RPGNow.com
Close
Close
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Deadlands Noir Companion
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/18/2013 08:10:47

Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefa-
n.com/2013/03/18/tabletop-review-deadlands-noir-companion-sa-
vage-worlds/


I’ve really been enjoying Deadlands Noir so far. It’s a nice mix of horror and detective work. It’s Call of Cthulhu, but with more mundane horrors and an emphasis on pulp action rather than antiquarian studies. I loved the core rulebook, I enjoyed the first adventure for the system, The Old Absinthe House Blues, and even found the two short stories (Tenement Men and Blood and Roses) to be fun little diversions. With four straight solid releases for the Deadlands Noir franchise, I had to wonder how long they could keep the streak of quality alive. Unfortunately, the streak ends here, with the Deadlands Noir Companion. While not a terrible release by any means, it’s definitely a turn for the worse, as it does a lot of things wrong and kind of sucked my enjoyment of Deadlands Noir out with one fell swoop, thanks to the multitude of bad decisions made here.


Let’s start with the first and most obvious one. When your PDF costs twenty dollars, it better be a weighty tome indeed. After all, Vampire: The Masquerade 20th Anniversary Edition clocks in at over five hundred pages, and it’s $29.99. Deadlands Noir is less than half the size, and only ten bucks less. Now Pinnacle does overprice their PDFs, so this is really no surprise here, but it’s also a big no-no when the companion for a setting or system costs more than the core book. Deadlands Noir is only $14.99, so the companion, regardless of size, should be roughly the same cost. Anytime a companion is more than the core book, a red flag is being waved.


The second big issue is that the Deadlands Noir Companion commits the cardinal sin of being all over the place with dates and locations, thus locking in the metaplot in too tightly. This sort of thing is what the aforementioned V:TM did back around Third Edition, and it’s sad to see Pinnacle making the same huge mistake less than half a year into the spin-off’s release. Even worse is that where Deadlands Noir was mostly hands off from things like other Deadlands, spin-offs such as Hell on Earth, the Deadlands Noir Companion locks Hell on Earth into rigid metaplot continuity meaning, that it is GOING to happen instead of being a possible future for the setting. Whenever a metaplot is forced this heavily on players, they become passive participants in their own game unless they jettison the metaplot completely. I hate to keep bringing up White Wolf as an example, but the parallels are too eerie here. All the complaints about Third Edition, where PCs took a back seat to the metaplot and published adventure NPCs is ringing all too true here, and it leaves a bad taste in my mouth. A good metaplot is written in such a way that players feel they can affect it. A bad one leaves them going, “What’s the point? Everything is already determined.” Where Deadlands Noir was in the former, the Companion is unfortunately in the latter.


The problems compounds further when you see exactly what you get in the Deadlands Noir Companion. There are four distinct locations, which is a great idea, because Deadlands Noir only provided information for New Orleans. However, things quickly go to pot when you realize these four cities are all in different decades, and none are in the same time frame as New Orleans in Deadlands Noir, which is set in 1935. This means you can’t string even TWO of these locations together without advancing time in some way, and there’s no real way to, say, pick up and move from one location to the next in the same time frame without a serious amount of work on the GM’s part. This means the vast majority of people playing a Deadlands Noir campaign will find the Companion interesting, but ultimately unusable. That’s extremely bad, and you have to wonder what the guys at Pinnacle were thinking when they ever considered going down this road, as it is neither smart nor accessible.


So here’s a list of what you get. There’s Chicago circa 1927, Shan Fan (San Francisco) circa 1939, Lost Angels (Los Angeles) circa 1946 and The City of Gloom (Salt Lake City) circa 1950. Again, due to the gaps in the time line, you can’t really use any of these locations in conjunction with each other OR New Orleans, unless you move up your campaign several years each time you want to change locations. This is just a terrible design idea in practically every way possible. We could look at things in a positive light and say that we now have five small locations to run campaigns in instead of one – but we’re still stuck to specific time periods for each. What the Companion should have done is list all four locations and how they are in 1935, so as to be compatible with Deadlands Noir‘s default time period and locale, OR it should have been one big timeline running from the 20s to the early 50s, which would then allow far more creative freedom in regards to where you set you campaign and allow for travel between locations.


So is there anything actually positive to say about the Deadlands Noir Companion? Well, about half of the collection is extremely well written. I enjoyed the Chicago and Shan Fan sections, and there is a lot to work with in either location. The Chicago section is really the only one in the book that actually has a Noir feel to it, while the Shan Fan locale is highly unique and offers some really interesting situations and characters for people new to the Deadlands universe, while longtime players of the Weird West version will enjoy seeing how things have changed in Ghost Rock Central. Lost Angels is… okay. Movie Town is well done, but the division and contrast between that and The Holy City kind of shreds the Noir feel, and the entire section falls completely apart by the end, leaving you to wonder why it was even written in the first place. See, so much of the Lost Angels section revolves around Sister Judith. She is the focal point of the location, the mood, the theme and the city itself. Everything written to let you effectively use the location of Lost Angels revolves around what she had done and is currently doing. In this aspect, everything is solid, cohesive and really well done. In fact, I would have said seventy-five percent of the book is well written, but the big long multi-chapter adventure at the end completely destroys all the quality work that was done here. Why? Because Sister Judith DIES AT THE END. This is truly terrible, because it pretty much renders the entire Lost Angels section moot. It’s one thing to have a portion of a supplement or sourcebook because unusable or incompatible as a product line goes on, but this is honestly the first time I’ve ever seen it happen in the SAME BOOK. Who is running quality control over at Pinnacle? This wouldn’t be so terrible if somewhere in the section gave GMs information on what the city will be like or run like after Judith’s death, but no, the adventure just ends and it’s off to The City of Gloom. This is so ill thought out, it’s hard to believe this Companion is written and edited by the same great team that did Deadlands Noir, but it is in fact so. Effectively, the Lost Angels section is little more than a series of adventure seeds where the others allow you to re-use the settings even after you play the adventures contained within. This wouldn’t be so bad if the adventure seeds weren’t the majority of the section, but they are. The actual description of Lost Angels is twenty pages, and the seeds and mini-chronicle take up thirty-seven. OUCH.


The City of Gloom gets even worse because there is no Noir at all, even though, you know, this is part of the Deadlands Noir line. Instead, you have a section that has far more in common with the bad atomic age sci-fi/B-horror movies of the 50s. This is obviously what the writing team was going for here, and that’s fine, but when I pick up a product that has NOIR in the title, I guess I expect NOIR, and not something that would have been great MST3K fodder. When the entire section, and even the final core adventure, revolves around one of the big bads from The Weird West, who has since died and been reborn into a giant robotoic body housing his undulating brain in glass tubing, well, that just defenestrates even the slightest facet of Noir that you could hope for. As well, this section, more than any other really, slaps the GM and players with the feeling of “Screw your campaign, this is OUR game and you will have it unfold the way we want it to,” right down to locking in certain characters as unkillable or untouchable because they show up in Hell on Earth. Look, a well written RPG book is meant to guide or suggest things to a GM and let them formulate their own ideas and scenarios. It’s meant to let them make the game all their own. Unfortunately, Deadlands Noir Companion does the exactly opposite, ESPECIALLY with The City of Gloom. I can’t tell you how much I hated the constant references to a future that they are saying IS going to happen, when it should be written in a way that suggests this could happen, but the GM doesn’t HAVE to go that route if he or she doesn’t want to. Add in the fact the section is a mix of bad sci-fi and even worse Cold War espionage adventures and you have a combination that soured me on the whole affair.


The thing is, Pinnacle would have been better off selling these four locations as separate PDFs that players could pick and choose from. They would feel a lot more flexible and optional that way. Unfortunately, the whole is actually less than the sum of the parts here, and all four sections combine to give the feeling of a rigid, inflexible campaign setting, where it doesn’t matter what the PCs do as everything is already predetermined in the end and players are just along for the ride. The Companion feels so completely alien and opposite to the core Deadlands Noir book, it’s not even funny. There you were, just given suggestions and occasional allusions to what happened in other Deadlands settings with no attempt to make you feel like you needed to be familiar with AND own said variants. The Companion, however, goes for a hard sell that these other Deadlands settings are not just recommended, but almost needed, which is in poor taste.


For twenty bucks you are getting an expensive PDF that will do far more to turn you off to Deadlands Noir than anything else. Only one of the sections is actual Noir infused, and another is a weird Noir/morality play hybrid that completely destroys itself by the end. Another is a well done 20s Kung Fu-esque piece, and the fourth is just terrible in pretty much all aspects unless Noir somehow means to you Cold War Era shenanigans and terrible sci-fi bits that neither you nor your players will be able to take seriously. It’s unfortunate, because there are some quality adventures and/or writing in this collection, but taken as a whole, the Deadlands Noir Companion just does too much harm to the campaign setting and to push players away – which is exactly what a setting companion SHOULDN’T DO. It should accentuate, not destroy, what was already built. If you’re fine dealing with locations where everything is laid out for you and your players, to the point where you will feel like you are merely rolling dice instead of actually role-playing, you might have a more positive outlook on this book, but for me, the Deadlands Noir Companion is pretty much a bunch of my pet peeves rolled into one big mess.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir Companion
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Hell on Earth Reloaded
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/10/2013 12:48:36
http://www.teilzeithelde-
n.de

Hell on Earth Reloaded beschreibt die schlimmste mögliche Zukunft, die aus der Welt von Deadlands Reloaded erwachsen konnte. Ob hier nur die Welt oder auch das Setting zerstört wurde, verrät euch Marc heute in seiner Rezension


Die Welt ist zur Hölle gefahren und die Wenigen, die dieses neue Zeitalter erleben müssen sehen sich einem täglichen Überlebenskampf ausgesetzt, der mit jedem Tag härter wird. Das entstellte Gesicht der Erde hat eine Menge Hässlichkeiten parat, die dem typischen Überlebenden buchstäblich das Leben zur Hölle machen können – zumindest für die paar Sekunden, die ihm noch bleiben. In diese Welt wirft uns Hell on Earth Reloaded, das Nachfolgesetting zu Deadlands Reloaded.


