Guide
by Tom W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/24/2014 16:57:35
I feel like Ghost Dog after finding the Hagakura!

(Side Note: GHOST DOG is one of the best Mafia/Samaurai cross over movies out there... We'll the only one that I know of...)

Having been working in the background for the past few years on what it takes to open a specialty retail shop, and Lloyd's work on RPG.net is outstanding. A year ago I even compiled all of his articles into my own reference print out book.

I felt that I owe way more than $15 for all the guidence and industry knowledge. What was even better is that this book is not just a rehash of the articles (though they do cross over on a lot of information and subjects) and it goes into the detail that I hoped to get from Lloyd if we were sitting down having a coffee and discussing the industry.

Thank you Lloyd! I will keep spreading the word on how great this gaming codex is!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Game Retailer Guide
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Lands Beyond Kos (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
by Heath F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/16/2014 19:07:28
As far as I am concerned, great campaigns, in any Role Playing Game, require background data. The more thought out the background, the better “fleshed out” the campaign will be. Skirmisher Publishing has done exceptionally well with Lands Beyond Kos, one of the latest editions in their famed Swords of Kos Campaign Setting.

In Lands Beyond Kos, we explore the much larger area around the island of Kos, lands both near and far. From neighbouring nations of pirates, to cities of the dead, to islands of scholars and poets, to lands where women rule with an iron fist. Those familiar to the Kos setting will find the nations outlined in Land Beyond Kos as an invaluable source of information for expanding any campaign and allowing PC’s to explore further afield and meet new friends and foes.

Anyone who isn’t as familiar to the Swords of Kos setting will find this book to be an interesting point of view from a more than accomplished author who has based an imagined extrapolation of real world places and citizens into a well written “What if” campaign setting. That setting being triggered by the “Great Cataclysm”, an event responsible for sending the setting into a world populated by humans, near humans, dwarves, goblins and where magic is real.

Being a lover of history and times that have past, I was sceptical when I first approached the Swords of Kos setting. To me there is nothing more annoying when someone tries to re-write history into a work of fiction and fails horribly. I am no History professor but details are crucial for a good story. I am happy to say that the Swords of Kos setting is a fantastic read and the more that Skirmisher produces, the more that they cement themselves as a publisher of not only great literature but marry fiction and fact in a way that leaves the reader wanting more.

Lands Beyond Kos is a great addition to anyone’s campaign setting library whether to use for the setting or as a rich source of ready to go nations and adventure hooks.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Lands Beyond Kos (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
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Kos Island (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/14/2014 06:09:03
This delightful system-agnostic setting book opens with a detailed history of how Skirmisher Publishing's Kos campaign setting came to be, and in particular the concept of rooting a fantasy setting in reality, which enables that fantasy world to assume a greater life within the shared alternate reality that is created around the game table. One look at the map confirms that I'm not the only person who carefully modifies real places I've been to when creating game locations... (and yes I have been to Kos!). Those who are interested in how game books come to be will find this introduction fascinating as the entire heritage of the Kos setting is explored.

A very detailed description of the Island of Kos forms the main part of this book. It sounds almost as idyllic as the real place... if not more so. Peaceful, prosperous, with an established system of government and, despite a lack of enemies, well-defended should the need arise. Naturally, there are also plenty of opportunities for adventure, even if you have to go off of Kos to enjoy some of them - a nearby island that is home to a rough community but a good place to visit if you enjoy pit-fighting, another that is a haven for pirates and other such rogues and so on. And of course there are hobgoblins on the nearby shore of Anatolia.

Next the towns and villages on Kos are explored (apart from Kos City itself, which is the subject of another book). There are twelve of these, so plenty of variety and interesting places to visit. Colourful too, with each having their own distinctive symbol appearing on banners and shields. A cataclysm some one hundred years ago destroyed a nearby ancient civilisation, and remnants of it are to be found to this day, some being noted as near the settlements.

This theme is continued in the next section on distinctive locations, many of which include ancient remains. Several adventure hooks are supplied here to entertain visiting parties... even a carnival to participate in. There's certainly a lot to see and do on Kos!

