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Shadowrun: Coyotes
by Kyle W. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/14/2013 22:42:22
Coyotes is an interesting piece. It's perhaps more for GM's than for players, but it answers the question of border crossings in Shadowrun nicely, while also providing an adventure and some guidelines for how players can get passage between places.

My main gripe with Coyotes is that it doesn't cover "unofficial" border crossings, like those done through tunnels or using thunderbirds, in very much detail. Fortunately, it gives a good idea of what to expect at border crossings, providing a good framework for roleplaying the events and actually turning crossing the border into a component of an engaging session.

Typesetting and graphics wise, I enjoyed Coyotes. There's a little bit of art repetition from prior works (I recognized one piece from SR4's Runner's Companion), but that's not a deal-breaker given the general high quality of previous works. Each page has the same header art, but it's subdued enough not to be too grating and distracting.

My only caution to people who would buy Coyotes is the price; for a short fiction, bit of fluff, and a short adventure you might do better for $8, but it's still a good product all-in-all, and if you're looking for that crucial travel information there's no better place to look.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Coyotes
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Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
by Kevin W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/14/2013 20:23:47
I'm with the "meh" crowd on this one. I was really hoping for more crunch, especially when there was an opportunity for more assassin-specific gear than just one sniper rifle.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
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Shadowrun: Character Dossier
by Torben E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/13/2013 13:27:38
So, I picked this up for inspiration, hoping to get some good ideas about how to construct good 5th Ed Shadowrun character sheets. Sadly, it turned out just to be an A5 pocketbook without any inspirational page design, intriguing layout or valuable insights into how to structure data for different character archetypes. Pity, given how good Shadowrun products generally are.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Character Dossier
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Shadowrun: Spell Cards, Series 1
by J.R. R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/09/2013 13:34:36
As a convention GM for many years I am always looking for ways to make Shadowrun more new player friendly. Spell cards are one such way. I was very excited when I heard Catalyst was going to be releasing these and bought a copy of the PDF so that I could utilize them at the next convention I work.

This set comes with 54 cards and there are 84 spells in the core rulebook. The cards are clearly laid out with all the information you need to cast them. This includes color coding based on type of spell. They do not provide any help on how to resolve them though, that is left to the GM's memory or the handy page numbers listed on the cards.

The cards are an excellent player aid featuring most of the spells which are likely to be needed during combat time. It includes 14 out of 18 combat spells with the missing 4 being those I see least often on player made characters. There are 12 out of 18 Detection spells, but most of the missing spells are simply the extended versions of other spells making the cards easy to modify to reflect that. The 3, out of 11, health spells which are missing are ones I have never seen used. Eight of the 19 Illusion spells are missing, but again it was primarily area effect spells which were left out. Lastly half of the 18 manipulation spells are missing. In addition to leaving out the area spells they also left out the popular "Magic Fingers" and "Fling" spells. Overall they did a decent job of selecting which spells were included in this set of cards. My biggest complaint on selection is that they left out spells which the sample characters in the core rulebook have.

As for the cards themselves, I appreciate the color coding, but for a PDF release I would have preferred if they used plain white backgrounds with color highlights instead colored backgrounds to conserve ink. I would also have liked a "back side" for the cards to make them more like real cards. Lastly I am unsure how I feel about it being 1 card to a page. It lets me pick and choose which cards to print, but it makes it that much harder to print (and cut) a full set at home. To those who are reading this and printing at home, print 3 rows of 2 cards per page and you will get playing card sized cards.

For the player who wants a quick reference, these are a worthwhile purchase. They are also useful for the GM who doesn't want, or have the time, to properly explain all the spells to their players, and since its a PDF a GM can easily print out what each player needs. If either of those describe you, then I recommend buying the spell cards. 3/5 stars.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Spell Cards, Series 1
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Shadowrun: Street Legends
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2013 00:00:00
I may be reviewer tilting this one a little high, but Street Legends does something very unusual that a lot of other NPC collections don't: they situate the NPCs within relationships with other characters. At its strongest, this creates characters that will evoke strong reactions in your players. But it doesn't quite hit the mark every time. Let's break it down.

Street Legends is a collection of 2-4 page descriptions of figures in the Shadowrun universe. Having checked out of Shadowrun early in second edition and only now coming back, I don't have a huge amount of knowledge of the Shadowrun universe or whether any of these people were important in the various novels, computer games, comic books or modules that have come about in the intervening 15-20 years. This makes me the ideal audience for an NPC book. The only fascination I can feel for these characters is strictly based on their utility at the table.

