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Defiants
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/29/2014 09:23:11

As is becoming established pattern, this book begins with a substantial chunk of in-character pages from the DeltaTimes website. As that's pretty much the mouthpiece for the Defiance organisation, it is extremely relevant in this case!

This time, we're looking at a secure area reserved for those within the Defiance movement, or at least seriously interested in joining it. There's plenty here from history (told with a decidedly anti-establishment slant, of course) to opinion pieces from several leading members of the movement. If your game is, as the original intention seems to be, about deltas who have chosen to stand against the government, it's essential reading. For a start, it is by no means a coherent movement, Defiance is a loose aggregation of deltas linked only by the determination not to register their powers with the government as the law requires. Some are happy to leave it at that, others want to campaign against the way deltas are treated, and there are plenty of other points of view as well. If you'll be playing deltas in Defiance, you'll have to decide what you want to do, choosing one of these paths or carving out your own. If political games intrigue you, you could even base the game around the interplay between various factions within Defiance!

The bulk of the book consists of this in-character material (and fascinating reading it makes, too) but eventually we reach Chapter 1: New Power Packages. Here there are several new power packages, mostly related to different Defiance factions and useful if that's what you are going to play. Archetypes are provided for each one, as usual.

The final section is The Guide's Handbook, intended for the Guide's eyes only. Chapter 2: The Truth of the Matter lays out what's really going on behind the in-character stuff presented earlier as well as a lot more detail on the different Defiance factions. Some of them may be as much of a problem for the characters as the government forces are! Indeed, some are presented as adversaries. And there's an even more secret and hidden corner of the DeltaTimes website that reveals a few truths hidden even from most of Defiance. The section ends with the Author's Afterword, which includes errata for the first two books as well as the comment that following books will be even less rules and more about unravelling this Brave New World and helping you to find your character's place within it.

Another good read, even if it is a bit frustrating how everything comes out piecemeal. It is good, however, to see such a coherent vision of a game world and to be able to explore it so thoroughly.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Defiants
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Ravaged Planet
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/28/2014 09:15:04

This, the Player's Guide for Brave New World, opens with in-character material from the 'DeltaTimes' underground website, setting the scene for the alternate now in which the characters live. It starts where the comic strip that opened the core rulebook left off: the capture of a delta called Patriot who'd been a leading light in Defiance, the dissident organisation opposed to the current state of affairs in America and especially the policies concerning deltas, as superpowered individuals are known in this game. This is followed by Patriot's autobiography which gives a good flavour of the recent history that leads up to the present day. It's a good tale, well told, and ought to give players enough of a feel to know which side - government, Defiance, the Mob, independent operator - they'd like their characters to be on. The clear implication, though, is that all right-thinking deltas will join Defiance.

Next, and still as pages from an in-character website, Crescent City is described. This is the base setting for the game, a city that arose on the ruins of what was Chicago. It covers the city layout, government, police and other things anyone living there needs to know about... notable buildings, public transportation, even a few locals. A city plan would have helped, though.

If you'd rather go further afield, the next section looks at the United States of America as a whole. This section (and we're still reading web pages!) is very city-oriented, but gives a run-down on the current state of affairs in the major cities that even non-Americans can probably name. It ends with an overview of the general state of the union and the sort of people you'll find there.

Next, we stray - still on that website, DeltaTimes - even further afield into A World of Hurt. Everything's been about America so far, here we can read about how the rest of the world is faring. It's a motley summary of various parts of the world in roughly alphabetical order and again biased towards cities in each country described. Deltas are urban animals it appears.