Even if you have an established campaign setting - homebrew or published - it is worth considering including Kos Island in a suitable location as it is presented as an interesting place to visit, if not to use as a base.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kos Island (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
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Wisdom from the Wastelands Issue #34: Plant Mutants I
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/09/2014 07:56:56
Plants often get neglected in role-playing games - all the wonder is reserved for animal 'monsters' and whatever variants of saphonts your ruleset allows. If you cannot be it or fight it, it appears, why bother with it at all? This seems a shame, particularly in a game focussed on the concept of mutation of organisms, so it's good to see the balance redressed.

Here there is a brief note on botany, which may be a bit confusing to non-botanists for whom the sporophyte is the 'plant' and the gametophyte merely its 'seeds' but which is worth persevering with if you want to understand what is going on biologically and create convincing mutations rooted in botanical fact - even if they are far more fantastical than anything you'll find in a stroll in the country.

This is followed by a collection of plant life described in detail which have interesting modifications and abilities whilst still clearly remaining plants - none of the animated vegetable monsters some game systems enjoy here, although most of these are quite dangerous to the unwary!

Then there is a list of new mutations appropriate to plant life, to equip you with the tools necessary to start designing your own mutant plants. The one thing that has been left out is edibility - although to be fair nearly all the original plants on which the mutations are based are not edible ones anyway.

A nice look at a neglected area of Mutant Futures, indeed of games in general.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wisdom from the Wastelands Issue #34: Plant Mutants I
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Adventures in Wonderland: A Sourcebook for OGL Roleplaying Games
by Heath F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/05/2014 23:41:16
If Lewis Carroll was alive and well today, in the 21st Century, he would be a gamer.
He would be an old school gamer, he would have this book in his collection, and it would be no more than a fingertip away.

Skirmisher’s “Adventures in Wonderland” is a wonderland itself; behind the cover lays a range of topics and material both perceptive and comprehensive, whilst leaving enough room to allow the GM to make the final “tweaks” to cater to their needs.

This volume includes stats and descriptions on a multitude of Wonderland characters and creatures including The Mad Hatter & March Hare, Card People, The White Rabbit, and The Queen of Hearts.
It also includes; new skills and feats such as Take a Beating, new spells and magic items such as the Robe of Hearts, adventure hooks and location descriptions such as the Hall of Doors and Queen of Hearts’ Croquet Ground.

All in all, this is a great supplement from Skirmisher for the discerning GM and would suit any number of gaming systems and provides for a humorous and quirky adventure whether main or side.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventures in Wonderland: A Sourcebook for OGL Roleplaying Games
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The Jester Dragon's Random Cult Generator
by Marques J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/31/2013 16:44:01
I was surprised with the quality of this product. I didn't really know what to expect but I was very pleasantly surprised. I greatly encourage you to put a little money down if you currently or would like to use Cults in your game. You will not be disappointed.

There are a total of 12 tables that you roll percentile dice upon to generate your cult. Most tables require multiple rules, drawing results from different lists of results. For example, on Table 02 you are designing a Cult Symbol. You roll a total of 5 times to determine Descriptor, Symbol, Position, Descriptor, Embellishment. Bestial Hand Behind a Broken Spiral is an example of a Cult Symbol rolled on the table. The 12 tables are;

Table 01 - Cult Name Generator
2 rolls: 1st Half Of Name, 2nd Half Of Name
Example: Antinomian of the Limitless

Table 02 - Cult Symbol
5 rolls: Descriptor, Symbol, Position, Descriptor, Embellishment
Example: Bleeding Hand Above an Inverted Sword

Table 03 - The Cult Worships a ...
2 rolls: Descriptor, Entity
Example: Unnamable Darkness

Table 04 - Cult Leader Title
2 Rolls: Honorific, Title
Example: Transubstantiated Hierophant

Table 05 - Cult Leader Identity
1 Roll: Actual Identity
Example: Inquisitor with a Complicated Plan

Table 06 - Favored Weapon
2 Rolls: Material, Weapon Type
Example: Living Shadow Bare Hands

Table 07 - Site of Worship
5 Rolls: Descriptor, Type, Position, Atmosphere, Location
Example: Desecrated Shrine Atop Mist-Shrouded Ruin

Table 08 - Cult Attire
3 Rolls: Color, Clothing, Material
Example: Purple Blindfolds Human Skin

Table 09 - The Cult has Infiltrated ...
1 Roll: Group (note there are two tables, one for fantasy, another for modern)
Example: Alchemists (fantasy) or Liberal Politicians (modern)

Table 10 - Sacred Cult Relics
3 Rolls: Descriptor, Type, Background
Example: Masterwork Reliquary (Contains a Dead God’s Soul)

Table 11 - Revenge!
Roll 1: Act of Vengeance
Example: Vermin Swarms

Table 12 - Cult's Goal
Roll 1: Goal
Example: Return the World to Its Primal State

As you can see there are some really nice options in here. I haven't included this but each table has a nice description regarding the significance of that table. I can see myself rolling up a cult in 5 minutes that will be really easy to develop in play. As with all generators, if you're not much into the random generation aspect of the product, the lists of options themselves are extremely thought provoking. A simple skimming of the options could give you creative jolt you need to develop a cult that you really care about.

