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Trapsmith (Pathfinder RPG)
by Luke M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2016 11:22:39

Very short for the price. Glad I got it on sale. Some great traps.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Trapsmith (Pathfinder RPG)
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Trapsmith (Pathfinder RPG)
by Carl C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/20/2016 14:29:03

This is an excellent book - on a rather narrow subject. If you are looking for a book of traps, this is a very good book. Several different sets of traps with different authors and slightly different moods. Even a cute little scenario featuring everyone's favorite draconic humanoids.


What rates this bookless than top grade is that I had hoped for more behind-the-scenes materials on traps, how they are made, from an in-game perspective. It does feature notes for how the GM can incorporate traps into the gam. Overall it is a very GM-focused book.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Midgard Adventures: The Forgotten King's Tomb
by Martin S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/09/2016 12:20:40

***ong>SPOILERSng>**rong>


This short adventure is set in the world of Midgard, a campaign setting created by Kobold Press. After providing a brief background for the adventure and a preview of how the adventure will most likely unfold, the adventure starts with the characters being contacted by a dragonkin general looking for adventurers raid a tomb. Information is provided to help GM run the adventure with the pregenerated characters at the end of the book or to run it with other characters. There is also a nice piece of art to depict the map the general will give to the characters. After the meeting, the characters can select a minor magic item that will serve as upfront payment for their troubles.


After the trek through the hills, for which an encounter is provided, the characters can easily reach the tomb. Before entering the tomb, the group will be set upon by soldiers turned zombies. After defeating the undead, the characters can explore the tomb and fight a few guardians until they the room where the unnamed king rests. There, they can discover that the magical writing is created by a variant allip that can turn its babbling into words. Then, the adventure concludes with guidelines on how the general will reward the group and how the knowledge gained can be by the Dragon Empire. The last few pages present five pregenerated kobold characters.


I did not rate the adventure very high because it is pretty straightforward without any surprises or interesting encounters. It is not bad at all, just unremarkable. The foes are ok and one of the room provides a formidable environmental challenge as well as hosting a mud elemental, but the ending left me wanting. While the variant Allip is a nice touch, there is no great discovery. I also felt like the conclusion did not provide a lot of place to expand.


I would summarize my review by saying this is a dungeon that is well designed and well balanced, but it does not innovate and feels almost like a sidetrek. If you are looking for a short low level adventure, that would be it. While the adventure can be adapted to any campaign, it does have an Egyptian feel. But the rooms do lack interesting feature that would make the players feel like they are visitng a tomb form an ancient king. While reading the adventure, there were not just enough details to help bring a sense of wonder at discovering the tomb. The adventure can be use in any campaign set in the desert.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Midgard Adventures: The Forgotten King's Tomb
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Trapsmith (Pathfinder RPG)
by James E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2016 20:03:24

Disclaimer: I purchased this PDF as part of a Deal of the Day special, so while I did not pay the normal cover price, I did pay for it.


Now, Endzeitgeist has already done his usual outstanding job of examining the product, and most of the things he said I agree with. To put it into my own words, though...


As the name implies, this book is more than just a collection of traps. Now, don't get me wrong, having lots of traps is worthwhile in its own right, especially if your group is one where they'll actually go off now and then. I wouldn't advocate instant-death traps being a sure-fire thing, but come on, what's the fun of putting them in if they never actually get triggered? Trapsmith takes it a step further, though, by guiding you through the process of sensibly setting and using traps. In other words, you shouldn't just toss in a CR-appropriate trap and call it a day. Instead, think about which sorts of traps would be most sensible in a given way and build them up from there.


As a result, this book is useful for novices and veterans alike. Pages 21 and 22 are especially useful because they give a guideline for Perception and Disable Device DCs at each level, running from 'Easy' to 'Very Hard'. If you're not dealing with a min-maxing trap remover, these guidelines should be more than enough. Other useful parts of the book include advice on layering traps (why spring one when you can spring several?), making different kinds of traps more challenging, and even options for PCs who'd like to make some traps of their own. I'm particularly fond of the extra lock types that are harder for people to pick.


All in all, I think this is a great resource for gamemasters, and definitely worth picking up if you enjoy creating your own adventure locations. Overall, I'd rate this book about 4.5/5 overall, rounded up since I didn't feel there were any huge errors. I'm not sure it needed to have system neutral stuff on a few of the pages (this is a supplement for Pathfinder, after all, and it feels slightly out of place), but overall, I think this book is worth the price for the sort of GM who will actually use it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Trapsmith (Pathfinder RPG)
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Southlands Bestiary
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/06/2016 03:44:04

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This massive bestiary for use with the Southlands campaign setting (but not limited to it) clocks in at 122 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of backer-lists, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 3/4 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 112 1/4 pages of content, so let's take a look!


I was a backer of the Southlands kickstarter, but am otherwise not involved with this book. My review is primarily based on the softcover print version of this book, though I consulted the electronic version to verify e.g. presence of bookmarks and similar components.


This book is pretty much a sans frills experience - the brief version of this review would be as follows: After an introduction by Jeff Grubb, we dive into a ton of monsters; in the end, there is a table of monsters by CR; they span the breadth from humble CR 1/2 to massive CR 26.


...


Yeah, I know, not very fulfilling now, is it? Let's try to do this more justice: We have, at this point, seen more than one book (or chapter) on creatures of the deserts - there usually are a couple of undead, some ambush predators, a killer scarab, the like. We know the tropes and this book very much is aware of this - instead of simply resorting to trying to re-invent the wheel, it pretty much says: "So yeah, you do - but guess what? You haven't seen THIS done!" What do I mean by this? Well, for one, the massive book has something unique going on for every creature - there is no boring rehash of old tricks in this book. That tentacley ambush-predator cactus you've seen done before? Well, it can generate a lethal aura of spikes by shooting them all at once in a pinch. That undead, doomed to wander the desert? Let's just say that it can be used in Ravenloft sans modification, since it requires brains to defeat it.


The second component that sets this apart is that, much like the Southlands-book, it borrows heavily on real world mythology and adds a unique spin to it - Mechuitl and Camazotz, for example, are statted as full-blown demon lords - including e.g. information on Camazotz in the underworld... Similarly, monster tropes are combined with great panache with Midgard flavor - Clockwork Shabti and Ushabti, for example tie in perfectly with the gearforged concept, while the types of tosculi and their master, dread Arbeyach, prince of swarms also get their due.