This flavour text, informative and enjoyable, fills over half the book - so it's a bit of a surprise to find Chapter 1: New Power Packages on page 109 of a 160-page book. A pleasant surprise, however, especially if you are finding yourself a bit limited by the selection of packages provided in the core rulebook. It also introduces the Covenant, a delta organisation run by the Roman Catholic Church, and the Schism - renegade Catholics and others, Christian and non-Christian alike - who have shied away from Church teaching regarding deltas and the world as it is today. This of course gives plenty more options for what sort of character you want to play and the adventures he might become embroiled in. There's plenty of detail if fighting the good fight takes your fancy and you want to involve Covenant characters in your game. They have some interesting powers exclusively available to them, based on 'faith' and with interesting names that mean more if you know a little about Christian heritage. If religion's not your thing, though, there are quite a few more general power packages available to any delta. This section ends with some archetypes for the new power packages, and a selection of dramatic artwork illustrating various events and concepts touched upon earlier.

Next, we come to the Guide's Handbook and Chapter 2: The Truth of the Matter. This lifts the curtain on all that has come before, presenting the 'truth' for the game master's eyes only. It is a bit dogmatic about what really happened, but whilst it is open to individual Guides to decide what's true and what's not in their game, it may make the following supplements less easy to incorporate. And there's enough comments about not being ready to reveal certain bits of information just yet to make you - if you like consistent game worlds - want to get hold of them.

Finally there's a Author's Afterword. This talks about the underlying concepts and inspirations for the game, and is again quite interesting especially if you are interested in how a game designer's mind works.

Overall, this is a good 'setting' book that will help everyone in a group get to grips with what the alternate reality that they'll be inhabiting is like.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Ravaged Planet
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Brave New World
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/23/2014 08:23:20

The book opens with a comic strip showing a young girl, newly into 'delta' powers, fleeing pursuit and being rescued, a process that rapidly descends into a brawl in which she's by no means sure who is on her side - aptly setting the scene for a game which melds alternate history and comic book superheroics into a fascinating if grim reality in which America is no longer the 'Land of the Free'... at least, not if you have superpowers.

Still in character, this moves on to facsimile web pages of an underground site called DeltaTimes, a place for those superpowered individuals who do not wish to cooperate with a fascist state to hang out. Taking the premise that the readers are newly come into their superpowers and are trying to figure everything out, the articles here give a lowdown (accurate as far as the game goes, if anarchistic in approach) about what it means to be a 'delta' or superpowered individual in this setting. So an excellent and immersive introduction to an alternate history that begins with the first delta arising on the battlefields of the First World War, superheroes flourishing during the interwar years, World War 2 being quite different with superhero involvement from the get-go, McCarthy chasing deltas as avidly as he did Communists, and finally a new twist on the 1963 Kennedy assassination where JFK survived but his wife did not, leading to repressive laws requiring deltas to register and cooperate with government... and worse, as subsequently Kennedy declared martial rule and continued to govern as a dictator to the present day.

Chapter 1: What You Need to Know cracks the fourth wall with the usual information about what a role-playing game is and how you play one. It's written in a casual style that explains the basics without sounding patronising. It also covers the roles of playing and Guide (the Game Master ) and says that only d6s are used... but a whole bunch of them.

Next comes Chapter 2: What It Takes to be a Hero. This deals with character creation, and takes you through the process in a logical manner, highlighting the need to know who your character is and what makes him tick as he is more than numbers on a page... but those numbers are important so it explains what they all are by reference to the character sheet. Characters are described in game mechanical terms by traits, skills, quirks and powers. Traits are the basic statistics of smarts, speed, spirit and strength. Human average in these is 2, but as you can imagine deltas often exceed that... the number assigned is the number of dice you roll when using that trait. Each trait has a number of skills - things you've actually learned or been trained in - associated with them. Quirks are the little things that bring a character to life, and powers are - as you might imagine - whatever superpowers your character has. OK, all that explained we then get down to the fine detail of how you actually make a character. Two options are presented: use an archetype or build one from scratch. If you are new to the game or in a rush, using an archetype gets you started with a minimum of fuss as all the number-crunching and selections have been done for you. Building one from scratch lets you have a delta that's really yours, even if it takes longer.