I highly recommend this product.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Jester Dragon's Random Cult Generator
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Kos City (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
by Wayne W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/23/2013 12:20:07
Kos City (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting) is a well done generic city setting for any fantasy rpg setting.


Kos City is set in a fantasy world much like our own, with a history much like our world from 2000 years ago.

This book is in the line of Skirmisher Press Kos setting. Many more books are coming out and are already out for this setting, but this book can pretty much be put in any high fantasy setting, regardless of gaming system used.

Set around a eastern Mediterranean center, this book centers on a city with a large number of business, public centers, and guilds that make up a city with a large number of humans, goblins and other fantasy races.

Kos City is a generic setting. No specific system is used for npcs or other rules, but each npc is given enough of a write up that any GM could be able to write one up in moments.

Each place , and there are about 70, has a detailed description, an npc or two and an adventure hook for GM to use for a game, or at least a side adventure.

There is a lot to like here. The setting itself is one thats not been done do death the last 30 years. If a GM is wanting to get characters out of the standard forests or icy mountains of the majority of most fantasy settings, moving the action south to the warm climate of the Mediterranean is a move in the right direction.

Kos City is well laid out, and the Map included is top notch. Even if the GM does not use the info in the book, the map is a keeper to use for your own city.
The look of the book is quite nice. The artwork is a collection of orginial art done for the book, as well as old paintings, wood cuts and photos from various museums. This gives the reader a perfect feel for the Kos City setting, as how the average npc would look and dress and in general what the city and shops look like.

The font and page lay out is well done for E-readers and computer reading as well. ON my Ipad2, the book was easy to read without having to zoom the page at all.

On my 7inch screen android tablet, reading was easy, but I did have to scroll around a bit on the page. Thats more of a issue of the screen size, and not of the PDF design of the book.

I found Kos city hard to read on my android phone, but again, thats an issue of the phone, not the book, but I just wanted to make sure that readers knew that.

Printing was easy and reasonably ink friendly. A few pages are art heavy, but those are few in this book. I used a Samsung 2510 laser printer for great effect. Ink Jet users might want to use a printing service as that could get expensive per page.

I really dont have any major issues with Kos City. A few GMs might bemoan the lack of written up npcs, but honestly, the write ups are well done enough that regardless of system, a GM is given enough info to make write ups easy.

I see Kos city working in nearly any system. Savage World and Hero players as well as the Pathfinder and D&D player will find a lot to work with here..

I might have been a bit happier if each chapter could have been printed off separately, for those of us that like to pick and choose, but thats the only real quibble I can find here..

For the record, I did get a complimantry copy of this book from the author and I have met Mr Vorhola at Gencon and we have chatted on some podcasts.

I am a fan of the company and have bought many of the City building books Skirmisher has published.
Im giving this book a 5 star rating.

Bang for buck, its one of the best buys on Drive Thru right now...get a copy, and read it….

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kos City (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
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Kos City (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
by David F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/18/2013 20:23:53
This is a review of Kos City (Swords of Kos fantasy campaign setting.)
The product comes with two files, the city book and a color coded map. It's nice to have the map as a separate PDF since I can have them both up at the same time on my computer. The map is color coded with codes for Government, Mercantile, Temple, Artisan and Slum quarters, the map is also keyed to the 44 locations and where they are in the city.

The book itself is robust at 79 pages; there is an introduction and brief explanation about the world. The intro is wrapped up by a table of contents giving the name of the establishment as well as what it is. This is good in case you don't know what the Sign of the Heron is; it gives you a heads up as GM as to what you need to prep. The general layout of the book is good, it's easy to read, line art interspersed with photos breaking up the text.

The book is system less so you could easily pop it into your campaign; each location is given a complete write-up describing the interior and people inhabiting the local. The NPC's have good backgrounds and would easily fit into any other city/campaign. Each location also has a number of character hooks that you can use as a cue for an adventure.