Speaking of resonance with real world myth - if you're familiar with Prester John's myth, you'll be like me and grin from ear to ear upon seeing the Blemmyes statted. The lightning-infused swarm "Bolt of Ekwanes" similarly resounds with a deep pulse of the familiar and yet unique. Fans of ancient mythologies will also cheer at the rendition of noble Buraqs, while drought swallows threaten the land and well-being of those foolish enough to attract their attention. Salt-devils scour the lands and demonic idolic deities await to be unearthed, while owl-headed harpies prey on the travelers.


Intelligent ambush predator spiders called J'ba Fobi or the smoke-lions mngwas, carnivorousnandi bears or an ooze camouflaging as whole oasis - the breadth and depth of adversaries and creatures covered herein is wide indeed. Perhaps you want a pygmy trumpeteer elephant companion? Heck, even the tired old desert worm gets a new twist, with Sathaq worms sporting a pain-inducing aura and a hunting style based on dragging foes beneath the sands. Even the classic hybrids that in earlier days sometimes ended up being less than interesting have great representations herein - the lethal serpopard (serpent-leopard-hybrid) is a brutal foe, while an orangutan-choker hybrid should, by all accounts, end up on a ridiculous monster-list...but it does work! Insectoid Xhkarsh can afflict their victims with oracle curses and creatures mentioned in the great setting book, from the twisted vine lords to the arcane wasting-bearing intelligent white apes resound with themes of our collective cultural consciousness.


The mythic Southlands titans do sport notes on words of power (and an optional, non WoP-array of SPs) while the wakane, a feathered pterosaur, is particularly feared for sinking boats - have I mentioned the huge, burrowing pitcher plants masquerading as an oasis, commanding whole swarms of its rootlets to defeat resilient prey? There is a lot of downright inspired material to be found herein and not one of the creatures in this book felt lazy or bland.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch - while e.g. MR is not capitalized in a statblock and while I noticed some small hiccups, overall, the book is solid. The statblocks I checked sported no glaring glitches. Layout adheres to a gorgeous two-column full-color standard and the pdf is fully bookmarked. The book has a huge selling point: The artwork is absolutely fantastic. original and truly evocative, full-color artworks for all creatures are provided and they are downright baffling, eclipsing even most 1st party bestiaries. Some of the artworks are so beautiful, they make you immediately want to use the creature they represent - and this holds true for just about all of them. Look at the cover: This is the level of awesomeness you get throughout the whole book.


Here's the awesome thing, though: As a long-time supporter of Kobold Press, I have, time and again, bemoaned the fact that some of the truly astounding full color pdfs were translated "only" into b/w-print copies. Not so here: The Southlands Bestiary's print version is a truly gorgeous full color softcover that features thick, glossy paper and thus is a joy to simply flip open - if you can, get the print edition.


Okay, so here is the list of designers:


Kristian Ahonen, Eric Anderson, Anonymous, Joshua Banks, Wolfgang Baur, dpb, Clinton Boomer, Marina de Santiago Buey, Angelica Burns, Jarrod Camiré, Aaron Cheung, Jim Davis, Lee DeBoer, Dan Dillon, John Doh, Chris Doyle, Harold Farmer, John Foster, Erik Freund, Leonard Grand, Amanda Hamon Kunz, Andrew Harshman, Jacob Haywood, Steven T. Helt, Jeffrey Hersh, Andrew Hind, Richard Iversen, Alex Kanous, Henry S. Kurtz, Richard Lawson, Jeff Lee, Chris Lockey, Ari Marmell, Ben McFarland, Jesse McGatha, Brett A. McLean, Brian Wiborg Mønster, Matt Morrissette, Robert H. Nichols, Stacy Nichols, Kalervo Oikarinen, Gunnar Ólafsson, Richard Rossi, Stephen Rowe, Adam Roy, Wendall Roy, Matt Rupprecht, Allen F. Schell, Brian Suskind, Troy Taylor, James Thomas, John Tolios, James Whittaker, Clarence Wisdom, Henry Wong - in spite of the established names among these ladies and gentlemen, one would expect quality to fluctuate. At least as far as I could tell (or where it would become jarring or problematic for the GM), I could not observe any tendency like that - Ben McFarland, Justin Riddler, Alistair Rigg, Brian Suskind, Jason Nelson and Amanda Hamon Kunz have done a glorious job reviewing, editing and developing these creatures - and the effort show. This is a superb bestiary, perhaps one of the most compelling ones I've read all year.


Even if you're not interested in Midgard or Southlands, I very much recommend you get this gorgeous tome - this is a glorious bestiary and well worth 5 stars + seal of approval as well as nomination as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Southlands Bestiary
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Southlands Campaign Setting
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/31/2016 03:02:39

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This massive campaign setting-style book clocks in at 302 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of editorial, 4 pages of ToC, 2 pages of KS-backer thanks, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with a massive 290 pages of raw content, so let's take a look!


I was a (hesitant) backer for this book's KS, but otherwise unaffiliated with the production of this massive tome. My book is mainly based on the print version, though the electronic version was consulted for the purpose of determining electronic functionality of e.g. bookmarks and the like.


What do I mean by "hesitant"? Okay, before we dive into this book's subject matter, a brief history lesson: I consider myself a pretty faithful fan of Kobold Press, ever since it was Open Design -I own literally every supplement and even have, back when I actually wasn't dirt poor, acted as a high-level-patron to get my very own special, unique module. I really like Midgard and the evocative potential Kobold press brings to the table. Alas, Deep Magic, the previous big book, was a heartbreaking exercise for me (see my review of that book) and it took, frankly, quite some prodding to dive in. I had a minor windfall and invested that, back in the day, in this book, as a kind of "make it or break it"-test. Did it pay off? Let's see!


The Midgard campaign setting's allure, so far, did lie primarily in its dark fantasy Germanic/Slavic flair, somewhat expanded upon by the Argonaut-style adventuring in the Journeys-books, but yeah - the focus was arguably euro-centric and thus, I was very much interested to see how the respective mythologies and power-dynamics would interact with the massive Southlands. The first thing you'll notice, though, is that the structure and organization of this book eclipses that of Deep Magic by leaps and bounds: We begin this book with a deatiled history of the Southlands - and it is a glorious read.