Erscheinungsbild


Das zweite Savage Worlds Setting, das sich mit Deadlands befasst, präsentiert sich dem Leser sehr ansprechend: Das Hintergrundlayout ist in einem dezenten graugrün gehalten und durch Endzeitelemente wie Seitenüberschriften in abgenutzter Straßenschildoptik aufgehübscht. Die Lesbarkeit ist ausgezeichnet und der Text ist ansprechend strukturiert.
Auch die Seitenleisten mit zusätzlichen Informationen fügen sich angenehm in das Seitenbild ein. Die grafische Gestaltung macht einen guten Eindruck. Die Darstellungen reichen von gut bis atemberaubend, nur die aus der Classic-Reihe übernommenen Bilder bleiben hinter dem neuen Qualitätsstandard etwas zurück. Insgesamt hinterlässt der Settingband einen ausgezeichneten Eindruck, der mit zahlreichen atmosphärischen Bildern punkten kann. Einige Bildentscheidungen, wie zum Beispiel die Abbildung eines Untoten aus Deadlands Reloaded wirken allerdings eher willkürlich und stören die ansonsten einwandfreie Gestaltung.
Technologisch ist das vorliegende PDF auf dem aktuellen Stand der Technik. Index und Inhaltsverzeichnis sind voll verlinkt, es existiert ein Inhaltsverzeichnis in digitaler Form und von dem von jeder Seite aus zurückgegriffen werden kann. Ein klares Lob an die Autoren: Auch im Text erwähnte Referenzen auf andere Teile des Buches sind verlinkt. Das sieht man momentan noch eher selten und bringt einen klaren Mehrwert.


Inhalt


[box]ACHTUNG: Dieser Abschnitt enthält Spoiler für die Geschichte von Deadlands Reloaded![/box]


Die Welt von Hell on Earth Reloaded ist die schlimmste mögliche Zukunft, die aus Deadlands Reloaded erwachsen konnte. In Deadlands Reloaded befreit ein wütender Schamane mit seinen Gefolgsleuten die Geister und Dämonen der ewigen Jagdgründe, welche sofort damit beginnen, durch das Wirken von Monstern, die Erde in einen schrecklicheren Ort zu verwandeln.


Durch die Einflüsterungen der Manitous erlangt die Menschheit Kenntnis von immer fortschrittlicheren und grausameren Möglichkeiten, ihre Mitmenschen unter die Erde zu bringen, was die Konföderierten Staaten von Amerika in die Lage versetzt, den amerikanischen Sezessionkrieg nicht nur zu verlängern, sondern sich auch den nördlichen Staaten gegenüber zu beweisen und als separater Staatenbund fortzubestehen. Dies animiert weitere Staaten wie z.B. Utah und Kalifornien, welches bei einem fürchterlichen Beben in ein Labyrinth aus gefluteten Canyons verwandelt wurde, ihrerseits die eigene Souveränität zu erklären. Als wäre das nicht schon schlimm genug nutzen auch die Indianer Ihre Chance und bilden eigene Stammesgebiete. Die Sioux-Nationen im Norden und die Coyote Konföderation im Süden befinden sich jeweils mitten im Staatengebiet der USA bzw. der CSA und splittern den Kontinent weiter auf.


Der Konflikt zwischen den beiden amerikanischen Nationen kommt nie zu einem kompletten Stillstand, sondern ist ein durchgehend existierender kalter Krieg, nicht zuletzt wegen einem neuentdeckten Mineral, dem Geisterstein, einer unheimlich kraftvollen Energiequelle. Dass die Dampfschwaden, die dieses Mineral bei Verbrennung ausstößt, wie Totenschädel aussehen und der Stein stöhnende Geräusche von sich gibt, ist zwar verstörend, wird aber als notwendige Übel angesehen.


Die Welt war also über 200 Jahre lang von einem kalten Krieg zweier Supermächte beherrscht, die ihre Staatengebiete leider direkt nebeneinander hatten. Dieser Konflikt eskalierte im Jahre 2081 nach der Ermordung der US-amerikanischen Präsidentin endgültig zu einem atomaren Weltkrieg, der beinahe die gesamte Weltbevölkerung auslöschte. Die eingesetzten Bomben, sogenannte City Buster waren verbesserte taktische Atomsprengköpfe. Diese verstrahlten nicht nur die direkte Umgebung und zerlegten alles in einem Radius von bis zu zehn Kilometern, sondern waren mit der Kraft wütender Geister ausgestattet, die einen Großteil des Lebens in einem Umkreis von 50 Kilometer auslöschten, ohne der Infrastruktur dabei zu schaden. In einem Umkreis von nahezu zehn Kilometer um die Einschlagstelle bildeten sich sogenannte Geisterstürme, welche das Gebiet darin von der Außenwelt abschnitten und bis heute bestehen. Man kann zwar durch diese Stürme hindurch gelangen, riskiert dabei aber, sich entweder eine Mutation einzufangen oder psychisch oder physisch verletzt zu werden.


Das alles ist aber noch nicht das Schlimmste: Durch die geballte übernatürliche Kraft dieser Bombeneinschläge wurde die Erde schlagartig in einen düsteren Ort verwandelt, physisch, aber vor allem auch spirituell. Auf diese Chance hatten die Abrechner, finstere Entitäten aus Deadlands Reloaded, gewartet. Endlich konnten Sie, nach Millennien der Wartezeit, selbst in Gestalt der apokalyptischen Reiter Fuß auf die Erde setzen. Sie erschienen alle an unterschiedlichen Orten im amerikanischen Westen, rotteten untote Heerscharen um sich und fielen mit diesen über die unorganisierten Überlebenden her, bevor sie nach Osten über den Mississippi hinweg aus dem amerikanischen Westen verschwanden.


Hell on Earth Reloaded setzt 2099, 18 Jahre nach dem Ende der Welt und drei Jahre nach den Ereignissen von Hell on Earth Classic ein. Für die meisten Überlebenden ist alles, was wir als technische Errungenschaften kennen und schätzen gelernt haben, nur eine schwächer werdende Erinnerung, nur einige Privilegierte können vereinzelt noch darauf zurückgreifen.


Die meisten Überlebenden haben sich in gut bewachten Überlebendensiedlungen zusammengeschlossen oder machen die Straßen in gewalttätigen Straßengangs unsicher. Wer das Pech hat, sich eine Mutation einzufangen, wird von den Normalos in der Regel ausgestoßen (oder direkt auf Sicht erschossen). Diesen traurigen Seelen bleiben meist nur die unwirtlichsten und gefährlichsten Orte, um sich ein eigenes Refugium zu errichten.


Reisen ist, dem Weltuntergang sei Dank, unheimlich gefährlich, einerseits wegen oben angesprochener Motorrad-Gangs, andererseits wegen allerlei Getier, das dem abenteuerlustigen Überlebenden ans Leder will. Wenn beides gerade nicht greifbar ist, sorgt Mutter Natur mit tödlichem Wetter für Abwechslung. Nahrung und Vorräte aufzutreiben ist ein Kernproblem der verbliebenen Bevölkerung und da die Ruinen früherer Großstädte 18 Jahre nach dem Fall der Bomben immer noch der wahrscheinlichste Fundort dafür sind, gehören diese zu den tödlichsten Plätzen des Wasted West.


Die Welt ist zur Hölle gefahren und das Einzige, was zwischen den Schrecken dieses neuen Zeitalters und der Menschheit stehen sind mutige Helden, die bereit sind, das Böse zurückzudrängen.


Charakterklassen


Der Settingband liefert eine große Anzahl möglicher Charakterklassen und gibt Ideen, welche Rolle ein Überlebender in der Endzeitgesellschaft einnehmen kann. Neben den nichtmagischen Charakteren, wie zum Beispiel dem Ganger, dem Revolverheld, der Gesetzeshüterin oder der Geschichtenerzählerin stehen dem Spieler auch übernatürliche Fähigkeiten zur Verfügung. Doomsayer gehören dem sog. Cult of Doom, also dem Verdammniskult an.