What more would I have liked? This is minor stuff but I would have liked the map key number next to the name of the title of the location, so I could easily glance at the number to find it, additionally I would have liked an alphabetical index so I could find it faster while flipping through it

However the book is well worth its cost and I think it would be a good addition to a GM's library and I recommend it as a buy.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kos City (Swords of Kos Fantasy Campaign Setting)
by Benoist P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/18/2013 17:28:09
I am very impressed reading through the Swords of Kos Campaign Setting material. It comprises two volumes as of this writing: Kos City, which describes the urban environment that has been built upon and developed throughout a variety of gaming and fiction products released by Skirmisher Publishing LLC over time, and the Lands Beyond Kos detailing the surrounding regions, most of which are located around the Mediterranean sea in this fantasy Bronze Age/Medievalish Magical alternate world of theirs.

The first thing I should note is that these products are completely free of system-specific descriptions, a fact which sometimes goes against the nature of the setting or scenario described, but which in this case I feel is a strong component of its appeal, particularly when paired with its generic yet specific (mostly because of its alternate history type fantasy with a strong helping of Classical and Ancient history you don't see that often in game products) appeal as a setting. Because of these Classical influences, I think the whole of the setting would work admirably well with game systems such as Original and Advanced D&D, Mythus Prime, RuneQuest II, III and 6, and the like.

The second thing that I should say is that I like the description format a lot. I am going to get back to Lands Beyond Kos later probably and use Kos City as my primary example: fundamentally, Kos City as a game product is a map that comes along with a short history of the place and the world around summarized in a few pages. On this map, and this loose yet (again) specific and very flavorful description of the setting, is grafted the real meat of the product, which comes in the form of 50 specific locations spread across town, from the chariot race tracks to the harbor to the training halls and restaurants, the cemeteries and jails of the city, you actually get a pretty good idea of the way the whole of the city works with just those few locations, which is a way to approach such a complex gaming environment that is both word-count effective, and somewhat liberating to one's own imagination at the same time, all the time providing a wealth of detail which could be used in any number of ways by any referee worthy of the name.

What I mean by this is that the locations, plots, factions could be just as well inserted in your games using Villenor, the City State of the Invicible Overlord, Ptolus, Waterdeep, Laelith or whatever other fantasy urban setting of your choice. I think Kos City is a coherent whole that deserves to be gamed on its own merits as such, but assuming you would not like the setting described, there is much detail included which could be dropped into another city without too much work, which in itself, I think, should be a win for any GM out there, especially considering the price of the PDF. The added bonus is that it doesn't take hundreds upon hundreds of pages to get there, and that you can basically switch from one place to the next in the book however you want, opening it at random, and picking up a nugget or scenario idea wherever it lies without having to do much flipping through the contents, since ideas abound, wherever you look.

I was expecting to dislike the map of the city but ended up liking it very much. I would love to see a version without the district coloring, and perhaps a full color version one day, who knows? My only real criticism is that some locations could have used floor plans, though I understand the rationale in not including them at all, since it leaves room for the GM's imagination to do his own thing with each of them.

A last thing I want to mention is that Michael O. Varhola, one of the main contributors to the Swords of Kos campaign setting, has been working with us at GP Adventures on the Crossroads to Adventure game books series taking place in the world around The Hobby Shop Dungeon ( https://www.facebook.com/hobbyshopdungeon ).

What struck me immediately reading through the Swords of Kos material is some of the similarities between our Duinnsmere area and the fantasy milieu described in the SoK Campaign Setting, including a fanciful distortion of historical references for fantasy's sake, and a work ethic very clearly aimed at creating material meant to be played at an actual game table, and not merely enjoyed from afar. I don't mean to say that one setting would be based off one another: This isn't the case at all. It is just that these similarities of colors and inspirations reflect the workings of kindred spirits apprehending fantasy and the construction of a milieu useful for others to play in comparable, yet different ways. It would be very interesting to run a campaign in which these worlds acted as alternate dimensions of each other, perhaps at different points of the chronology one could fathom construing each as a shade of a quintessential Prima Terra somewhere.