No, really - I mean that - the history as presented already takes you right into this book's world; it's prose is evocative and makes you remember immediately what you wanted, what you craved in fantastical settings. Still, this is the general history, the time-line. The book also is suffused by small sideboxes, where an in-character narrator provides quotes as a guide and adventure hooks/bucket-lists for adventurers for the respective regions can be found. The book also provides 5 general, new races that can be found throughout the Southlands: Gnolls, Trollkin, Tosculi (see the advanced races-installment for more on the wasp-people), Nkosi (feline shape-changer humanoids) and Kijani (plant humanoids that seek to become mammalian). The races themselves are pretty powerful (plant-immunities, for example), but not excessively so - they should work within the context of most fantasy games, though, if your gunning for gritty gameplay, you may want to take a close look at them. An innovation used here for the first time (for the tosculi exclusively) and later expanded in the Advanced Races Compendium is advice on racial scaling - so yes, you can scale down the tosculi by a bit, though imho the race does not require this in all but the grittiest of games. On a nitpicky side, some races are "lopsided" with attribute bonuses allocated to physical attributes, so if you're like me and prefer your races with a strong suit in both physical and mental attributes, that may be something to be aware of.


It should be noted that ethnicities of regular races as well as age, height and weight tables are part of the deal here. Now the interesting component here, ultimately, does not lie in the crunch (though it is significantly more solid - kudos to the authors! The intriguing component, however, would be the seamless and smart integration of literally thousands of years of history within the mythology of Midgard as a whole - whether it's the origin of Boreas, the frigid northern wind and the tie to the survivors of sunken Ankheshel or Umbuso, the ancient empire of titans, fleeing from the domains of Wotan - the most intriguing aspect here is that this massive continent of pure historicity manages to weave its meta-narrative seamlessly into the overall context of Midgardian mythology, extending the diversity and organic feeling of the world by leaps and bounds. An interesting component is also how mythic rules are handled - as a basic tenet, they are considered to be the effects of remnants of divinity sparks, left behind by fallen pantheons and titans, which provides a nice in-game rationale for the existence of powers like that.


Now, it is after this that we focus on the first overall region, which would be Nuria Natal, the eternal realm - Nuria Natal, at first glance, seems very much like the pseudo-Egyptian realm, but it is distinct from e.g. Osirion and Khemit or similar realms in several key aspects, the first of which is the focus on the river that defines it - springing from a planar rift of the world-tree Yggdrasil, it blends the mythologies of the Nile and Midgardian theology in a truly distinct and unique vision. Similarly, the trope of undying godkings has a twist that goes far beyond what you'd expect - the legendary rulers of the land, semi-divinities and halfgods, have achieved a sense of immortality and may return from the grave to vanquish the foes of Nuria Natal, thus also explaining why the powerful, draconic sultanate Mharoti has failed to conquer this powerful nation. Similarly, the gods, while utilizing the themes of real world mythologies, never feel like simple carbon adaptations of real-world mythology, instead acting as a properly woven-in essential component of the vista portrayed.


Nowhere does this become more apparent than in Per-Bastet, the city of the everlasting cat, home of the deity...and basically a modern metropolis seen through the lens of the fantastic: A distinct patriotism unifies the quarters and their diverse residents, which contains gnolls and catfolk in abundance alongside werelions; from planar alleyways to a churning river of elemental-inhabited sand making its way through the chaotic jumble of the metropolis, the influence of Bastet, her church, the god-queen and her agents or the vampiric masterminds in the shadows, the vision of a true melting pot of fantastic ethnicities resonates with a character one usually only ascribes to real world cities. The writing here is impeccable and, much like the entries on a certain city and its necropolis, the staggering panorama extends in its quality throughout the whole chapter - from sandships as a vehicle-modification to a well-written ecology of the mummy (with ample variants and death curses), this chapter is abask in inspired writing and makes the places jump forth from the pages - whether they be the aforementioned places or the Ghatazi salt pits or the dreaded city of Per-Anu, devoted to ending lives in all manner of ways. The church of Aten and its diverse teachings, variant mummies, a city of undead and 4 archetypes (including archetypes for Theurge and White Necromancer) as well as a 10-level-PrC complement this chapter. While not universally awesome and sporting some minor deviations in rules-language, the content herein still is rather solid and well-ingrained within the context of the world. The book also sports multiple nice traits for further customization. The book also sports a HUGE number of hieroglyphs - these work akin to how rune magic or ankeshellian glyph magic work - and, while powerful, their limitations per associated cult do offer a rather easy way for the GM to control their availability - want that trick only followers of Anu-Akma have? Well, you better buckle up and join that organization!


The second, massive chapter details the nation under the auspice of the remaining wind lords, the same entities that sent Boreas packing with his aspirations of genocide - but that does not mean these eternal lords of the lands are kind - far from it. Their description very much makes clear that these elemental spirits do not adhere to the same morality as mortals. It is also in this domain that the twin lands of the gnolls (with a delightfully nasty gnoll-tactics sidebar) can be found. What do I mean by these? Well, here's an entry: "Three words: leucrotta sorceror chieftain." If you're like me, this made you grin from ear to ear. The pages chronicling these harsh regions also tell of a depressed sphinx and her honor guard watching over the verdant ruins of a fallen empire and of the fate of Roshgazi, minotaur-nation and Catharge-equivalent - the nation has been razed to the ground by Mharot's might, but in the ruins of this place, the sentient maze still draws visitors inside, hoping for salvation...before its other personality comes to the surface - and the "Broken" does not take kindly to intruders...