If you are building your own character, you start by distributing Trait Points as you please between the four traits. You have 12 to play with, enough to have an above-average 3 in each... or you may wish to boost one or more at the expense of the others. For every point assigned to a trait, you have 3 points to spend on skills associated with that trait. Quirks can be positive or negative: a positive one costs you points you might have spent on skills whilst a negative one gives you extra points... or you may prefer to balance out positive and negative quirks instead. There's a limit of 10 points-worth of negative quirks for playability reasons, but you can have as many positive ones as you are prepared to pay for! Next you pick superpowers which are organised in bundles called packages to give some coherence, rather than just selecting a random assortment of cool powers that do not really fit together. This all explained, there's a two-page quick reference guide to the process. A blank character sheet and a selection of archetypes are followed by several chapters that present skills, quirks, powers and tricks - signature knacks your character has - in great detail.

Next, Chapter 3: The Basic Mechanic, lays out in detail the core game mechanics. Task resolution is based around a single roll, the number of dice used being based on character capabilities, against a target number set by the Guide or an opponent as applicable. The target number gets higher the harder the task is deemed to be to accomplish. It's all quite straightforward, although it places a lot of responsibility on the Guide to set realistic yet achievable targets in order to present sufficient challenge yet keep the story rolling.

The next chapter goes into considerable detail about the skills available, including how to use them and likely target numbers for common uses of each skill. This is followed by a chapter on quirks and how to use them to present a well-rounded character - there's plenty of material here to empower good role-play, although contributions to game mechanics are also signposted clearly.

Then Chapter 6: The Big Throwdown takes a look at combat within the game. It's interesting that this comes before superpowers, but this section looks at the mechanics of brawling - initiatives, combat rounds, actions and so on - rather than every last thing that you might do during a fight, so if you pick a power package that has elements which are useful for brawling (or even designed for doing harm) you will be able to see how and when you will be able to use them within the context of the combat mechanics. Other ways to get hurt and healing are also covered here.

This is followed by Chapter 7: Tricks of the Trade, which explores a wide array of tricks - special things that you can do if you get a LOT of successes on your roll, well in excess of the target number you were aiming at. Here's the opportunity to be spectacular and cinematic. Characters start out knowing three tricks, and can acquire more later on in the game. Most tricks are related to a particular skill, so can only be used when you have that skill and are doing something which utilises it, but there are others which are more general in application as well as ones which, although associated with a particular skill, can be taken and used even if you have not been trained in that skill.

And now at last we get to the really important bit - Chapter 8: What Makes a Delta a Delta. Here superpowers are discussed, and you get to find out what power packages are available. Up til now, everything can be applied equally to a regular human being as to a superpowered one, which is good on two points. Firstly, it shows that deltas are no different from anyone else except as regards their powers, and secondly it ensures that all characters are well-rounded PEOPLE, not a set of powers with a mere glimmering of personality tacked on! It also makes it easy, if you wanted to, to play a regular human - perhaps one which might develop powers later in the game or who works with deltas helping to keep them safe from malign forces in government or elsewhere. There are notes on how to develop your own power packages and the promise that there will be more available in supplements, but the main thrust here is a detailed analysis of the options available.

We're almost ready to go, but Chapter 9: Things Every Hero Needs ensures that characters have all the equipment and other possessions that they need. Costs are based on real-world prices for everything that actually exists, which makes it easy if your character wants something not listed here.

The final part of the player section is Chapter 10: Liberty or Death. This is concerned with the setting and how it relates to characters who are deltas. Scene set, we move on to GM territory, taking the view that people will only ever play or GM this game. Obviously you can only do one at a time, but in many groups people take turns to run the next game so it is difficult to be hard and fast about GM knowledge. This section, however, covers how to organise and run your game rather than revealing any dark secrets, although the next two chapters do reveal things that characters would not know (at least, not when they start out...). The main secret's a biggie... but you'll have to find it out for yourself! There's also some bad guys and other NPCs to round things off.

