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Phoenix: The Terrible Valley of Static
by David N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/06/2015 23:59:33
I really like this supplement. Its very short (only 21 pages, including the cover) and its mostly fluff. But what excellent fluff and the rules that go with it are excellent.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Phoenix: The Terrible Valley of Static
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Japan: Empire of the Setting Sun
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/06/2015 07:06:43
SIX POINT SUMMARY:

- Some of the stuff, like geisha sexbots and the bioforms just seem really creepy, but not out of place.

- While I get the need to keep word count down, the lack of any game mechanics married to the Savage Tales makes them less user friendly than I, as a Savage Worlds GM, would like. Two of them essentially removing player control of their characters, especially with one of them being for the bulk of the adventure, gives me pause. That can be kind of a huge turnoff for a lot of players.

- Virtually no wasted space. Double columns of text on the pages, densely packed. Don't let the page count fool you...there's a lot of info here, including great setting elements like the virtual afterlife.

- The amusing and insightful "commentary" for in character message board/social media-like chatter continues, and I almost always love these asides. They add extra context and flavor for the text and they continue to be just the right length and frequency to get the point across without overstaying their welcome.

- I want to run a mission that takes the party into the heart of the Fukushima power plant.

- Some great mechanical tidbits, with multiple Edges and the Second Skin armor really standing out. Ancestral Zeek, Ghost in the Machine, Mask Master and Merciful are all big standouts to me.

I would say this is worth picking up if you're an Interface Zero fan, even if you aren't running a game in Japan (individuals and organizations can travel, after all, and some of the setting elements are entirely too cool to not use). It's certainly not essential, and it's not without its flaws, but the pros definitely outweigh the cons.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2015/03/tommys-take-i-
nterface-zero-20-japan.html

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Japan: Empire of the Setting Sun
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Interface Zero
by francesco b. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/22/2015 20:05:25
Alot of great ideas. I don't use the setting, but I do use many of the modifications and additions to the rules.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Interface Zero
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Interface Zero 2.0: Full Metal Cyberpunk
by Gui S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/02/2015 12:43:51
This is one of the best sourcebooks i've had in my possession. The background lore is flavorful, very complete and never feels boring, It provides clean and easy to use rules for hacking, cyberware and even psionic powers. The gear lists are as useful as their descriptions are flavorful and fun. The section on randomly generating adventures is particularly useful and creative.

A definite must-have if you're planning on doing a Cyberpunk campaign, even if you're not using Savage Worlds.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Interface Zero 2.0: Full Metal Cyberpunk
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Interface Zero 2.0 GM screen
by Steven J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/30/2014 14:20:05
Not bad, I liked the art and layout. two minor points that would have made it better. If the font was a tad bigger, this old school gamers eyes aren't what they once were. and I would liked it have seen the world map from the book included so that it could have been printed as one of the player facing panels.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Interface Zero 2.0 GM screen
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Hot Potato
by rasmus h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/01/2014 22:53:50
One of the best things about this adventure is how sandboxy it is, and how it fits into all of the towns in and off world. Want to throw something random and high octane after your group, making their wheels guy shine, then show a Hot Potato after them.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hot Potato
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The Exchange
by rasmus h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/01/2014 22:47:46
Do your players think that they control the world, and no the other way around? Then play "The Exchange" with them and get the laugh of the century as the plot unfolds around them.

While the description says 4-6 hours are there inspiration to at least 12 hours if all things go well.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Exchange
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The Delivery
by rasmus h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/01/2014 22:41:48
One of the best items ever, the "Cyber-restraint" is introduced in this adventure, a gismo that surely are going to inspire many an adventure.

While the plot written in the product only will fill out a single night of session (4-5 hours) are there more than enough material between the lines to plan your whole adventure on. Best 1.50 that I have ever spent on an adventure!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Delivery
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Real Estate
by rasmus h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/01/2014 22:37:28
A perfect scenario to start your cyperpunk adventures out with, and can likewise be used between jobs or simply when the GM thinks that things need a little bit more action, because there are never enough of that in IZ 2.0 (Danger danger! Sarcasm detected!)

One of the few adventures that I really are looking forward to play with my group, knowing that it are going to be just as fun for me to present to them as for them to play it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Real Estate
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Interface Zero 2.0: Player's Guide
by rasmus h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/25/2014 09:46:45
One of the best cyberpunk systems that I have had my hands on to date! Their hacking rules are amazingly easy to understand, and allows you to do a myriad of things without getting too overpowered, while still living up to all the f's in Savage Worlds FFF.

Another really really strong force about this system is the tone of the lore. Normally when you pull up a source book like this (do note that while the world chapters ain´t included in this PDF are there still a lovely introduction to the world) is the tone heavy and dusty, it being like reading up date found from a old history book found in a dusty basement, or more fittingly, like an olden tome from an old crypt. But in Interface Zero do they go with the flow, each and every piece of lore being written like it was taken down from a blog instead of written in a book, really giving the feeling of being drawn into the setting. That a lot of the darker themes are only hinted at and never fully proven is another ace since GMs for once can choose themselves which pieces of lore that they want into their stories.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Interface Zero 2.0: Player's Guide
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Hot Potato
by Niall M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/16/2014 03:07:37
A frantic scramble to offload hot goods before they get you killed. Classic cyberpunk stuff. Awesome.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hot Potato
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The Package
by Todd C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/29/2014 21:50:57
Ran it twice with different groups. Pretty fun both times. Pretty fun but not amazing. That's not a ding it is great for the size and price for sure.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Package
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Drip by Bloody Drip
by Nathan J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/20/2014 14:53:25
This adventure is a great example of how to use the Savage Worlds system to its fullest. Some of the greatness with Savage Worlds system is its more cinematic features: Social Conflicts, Dramatic Tasks, Chases etc.