Goblin-occupied Mardas Vula with its black pyramid still exerts a lure on others and, wandering the sands, a colossal dire camel prophet sports howdah-like gnoll-encampments. The jinnborn race hearkens back to the genasi or planetouched and can be pictured as the elemental-themed mortals and the race sports quite a diverse and well-crafted array of options, including limited protection versus one's element, endure elements and elemental blasts that can be upgraded via feats. That being said, this is very much a strong race, stronger than the "core"-races of the book, so take care when using them. At the same time, I thoroughly enjoyed their unique psychology and culture...but still. At their pretty high power-level, I wished more abilities were alternate racial traits instead of jamming all those abilities into the base frame of the race. The archetypes here are interesting - an elemental-themed paladin, gnoll caravan raiders and janni-calling summoners can be found and a PrC depicting the elite guard of aforementioned sphinx priestess is part of the deal. The chapter, like those before and after, also sports several unique spells and magic items - the latter of which deserve special mention, after all, we get an enchanted bed of nails and several unique carpets. One belt should be eyed very carefully, as it lets you pilot willing outsiders, fusing your body with them, which is exceedingly powerful when not handled with care.


Beyond the dominion of the wind lords, the book finds its full-blown stride with the high jungles, where access to the fabled well of urd can be found, as powerful aeromancers guard the Black Lotus Mesa as intelligent white apes afflicted with arcane wasting prowl the jungles. More unique and perhaps one of the most awesome and disturbing components of the whole book would be the fact that an Old One, verdant and all-consuming, ever-growing, extends its tendril'd reach beyond the confines, ever seeking to mutate and grow - it should then come as no surprise that the nation of Kush has, in efforts to stem the tide, turned to all manners of magicks most dark - but it may not be enough, as the corrupted Kijani that couldn't escape its influence spread spore pods far and wide, creating horrid tendril slaves. The chapter also is a JOY to read due to an actually neat aeromancer archetype and, more than that, due to the vast array of hazards and the 8 lotus-types, which act as addictive, yes...but they also serve as powerful power components. This chapter is twisted, inspired and absolutely glorious.


The kingdoms of salt and steel, bustling and defined by commerce - here, the land of serpent-scholars beckons, while in the land of ancients, the living reliquaries roam. This section is not only brilliant for its take on themes usually not represented - a royal mythic naga lich rules over Ankhrimari, while the Narumbeki legions with their battle tactics and unique combat options represent a powerful militaristic force - the themes evoked here are seldom seen, borrowing heavily from Africa's mythologies, with magical masks and awesome incantations sweetening the deal, while powerful combat divinations make for a unique and compelling magical tradition.


On the Corsair Coast, the holy city Shuruppak beckons, while the city of Sar-Shaba contains horrific demonic legions, warded and sealed await intrepid adventurers. The fabulously wealthy island nation of Shibai and wicked corsairs can be found...but there is also the happiest land, Kesara, realm of the saffron rajah, where everyone smiles - a smile of desperation and fear, for the tyrannic rajah of the land is capricious and nasty indeed - a realm devoted to the decadence of the horrible rakshasa master that sits bloated on its throne. Fiercely meritocratic lion kingdoms of Omphaya, led by a returned titan and his rakshasa vizier may not be a nice place to visit either. - but it sure should prove interesting.


The heartlands of the Southlands, the abandoned lands contain vast stretches of desert - it is here that the massive, black towers of the disturbing hive-cities of the tosculi can be found. Why disturbing? Well, there is one that consists of the resin-hardened corpses of the fallen. Yes. Awesome and so perfectly evocative. Someone has also probably read China Miéville's excellent "The Scar", for there is a floating city in the style of Armada to be found. Mechanically, these lands are brutal, as the web of ley lines is damaged, which makes primal magic rather powerful...and excessively dangerous. The long-limbed Ramad are a balanced race sported here and significant ley line magic expansions and delightfully disturbing living tosculi items complement this evocative, harsh land as we turn our gaze southwards, to the fringe of the southlands, where dinosaurs roam and the minotaur nation of Sudvall stands guard. The xorn sultanate of Zanskar can also be found here...and should you hesitate to set a whole campaign in the southlands...did you know that one particular bottle contains a whole city of assassins? Yeah...if you don't come to the Southlands, they may well come to you.


The pdf's last chapter is devoted to the pantheons and gods of the Southlands - and their depictions are inspired, utilizing concepts and names from real-world mythology, but putting a thoroughly unique spin on them. The book concludes with an equipment table as well as a feat-index. My copy also sports a truly superb, glossy poster-map of the gorgeous cartography.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch for a book of this size - while I did notice an instance where the page-reference was still the layout-stage's "$$", the crew of Kobold Press has done a vastly superior job when compared to Deep Magic; the formal editing is more than solid and while I consider not all crunchy bits to be perfectly balanced, the rules-language is significantly more precise than in Deep Magic. Layout adheres to a 2-column standard in full color and is absolutely stunning; much like the lavish amount of original full-color art, the aesthetic components render this book frankly one of the most beautiful RPG-supplements I own. The pdf comes fully bookmarked. The hardcover uses high-quality, thick, matte paper and glossy, high-quality paper for the huge map. The cartography of the book is superb for the most part, though some of the more ruined cities look "only" very good - still, overall, this is one of the most beautiful books you'll ever see.


Wolfgang Baur, Eric Cagle, David "Zeb" Cook, Adam Daigle, Dan Dillon, Amanda Hamon Kunz, Steven T. Helt, Steve Kenson, Ben McFarland, Richard Pett, Marc Radle, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Ted Reed, Stephen Rowe, Adam Roy, Owen K.C. Stephens, C.A. Suleiman, Brian Suskind, Henry Wong - ladies and gentlemen, congratulations are in order.


You see, Golarion and similar setting have often drawn upon the tropes of Arabian nights and pharaonic Egypt - but never this way. The creative approach to this book could be summed up as follows: The book took the classic real-world mythologies that resonate with us and put a spin on it - so far, so common. However, the true excellence of Southlands lies not within this; no. The massive achievement of this book lies in the concise manner in which it brings the truly fantastic to the table and treats it seriously; the Southlands feel alive and concise, because it takes a very much logical, concise approach to world-building - whether as stand-alone or as part of the Midgard campaign setting, the Southlands excel. The blending of mythologies and use of more obscure themes collides with pure imaginative potential in a true, creative firework. I wouldn't have expected this book to be that great a read - as a huge fan of Catherynne M. Valente's "Orphan's Tales", my bar for myth-weaving is ridiculously high...but here's the thing: I loved reading this book. Much like the best of mythpunk novels, much like the most inspiring of fantastic novels, this tome is a true page-turner and contains more imaginative potential than just about every setting I could list. This is not Al-Qadim v. 2.0. - it surpasses this excellent classic and mops the floor with it.