Sie sind ohne Ausnahme Mutanten und stehen auf dem Standpunkt, dass die Mutanten die nächste Stufe der Evolution sind. Sie verfügen über die Macht, Strahlung ihrem Nutzen zu unterwerfen. Im Spiel darf man nur der Häretikerbewegung des Kultes folgen, welcher anders als der ursprüngliche Kult nicht aktiv das Ableben der normalen Überlebenden im Sinn hat.
Die Junker sind die Evolution der verrückten Wissenschaftler. Anders als ihre Vorgänger warten sie nicht darauf, bis sie ihre Einflüsterungen erhalten, sondern gehen aktiv in die Geisterwelt und mischen die dortige Geisterwelt so lange auf, bis sie bekommen was sie wollen.
Die Syker sind Psioniker mit furchteinflößenden Kräften. Aus unbekannten Gründen fallen allen Sykern die Haare aus, daher sind diese Ex-Soldaten schon von Weitem zu erkennen.
Eine interessante Komponente bringen die Templer ins Spiel: Der Gründer des Ordens, Simon Mercer wurde Zeuge, wie ein Gesetzeshüter sein Leben für eine Horde Überlebender wegwarf, die sich weigerten, ihm zu Hilfe zu eilen und beschloss, die Templer zu gründen. Auch sie sollen die Überlebenden vor den Schrecken des Wasted West bewahren, aber anders als die Gesetzeshüter sind sie nicht dazu verpflichtet. Jeder Templer darf selbst entscheiden, ob und wem er hilft und mehr als ein Templer hat sich als Mutant oder Bettler verkleidet in eine Siedlung geschlichen, um den Charakter der Menschen zu erkunden. Besonders an den Templern ist, dass alle ihre Kräfte, mit Ausnahme von Heilung, nur auf sie selbst gewirkt werden können.


Die letzen im Bunde sind die toxischen Schamanen, eine Weiterentwicklung des Schamanen aus Deadlands Reloaded. Diese haben sich mit den Geistern der Verschmutzung (Müll, Schlamm, Smog und Strahlung) verschrieben und verwenden Ihre Kräfte, um entweder Verschmutzung aus der physischen Welt in die Geisterwelt oder umgekehrt zu übertragen.
Aus Hell on Earth Classic bekannte weitere mystische Hintergründe wie zum Beispiel die Hexe oder der Bibliothekar wurden entweder komplett entfernt oder stehen nur noch als nicht magische Charakterklasse zur Verfügung.


Aufbau


Das Buch ist, wie in den Deadlands Settings üblich, in die Teile Player‘s Guide, No Man's Land und Marshal's Handbook, also einem Teil für die Spieler, einem Teil für die Spieler übernatürlicher Charaktere und einem Teil für den Spielleiter eingeteilt. Der Spielerteil besteht knapp zur Hälfte aus einer allgemeinen Einführung in den Wasted West und stellt die wichtigsten Orte, Fraktionen und Persönlichkeiten vor.


Anschließend steigt der Spieler – hoffentlich, inspiriert durch die Vorgeschichte – in die Charaktererschaffung ein. Diese begleitet den Spieler knapp aber ausreichend durch den Charaktererschaffungsprozess von Savage Worlds. Den größten Teil nimmt die Ausrüstungsliste ein, die neben allerlei Tötungswerkzeug auch Fahrzeuge und Regeln zum Aufmotzen derselben bereithält. Der Abschnitt schließt mit einigen Settingregeln für Hell on Earth ab.


Das No Man's Land enthält zu allen oben angesprochenen mystischen Hintergründen eine kurze Beschreibung über den Ursprung des Hintergrundes, gibt Hinweise und Tipps zur Darstellung und wird mit einigen besonderen Vor- und Nachteilen bzw. Kräften abgerundet. Die Ideen sind allesamt interessant und jeder Hintergrund verspricht ein spannendes Spielerlebnis. Man merkt an dieser Stelle deutlich, dass es sich bei dem Setting um eine Adaption eines bestehenden Systems handelt. Hell on Earth Classic Puristen werden aufgrund der vereinfachten Mechanik wenig begeistert sein, tatsächlich trägt dies aber zu einem schnelleren Spielablauf bei. Die Beschreibungen der Hintergründe sind praktisch die Essenzen ganzer Bücher, die diesen mystischen Hintergründen gewidmet wurden, was es den Autoren erlaubte, jedes Kapitel inhaltlich sehr dicht und interessant darzustellen.


Der Spielleiterteil nimmt über die Hälfte des Buches in Beschlag. Zu Beginn werden Sonderregeln des Settings nochmal erläutert. Hier sind insbesondere die neuen Regeln zum Thema Wetter und Mutationen interessant. Den Rest des Handbuches teilen sich die ausführliche Weltbeschreibung sowie das Bestiarium.


Fazit


Der Hell on Earth Settingband präsentiert sich auf gewohnt hohem Niveau. Es gibt wenig, was man an der Form des Buches kritisieren könnte, einzig der etwas wilde Mix zwischen neuen und alten Grafiken schadet der ansonsten ausgezeichneten Gestaltung dieses Bandes.


Die Welt selbst wird fesselnd beschrieben und die Information zwischen Spieler- und Spielleiterwissen ist klar abgegrenzt. Das führt aber auch zu doppelten Sätzen und Passagen. Das ist aber selten ein Problem und erspart das eine oder andere Mal lästiges Zurückblättern


Wirklich schade ist, dass weder eine Plot-Point Kampagne, noch Savage Tales im Settingband enthalten sind. Dies war bei Deadlands Reloaded zwar auch der Fall, hier wurden jedoch zeitnah One-Sheet Abenteuer nachgereicht. Hell on Earth Spieler warten hierauf bislang vergeblich.


Das Preis/Leistungsverhältnis ist mit 24.99 USD im Hochpreissegment angesiedelt und ist mit dem Inhalt kaum noch zu rechtfertigen. 20 USD wären ein fairer Preis gewesen.
Insgesamt erhält man mit diesem Settingband ein grandioses Endzeitsetting, das jede Menge Potential mitbringt. Gerade die Mischung aus Horror und Endzeit mit einem gnadenlosen Wild-West Feeling funktioniert überraschend gut. Die Elemente ergänzen und verstärken sich zu einem tödlichen Mix aus gnadenlosen Gefechten, coolen Sprüchen und finstersten Bösewichten. Allerdings bleibt es dem Spielleiter überlassen, eben diese Welt mit Leben zu füllen, da man vom Settingband im Stich gelassen wird.


Unsere Bewertung


Erscheinungsbild: 4/5 Stimmige, zum Setting passende Optik. Alte Grafiken nicht mehr zeitgemäß
Inhalt: 4/5 Hervorragendes Setting, leider ohne Kampagne
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis: 3/5 Für einen Settingband sehr teuer
Gesamt: 4/5 Hell on Earth setzt frische Akzente im Endzeitgenre und überzeugt durch eine düstere, zugrunde gerichtete Welt.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hell on Earth Reloaded
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Player's Guide Explorer's Edition
by Robert S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/07/2013 22:49:09

This week we are reviewing Deadlands Reloaded .
The Deadlands RPG series is an alternate history setting from Pinnacle Entertainment which mixes horror and pulp fiction with the western. The setting and game line won eight Origin Awards over the years and sets a high benchmark for successfully marrying game mechanics and setting design. Deadlands Reloaded is the newest version of the work and currently employs a variation of the Savage Worlds game engine.
The editors and layout people, Simon Lucas, Aaron Acevedo and Travis Anderson – among others – organized the Reloaded book well; the work flows logically and includes a solid table of contents and a comprehensive index so that finding what you are looking for is relatively easy. Further, the PDF sports a thorough set of bookmark and it is replete with… hyperlinks.
Reloaded nicely balances text, illustrations and white space thorough the work, making the pages easy on the eyes. Many of the illustrations appear to have been scooped from earlier versions of Deadlands and the many Deadlands supplements, however they are well executed and serve their purpose, although few illustrations really standout none are bad. Contributing artists include Brom, Ron Spencer and Cheyenne Wright, among others.
The quality of the writing, by Shane Hensley and BD Flory, is debatable as the text possesses an extremely jocular tone which is consistently breaking the fourth wall and speaking directly to game masters and players – or as they are called here, Marshall’s and members of the posse. This tone, speaking to the reader as though they were a part of the setting, occurs even when conveying out of character information. As with everything, your mileage may vary, but it can be off putting, undermining the works ability to reach an audience and it is too campy.
The format of this show notwithstanding, I do not actually like camp – it is an irritatingly poor attempt at humor that undercuts any attempt at a real emotion, be it fear, joy or anything in between. The campy quality to the setting of Deadlands is distracting… but that quality is also probably inevitable. Namely, the setting includes Confederate soldiers as big damn heroes, steam-powered robots and various agents of evil trying to ruin the world – so camp is probably inevitable. Nothing says I have to like it – and I do not. However, I also acknowledge this is a matter of personal taste and your mileage may vary.
In terms of the setting itself, imagine watching the Wild Wild West . No, do not imagine watching the Will Smith movie, but imagine watching the original television series . Now imagine watching the original television series after dropping some acid.
Yeah, the setting of Reloaded is kind of like that.
Putting it in a less snide manner, Deadlands is an alternate history setting. Halfway through the American Civil War , or 15 years before the official time of the setting, a group Native Americans successfully enacted a ritual that returned dangerous magic and malevolent spirits to the world. This in turn caused the dead to rise, made the casting of all manner of spells possible and permitted the creation of mad science fiction steam punk devices. It also meant the American Civil War would drag on for almost 20 years, that much of California shattered in an earthquake that reduced it to a set of islands and sea-filled canyons, while straight up monsters now stalk the landscape .
Many people and places from history still exist, such as Doc Holiday, Calamity Jane and Tombstone, Arizona . They are part of the mad mix of setting and well integrated.
Reloaded presents a well-executed setting, with adventuring across the campaign world and the chance for participants to play with everything from gunslingers to shamans to mad scientists and more. With Reloaded Pinnacle Entertainment does a good job of integrating the genres of Western, horror and steam punk if you like that and enjoy, or can at least tolerate camp… then this setting will probably match your aesthetic tastes.
Speaking of mad scientists, can someone please tell me what is the worst business and technology can bring us?
Reloaded is not a standalone game – it requires the use of the Savage Worlds game book to run.
It is rare to find a setting so well wedded to the mechanics. Usually game mechanics are aesthetically neutral, serving to adjudicate disputes but neither aiding nor hindering the mood of a game, at least by themselves. However, the variation on the Savage Worlds rules employed in Reloaded serve the setting well.
Savage Worlds employs a feature called exploding dice - when you rolled the highest number any particular dice allows you may roll that dice again and add the cumulative result. In Reloaded, this die roll result is getting an ace. Every five points achieved over the target is a “raise” indicating the character is particularly effective.
Savage World also employs features called Edges and Hindrances , which is the Savage World version of GURPS Advantages and Drawbacks or the Merits and Flaws is the White Wolf Storyteller system. In other words, they are a set of additions that allow players to tailor a character to something very specific, to suit themselves and the game. All the edges and hindrances here are perfectly suited to the setting.
In addition to gunslingers and other straight up fighters are shamans, holy men and the mad scientists who may create effects. They all draw their effects from the same basic list – they can each create a blast, for example. It is how they create the blast that sets them apart, be it magic, prayer or mechanized flobotnyms. The career path to create such effects is among the setting appropriate edges presented in Reloaded.
As with standard Savage Worlds, dice rolls determine initiative while playing cards dealt to the players indicate the play order.
Reloaded dismisses Savage World’s bennies system for Fate Chips, employing multi colored poker chips, the color indicting different things, some good and some bad. Players draw a set number of chips from a hat and do not know the color of their fate chips until it is potentially too late. However, as with real poker, savvy players do the best they can with their hand.
This game mechanic employs dice, player cards and poker chips and it all works great with the Weird Western setting.
It is worth noting, the Savage Worlds game engine grew out of the Great Rail Wars miniatures game, which grew out of the mechanics of the original Deadlands game. In Reloaded, the system came full circle so to speak.
In the end, I give Deadlands Reloaded a 20 on a d20 roll. The setting is fun, the book well organized and a great example of exactly what it says on the tin, adventure games in the weird west. The jocular tone and campy quality undercut the elements of horror and drama; however, few RPGs that do as good a job of marrying the mechanics with the aesthetics.
Check out this game is you like the Savage Worlds engine, western games and weird fiction.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Player's Guide Explorer's Edition
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 3-Range War!
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/07/2013 02:19:59
http://www.teilzeithelde-
n.de