First, there's a nice variety of stat levels. There are characters who are just "at the start" of their shadowrunning career. Most are somewhat more experienced - some are frankly loaded down with magic and resources. None feel like they couldn't be a player character after some effort and time (except for the dragon.)

Second, there's a good variety of origins and statuses, ranging from non-persons who make an effort at erasing everything they do to globally famous celebrities, from privileged origins to run-down blanks. I feel like I get an idea of what sorts of people the player characters are likely to become after I read Street Legends.

Third, there's a good sense of the characters' various backgrounds. Even the characters I don't find compelling (see below) have enough details and information that I get some idea of the things they've done, and from their stats they seem like they could do those things potentially with some help, or perhaps with some exaggeration of the story.

That takes me naturally to the main point of this review, which is that Street Legends at its best speaks clearly through the voice of a character in the Shadowrun universe. One of the conceits of several Shadowrun books is that the information in the book is "presented" on a private Matrix board where various personalities argue, converse and provide each other with intel and stories. The best Street Legends are entries that permit us to learn not only about the character they're talking about, but the character that's "writing" about them. The two rival cat burglars who have written each other's snotty/adoring entries are a perfect example - as is the entry on Puck, which can be summed up as "this guy screwed up and everyone in the world hates him (within the margin of error)". Not only am I attracted to the voice of a character rather than a dry editorial voice, since I already have a Shadowrun corebook, I now have at least one relationship for the character to begin with.

Relationships are the core of cyberpunk (actually they are the core of almost all literature) - a cyberpunk protagonist is crushed between the soulless mechanisms of the world and the human feeling that pushes them to the edge. So it was a real pleasure to find in Street Legends information about love affairs, political causes, rivalries and vendettas. I'd say that a solid 80 percent of the entries in this book have solid relationships that help me see the character through a lens of emotion and put them in an interesting position as a result.

Street Legends doesn't hit the bullseye exactly, though. Some of these characters, while interesting in their own right, don't create actionable gaming material. As an example, the two rival cat burglars create a great dynamic between the two of them, but other than observing it (and probably saying "get a room"), there's not much that player characters can do about it and not many ways that the relationship will affect their game. Instead, what if these two criminals who are obviously obsessed with/into each other have significant others - each of them trying to stop their girl/boyfriend's obsession and clear them off the board. Now we have something where someone can hire a PC to do something about a situation rather than just constantly one-upping each other.

This isn't really a unique fault of Street Legends - a lot of NPC books fall into this trap (and, as a friend pointed out on Twitter, virtually all of some classic game settings like Over the Edge). The purpose of an NPC book should be to give me someone that I can use via the corebook to create actionable situations for the player characters. In a game like Shadowrun that means not only that they have interesting action-adventure abilities (since Shadowrun is an action-adventure game), but that they have some problem, flaw, or drawback that requires them to cope with the player characters in some capacity, either as allies, enemies or obstacles. This is especially important for supposedly "mysterious" characters - I actually am much more interested in Puck than in the dang dragon in this book for exactly that reason! A guy that everyone in the world hates is someone who is going to be real interesting in the same room with the player characters because I don't know what the characters will do. A mysterious figure with an unknown agenda? A guy that maybe did something in some other conflict years ago? Well, how can I really care about that? And if I can't, how can the players?

Even when you take this into account, Street Legends actually does much better than a lot of other NPC books - I'd say a solid half of the characters in the book have an immediate need or problem the PCs could pop up on one side or the other of. And I was able to come up with simple ways to improve many of the other NPCs in this fashion because the background and capacities of the characters are presented well.

For example, the first entry in the book, "Agent", is a disinformation guy in a South/Central American war, who has a mysterious cyberarm that the various fictional "contributors" argue about. Since he's a disinformation/psyops guy I have to give him a problem that he can't solve with disinformation - or maybe that he can only make worse with disinformation. Simple - I say that even he doesn't know how he got the cyberarm or where it comes from or why it doesn't interfere with his adept abilities, and everywhere he looks someone is just telling him what he wants to hear. Boom, a perfect reason he needs a bunch of weird magical people with machine guns (PCs) to help him out. And there's plenty of reason them digging around on him might create a lot of problems for him, the PCs, and those surrounding them.

I should note that I have this book in print - every character is vividly realized in a full-length portrait. Even if you're like me and trapped with a group that categorically refuses to play at a table, it's big enough to hold up even in a wide living room and get a good idea of the colors and appearance of the portrait. (I still don't like any dang art in books that are part of a verbal hobby but WHATEVER it's real good okay.)