Now granted, I am not sold on all design-decisions herein, not perfectly convinced regarding the balance of some components - but all of that ultimately pales before a book that is true excellence. I haven't enjoyed reading a campaign setting this much since the original Midgard Campaign Setting and honestly, enjoyed this book even more - because it takes less familiar concepts, because it brims with the spark of genius and more evocative locations than multiple settings combined. There is not a single campaign setting book that is comparable in scope and ambition and, better yet, while not all the crunch reaches the constant, almost frightening level of genius of the prose, there are ample instances where I simply fist-pumped - the lotus-magic is pure awesomeness and similarly, quite a few of the magic items just feel magical, unique, awesome...and the hazards...oh boy, do I love me some hazards!


Here's the most important component, though: Beyond simply being a superb read and surprisingly, in spite of heavily quoting real world mythologies, Southlands is a book of jamais-vus, of the novel and still familiar, an accumulation of brilliant ideas that practically DEMAND that you run modules, campaigns, whole APs in this wondrous, exceedingly captivating setting. My only true gripes while reading this tome pertained to the organization of player-material - out-sourcing that to a Player's Guide would have probably been a prudent move - but I'm ultimately just nitpicking. If anything, just about every nation herein made me crave more; each chapter made me want a whole AP set in it so bad... Southlands is a furious return to form for Kobold Press. This book very much shows how and why Kobold Press became as popular as it now is - even if you're not actively gaming, this is well worth buying: Flip open those pages, start reading and dream a dream of harsh jungles, enchanted deserts and gorgeous cities, both bustling and ruined, of a savage land of splendor and glories untold. Go to the Southlands. Get this book. Dream. There are very few books of this size that manage to maintain a sense of narrative consistency, much less at the thoroughly impressive level of quality the ideas in this tome have.


This may well be the best sourcebook Kobold Press has released (I'm a fanboy of some adventures...), perhaps this is even one of the best sourcebooks I've ever read. If anything, I do hope that Northlands at one point get a similarly detailed second edition. Southlands is excellence - if you even remotely are interested in the subject matter, do yourself a favor and get this glorious tome - it contains enough ideas and adventure for a lifetime and I am not engaging in hyperbole here. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval and I'll also nominate this as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015. (Scheduled for release soon!)


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Southlands Campaign Setting
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Cat & Mouse for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
by Carl C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/18/2016 14:37:46

A very cute and encouraging introductory adventure, from which many further plots can be spawned. A good introduction to the Southlands setting, but not rooted there; it can work in most oriental cities with a spread of races. Beautifully illustrated and mapped.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cat & Mouse for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
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Eleven Arabian Nights
by Carl C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/18/2016 12:16:41

THe book begins with shorter scenarios, plots that can be inserted into acampaign at any point. This is about half of them. The second half is longer stories, that are likely to take more than one session to play. The themes are a mix of arabian nights and pulp; there are the obligatory pulpy dungeons but also fairy tales with djinns. Overall I liked the book. It is a mix of high and low, humor and gritty dungeon-delving. Every eader is sure to like some of the stories, but most are also likely to dislike others.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Eleven Arabian Nights
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Larger than Life: Giants for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
by Billy W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2016 20:31:45

The gentlefolks from Kobold press once again provide us with some interesting reading material in the form of Larger than Life. Ill be honest here listeners, I am not sure what I expected when I acquired this particular tome, but what I received overawes whatever it was. I will save you all a bit of reading here and in fact if you don’t feel like scrolling to the bottom you can stop right here. This is purely my opinion, Fangbjorn in case you thought Antonio was typing these out. GO GET THIS BOOK. That being said, read on to discover why I recommend this work so highly.


The work put into this is of the same caliber of work as everything they produce, which isn’t exactly unexpected. Credits for the design go to Mr. Mike Welham, and art credits belong to Bruno Balixa, Micah Epstine, Malcom McClinton, Addison Rankin, David Rabbitte, Jason Rainville, Bryan Syme and cover art by Florian Stitz. Now that the quality of work is noted as excellent it is high time to move on to the particulars.


The book as I said overawed me when I dove into it the first time. It is, for lack of a better description, a full anthropological breakdown of the many races of Giants. The gang is all there too. Storm giants and Cloud giants, Hill, Stone, Fire, Frost and a brand new breed in the form of the Thursir. Ever wondered what a Hill giant arcane caster looked like? I know I have, I have even attempted to make giant NPC's and PC's. Well now, with this book, you get eight NPC's who have been generated for you, as well as a damned good idea of how to go about making one or many for yourself! The well written sections are accented with beautiful illustrations and over all it is a solid addition to any fantasy game library.


Within each section are included several sub-sections, the opening paragraphs give an overall idea of who and what the particular race of giants are. This is followed by a comprehensive treatise on the normal lives and customs of each giant type. When I say comprehensive I mean it, it goes farther in depth than any monster supplement I have ever read. Social organization, religious practices, and how they interact with the other races are all included in full detail. Then we move on to more specific rules pertaining to the giant race in question. Racial rules, which include race specific feats, spells known only to that race of giants, and magical items that they may have or create. Also race specific equipment that they often have in their homes or on their person. I'm not exaggerating when I say I am very much in love with this book. It is awesome to see this much love and devotion given to an often underutilized monster and you guys and gals know how we feel about our monsters. Enough digression. Also included are a fully fleshed out NPC with a back story and full stat listing. Then, finally, a collection of story or adventure seeds to get the creative juices flowing for those of you who like us love to hare off on any excuse to take an adventure to another world.


To sum it all up, Larger than Life is beautifully put together. The artwork from cover to cover is gorgeous, and the attention to detail and the care involved in bringing these monsters to the fore is beyond admirable. Mr. Welham did an amazing job of fleshing out an already fun to play with group of creatures and making them into what they should have been from the very beginning. Awe inspiring, town devastating, GIANT FREAKING MONSTERS! The PGP wholeheartedly gives Larger than Life from Kobold Press a 9.5/10.


As an aside. When I went over all of this with Antonio, you should have heard him cackling like a mad thing. I feel for whomever he runs next through a fantasy setting. I can only envision a phalanx of Fire Giants descending upon whatever castle or fort his hapless party of adventurers happen to have hold up in.