Overall, it's a fascinating premise repleat with potential, setting and mechanics rolled up into a tidy package that is well suited to those who would like a superhero game with a difference, a core purpose beyond beating up on any passing supervillain.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Brave New World
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FarScape Roleplaying Game
by Scott B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/20/2014 02:34:17

I purchased this as a resource, and because I liked the series so much. I have not yet read the entire book through, and am finding it difficult to do so for a 3 main reasons.

First, I find the odd, slanted, two-column layout to be hard to follow. I'm sure someone thought it added character, but it just does not flow naturally.

Second, the chapter titles are done in a wretched font that I have to work at to decipher. Again, I can acknowledge the attempt to add character to the text, but being unreadable does not serve that purpose well.

Third, the font used for the body text is also a little hard to read across the various backgrounds, etc. This may also be exacerbated by the scanning used to create the PDF. (The fact that this is a scan was not mentioned in the description, but I noted it in the review after-the-fact)



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
FarScape Roleplaying Game
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Adventure I
by David L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/04/2014 23:17:16

First off the claim that the adventures are linked in one giant plot thread is false. Their is no real linkage and that is a good thing allowing the DM to use whichever adventures they want. Like any product consisting of multiple authors some of the adventures are good, some are mediocre and some are very very bad. Each adventure is fairly short and can be run in 2 short sessions or one long session. The only problem that is omnipresent through all adventures is that almost every adventure features a different unique monster and with one exception (brain vine) the new monsters are terrible and unnecessary and should be replaced by a similar monster of equivalent CR from whatever monster manual type books you own.

The main reason I have rated this product so highly is that it is $3.95 for 24 adventures/260 pages. If the price was higher my rating would be a lot lower, but at the current price the product is a pretty great deal.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure I
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Ultimate Toolbox
by Jon H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/11/2014 21:09:38

The ultimate Toolbox is the best thing since Swiss cheese! No DM should be without it regardless of what game you are playing. i found the extensive tables helpful in my games.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ultimate Toolbox
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Evil
by Jeff A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/22/2014 15:47:40

To be honest, I only bought this book for one race that my friend wanted to run in my game. That being said, I did page through it, and found it to be a very useful sourcebook.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Evil
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World's Largest Dungeon, The
by David R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/19/2014 16:23:05

I'd like to give this product a better review but when I pay $40 for a PDF dealing with something called the World's Largest Dungeon and there are absolutely ZERO bookmarks all I can say is WTF? And the maps? They don't line up leaving huge gaps when you print them out.

If the technical issues are addressed with the PDFs and Maps I'll review based on actual content. But for me the technical issues are deal breakers.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
World's Largest Dungeon, The
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Adventure I
by Marchgo M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/25/2013 18:39:42

Many Good adventures with lots of possible expansion. Excellent product



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure I
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The Gauntlet
by Dale M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/07/2012 13:26:48

The adventure is good and it would be worth a 4 Star rating. However, the presentation is IMPOSSIBLE. It is a staples removed scanned in product the size of a piece of paper folded in half from top to bottom. That would be fine except they did not arrange the pages into a readable fashion. So page 1 is on the right side while page 16 is on the same sheet. Page 2, switching sides from page 1, is on the left and page 15 is on the right. So to read this, you have to start at the front, read half pages to the end and then go BACKWARDS to read the second half of the adventure. Utter madness.

The adventure is pretty decent and is the only thing that saved this adventure from a 1 star rating. It really isn't even worth the 80 cents it is currently priced at. My apologizes to the authors who put time into this.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The Gauntlet
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Brave New World
by Antonio M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/18/2012 08:18:29