Blood Drive 3 für Savage Worlds/Deadlands Reloaded bildet den Abschluss der Blood Drive-Kampagne rund um einen Viehtrieb quer durch den unheimlichen Westen.


Erscheinungsbild


Das PDF umfasst 39 Seiten mit dem gewohnten farbig-stimmungsvollen Seitenhintergrund, großer, gut lesbarer Schrift und angemessenen, aber nicht beeindruckenden Illustrationen. Das 6.5″ x 9″ Format sorgt für eine vergleichsweise geringe Textdichte, aber auf Bildschirmen, Tablets o. ä. für bequeme Lesbarkeit.


Inhalt


Waren Blood Drive 1 und 2 noch Reiseabenteuer, so spielt Blood Drive 3 – Range War! nunmehr am Ziel des Trecks, in und um das Städtchen Dirtwater (am Bighorn River, Wyoming) herum. Der Führer des Viehtriebes hat dort (zu) preisgünstig ein Stück Land erworben, auf dem er die Ansiedlung plant. Haben die Helden die ersten beiden Teile der Kampagne durchgefochten, so sind sie im Verlaufe dessen mutmaßlich Anteilseigner der Herde geworden und haben so entsprechendes persönliches Interesse; auch in einer Einzelgeschichte wird es nicht schwerfallen, anderweitige Anreize für den Einstieg zu erschaffen.
Neben dem Erarbeiten von lokalem Ansehen stellen sich natürlich weitere handfeste Probleme. In Anlehnung an Ereignisse wie den historischen Johnson County War und entsprechende filmische Umsetzungen werden die Helden in einen genretypischen Weidekrieg mit den etablierten Größen der Region hineingezogen.


Nach einem Überblick über den Hintergrund des Abenteuers und der Stadtbeschreibung von Dirtwater folgt sodann die Schilderung des potentiellen Handlungsverlaufes. Strukturell hebt sich Blood Drive 3 wohltuend von seinen Vorgängern ab. Eine Reihe flexibel einsetzbarer Szenen bricht den bisher filmartigen Ablauf auf; zugleich wird den Helden freundlicherweise offiziell gestattet, beim Management der Ranch etwas Verantwortung zu übernehmen. Gleichwohl bleiben die Ereignisse im wesentlichen aneinandergereiht, dynamisch nur in eng gezogenen Grenzen; unaufhaltsam rollt die Handlung auf den in weiten Teilen vorgezeichneten (und etwas skurrilen) Showdown zu. Ein kreativer Marshal wird mit der Story zwar so arbeiten können, dass die konventionellen Schienen verblassen, doch erreicht das Abenteuer die Offenheit der Szenarien aus beispielsweise Ghost Towns (Klick) nicht. Nebenbei hege ich erhebliche Zweifel, dass eine auch nur einigermaßen aktive Spielrunde auf die Zaunpfähle des Abenteuers warten wird, ohne früher das Heft in die Hand zu nehmen. Zu häufig geht der Band von der Vorstellung aus, dass die Runde erst einmal die Hände in den Schoß legt und auf das nächste Ereignis wartet, ohne Eigeninitiative zu entwickeln. Trotz des Gesagten bleibt festzuhalten, dass das Abenteuer genügend Material enthält, um daraus eine interessante, vom geplanten Verlauf abweichende Story zu schmieden.


Die Hintergrundgeschichte strebt (abgesehen vom schrägen Endgegner, der geheim bleiben soll) nicht nach Preisen für Originalität, sondern spielt mit vertrauten Versatzstücken aus dem Deadlands–Hintergrund. Versöhnlich stimmt die Betonung archetypischer Western-Facetten mit vielen klassisch inspirierten Szenen, deren Charme Freunde des amerikanischen Heimatfilmes für sich einnehmen dürfte. Zwar wird das Rad hier nicht neu erfunden, dreht sich aber vor stimmiger Weird West-Kulisse.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis


Nach dem Umfang sticht der Preis im Verhältnis zu den bisher veröffentlichten DLR-Abenteuern und ähnlichen Publikationen zwar nicht heraus. Die nur 113seitige Gesamtkampagne aber reißt ein .ca. $30 großes Loch in die Geldbörse, ohne dass es Geschichte und Handlungsführung gelänge, mit wirklich interessanten strukturellen oder inhaltlichen Ideen zu punkten. Zwar mag sie gerade wegen ihrer Schlichtheit einsteigerfreundlich sein, bleibt aber qualitativ deutlich hinter den großen Plot-Point-Kampagnen zurück. Da bietet die für Neulinge gedachte Mini-Plot-Point-Kampagne Coffin Rock zum Preis eines der Abenteuer deutlich mehr Inhalt und Flexibilität; das zu investierende Kapital wäre darüber hinaus in den reichhaltig ausgestatteten Bänden The Flood (192 S., $19.99) oder The Last Sons (336 S., $34.99) besser angelegt.


Fazit


Blood Drive 3 hebt sich als Stadt-und-Umland-Szenario angenehm vom Railroading der vorhergehenden Bände ab. Stimmungsvoll verschmilzt das Abenteuer Nostalgie-durchtränkte Western-Stereotypen mit den Besonderheiten des unheimlichen Westens. Schwächen in der Handlungsführung wird der Marshal mit Hilfe des dargebotenen Spielmaterials kompensieren können. Als einzeln stehendes Abenteuer wäre Blood Drive 3 je nach Bedarf vielleicht sogar eine Empfehlung wert, gäbe es nicht bereits weitaus bessere (und im Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis günstigere) Alternativen.


Unsere Bewertung


Erscheinungsbild 3,5/5 Der gewohnt hohe Standard
Inhalt 3/5 Charmant-archetypisches Weird-West-Abenteuer mit Schwächen
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis 2,5/5 Ist für die Gesamtkampagne schief.
Gesamt 3/5 Eine teure Kampagne mit etlichen Schwächen und besserer Konkurrenz



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 3-Range War!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 2-High Plains Drovers
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/07/2013 02:18:56
http://www.teilzeithelde-
n.de

Blood Drive 2 für Savage Worlds/Deadlands Reloaded bildet die Fortsetzung der mit Blood Drive 1 – Bad Times on the Goodnight (Klick) begonnenen Kampagne rund um einen Viehtrieb quer durch den unheimlichen Westen. Der erste Teil der Geschichte begann mit einem jener harmlosen Aufträge in einem kleinen Kaff in Südwest-Texas und endete nach zahlreichen Herausforderungen für die Überlebenden bei Denver. Während des Grundkurses „Cowboytum für Dummies“ säumten bereits etliche Schurken und Komplikationen den steinigen Weg – in den Folgebänden wird das nicht anders sein.


Erscheinungsbild


Das PDF umfasst 37 Seiten mit dem gewohnten farbig-stimmungsvollen Seitenhintergrund, großer, gut lesbarer Schrift und angemessenen, aber nicht beeindruckenden Illustrationen. Das 6.5″ x 9″ Format sorgt für eine vergleichsweise geringe Textdichte, aber auf Bildschirmen, Tablets o. ä. für bequeme Lesbarkeit.