This is Fangbjorn for the Players Guide Podcast signing off for now. Keep your dice close to hand, and play more games.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Larger than Life: Giants for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
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Cat & Mouse for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
by Billy W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2016 20:30:35

Cat and Mouse is our most recent review and, from what I’ve read, it will be a wonderful addition to your library. It is an adventure for a 1st level party, pre-written to handle up to six PCs. The module is set in the city of Per- Bastet which is part of the Southlands campaign setting. The adventure puts the PC’s square in the midst of several groups vying for the possession of a minor artifact known as the Grimalkin Eye.


The layout of the module is very easy to follow. It presents the NPC’s stat blocks as the PCs meet them. The minions of the major NPC’s are listed as a reference to their appropriate Pathfinder book, usually a bestiary whose info is easily accessed on the PFSRD if the book isn’t already in your possession. There are several instances which also reference the Southlands campaign setting book itself, but most of these are to add more info to the background of the city or setting specific deities and religions.


Areas that the party visits are described in detail, and any that see possible combat are played out with a grid map. The module itself gives the party several directions to go with the adventure and many of the choices the party can make are already written with multiple possible hooks that can be used together or individually. Cat and Mouse also encourages the GM to think of the “big picture.” It asks the GM to consider how pivotal choices will effect the party in the long term, as well as how certain acts could have consequences that will not be readily apparent to the PCs. One of my favorites is that simply saying one thing to a certain group will get you stoned, whereas another approach to the same group will win you some help. I will not give any spoilers, but the possible rewards are many and varied.


In my opinion Cat and Mouse is well written and a wonderful way to introduce new characters to the world of Southlands, or to be used as a starter adventure for any desert-themed campaign. Keep up the good work over at Kobold Press, the stuff you’ve been sending us is amazing. Thank you Antonio and Fang for the opportunity to look this over.


Daernae from PlayersGuidePodcast



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cat & Mouse for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
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New Paths 8: the Trickster (Pathfinder RPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/07/2016 06:37:14

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the New Paths-series clocks in at 10 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This pdf was moved up in my review-queue at the request of my players.


The trickster class presented herein receives d8 HD, a massive 6+Int skills per level, proficiency with simple weapons plus rapier, longsword, sap, short sword, shortbow, whip light armor and shields (excluding tower shields) and may freely cast spells while only wearing light armor and/or using a shield. The class receives 3/4 BAB-progression as well as good Ref- and Will-saves and gains spellcasting.


Spellcasting of the trickster is slightly more tricky (I'll punch myself later for that one) than you'd expect: The trickster's spellcasting is governed by Intelligence and thus is prepared according to convention. However, spells prepared are not expended upon being cast - instead, the spell slot of the appropriate level is expended. Metamagic is handled as for sorcerors and similar spontaneous casting classes. High Intelligence influences the number of spells a trickster can cast, but not the amount of spell-slots he has - this is pretty important for balance, so bear that in mind. So, in summary, we have an actually working blend of prepared and spontaneous casting here for a surprisingly unique take on the old vancian system. And yes, concise rules for cantrips gained (often overlooked) and spellbooks (ditto!) are part of the deal here. This section is rather elegant - kudos here! Tricksters begin play with 4 cantrips known and 2 1st level spells and increase that up to 6 for each spell level, barring 5th and 6th, which cap at 5. 5 is also the maximum spells per day limit. Akin to the alchemist and similar classes, spellcasting caps at spell level 6.


The trickster also receives access to sneak attack and begins play with +1d6, increasing this by +1d6 at 4th level and every 3 levels thereafter. Similarly, at first level, the trickster gains trapfinding. So far, so rogue-y, right?


Well, second level becomes a bit more unique, as the trickster gains a forte on which to focus, of which 4 are provided. Structure-wise, the fortes provide immediate benefits and unlock new abilities at 5th and 9th level. The first would be Acrobat, which not only provides skill-bonuses to movement-related skills and eliminates the need for running starts to get the associated bonus, it also eliminates the armor check penalty for said skills. At 5th level, the trickster rolls Acrobatics twice and takes the better result 3+Dex-mod times per day, while 9th level increases AC when wearing light armor and eliminates the Acrobatics-DC-increase when moving through threatened squares.


The second forte is arcane accomplice, which nets a familiar, though the familiar receives Disable Device and Sleight of Hand as class skills and can deal sneak attack as long as it's within 30 ft. of the trickster - and yes, this means you can basically double-team on your own, greatly increasing the validity of sneak attack, though, for balance's sake, a familiar's sneak attack uses d4s, which proved mathematically feasible in my tests. 5th level goes one step further and nets the familiar all teamwork feats of the trickster, while 9th level provides basically spring attack for the familiar, but only with regards to delivering harmless touch attacks - and yes, this is more versatile than you'd think.


The third forte is Beguile and provides +1 to DCs and +1 to rolls to overcome SR, scaling by +1 at 5th and 9th level - but only when targeting creatures that would be denied their Dexterity-modifier or that are helpless. At 5th level, when successfully feinting, the target would be denied his Dex-mod to AC for the next melee attack or spell targeting by the trickster, but only when performed on or before his next turn. 9th level decreases the required action to feint to a move action, a swift action if the trickster has Improved Feint.


The fourth forte is Spell Pilfer, which is easily the most unique of the fortes: As an immediate action, the trickster can make a Spellcraft check (DC 15 + spell level) to identify the spell and, if successful, the trickster may attempt to pilfer the spell. The caster receives a Will-save versus 10 + 1/2 trickster class level + Int-mod to negate the attempt. If the caster fails, he loses access to the spell known or prepared spell, while the trickster temporarily (1/2 class levels, minimum 1) adds the spell to his list of spells known. While the spell is pilfered, the original caster may not cast it, but the trickster may, provided he has an available spell slot. Only one spell (again, VERY important for balance) can be pilfered at a given time - pilfering a second spell, the previous spell immediately reverts to the owner. This ability can be used 3 + Intelligence mod times per day. It should be noted that tricksters can only pilfer spells they can cast, another VERY important limitation. Now you may have noted that Will-saves are pretty easy for most casters - thus, at 5th level, the trickster's Wisdom modifier is also added to the DC to resist the pilfer attempt. I am usually fiercely opposed to dual attribute-mods to anything, but considering that Wis is NOT a trickster's crucial stat in any way, in practice, this is not problematic. 9th level allows the trickster to pilfer spells above his casting capacity, but thankfully with the caveat that the trickster can't cast such spells - so no abuse possible. This is a very impressive ability in my book, since it makes spell theft work sans holes in the wording, sans abuse. Love it!