As I was writing all this up I realized the bottom line is that I think my four stars are right on target. Street Legends is more than solid because of its approach to characterizing NPCs through each other, through trying to connect them to the web of shady relationships and gossip that should make up the world of the PCs as well as the world Catalyst is presenting. In other words, in the future, everyone is just a sum of their Twitter mentions. Let's do this.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Street Legends
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Shadowrun: Fifth Edition Core Rulebook
by Cory H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/02/2013 00:00:00
Very clean and beautiful book. My only criticism is the layout has a couple jump arounds in character creation, but mechanics and game balances are amazingly well done.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Fifth Edition Core Rulebook
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Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2013 00:00:00
'The Assassin's Primer' is a good document to have at the table for anyone wanting to take this Archetype. At only seventeen pages (including cover), you get
- an overview of the life of the assassin,
- and explanation of assassin stereotypes (from the Desperate, the Psycho, and the Idealist)
- 'Knowledge is Power' which describes the sorts of skills that are necessary and how to use them creatively
- a short section on gear and magic
- general advice and Qualities (and a Negative Quality).

All is told from the viewpoint of an assassin who realises that he has a very short time to live and wants to pass along his knowledge. Interestingly, this is the second SR product I've reviewed this week with a White Wolf connection (the other be 'The Vladivostok Gauntlet'). In this product, the handle of the assassin is Quietus (the signature Discipline of the vampire assassins in Vampire: the Masquerade). Interesting.

So, is it worth it?

The book reads like a long magazine article with some rules at the end, a format that should be fairly familiar to most gamers. It does offer some good advice and would be very handy reading for anyone considering running an assassin-type character in the Sixth World. I question the longevity of usefulness for the product; I can see players reading it once, building a character and then maybe referencing it once or twice again. The Creeds are a mixed bag, and mileage will really vary. However, you could wrap an entire character concept around them, so for that they are useful. The edges they provide are situational, but a clever player can engineer this to their advantage.

It was an enjoyable read, and I can see this document having a role at my table, but mostly during character creation.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
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Shadowrun: Mission: 04-09: Assassin Nation
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/26/2013 08:24:00
SRM 04–09 Assassin Nation ist Teil der Shadowrun:Missions. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine von Catalyst Game Labs inszenierte Kampagne, die auf Conventions und vergleichbaren Treffen gespielt werden soll.

Nach jeder Mission erhalten Spieler ein Debriefing Log, welches sie zu ihrer nächsten Runde mit-nehmen können. So soll sichergestellt werden, dass verschiedene SpielerInnen aus verschiedenen Runden dennoch weiter an der gleichen Geschichte spielen können.

Die Inhalte können auch aus dem Internet via Download gekauft werden, um sie zuhause zu spielen.

Assassin Nation vertieft die Ereignisse aus dem orkischen Untergrund der vorherigen Missions und bringt erstmals die Politik ins Spiel. Mit etwas chaotischer Würze entsteht daraus ein charmanter Mix.

Inhalt

Der orkische Untergrund von Seattle soll durch einen Volkentscheid zu einem legalen Sektor/Stadtteil werden. Während der Stadtrat versucht, dieses Vorhaben um jeden Preis zu stoppen, engagieren sich pro(meta)menschliche Aktivistengruppen für die Umsetzung. Die Vorteile durch Sicherheit, medizinische Leistungen und bessere Anbindung an die Stadt sind nicht von der Hand zu weisen. Auf der anderen Seite ist dort die organisierte Kriminalität, die nicht möchte, dass ihre gut laufenden Geschäfte gestört werden.

Und dann, dann ist da noch das personifizierte Chaos, das in Form eines Technomancers sich in die Geschehnisse und Verwicklungen einmischt.

Der Run beginnt ganz einfach mit einem Einbruch. Auf dem Cyberdeck des Staatsanwaltes sind belastende Beweise und der Auftraggeber möchte, dass diese verschwinden. Doch leider finden die Runner neben dem Deck auch den Leichnam des Staatsanwaltes. Als dann Knight Errant auftaucht, bleibt nur Kampf oder Flucht.

Im orkischen Untergrund wurden gleichzeitig Niederlassungen der Aktivisten angegriffen und viele Tote sind zu beklagen. Aufgrund vorheriger Verwicklungen im Run werden die SC wiederum beschuldigt.