Inhalt


Nachdem sich die Helden in Blood Drive 1 ihre ersten Sporen verdient haben, können sie in Blood Drive 2 – High Plains Drovers den Treck von Denver aus weiter nach Wyoming begleiten. Die nur lose Verbindung mit dem ersten Teil ermöglicht es, Blood Drive 2 ohne besondere Mühe auch separat zu spielen. Im wesentlichen besteht die Geschichte diesmal aus drei Segmenten mit innerem Zusammenhalt, die die Helden mit Ausläufern des Eisenbahnkriegs, Indianern und unheimlichen Phänomenen in den Sioux Nations sowie dem Grauen des Krieges konfrontieren.


Leider reiht das Abenteuer über weite Strecken wieder geradlinig Begegnungen aneinander und lässt den Helden keinerlei Möglichkeiten, den programmierten Ablauf zu beeinflussen. Probleme, die sich durch Abwarten und Würfeln nicht lösen lassen, stellen sich zunächst kaum. Die rahmengebende Hintergrundgeschichte bleibt papierdünn und besteht aus gerade hinreichender Motivation für die mäßig konturierten Antagonisten der Segmente, aus dem Gebüsch auf die Füße der Helden zu springen. Das Wieder-auftauchen eines bemerkenswert identitätslosen Schurken aus dem ersten Teil (und seine für den dritten Teil angedrohte Rückkehr) erinnern an C-Movies mit überlangem Finale, in denen der ausgereizte Bösewicht das Sterben hartnäckig verweigert. Half der Western-Charme dem ersten Teil noch über solche Hürden hinweg, dürfte die monotone Struktur allmählich die Geduld einer Spielrunde strapazieren - es sei denn, man hat das sadomasochistische Bedürfnis, am Nasenring durch eine Manege von Situationen zu zerren und/oder gezerrt zu werden. Bereits die Lektüre macht die Länge der zurückgelegten Wegstrecke fast physisch spürbar; mein Bedürfnis, wieder einen langsam-melancholischen Spät-Western zu sehen, stieg jedenfalls rasant an.


Erst spät, zum Finale des Bandes, findet das Abenteuer schließlich zum verfremdeten klassischen Western zurück – für all diejenigen jedenfalls, denen es gelungen ist, bis dahin wach zubleiben. Ohne zu viel verraten zu wollen: die Geschichte greift eine legendäre Sequenz aus einem der bekanntesten Western aller Zeiten auf, um sie im Deadlands-Universum mit dem Spiegel des unheimlichen Westens zu verzerren. Zugleich stellt sich den Helden damit eine echte Herausforderung, die nur mit Einfallsreichtum und planvollem Vorgehen zu bewältigen sein dürfte. Der clevere Western-Horror-Showdown entschädigt zumindest teilweise für die zähen ersten 2/3 und bietet der Spielrunde nach langer Durststrecke endlich eine interessante Aufgabe.
In Dirtwater am Bighorn River, Wyoming (nahe Yellowstone und den Sioux Nations), endet dieser Teil der Kampagne, mag also abgeschlossen oder mit dem letzten Kapitel fortgesetzt werden; die bisherigen Handlungsstränge lassen sich zu einem befriedigenden Abschluss bringen.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis


Nach dem Umfang sticht der Preis im Verhältnis zu den bisher veröffentlichten DLR-Abenteuern und ähnlichen Publikationen zwar nicht heraus. Die nur 113seitige Gesamtkampagne aber reißt ein .ca. $30 großes Loch in die Geldbörse, ohne dass es Geschichte und Handlungsführung gelänge, mit wirklich interessanten strukturellen oder inhaltlichen Ideen zu punkten. Zwar mag sie gerade wegen ihrer Schlichtheit einsteigerfreundlich sein, bleibt aber qualitativ deutlich hinter den großen Plot-Point-Kampagnen zurück. Da bietet die für Neulinge gedachte Mini-Plot-Point-Kampagne Coffin Rock zum Preis eines der Abenteuer deutlich mehr Inhalt und Flexibilität; das zu investierende Kapital wäre darüber hinaus in den reichhaltig ausgestatteten Bänden The Flood (192 S., $19.99) oder The Last Sons (336 S., $34.99) besser angelegt.


Fazit


Das Gefühl, an einer einsteigertauglichen Besichtigungstour durch den unheimlichen Westen teilzuhaben, erhält in Blood Drive 2 in zunehmendem Maße eine arg fade Note. Pinnacle Entertainment selbst hat in den Plot-Point-Kampagnen und anderen Abenteuern bereits gezeigt, dass es auch ganz anders und besser geht. Nicht nur erfahrene Spielrunden dürften das vorgegebene Korsett arg eng finden und/oder eine kohärente Story vermissen; auch Einsteiger sollten Rollenspiel nicht auf eine pfeilgerade, mit Würfeln kurz unterbrochene Erzählung reduzieren müssen. Erst im Finale des zweiten Teils findet sich in einem interessanten Szenario eine gelungene Kombination von klassischem Western mit einem Deadlands-Twist, die sich auch für alternative Geschichten plündern lässt.


Unsere Bewertung


Erscheinungsbild 3,5/5 Der gewohnt hohe Standard
Inhalt 2,5/5 Ein müder Ritt
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis 2,5/5 Ist für die Gesamtkampagne schief.
Gesamt 3/5 Eine teure Kampagne mit etlichen Schwächen und besserer Konkurrenz



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 2-High Plains Drovers
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir Original Soundtrack
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/28/2013 04:25:53

This is a selection of atmospheric music which makes good 'background': it is unobtrusive enough that it does not intrude, yet creates an ambience suitable for the Deadlands Noir setting... easy listening, yet suggesting the kind of environment that you and your group is trying to create as you play.


I particularly enjoy 'specially written for the game' soundtracks because they do not distract the players when you put them on. It's often quite easy to find existing music that fits the mood and the game that you are planning but when you actually start to play, people get distracted by trying to identify music they've heard before or start to draw their own conclusions based on their past experiences or knowledge of the music. It can be good when planning and writing an adventure, though... but this original themed music is far superior when the dice come out!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir Original Soundtrack
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Texter
by Chris K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/22/2013 13:22:57

Very, very good short story. The texts feel like real texts without being full of teenage text-speak, and the whole thing just feels realistic. The dialogue was good, and by the end, there was a real air of tension and suspense. It was like a really good, suspenseful horror movie distilled into a short story. All in all, I'd buy it again.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Texter
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir: Blood and Roses
by Mike R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/15/2013 04:15:55

Very evocative and absolutely enjoyable. My only gripe is it ended so quickly .



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir: Blood and Roses
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir: The Tenement Men
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/12/2013 08:03:11

Originally Posted at: http://diehardgamefan-
.com/2013/02/12/book-review-deadlands-noir-tenement-men-sava-
ge-worlds/


Yesterday I reviewed the “dime novel” Blood and Roses, based on the Deadlands Noir campaign setting for Savage Worlds. Today it’s Tenement Men. Although both were released simultaneously, Tenement Men takes place first chronologically. Only one character and a single MacGuffin connect the two, but both are pivotal to each story, and you may find yourself a bit confused if you read them out of order. I know I had to stop and say, “Why does this name sound so familiar?” and “Why do both stories have the same MacGuffin?” It wasn’t until I finished Tenement Men that I realized I had read them out of order. There’s no indication on the tales that one comes before the other, which is a shame, as it would have been an easy notation for Pinnacle to make. Instead, the only way to discover that the two tales are rather connected (even though they are by two different authors) is the same way I did – by just plowing through them and making connections.


Tenement Men is a bit of an odd duck. It’s a continuation of the adventures of a private dick named Harvey Jenkins. Now when I say that, you probably assume that this means Harvey is the protagonist in Blood and Roses, but that’s incorrect. He’s actually the protagonist of the four part audio drama, Hard Boiled in the Big Easy. Tenement Men is a continuation of the events in that tale. It helps to have listened to it, but the story will still make sense if you haven’t – you just won’t be getting the bigger picture. If you’re interested in listening to it (it’s about forty minutes long), you can do so by going to Pinnacle’s YouTube channel and clicking on the appropriate links there. There are only seven videos, four of which are the audio drama, so I don’t think you’ll have too much trouble finding it.


So let’s talk Tenement Men. Like 99.99% of all Noir tales, this one begins with a dame. This particular lady of the night isn’t a femme fatale or a moll looking to con a private dick into taking a case that’s more trouble that she’s paying. No, this particular lady happens to be a voodoo high priestess, and the person that saves Harvey Jenkins from sleeping with the fishes in his original tale. Seems someone’s stolen some bad juju from her shop and she needs Jenkins to track it down. She did save his life after all. What follows is a tale that wonderfully blends Noir with survival horror. More importantly, Tenement Men feels like a role-playing adventure turned into a narrative tale. You can almost visualize the DM at the table with his players, watching them roll dice to determine the fate that will eventually unfold. Blood and Roses, while still an excellent story, felt like a “just” a story and not an ancillary product to a roleplaying game. Both have their positives because of this, but if you’re looking for which story gives you more of a feel for what PLAYING Deadlands Noir would be like, this is the one.