Starting at 3rd level the trickster adds +1 competence bonus to Bluff, Disguise, Escape Artist, Sleight of Hand or Stealth, increasing the bonus by +1 every third level, though the new bonuses gained may be freely distributed among aforementioned spells. 3rd level also nets evasion and 6th, 12th and 18th level provides bonus feats from a limited list. 8th level provides uncanny dodge, 11th improved uncanny dodge.


At the level, as a standard action, the trickster can cast a spell with a range of touch and deliver it as part of a melee attack, with the restriction of only working in conjunction with spells that have a casting time of 1 standard action or less. If the trickster hits, he also deals sneak attack damage in conjunction with the touch spell. Important: Misses mean the spell is lost, not held! This, combined with 3/4 BAB, is an important balancing mechanism...At least until high levels, for at 17th level, it is no longer lost - as a minor nitpick, while it is clear from the wording, it would have been nice to see the class explicitly specify that the trickster can hold only one sneakspell charge to avoid stacking them up.


Spells thus delivered may also not be enhanced by metamagic and, have a crit mod of x2. 9th level provides ranged legederdemain, though the ability is thankfully MORE precise than that of the arcane trickster PrC, specifying how far you can propel stolen objects and increasing the required skill ranks to 5. At 14th level, the trickster receives Filch Spell, which allows the trickster to hijack spells requiring direction (flaming spheres etc.) as a move action 3+Inttelligence modifier times per day. 15th level provides Surprise spells - but unlike the imprecise original take on the ability, this one clarifies from the get-go how it works with magic missiles or AoE-spells. As a capstone, the trickster treats all sneak attack damage 1s and 2s as 3s and automatically confirms all crits when using sneak attack. Additionally, the trickster may add metamagic to sneakspells sans increasing the casting time.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch and precise, I noticed but one minor fringe case; other than that - all around precise and well done in both formal and rules-language departments. Layout adheres to Kobold Press' gorgeous two-column full-color standard and the pdf sports multiple gorgeous pieces of original art. The pdf comes with bookmarks in spite of its brevity - nice.


Marc Radle's trickster is interesting - it is a testament to how much we love the concept of a rogue-y character that the by now pretty broken (as in: too weak) base class continues to see truly excellent takes on the trope. Regarding customization options, both the talented rogue and in particularly, Legendary Games' absolutely brilliant Legendary Rogues-book provided options for the "mundane" rogue that retain their viability in the system. Why "retain"? Well, simple: You see, the rogue has been pretty much a casualty to changing design-paradigms in PFRPG - when the core-rules were releases, the value of a rogue talent was obviously set to about a feat or less, while later classes have increased the value of class-specific options - compare alchemist discoveries and rogue talents if you need proof of that...or look at the ninja's framework and unique tricks and you'll notice the paradigm-shift.


The trickster, however, is not a simple rogue redesign - it could be summed up as a magus/rogue-hybrid, but that does not do the class justice: Instead of cobbling together two classes, the trickster is a completely unique class. Let me sum up the unique benefits here: The trickster streamlines problematic arcane trickster class features, has a unique spellcasting-blend that plays different from standard classes while being easy to understand and it provides a balanced, strong means to represent the sneak attack double team as well as, most importantly, creating the AWESOME spell pilfer mechanic.


Where am I going with this history lesson/comparison? Well, the trickster is stronger than the vanilla rogue - no doubt. It frankly SHOULD be - there are three classes that need versatility/power-upgrades: Rogue, monk and (versatility-wise/unique class feature-wise) fighter. The trickster is stronger than the rogue can deliver solid damage - much like a magus, this class is a glass cannon, though one that also is a rather good face/skill-monkey: Since the class receives A LOT of skills per level AND has Int govern just about everything, it will, by necessity, be able to cover a lot of bases. That being said, good Dex and Str are still important, build-wise, so maxing out Int sure is viable, but probably won't net you maximum efficiency. Now personally, since I gravitate to a more subdued gameplay, I'll settle on 4+Int skills per level in my home game, analogue to the alchemist - but the class's default is not broken per se - it's just geared more towards higher powered gameplay. When you reduce skills to 4+Int, you pretty much get the alchemist's level of potency, at 6+Int it's slightly above the class.


Ultimately, though, skills per level is more a matter of taste than a balance-concern and, more importantly a no-brainer-level easy modification of the chassis literally anyone can perform. All in all, the trickster as presented here is a pretty awesome, viable class that plays in a very unique way and mops the floor with any other take of the arcane trickster I've seen so far. Now, I do have one complaint and it pertains to the pdf's size: If anything, this pdf left me wanting archetypes, more options, feats, favored class options - none of which are in this book. Sure, they are not explicitly required, but they would have been nice and I sure hope this will get expansions in the future.


Yeah, I'm rambling, I know. It's just not every day I get to see a class like this. You know that I'm pretty much a huge advocate of modularity of class features, of options and complex systems. However, once in a while, most often by the pen of Scott Gladstein or Marc Radle, I stumble over a class that has a framework I consider too light on the player-agenda side...and still end up loving it for the impressive, elegant simplicity exhibited in the design. Just about everyone can play this class - it's simple, concisely presented and easy to grasp. More importantly, unlike many less complex classes, it allows for a significant array of diverse playstyles and has a unique identity: This class has plenty of "only the trickster can do that"-moments, particularly when spell pilfering, which is, in one word, glorious.


How to rate this, then? Well, it should be taken as a testament to how well the class is written and presented that this conclusion was no never-ending ramble on how we need favored class options, archetypes, etc. The trickster is an awesome class with several innovations in its abilities I absolutely adore...and yes, this is allowed in my game. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars, missing my seal of approval only due to the lack of supplemental material...so when do we get the expansion?