Als sich dann noch die Presse in Form von zwei Starjournalisten einschaltet und den SC die Hilfe anbietet, beginnt das Feuer nicht nur von allen Seiten zu kommen – nein, der Run nimmt nun richtig Fahrt auf. Vermutlich hängt das auch mit dem Kopfgeld in Höhe von 50.000 Nuyen auf die Runner zusammen…

Besonders gut gefällt mir, dass die Handlung viele verschiedene Facetten aufgreift: Betrug und Verrat, Einbrüche, Detektivarbeit, Gefechte, Bedrohungen, interessante NSC und brutalste Gewaltexzesse. Aufgrund der Verwicklungen und der Komplexität empfiehlt es sich jedoch mit einer Gruppe gespielt zu werden, die das Denken um die Ecke gewohnt ist. Das Abenteuer verbindet rollenspielerische Passagen mit hektischem Würfelwerfen und testet die Fähigkeit der Spieler, Zusammenhänge auf abstrakter Ebene zu erkennen.

Die Antagonisten haben mir gut gefallen. Auch wenn die Informationen über sie noch recht karg sind, hoffe ich, dass in kommenden Missions mehr über sie zu erfahren ist.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Für 18 Seiten Run und 23 Seiten Erklärungen, NSCs, Karten – das alles für 3,95 USD. Ein Preis, der den gefachten Preis die entsprechende eigene Vorbereitung einer gänzlich eigenen Idee um Welten unterschreitet.

Ich mag die Geschichte sehr und auch die mitgelieferten Handouts. Auch die Qualität weiß zu gefallen. Dementsprechend – Schnellstarter greifen, die Mission kaufen und Spaß mit den Freunden haben!

Erscheinungsbild
Die PDF ist ansprechend, aber zweckmäßig gestaltet. Hinter einem bunten Cover verbergen sich 40 weitere Seiten, die kurz beschreiben, wie die Shadowrun:Missions zu spielen sind und welche Mög-lichkeiten der zusammenhängenden Handlung gegeben sind. Danach schließt sich direkt der Run an, der in 10 Szenen aufgeteilt ist. Das wenige Artwork ist gut gelungen, unter anderem hat Andreas Schroth dazu beigetragen.

Die Schrift ist etwas zu klein geraten, der Hintergrund der Seiten ist mit einem zartblauen Hinter-grund unterlegt. Abgeschlossen wird die Mission durch eine Auflistung der Belohnungen, NSCs und Auswirkungen auf den Charakter. Als zusammenhängende Kampagne kann man hier NSCs als Kontakte bekommen (dafür gibt es hübsch anzusehende Kärtchen zum Ausschneiden).

Desweiteren kann positive oder negative Reputation bei Vereinigungen und Organisationen aufge-baut werden, auch dieses hat Auswirkungen auf nachfolgende Runs. Und, wie bereits geschrieben, findet sich hier das Mission Debriefing Log.

Und natürlich darf man nicht vergessen zu erwähnen, dass die Runde diese Mission auch ganz ohne Kampagne spielen kann. Angesichts der offenen Enden und Kreuzverbindungen zu vorherigen Mis-sionen erscheint mir das eher fad.

Die beigefügten Karten sind zweckmäßig, aber keinesfalls hübsch zu nennen. Für die Visualisierung reichen sie aber vollkommen. Sie sind nicht gerastert und auch nicht in zureichender Größe für eine Battlemap.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Auf der offiziellen Shadowrun 4 Seite im Web finden sich etliche helfende Downloads, wie auch Links zu Bezugsquellen: http://www.shadowrun4.com/missions/

Fazit

Schade ist es schon, dass die derzeitige Staffel der Missions mit Assassin Nation endet. Die Geschichte des Orks MacAllister, der seine Tochter an einen Sadisten verlor – der Untergrund, der seine Unabhängigkeitsbemühungen durch einen Feuerteufel und Rassisten gefährdet sah - und nun endlich offiziell anerkannt wurde – all das endet nun.

Fast hat man die NSC und ihren Leidensweg lieben gelernt. Und gerade der Abschluss ist durch viel vielschichtig betonten Facetten des Rollenspiels in der Welt von Shadowrun gut gelungen. Preislich kann man eh nicht meckern.