Harvey Jenkins ends up cruising through the Big Easy as the story keeps getting bigger… and weirder. Although Tenement Men starts as a simple recovery tale, it ends up becoming a full fledged adventure involving hunting down a missing person, forming a love/hate relationship with a member of the Black Hand (the Mafia in Deadlands Noir, not a sect of ancient vampires ala Vampire: The Masquerade), forming a party with a super scientist pal by the name of Doc Carver and finally, a full out hack and slash battle against some truly creepy monsters. Not only is the description of these things freaky, but you never get to know what they actually are or how they came about, which adds even more to the ominous tone of the entire tale. I love that their isn’t some sort of exposition as to what Harvey and his team encounters. They’re just simply there, and it’s very Lovecraftian in that respect, which is how I like my spooky stories.


The story resolves nicely, but as you move on to Blood and Roses you’ll see how the events of this story affect the next. It may be the Big Easy, but the city’s smaller than you think (says a person that’s walked nearly every square inch of it). I will say that I’m disappointed that a character from this story not only looks and sounds VERY different when he reappears in Blood and Roses, but he’s killed off rather as an afterthought, which is a shame, as I actually thought he had just as much potential as the two protagonists. Ah well, that’s what the Manitou are for, yes?


When all is said and done, Tenement Men is a great read and a story that makes you want not only more fiction, but to pick up whatever else comes out for the Deadlands Noir setting. I have only one quibble, but it is a big one, and that’s that the story costs $3.99 when it is only seventeen pages long. That’s rather pricey for a short story and about twice as much as you’d find something of similar length or longer for your e-reader. Because of that, you might want to wait for a sale or a permanent price reduction. For the cost of both stories, you can pick up full supplements or sourcebooks from DriveThruRPG, and you’ll get more value out of something like that. Still, Tenement Men is a great read, as it’s a story that will stick in your head for some time. If you’re already invested into Deadlands Noir, you probably won’t mind overpaying for this creepy little short story.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir: The Tenement Men
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir: Blood and Roses
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/11/2013 08:06:48

Originally posted at: http://diehardgame-
fan.com/2013/02/11/book-review-deadlands-noir-blood-and-rose-
s-savage-worlds/


Blood and Roses is a short story that came about as a result of funders meeting one of many stretch goals for Deadlands Noir when it was first pitched over at Kickstarter. I’ve loved everything released for Deadlands Noir so far, be it the core campaign setting or its first adventure, The Old Absinthe House Blues. In fact, Deadlands Noir was a close contender for our “Best Campaign Setting” award in our 2012 Tabletop Gaming Awards. If only it hadn’t been released so very close to the end of the year. Ah well, if you’d like to learn more about the setting, feel free to check out my reviews of what’s out so far. If you’re just here to get the scoop on the dime novel, then keep reading…


Blood and Roses is a very fun short story that hits all the typical Noir clichés. Smart mouthed unflappable protagonist? Check. Femme Fatale? Check. Mysterious MacGuffin? Check. Intimidating man from a powerful organization? Check. The ability to turn one’s own blood into an acidic mystical weapon? Chec….wait. That’s not normally in a Noir story! Which, of course, is where the Deadlands aspect comes in, and what really makes the story stand out from the more generic Noir style stories penned every day. Take our main character, Jacob Toso. He’s not a private dick, but a piano player who works at various locations around the Big Easy, tickling ivories for pay. Before the story even gets going, Toso is advised by a not so mysterious stranger to keep his nose clean and not to help out a young lady. Of course, Toso hasn’t even met the lady in question, piquing his curiosity and thus making him far more willing to help an acquaintance by the name of Gretta once she actually does show back up in his life.


From there, the story hits all the bases you expect from a Noir tale. You have an item everyone wants, a dead body here or there, involvement by the local crime syndicate, a Nazi or two, and of course, a few betrayals along the way. Because it’s Deadlands though, the story wouldn’t be complete without a bit of magic and some otherworldly horror along the way. In this case, you have a gris-gris bag that acts as the MacGuffin in this tale, and a very subtle homage to The Dunwich Horror, which might be missed unless you’re a big Call of Cthulhu or Lovecraft fan. The story wraps up nicely and left me hoping that this will be the first of many dime novels featuring Mr. Toso, although I’d like to see a full-fledged Deadlands Noir novel as well, considering the core line has a few out there.


For those looking for game mechanics, you’ll find that the last page of the PDF is Jacob Toso’s stats, so that your players can encounter him in-game as an NPC (hopefully a friendly one…). About the only bad thing I can say about Blood and Roses is that $3.99 is rather pricey for a nineteen page story, especially when only fourteen of the pages are actual story, and all of the art is reused from the core setting book. The price alone makes it hard to recommend to gamers who didn’t get this for free via the Kickstarter campaign Pinnacle had for Deadlands Noir, especially when you can get full adventures or supplements for a system for that much these day. Heck, you can even get full digital novels for your e-reader for the same cost. Although Blood and Roses is a very fun piece that makes me want to read more about Jacob Toso and his continuing adventures in the Big Easy, you probably shouldn’t pay more than $1.99 for this due to its brevity, especially if you are new to the setting or are just looking for some RPG fiction to pass the time. The only people that will find it worth the current cover price are people like myself who adore Deadlands Noir.


Again, I really enjoyed the story, but when a digital short story costs almost as much as a full length paperback, it’s a bit overpriced. Here’s hoping we’ll get a sale or price drop soon so everyone can enjoy this. It’s a great gateway into Deadlands Noir and you don’t need to know anything about the setting or even tabletop RPGS at all to enjoy it.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir: Blood and Roses
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir
by Will L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/10/2013 15:32:13

Love it, if you love the noir setting definitely worth your time and money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir: Blood and Roses
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/09/2013 11:37:26

It involved a dame. Somehow it always does...


An atmospheric short story that introduces a fascinating character, well fitted to the 1930s and to the darkly sorcerous edge of Deadlands Noir. A nightclub pianist with rather a bit more to him than you'd see at first glance. A Texas Ranger that warns our pianist from getting involved with someone he hadn't yet met... enough to pique interest so that when she did walk in, why, he got involved!


For flavour, and for quite a few cameo characters that you might wish to incorporate into your game, this is well worth a look. You might even want to decide what the loot that everyone's interested in is, and use that too.


And as for the piano player - well, he's been fully statted out, with enough flavourful background for you to make him a major individual within your world. Perhaps even a player-character, if someone fancies him, but I think he might work better as an NPC. Or ask me round, I quite fancy playing him!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir: Blood and Roses
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Ghost Towns
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/05/2013 04:17:44
http://www.teilzeithelde-
n.de

In Ghost Towns, dem jüngsten Quellenbuch für den Savage Worlds Hintergrund Deadlands:Reloaded, dreht sich alles um unheimliche und gefährliche Ortschaften. Lest selbst, was unerschrockene Helden und enthusiastische Marshals da so alles erwartet.


Rezension: Deadlands Reloaded – Ghost Towns


Ghost Towns für Savage Worlds/Deadlands Reloaded führt den geneigten Leser durch sieben quer über den unheimlichen Westen verstreute kleine und größere Städte, deren Herausforderungen und Geheimnisse leichtsinniger Westernheroen harren. Konzeptionell Boomtowns für Deadlands Classic ähnlich, können sie als Schauplatz wie Handlungsfutter für einzelne Abenteuer oder Mini-Kampagnen dienen. Zudem stellt der Quellenband dem Marshal einen Zufallsgenerator zur Verfügung, der es ihm ermöglichen soll, auf die Schnelle ein merkwürdiges Örtchen im Westen zusammenzustellen, um schnell für angemessene Abendunterhaltung zu sorgen.


Erscheinungsbild


Auf 129 Seiten präsentiert sich das PDF mit gewohnt farbig-stimmungsvollem Seitenhintergrund, großer, gut lesbarer Schrift und hübschen, aber nicht bemerkenswerten Bildern. Das 6.5″ x 9″ Format sorgt auf Bildschirmen und Tablets, sogar grossen Smartphones für bequeme Lesbarkeit. Freunde bedruckten Papiers können das Dokument durch Ausblendung einzelner Ebenen in eine druckerfreundliche Version umwandeln.


Inhalt


Wieder einmal sorgt eine Ausgabe des Tombstone Epitaph, beliebtestes Boulevardblatt der Freunde des Obskuren, für die Einstimmung auf das Fleisch des Quellenbuchs. Neben einem Überblick über die allgemein zugänglichen Informationen rund um die Orte des Geschehens finden sich weiterführende Ansätze, die den Weg ins Abenteuer bahnen können; je nach Geschmack könnte man Spielern die entsprechenden Artikel zum Einstieg in die Geschichte an die Hand geben. Leider trübt der vorherrschende nüchtern-rationale Stil das Lesevergnügen - ein eher flapsiger Ton wie in anderen Epitaph-Einleitungen hätte auch Ghost Towns sicher gutgetan.


Die Darstellungen der Städte selbst folgen einem im wesentlichen vereinheitlichten Format. Nach einer Beschreibung der Lokalität, ihrer Geschichte und ihrer verborgenen Besonderheiten werden die wichtigen Bewohner des Ortes vorgestellt; im Anschluss daran knüpfen Savage Tales, grob oder feinkörnig ausgeformte Abenteuer, Handlungsfäden durch den Schauplatz. Merkwürdige Kreaturen und besondere Antagonisten schließlich sind ans Ende des Bandes verbannt worden. Was nun das Potential und den Ausarbeitungsgrad der Örtlichkeiten angeht, so unterscheiden sich die vorgestellten Orte ganz erheblich.