In any case. Kos City is a solid, gameable product that will be useful to anyone running urban areas in his or her campaigns. The Lands Beyond Kos I shall get back to, for I believe they deserve their own specific review. This stuff is worth getting into! I want print copies, now! - BP

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Jester Dragon's Random Tavern Generator
by Heath F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/06/2013 15:06:54
When it comes to Random Tables, I usually have to wade through them to;
A) make sure that they are geographically appropriate to the campaign setting at the time and
B) make sure that they are not contrary to campaign material (ie, if you say that the world is low magic and the random encounter is a highly magical creature).

Skirmisher's "The Jester Dragon's Random Tavern Generator" is as it advertises, that is to say; a random tavern generator.
It covers the essential topics of a good tavern and allows for tweaking the fun little things.
If you don't need a table within the generator, don't use it.
If you already want to use a particular predetermined NPC or encounter in the tavern, the generator is incredibly flexible so that you can insert your data.

It is complete in its simplicity, allowing you the GM to set the scene, tailor the small details and let the adventure hooks begin!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Jester Dragon's Random Tavern Generator
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Game Retailer Guide
by Andrew B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/23/2013 12:40:20
Having been following his blog for many months on my own quest to open a game store, it made total sense to purchase his book. I haven't been disappointed. The broad range of topics discussed give me a great idea of what I need to tackle, which is a lot. Each topic is broken down and explained at length. There are a multitude of things to think about and plan for when opening up a store, far more than I even thought of. For anyone planning on taking the plunge, or even if you're a little more than casually interested, this book is a must read.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Game Retailer Guide
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The Jester Dragon's Random Tavern Generator
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/22/2013 10:53:43
A handy set of random tables that you can use whenever the party gets a thirst on, to enhance your alternate reality by giving them a proper drinking experience rather than a bland "You get some ales" and move on.

The first table is a combined one: roll percentage dice twice to determine a convincing name for a tavern whenever the party declares that they are looking for one. Some combinations will work better than others, but even if you are good at coming up with names on the fly this can be helpful especially if your characters are getting suspicious about finding a Sword and Board and The Broad Face (two tavern names I use quite often) in every settlement they visit!

Next is a table to determine the primary clientele, and this is followed by one with the intriguing title of 'Tavern is fresh out of...' You may prefer just to select whatever it is your adventurers (particularly the grumpy ones) like to order, else get your bones out and roll. The results offered are quite broad, so you may wish to use this table with caution - inns that are regularly out of essentials like ale do not keep their customers for long.

And so it goes on with further tables for Barkeep's Attitude, The Mysterious Person Drinking Alone in a Corner, The Facilities are a... (very useful for those who like an air of realism, if not a miasma in the privy - this has a subtable to determine how clean the rest facilities are), and for those who want more entertainment there are tables for games played in the establishment and that evening's live entertainment.

There's even a table for likely consequences for those who have a bit too much to drink; whilst you can also find out the name of the house drink, the atmosphere of the place, what accommodations are available and even which section of the community is not welcome at the tavern.

Overall very handy, generating enough for you to create a realistic establishment literally as the characters ride into town declaring that they need a drink!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Jester Dragon's Random Tavern Generator
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City Builder Volume 1: Communities
by JK R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/16/2013 08:58:44
This 31 page book (plus OGL, cover page, etc.) describes communities in standard fantasy settings, ranging from temporary labour encampments to metropolises - although the focus is mainly on cities. While I was rather less impressed with later volumes in the series, this first one is particularly good.

It opens with a general description of communities of various sizes, and how they might be affected by non-human populations and the like. Much of this is generic, but it seems well-researched, and provides a solid base to deviate from if your setting has particularly unusual features. This is followed by a brief look at common building types, and some more detailed examination of urban fortifications, law enforcement, and street lighting (or the lack thereof). There's also discussion of moving about in cities, addressing such things as rooftop chases and sewer delving - a staple in urban RPG settings.

Finally, there is a rather good 6-page section on civic disasters, covering things like flood, fire, famine, and plague. Any of these can radically upset a city and the lives of anyone resident within, and they can make dramatic backdrops for adventures, or just a sense of living in a real world. Again, a lot of this is well thought out.

The artwork is good, although some might want to note that 8 of the pages (a quarter of the total) are art-only, so that the text portion of the book is shorter than you might expect. What remains, though, is well worth the price.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
City Builder Volume 1: Communities
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Game Retailer Guide
by Muzaffer B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/24/2013 00:54:24
If you're thinking about running your own gaming store, then you need to read this book. Period.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Game Retailer Guide
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