Overall, I'd have to say this is a pretty well made game. The system isn't the greatest I've seen and definitely not the most "statistically accurate" if you can call a system that. Basically, it's a pretty simple system resulting in a simple game. The reason this game stands a head above a lot of other games is simply because of the setting. This game is worth the money just for the first about 50 - 100 pages where it describes the setting, characters, and how everything happened. Also the last few pages deal with what is not revealed in the beginning, the secrets and is only for the GM to read. What makes this game great since the system is so simple, you could actual integrate your favorite system into this pretty flawlessly. All you'd have to do really is change a few feats around and the stats and your good to go. All in all, this game is worth the money just because the setting alone. It's a simple system which is fun, but also allows for an easy integration of another system with one of the best settings I've ever read.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Brave New World
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The Last Gods
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/05/2012 08:36:28

With potentially world-shaking import, here's a real cracker of a stand-alone adventure to drop into your campaign just when your characters think that all they have to worry is about whose turn it is to cook over the campfire...

So, there the party is, sitting around said campfire when a robed figure clutching a sythe turns up! But he hasn't come for anyone's soul, it's a bit more of a challenge than that. As he crumbles away before their very eyes, he asks them to take on a quest to save the very fabric of the universe itself. Assuming they don't dismiss this apparation as something brought about by those dodgy mushrooms the elf insisted on adding to the stew, they have an incredible adventure ahead of them, with all to play for and the very universe at stake.

Perhaps inevitable when gods start interfering in the characters' affairs, but there is a fair element of railroading once they embark on this adventure. A single path to follow, arbitrary effects that WILL happen and which there's nothing that they can do anything about... things that will annoy some players, but - for those prepared to enter into the spirit of the thing - events that bring home the fact that this time they are messing with things that are truly beyond mortal comprehension, even for relatively high-level fellows like themselves. As you'd expect, the combat encounters are physically challenging, but the main thrust of events involves a lot of puzzles to solve - something else that some players find annoying but others relish. Solving them should prove entertaining, and they can all be solved, even if you may find the need to drop the odd hint here and there.

It is, and intended to be, a strange adventure, not the regular sort of affair that goes to make up a normal campaign. It has the potential, if well handled and entered into in the right spirit, to be something that those who venture through it will talk about - in character and out - for years to come. Some players, as mentioned before, will find it a frustrating or even dull experience. That's the trouble of messing with the affairs of deities. They don't think like you or I do, and this adventure gets this across well.

It will work best - although it is truly a stand-alone event - if inserted into your regular campaign, and played through with your usual characters, than run as a one-off. For there are times when players will see their cherished characters at dire risk, maybe even having to contemplate making the ultimate sacrifice - and by that I mean, choosing to do so, not just risking all in a brawl. Moments that can become the highlights of your shared storytelling.

If everything goes wrong, and they fail to complete the quest, say it's a shared dream and blame it on those mushrooms! Yet if they complete their mission, they all will have something quite unusual to look back on as they break camp and continue on their merry way.

[A note on the rating: This adventure is one that will be either loved or hated - I've given it 5 stars, as it could be THAT good with a group for which it works. Just remember: it may not be to your taste!]



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Last Gods
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The Heart of Amun Khonshu
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/04/2012 10:18:45

A neat little adventure to slot in when you haven't had much prep time or there's a lull in the ongoing campaign, this is designed to entertain your players for an evening's play. All you need to do is have the characters in a city near a desert then sucker them into going for an ale one evening and then...

The premise is simple. Out in that handy desert there is an ancient tomb with rich pickings to be had by any willing to brave a little danger. As encouragement, the informant has a classic sob story to tell about his lifelong friend who lies at death's door and can only be saved by an artefact he believes is hidden in this tomb - everything else the characters may take for themselves. Who could resist?

Assuming the characters take the bait, er, I mean, decide to aid this worthy cause, they'll need to travel across the desert to the tomb. That bit is left to you, gloss over it or throw sand, sun and suffering at them as you please. There are plenty of resources to help you deal with desert travel if required. The tomb is, however, detailed comprehensively, as befits the focus of the adventure. It depends on how much time you have and the way in which you wish to present things - and how it all fits in with anything else that might be going on in your campaign.