Devil´s Backbone (Kalifornien) wäre noch immer ein friedfertig vor sich hin vegetierendes Städtchen, wenn das große Beben es nicht auf einen Felskamm gehoben und beachtliche Mengen wertvollen Geistersteins freigelegt hätte. Seither sorgen scheußliche Kreaturen, Banditen und der erschwerte Zugang dafür, dass sich bei den Einwohnern keine Langeweile ausbreitet und Helden etwas zu tun hätten. Die beiden zugehörigen Savage Tales gießen alle wesentlichen Handlungsstränge in Abenteuer - sie können und sollten meiner Ansicht nach verknüpft werden, um eine hinreichend interessante Story zu erschaffen, die wohl eine Spielsitzung füllt. Damit allerdings sind die Optionen, die Devil´s Backbone bietet, bereits erschöpft; wenig mehr als ein kurzes vorgefertigtes Abenteuer also, das indes wenig zusätzliche spielleiterische Eigenarbeit erfordert. Eine Ungereimtheit sorgt zudem für Stirnrunzeln. Dass der große Geistersteinfund über einen beträchtlichen Zeitraum hinweg kaum weitere Aufmerksamkeit erregt hat, lässt sich vor dem Deadlands-Hintergrund nur mühsam rechtfertigen und strapaziert meines Erachtens arg die Glaubwürdigkeit.


Grant´s Pass (umstrittene Territorien, südlich der Sioux-Nationen) liegt inhaltlich sozusagen in den Ausläufern des großen Eisenbahnkrieges. Geführt wird die geteilte Gemeinde von einer fragilen Allianz aus desertierten Kämpfern des chinesischen Kriegsherren Kang einerseits und Loyalisten von Union Blue, der großen Eisenbahngesellschaft des Nordens andererseits. Die entsprechende Savage Tale präsentiert in einem Mini-Abenteuer einen kleinen Einstieg ins Setting. Ansonsten erwarten die Helden in dem augenscheinlich ruhigen Szenario etliche NSC mit – natürlich – finsteren Absichten und Zukunftsplänen. Ganz im Gegensatz zu Devil´s Backbone aber bleibt es größtenteils dem Marshal überlassen, daraus Geschichten zu schmieden.


Die Beschreibung von Culverton führt uns in eine große, boomende Stadt am Ufer des Mississipi. Einst diente sie einem nahezu legendären Piraten als Unterschlupf, bis ihn die Texas Ranger abserviert haben; der Schatten des Schurken aber liegt über der Zukunft der aufstrebenden Stadt. Zwei in unterschiedliche Richtungen gehende Abenteuer, in denen wenig so ist, wie es scheint, deuten bereits an, dass der Hintergrund von Culverton breiter angelegt ist. In der Tat finden sich vielfältige Ansätze, um aus dem Material so einige Geschichten zu erspielen, denen ein (für DL:R-Verhältnisse) erhöhtes Maß an Subtilität gemeinsam ist.
Düstere Legenden ranken sich um Josephine (im weiten Nordwesten), eine, wie es heißt, verfluchtes Provinznest, dessen Einwohner ihre Türen verrammeln, wenn die Dunkelheit hereinbricht. Ähnlich Devil´s Backbone könnte sie zum Schauplatz einer oder mehrerer verknüpfter Geschichten werden, bis die Helden ihr nett verpacktes Geheimnis gelüftet haben.
Hope Falls im wilden Südwesten ringt trotz der erstaunlichen Verfügbarkeit von Elektrizität in weiten Teilen der Gemeinde ebenfalls mit einer zügig fallenden Einwohnerzahl. Mancher glaubt nicht an die Mär von der sauberen Energie, aber, von ein paar vernachlässigbaren Todesfällen abgesehen, ist das sicher nur Geschnatter abergläubischer Fortschrittsverweigerer. Hier erwartet den Leser wieder ein vielschichtiger Hintergrund, der eine Heldentruppe mit abwechslungsreichen Ansätzen für kleine Storys ein Weilchen beschäftigen könnte.


Mit Rulamer inmitten des Great Maze, einer verborgenen Piratenstadt, entfernt sich das Buch langsam von gängigen Stereotypen in die Gefilde des Exotischen. In der Stadt bzw. mit den zugeordneten Savage Tales läßt sich der Maze zwischen den sie beherrschenden konkurrierenden Banden und weiteren "Interessengruppen" aus einer etwas anderen Perspektive erleben, der der Unterwelt. Rulamer legt ein schönes Fundament für abwechslungsreiche, vielleicht sogar epische Geschichten, und bietet Marshals in der Beschreibung wie den Abenteuern zahlreiche interessante Anregungen.


Es bleibt exotisch: Wagonsend, irgendwo im nirgendwo, ist Städtchen und niedergelassener großer Zirkus zugleich, eine Art skurriler West-Vergnügungspark der Prä-Disneyland-Ära. Das Unterhaltungsprogramm hinter den Kulissen aber sollte, den obligatorischen sinistren Umtrieben sei dank, auf ein erwachsenes, aber nicht weniger sensationslüsternes Publikum beschränkt bleiben - Gerüchte rund um verschwundene Menschen, Poltergeister und bösartige Clowns gehören im unheimlichen Westen nämlich quasi zwingend dazu. Interessante Charaktere und Geschichten runden das Gesamtbild eines sehr gelungenen Schauplatzes ab, der sich wohltuend von monoton wiederholten Standards abhebt. Das Hauptabenteuer führt in einer detektivischen Story elegant vom unbefangenen Zirkusvergnügen weg in die dahinter - natürlich - lauernden Abgründe.


Angesichts der Unterschiedlichkeit der beschriebenen Örtlichkeiten fallen mir zusammenfassende Worte relativ schwer. Auch wenn die Qualität der Stadtbeschreibungen erheblich schwankt, lässt sich festhalten, dass viele tragende Säulen leider arg konventionell geraten sind. Zumeist spielen die Ortsbeschreibungen/Szenariovorschläge mit sattsam bekannten Versatzstücken aus dem Deadlands-Hintergrund und fügen selten neues hinzu. Ein wenig zu häufig müssen Agenten der üblichen Verdächtigen aus dem Schurken-Repertoire des unheimlichen Westens als Aufhänger der Handlung herhalten. Erst mit Hope Falls, Rulamer und insbesondere Wagonsend scheint das Buch Fahrt aufzunehmen und Energie zu entwickeln. Unbefriedigend finde ich es auch, wenn sich manche Stadtbeschreibung im Ergebnis als nicht mehr als ein einzelnes, sehr überschaubares Abenteuer entpuppt.
Nach all dieser Nörgelei seien aber die positiven Seiten des Quellenbandes ebenso deutlich herausgestellt. Das Format der Stadtbeschreibungen spielt im Buch nämlich auch seine Stärken aus; es lässt DL:R-Spielrunden innerhalb der übersichtlichen urbanen Schauplätze die Handlung ohne „ablaufendes Programm“ frei erspielen. Die Savage Tales geben daneben genügend Hilfestellungen, um auch Anfängerrunden bei der Ausgestaltung nicht mit unüberwindbaren Hindernissen zu konfrontieren. Die Versatzstücke sind außerdem flexibel genug gehalten, um recht universell einsetzbar zu sein; so laden sie geradezu zur Plünderung ein, um Eigenentwürfe mit Orten, Personen und Handlungssträngen auszustatten. Auch wenn ich also ein gewisses Maß an Ideenarmut bemängele, Dynamik steckt in dem Buch: Marshals erhalten mit den Ghost Towns-Städten trotzdem einen breit ausgestatteten Baukasten, dessen Inhalte auf vielfältige Art Storys inspirieren, gestalten oder ergänzen können.


Den Abschluss des Buches bildet der Strange Locales Generator, der an Hand von Tabellen und Pokerkarten die zufällige Erschaffung von Siedlungen ermöglicht. Vergleichbare Generatoren fanden sich bereits mit jeweils regionalem Bezug in den Kampagnen The Flood und The Last Sons. Wert und Farbe der gezogenen Karten bestimmen über die einzelnen Aspekte der Stadt, angefangen bei der Größe über mundane und übernatürliche Probleme hinweg bis hin zu Komplikationen, die sich im Verlauf der Story ergeben sollen. Dieser Ansatz zur Erstellung eines Handlungsrahmens entspricht, offen gesagt, nicht meinem bevorzugten Spielstil. Gleichwohl zeigt der Feldtest, dass es leicht fällt, die vom Generator gelieferten Stichworte zu einer sinnvollen, möglicherweise spannenden Geschichte zu verbinden – auch wenn die zentralen Ideen letztlich doch aus dem Hirnschmalz des Spielleiters entstehen, nicht aber aus dem Generator selbst. Marshals, die Anschub brauchen können, damit die Ideen ins Rollen geraten, werden also möglicherweise wertvolle Unterstützung erhalten.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis


Gegenüber anderen DL:R-Produkten mit gleichem Preis hat Pinnacle Entertainment diesmal die Seitenzahl merklich reduziert. Einerseits enthält Ghost Towns zwar einen vielfältig einsetzbaren Baukasten, der ohne Aufblähungen auskommt; andererseits aber warten viele PDFs anderer Verlage mit einer weitaus höheren Textdichte pro Seite auf, besitzen also deutlich mehr Inhalt. Leider verfestigt sich so mein Eindruck, dass sich Pinnacle Entertainment bei den Neuerscheinungen im oberen Preissegment positioniert.