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
New Paths 8: the Trickster (Pathfinder RPG)
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Midgard Preview
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/04/2016 13:14:28

The Midgard Preview offers an enticing overview of the campaign setting. The preview starts with two pieces of fiction, which effectively convey the tone of the setting and the types of adventures that may occur therein. This is followed by a write-up of one of the settings unique races, providing usable content without any further purchase. The preview finishes with an overview of the various regions and what makes them memorable.



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[4 of 5 Stars!]
Midgard Preview
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New Paths 6: Expanded Gunslinger (Pathfinder RPG)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/27/2016 12:37:54

Subtitled 'Grit and Gunsmoke' (worth mentioning because that's how the book self-refers, a bit confusing if you haven't noticed!) this work adds new traits, feats and archetypes aimed at enabling characters of any class to use firearms, assuming that they exist in your game. Not everyone feels that firearms fit in a fantasy game: if you don't, put this down and look at something else. However, if you are comfortable about including firearms in your game, this has some good additions to the material concerning black powder firearms that you might wish to incorporate.


We start with some Firearm Traits, which can be used to explain how come a character is familiar with firearms even if they are not normally associated with his class - perhaps he was a hunter as a young lad - or in some way was involved for better or worse with them. One's quite delightful, 'Gun Shy' which makes a character quite unhappy around firearms, with negative modifiers to shoot and the shakes after he's done so... but a massive luck bonus for resolving criticals should he ever manage them!


Next come some Firearm Feats. Some rely on the Grit class feature (or at least, you need to have it to take them) and others are firearms-related Combat feats. There are even some - the Thundering God series - that bring firearms and martial arts together, enabling you to build a gun-toting style.


Finally, and this is the main part of the book, we have an array of archetypes. These provide many routes for the aspiring gun-slinger and indeed for characters of other classes who wish to add in firearms. Some are downright strange, like the Black Hat who brings bad luck to his opponents. Or maybe you prefer the barbarian approach with the Black Powder Reaver, who doesn't really understand guns but boy, does he enjoy the noise and the havoc that they cause! Then we have the Coilgunner who uses an alchemical weapon called a coilgun, a strange thing that uses alchemy to generate magnetic fields to spit out iron bullets. OK so you need iron bullets rather than lead ones and alchemical fluids rather than gunpowder, but the end result is the same. Or perhaps the Futurist appeals, a witch who senses glimmerings of technical advances that haven't been made yet... and we could go on. The Gunfighter (a fighter who specialises in firearms) is quite obvious, then there's a Hellfire Preacher (a cleric archetype who prefers a firearm over his deity's favoured weapon), and finally the Noble Shootist, a confident fellow with leadership skills.


If you want to make use of firearm technology within your game, here are some novel ideas to help you do so.



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[4 of 5 Stars!]
New Paths 6: Expanded Gunslinger (Pathfinder RPG)
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New Paths 5: Expanded Monk and Ninja (Pathfinder RPG)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/25/2016 10:23:42

Properly practised, the martial arts are a way of life, not just a way to knock seven bells out of the opposition! It's good to see a supplement that reflects this... for who after all can ignore the allure of the almost-legendary unarmed warrior that is the monk, or the sneaky, skilled assassin that is the ninja?


This book sets out to provide alternative and enhanced ways in which to play such characters. It starts off with some monk archetypes: the Beast-Soul Monk (who takes the concept of animal-styles to an extreme), the Clockwork Monk (which is what you get when a gearforged - a character race unique to the Midgard setting from Kobold Press - decides to take up martial arts), the Monk of the Compliant Style Rod (who specialises in use of the bo staff), the Monk of the Glorious Endeavour (who seeks enlightenment through the mastery of but a single weapon, he won't even touch anything else), the Monk of the Peerless Mountain (who specialises in kick attacks, think savate), the Paper Drake Monk (whose philosphy is rooted in origami...), and the Six Talismans Monk (dedicated to protecting others through the use of magic items as well as martial skills). Whatever sort of monk you want to be, you'll find something of interest here.


Then attention turns to the ninja, with some new master tricks to expand on the class abilities, and of course new archetypes: the Elemental Ninja (who utilises knowledge of the elements alongside acrobatics and martial skills) and the Mist Stalker (who is exceptionally stealthy, using shadows and mists - natural or otherwise - to advantage).


Next there is a selection of new feats which could suit anyone wanting to use the martial arts, built around several new martial arts styles. Each style gives you progressive access to a list of feats to enable you to develop your skill in a particular direction. If that's not enough there are also some new exotic weapons with which to get to grips... fancy attacking with a horse tail whisk, an iron flute or a farmer's hoe?


In summary, then, this supplement provides a lot more options for monks and ninjas, a chance to develop a distinctive style and achieve renown as a legend in your own lifetime.



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[4 of 5 Stars!]
New Paths 5: Expanded Monk and Ninja (Pathfinder RPG)
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New Paths 4: Expanded Battle Scion (Pathfinder RPG)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/24/2016 12:06:16

This variant base class describes what might be thought of as an 'arcane paladin' - someone who has combat and spell-casting skills but who wields arcane rather than divine power. One particular neat ability they have is to loose a 'force blast' - a bolt of pure arcane power - at their foes. Acting a bit like a magic missile, the strength of the blast increases as the Battle Scion rises in level, although the number of times a day he can fire one remains constant.


Full details are provided to enable you to create and play a Battle Scion character. There is also a couple of archetypes - the Force Blaster (who specialises in using his force blast to effect) and the Bonded Scion (who bases his abilities on his link with a bonded weapon) - and some new feats and new magic items with which to equip your Battle Scion. Of particular interest are three items said to have belonged to a legendary Battle Scion, one Gax (who is the hero of the bit of flavour fiction at the beginning of this work) - his armour, shield and sword are there awaiting a new hero.


Finally there's a Prepared Spell Tracking Sheet to help you keep your spells in order, another neat idea. (I used to use index cards, one per spell, which I'd lay out on my table when I chose spells, but that was a long time ago...)


This is a rather nice base class which provides a good role for someone who wants to mix powerful fighting skills with appropriate battle magic, but who doesn't want to be lawful good or committed to the service of a specific deity. Well worth a look...



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
New Paths 4: Expanded Battle Scion (Pathfinder RPG)
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