Ich freue mich sehr auf die neue Staffel und bin gespannt, was nun thematisiert wird. Seattler Untergrund, ich werde Dich vermissen.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Mission: 04-09: Assassin Nation
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Shadowrun: Missions: Chasin' the Wind (5A-01)
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/25/2013 23:47:05
Chicago is one name that has a particular resonance to Shadowrun, the infamous Bug City. When this season was announced, I was very excited to see what Catalyst would do with the place after it had been left relatively dormant for a couple of editions.
The introductory Mission for the season does feel very much like set-up. No, not a set-up, but rather building the foundation for the rest of the modules. There are really three separate jobs here. They are all very straightforward, with some suggestions for Pushing the Envelope, but I would imagine that the aim is to ease new players and GMs into SR (especially given the new edition). There are relatively few surprises for a solid module and it wouldn’t take too much to prep. On reflection, there are a number of possibilities from this module, and I’m hoping that the story threads are picked up in future modules and expanded.
The setting is briefly explained, with heavy stereotyping (the weather is windy and snowy, the meeting place is a Chicago pizza joint) in both the locations and the Johnsons. Again, there is the distinct feeling that this is meant for the new GM and player. The plot does require social, investigative and technical skills (with some Debugging advice if characters don’t have the requisite skills), and unless you Push the Envelope, combat is absent from this ‘run.

However, as an introductory module, it definitely succeeds in whetting one’s appetite for further adventures in the Windy City. The module can be easily completed in a couple of hours if run ‘as-is’.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Missions: Chasin' the Wind (5A-01)
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Shadowrun: Spell Cards, Series 1
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/25/2013 22:13:49
I’m a big fan of cards at the gaming table. As ready-reference items, they are also very transferable and require little book-keeping. I make extensive use of the Paizo magic item decks at my D&D table, and have been casting about for a similar solution for SR5. So, for USD5.99, what do you get?

The file contains fifty-four single-sided cards, colour-coded to the spell type (Combat, Manipulation, Illusion, etc). Each card has the information for the Spell Type, Range, Damage, Duration, and Drain, with a handy page number reference to look up the spell. There is also a very short flavour-text type description of each spell.

The only improvement I would suggest is to make the cards double-sided and include more rules information on the flipside. Many spells have nuanced information such as increasing effect by number of successes and this would be useful. To be honest, I’d want these cards to be a replacement for the Magic section of the core rulebook – becoming quickplay reference. At the moment they aren’t quite up to the job.

I’ve tried printing them out in both colour and black-and-white and they have rendered well in both formats (although I like the colour better). I would advise anyone purchasing this product to invest in either some decent cardstock for printing, or become friends with someone who owns a laminator. Either way, you want to extend the life of the printed cards, and the heavier cardstock/laminated options make them feel like better than flimsy paper.

They are a nice product, and I would like to check out further decks for equipment, drones and even vehicles, common NPCs, and paracritters. I could imagine that by investing a range of decks, a GM could easily construct ad hoc encounters by laying out some cards behind the screen. If the NPC and paracritter cards came with Damage Tracks, you could laminate them and use a dry-erase marker to keep wounds. I like this direction, and I’ll be most interested to see where it goes.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Spell Cards, Series 1
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Shadowrun: The Vladivostok Gauntlet
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/25/2013 21:51:21
‘The Vladivostock Gauntlet’ is a welcome addition to the Shadowrun novella line, and follows in the footsteps of classics such as ‘Wolf and Raven’. The writing style is clear and evocative, and is an excellent example of how broad the term ‘success’ is when undertaking (even unwillingly) a run into the shadows. Set in the eponymous city, it follows Yuri as he finds out the cost of ‘doing the right thing’.
The novella feels like a 1980’s action movie with all of the necessary tropes; but has a distinctly Sixth World feel to it. The characters see some development, and the uneven technological levels is handled very nicely. In summary, it was an enjoyable read.

The only two downsides to the product are minor. Firstly, in a book that features werewolves (of a sort) having two minor characters named Garou and Gangrel seems like the author wants to port in as much White Wolf as possible and this was jarring as I read a lot of old World of Darkness source books and fiction. Secondly, there is a game mechanics chapter to the book detailing stats and the like, but you have to visit the Catalyst website to download it (it is admittedly free). One questions why the two items would be disaggregated beyond an attempt to drive traffic to the company site. I would have preferred to see this gaming material make it into the product.