The tomb itself, whilst somewhat reminiscent of something found in Ancient Egypt, is well-constructed from a fantasy point of view which an array of obstacles to keep tomb-raiders at bay. There's plenty to keep the characters occupied, without being too frustrating... at least, provided they are willing to put in some hard work to excavate the tomb properly.

Most monsters herein are relatively familiar, but there is a useful new one well suited to any formal tomb of a devotee of a cult that believes you and your possessions can pass on to an afterlife, the artefact itself (which has plenty more plot potential even after you've retrieved it), not to mention the occupant of the tomb who, shall we say, may well object to anyone having the temerity to disturb his eternal rest.

It's a neat package to use as a one-off game or a side-adventure dropped into a campaign at a suitable moment. With a bit of care and advance prepartion - such as finding reference to the artefact or encountering a situation in which it could be of use independently of a fellow in an inn enlisting the characters' aid, the adventure could be woven into your overarching plot.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Heart of Amun Khonshu
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The Gauntlet
by Jazmin O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/20/2012 14:22:26

My players enjoyed this module, which was played the session immediately following the Honor Among Thieves Module. The party was made up of four level 6 players and one level 5 player; a mercenary group with good & neutral tendencies. They were trying to infiltrate the thieves guild and one of the fighters had dreams about it. They were also highly sympathetic to Sebastian, since they just helped him out.

Cons: It says that it is a sequel of Honor Among Thieves, or can be played as a standalone. However, it does not reference any NPCs from Honor Among Thieves (I worked Swift, the Minutemen, and Sebastian back in, however I did not use Desburg for the city in the 1st module and didn't use Desburg in this one). Again, the Module is laid out like a "pamphlet," which is a nuisance to assemble. I also switched the cleric's and the noble's house, it seemed like the cleric would have a more modest house than the noble.

Pros: I liked the fact that the DM can choose the last task (worked really well in my case), but perhaps 12 hours is too long for the PCs to get all the tasks done; using the Diplomat and some bluff/diplomacy skills (and one magic pipe performance, which made people dazed at the statue), they were able to get all or most of the tasks done within 4 1/2 hours.

I really enjoyed the how the players got around some of the tasks, for instance, since they were supposed to leave a bloody dagger in the noble's house (ie Sebastian), they weren't told how to do it or where to get the bloody dagger, so they drew one and left an apology note.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Gauntlet
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Honor Among Thieves
by Jazmin O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/30/2011 13:06:48

I ran this over 2 sessions for my current Black Company game. The only differences I made that it was set in Beryl, the group got arms and armor instead of the Desburg magic item and I switched the shapeshifter's type from Terror fiend to Forvalka (wereleopard). In the tunnel section I switched out the water based monsters to alligators, although my party managed to avoid all of the alligators.

spoiler (some):

My group went the fastest route to Sebastian's house, and made a stop at the TTESSFFTT__ trap; it stumped them for a good 10 minutes or so, but I gave them several hints (ie "There are 10 spaces, 9 are filled and the last space is blank"). My suggestion to other DMs is to let the group roleplay it out, instead of using a Decipher Script roll. One of my players loved this trap so much, she is going to use the trap and part of the module in her home game.

I did up the HP of the terror fiend/forvalka some. My group was 5th level while playing this module, and are heavy hitters, so they would destroy a 50 hp creature within 2 player's turns. (However, I used the Terror Fiend's AC instead of the Forvalka's AC, and it took them a while to be able to hit it, before they dazed it and brought the AC down).

My top complaint is the layout of the module, where you had to assemble into a packet before you were able to read it completely through. The map was also very hard to read in the shades of grey (to see where the ledges where in relation to the rest of the tunnel was hard for the party), so I'd suggest at least making the map in color. If the DM's map is not possible to make in color (I copied the map included in the module and gave it as a hand out to the party), maybe make a Player's Map that is in color, as the party kept saying "oh, we're going towards room 10 or avoiding room 8" etc comments.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Honor Among Thieves
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