This Adventure includes: 2 Dramatic Tasks, 1 social conflict, 1 Chase (possible), Exploration and Exciting Encounters.

For the GM that wants to play gridded combat encounters (minis) can do so but for those who like 'roleplaying' their combat as well this adventure is perfectly setup for that.

Megan, does an awesome job of explaining the overall story/arc of the adventure but i just wanted to confirm that it is indeed an outstanding adventure + a great way to use all of the Savage Worlds more cinematic features.

Even if you didn't want to run it, it is a great example of how Savage Worlds adventures should be written. Lots of flavor and change-up of encounter types.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Drip by Bloody Drip
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Colonial Gothic (True20 version)
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/17/2014 16:20:25
Call of Cthulhu was the first breakout hit of horror themed RPGs, surprising, since Lovecraft's work concerns itself often with horrors that are literally indescribable and RPGs rely on verbal description to get across their situations and emotions. What Call of Cthulhu, the RPG, brought to the table was a simple, clear system and a methodology of GMing and playing that put players in the mindset of investigators who would put themselves in the middle of horrific mysteries and not run away at the first ominous shadow. Most horror games since that time have mimicked this successful investigative formula, for good reason.

However, few have taken another element of Call of Cthulhu's initial success: a historical setting. As a historical gaming buff, I have always felt that making Call of Cthulhu close enough to reality that we can recognize things like police officers and hats while far enough away as to still put us out of our comfort zone. I like historical gaming quite a bit and a well-realized historical setting appeals to me more than yet anothr fantasy game completely disconnected from reality.

The world offered by Colonial Gothic is one in which mysterious monsters and witchcraft exist in colonial America. The characters must navigate the dangerous politics of the revolution and avert the supernatural threats that could endanger everyone's survival.

In terms of being a True20 adaptation, Colonial Gothic does a solid job. It only introduces a handful of new mechanics, skills and feats, sumarizes them well in a few pages. True20 works well for this kind of game and there isn't a need to significantly alter it. The main shift is for magical powers, which become witchcraft and ritual.

Colonial Gothic doesn't delve deeply into colonial-native relations or the issue of slavery. However, I appreciate that it gives native and former slave characters as a player character option and takes their points of view seriously. In the time frame described, native tribes were seen as equals to colonial forces in strength and importance. Though racism colored all interactions, it was not seen as strange to seek out native allies and partners in conflicts or enterprises.

Based on the world of Colonial Gothic, natives know more about the supernatural than colonists since to a certain degree America actually is a magical land in this world. This decision helps separate Colonial Gothic from the "magic native" stereotype - it simply makes sense that in a world where a certain area has monsters, that people there would know more about monsters. Each of the major native tribes has a full writeup in the gazetteer section of the book.

All in all, I feel that the native characters, both player characters and NPCs, are given a very thorough and fair approach in the book and Colonial Gothic gets high marks from me for making this attempt.

However, I do think the treatment of blacks (not just slaves) in various colonies is somewhat less detailed and specific than it could be. Free black laborers, entrepreneurs, soldiers and leaders existed in New England colonies even very early on, and it was their organization and support that would lead, only a few years after the Revolution depicted in Colonial Gothic, to the emancipation acts that would make the North nearly slave-free in a relatively short time, while in the Southern states an increasingly baroque and stringent infrastructure to control slave populations necessitated targeting free blacks as well. Given that a significant portion of the game is dedicated to creating a real-feeling political milieu that the characters must navigate, it seems an important omission.

There are a few strange historical mistakes in Colonial Gothic - in the area of mental health treatment, electroshock therapy was mentioned, though at the time induction of seizures theraputically was rare and usually accomplished through the injection of Camphor oil. It was also primarily used on those that were comatose, thinking that the seizure could jump-start their bodies. The first electroconvulsive therapy wasn't reported until 1938, almost 200 years after the time frame in the game. The rules for getting rid of psychological disorders in general are strange and ad hoc, which is unusual for a game with sanity mechanics like Colonial Gothic - characters make a roll when they go up a level to see if they can slough off a disorder. That's fine, but it means that high-level characters really aren't impaired nearly as much. Perhaps this is what's intended by the rules, but it does seem odd.

A welcome addition is the "Secrets" section, which gives a thorough analysis of what GMs should do in Colonial Gothic to get across the history effectively while not being straitjacketed by it, as well as some pitfalls to avoid in horror games specifically. In addition, it contains themes associated with villain types (undead, etc.) that can make a game very atmospheric.

Finally there's a sample adventure regarding an evil cult. Although the adventure is straightforward (as befits an introductory adventure), I'm happy to note that the "aftermath" section introduces some fun complications for player characters to face. Some of the cultists may surrender (they think their demonic master will eventually win anyway, so why face tortuous death in this world?), and become prisoners. Transporting them back to civilization along with the captives the cultists had taken is a challenge that often times we overlook in a world of ambulances and police cars.

The file includes bookmarks, and the art is woodcut period-style illustrations so it shouldn't be too hard to print part of all of.

Colonial Gothic is a solid True20 adaptation (and I love True20), a solid historical game (and I love historical games) and a solid horror game (and I love horror games.) Is someone pandering to me specifically?!?! This seems almost suspicious. Anyway, I give it high marks and a strong recommendation.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Colonial Gothic (True20 version)
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Real Estate
by Niall M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/17/2014 08:43:34
Hardcore, street-level, textbook Cyberpunk - the perfect opening to a full length campaign.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Real Estate
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