These two detractions aside, I did really enjoy the novella. If another tale of Yuri and Soren was released, I’d certainly invest the time to read it.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: The Vladivostok Gauntlet
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Shadowrun: 10 Mercs
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/16/2013 13:20:12
What makes a good Shadowrun supplement? After having reconnected with the game after many years away, I've looked at a lot and talked to a lot of players. Here's what I concluded: a Shadowrun supplement is best when it relates to and challenges the core reward cycle of the game. That core reward cycle is: engage in exciting/dangerous/shady activity -> get paid -> shop -> engage in more exciting/dangerous/shady activity, and it's very well supported. It's the rare Shadowrun campaign that actually takes on large-scale military operations as anything more than just a condition, like the weather, that has to be taken into account to handle the job. And that's the challenge that "10 Mercs" has - not writing interesting fantasy-cyberpunk military units for hire, because that's pretty easy (and fun). But instead the challenge is to keep it relevant to Shadowrun and what player characters would be doing.

"10 Mercs" is at its best when it is giving us something actionable, something that player characters in a typical Shadowrun game would interact with or care about. That means a corporate/criminal objective, or some kind of personal stake that someone has in the activities of the mercenary companies.

This means that (for example) the 58th Battle Brigade, which is a former military unit that's now scavengers and enforcers for a crime syndicate, is a great addition because I can immediately envision multiple problems they could cause for shadowrunners, or issues they could create that would require shadowrunners to resolve. Even the 77th Independent Rangers, which are pretty generic shootymans, are actionable because of the personal conflicts and loyalties that are showed off in the sidebars and in-character inserts that are the most fun part of any Shadowrun supplement. The 180th Independent Air Regiment entry focuses, I think correctly, on their rescue and exfiltration operations since those will be the circumstances in which most PCs will encounter them.

On the other hand, it means the Free Marine Corps, which is fairly generic, is not well-turned. All the business about their origin as a breakaway unit of a bigger military outfit isn't really acitonable insofar as there's no real chance a team of shadowrunners is going to be making significant changes to their operations. New Assets is also a misfire, since the whole point of buying a supplement like this is to generate situations for shadowrunners to go into, not to create other shadowrunners. Task Force Magus is not well detailed enough to show me how mages organize themselves differently (if they do), so it's not even a great example.

All in all, "10 Mercs" has around half the entries that are solid and directly on point, another 2-3 that are interesting for aficionados of the world, but not very actionable in play, and another 2-3 which are just boring. Even among the least interesting entries, though, are inserts describing new tactics, equipment and connections that are all absolutely rock-solid tied into that reward cycle. If I'm gonna kidnap a guy off a boat, it makes sense that I'd want a superscience "body bag" I can zip him into and toss him into the ocean for later retrieval. Now that's Shadowrun!

"10 Mercs" is solid and small touches like this make it a pleasure to read and very useful for your Shadowrun game.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: 10 Mercs
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Shadowrun: Missions: Chasin' the Wind (5A-01)
by warren b. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/15/2013 12:20:58
Still reading the adventure at the moment. Will be playing it in a week or two. Will post full review here at that time.

One note, I print my pdfs out on paper so I can make notes on it. As much as I love the look of the pdf, it is hell on my printer ink even at fast draft print mode. Perhaps a more ink conservative design.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Missions: Chasin' the Wind (5A-01)
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Publisher Reply:
Hi Warren, The Chasin' the Wind PDF does include Acrobat layers. If you go into the layers tab, you can drop out the background layer and print that way, saving ink. Sorry we didn't make that more clear! -Matt at CGL
Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
by Derek A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/11/2013 23:17:37
I guess I'm a little more demanding than the other reviewers here, and if I'm being honest I didn't expect much for the price. So why just 1 star? Well the qualities are not in the standard format that matches the core game. They break out the qualities in terms of positive or negative, but even that isn't exactly right because all of them have a positive and negative portion associated with the quality. My chief complaint is that with just a little work and revision these could have been really good qualities, but in their current state I think they are rather broken. Twelve karma for a quality that allows called shots at a -2? Who would pass up on that economy? A negative quality that gives a bonus to negotiations? Even going in with low expectations, this product failed to deliver. The bright side is that with just a little effort the content in this book can be fixed, for those who don't mind some house rules.

The fluff is just OK for those that like that style of writing. I found the explanations on the different types of assassins to be rather shallow, instead of investigating the depths of these characters, this supplement just highlighted most of the cliches. There is a new sniper rifle, but it's nothing special.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
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Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
by Christian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/11/2013 05:03:32
For the price it's a fair enough buy. It has some mistakes like most of the products that come out for SR, but it's an OK read, though I find that it is a bit light with regards to the "crunch" part (one rifle and a couple of qualities). I'd hoped for a bit more interesting info on possible Assassin tactics etc. to use for inspiration within the game, but so be it.
It's nothing stellar, but it's not bad either. I is worth $4.95? I believe it is.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
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