Fazit


Leider vermisse ich bei aller Brauchbarkeit des Materials mehr zündende, interessante Ideen; für meinen Geschmack verharrt das Buch zu stark darin, sattsam bekannte Elementen des unheimlichen Westens zu rekombinieren, ohne ihnen neue Facetten abzugewinnen. So bleibt Ghost Towns im Schnitt handwerklich solides, gut verwertbares Spielmaterial, aber mit zu wenigen echten Höhepunkten. Vor dem Hintergrund der Preisentwicklung kann ich eine gewisse Enttäuschung nicht verhehlen, denn das Niveau von beispielsweise Return to Mani¬tou Bluff erreicht das Buch als Ganzes nicht.


Unsere Bewertung


Erscheinungsbild 3,5/5 Gewohnter DL:R-Standard
Inhalt 3,5/5 Solides Spielmaterial ohne Aha-Effekt
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis 3/5 Leider oberer Preisbereich, vom Inhalt nur bedingt gerechtfertigt
Gesamt 3,5/5 Vielfältig einsetzbar, aber mehr routiniert als inspiriert



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Ghost Towns
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir: The Old Absinthe House Blues
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/21/2013 09:02:37

Originally posted at: http://diehardgam-
efan.com/2013/01/21/deadlands-noir-the-old-absinthe-house-bl-
ues-savage-worlds/


Earlier this month, I reviewed the Deadlands Noir campaign setting and absolutely fell in love with it, to the point where I’m STILL kicking myself for not taking part in its original Kickstarter campaign. Since then, Pinnacle Entertainment has released the first adventure for the setting, entitled The Old Absinthe House Blues, and I knew I had to see if it was just as good. As the adventure was originally a free Kickstarter stretch goal to backers of a certain dollar amount, I’ll admit to being a bit shocked at the price tag on this adventure. With a page count of only thirty-two pages, it’s hard to justify the $9.99 price tag for this adventure, especially when it’s a) almost a fifth the size of Deadlands Noir but roughly half the cost b) just a PDF and c) crazy expensive compared to adventures like the Shadowrun Missions series, which is the same size, full colour and only $3.99 per adventure. The good news is that, while The Old Absinthe House Blues is pretty expensive compared to similarly sized adventures from other systems, it’s a really fun adventure that works as an excellent introduction to not only the Deadlands Noir campaign setting, but the Savage Worlds. Pinnacle does have you over a barrel right here.


If you’ve read Deadlands Noir (or my review of it), then you know to expect two things. The first is that you’ll need a copy of Savage Worlds in order to play this adventure, as that is the rules system it uses. The other is that the adventure is set in and around New Orleans in the 1930s. Eventually, we’ll see other locals for Deadlands Noir, so just hang in there if The Big Easy isn’t your preference.


If you haven’t picked up Deadlands Noir, you really should grab that before getting The Old Absinthe House Blues. Again, you will need copies of Deadlands Reloaded and Savage Worlds for rules and mechanics, and the aforementioned Deadlands Noir for setting information. So that’s three whole books just to play The Old Absinthe House Blues, which is a bit of a sorespot to me, but seeing as I only get PDFs of RPGs these days, it’s not like having all these books to play an adventure is going to break my back or take up a lot of space. Still, couple the need to purchase three books on top of a ten dollar adventure and the cost is going to add up quickly for newcomers, perhaps even to the point where it drives them away. So if you’re gaming on a tight budget, The Old Absinthe House Blues might not be where you want to begin with this system.


The player characters are either gumshoes by trades or roped into the role for whatever reason. They’ve been hired by the bartender of The Old Absinthe House to find the joint’s missing torch singer, one Ms. Delilah Starr. Seems she played her regular gig Friday night, but never showed up to work on Saturday. Sounds like a simple missing person’s fetch quest, right? Well it’s not. The adventure throws everything but the kitchen sink at the PCs, including an unrequited would-be amour, an evil oil company (is there any other kind?),a bunch of petty thugs, some voodoo magic for good measure and an unwholesome beast out to turn the PC’s insides into their outsides. Characters will be going everywhere from New Orleans proper to a bayou swamp inhabited with spooky things in spooky locations. The Old Absinthe House Blues is a pretty turbulent affair, and there’s a good chance at least one player character will bite it through the progression of the adventure. It’s a fairly creepy adventure that will have you wondering who is the bigger evil in the adventure – man or monster – and it blends supernatural horror and two fisted pulp drama together in a way that it is hard to imagine one without the other. By the time all is said and done, you’ll have been given a taste of everything Deadlands Noir has to offer, and you’ll want to come back for more.


One thing I should mention is that The Old Absinthe House Blues is pretty different from regular Deadlands and Deadlands Reloaded adventures that I have played or red through in the past. This is not an adventure fraught with fast paced actions or shoot ‘em ups. Sure, there are times where combat is the answer (perhaps the only answer in fact), but The Old Absinthe House Blues has more in common with Call of Cthulhu adventures than the Weird West Deadlands is typically known for. There’s a lot of legwork, research, hobnobbing and persuading here. There is at least one point where the PCs will encounter an alien horror that defies understanding, and their best option is for flight over fight. Honestly, with a little bit of tweaking, you could actually make The Old Absinthe House Blues work as a 1920s/30s Call of Cthulhu affair, and it would still work wonderfully. I bring this up for two reasons. The first is this means The Old Absinthe House Blues is a wonderful way to introduce people to Savage Worlds or Deadlands who primarily play games like Chill, Call of Cthulhu, Trail of Cthulhu or Gumshoe. There’s a strong crossover appeal, and it will help with the learning curve of the new system, as Deadlands has some very unique quirks that people tend to either really love or really hate, like the deck and chips mechanics. The other is that the slow pace of this adventure coupled with the more cerebral gameplay might be a turn-off to others, especially those who want a more traditional Deadlands adventure or something hack and slash based. Personally, I loved this adventure and found it to be exactly the sort I love to run/play, but then, my favorite games are Call of Cthulhu, Shadowrun and Vampire: The Masquerade, so I’m not your typical Deadlands player.


The Old Absinthe House Blues should take between one and three sessions of a few hours, depending on the players progress. It’s a fairly linear adventure, but there is room for deviation and places where the authors suggest throwing in some of those Savage Tale side stories from the Deadland Noir core rulebook. It’s full of memorable characters and does a good job of combining the core theme of Deadlands proper with the grit and locales of a Noir setting. The adventure also sports some excellent art, some helpful handouts for players and some reference maps for the Marshall/Keeper/DM/GM/Whatever to use. The Old Absinthe House Blues is a solid affair from beginning to end, and it’s a great companion piece to the core Deadlands Noir campaign setting. The worst thing I can say about the adventure is that it’s priced a bit too high compared to its contemporaries, but even then you’ll get your money’s worth out of The Old Absinthe House Blues and then some. At this point, my biggest concern is whether or not Pinnacle can keep a string of high quality Deadlands Noir releases coming, and the speed at which they do it. After all, there’s so much potential in this setting and we’ve only got a single city locked down so far. So far the Deadlands Noir setting is two for two in terms of quality releases and I can’t wait to see what’s next.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir: The Old Absinthe House Blues
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Deadlands Noir
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/18/2013 01:43:14
http://www.teilzeithelde-
n.de

Erscheinungsbild
Das Erscheinungsbild des nur 145 Seiten starken Bandes präsentiert sich durchweg gut. Dem Setting getreu ist die Farbgestaltung in einem hellen Grau gehalten, dass durch den sparsamen Einsatz kräftiger Farbtöne akzentuiert wird. Es unterstreicht damit die triste Atmosphäre des Settings ohne dabei langweilig zu wirken. Die Schriftart und der Kontrast zum Hintergrund sind ordentlich gewählt, und der Inhalt ist sehr gut lesbar. Nur in den Seitenleisten leidet die Lesbarkeit aufgrund der Darstellung als Filmstreifen manchmal ein wenig, wirklich unlesbar wird dadurch aber nichts. Das Artwork wurde übrigens von Cheyenne Wright erstellt, der Deadlands Fans sicherlich ein Begriff ist. Die Illustrationen fügen sich in das allgemeine Thema ein und vermitteln dem Betrachter eine düstere, feindselige Welt, in der Hoffnungslosigkeit die vorherrschende Emotion ist. Insgesamt ist das Erscheinungsbild unheimlich gut gelungen. Es gab keinerlei offensichtliche Tippfehler oder grafische Entgleisungen. Die verwendeten Grafiken wirken durchgängig sehr stimmig, passen gut zueinander und harmonieren sehr gut mit dem Gesamtlayout. Es macht richtig Spaß, sich mit einem so schönen Settingband zu beschäftigen.


Inhalt


Der Band ist wie bei vielen Savage Worlds Settings üblich in einen Bereich für Spieler und einen für den Spielleiter gegliedert. Der Spielerteil beginnt mit einer kurz gehaltenen Übersicht der Ereignisse, die in Deadlands von der uns bekannten Geschichte abweichen. Danach folgt die Charaktererschaffung welche den grundsätzlichen Charaktererschaffungsregeln von Savage Worlds entspricht. Als Settingregel erhalten alle Charaktere erstmal den Nachteil Arm, was die Grundstimmung des Settings sehr schön unterstreicht, wenn den Charakteren buchstäblich das Geld durch die Finger rinnt. Neu im Spiel ist die Fähigkeit Vorführen (engl. Perform), welche ähnlich wie Glücksspiel, als abstrakte Einkommensquelle in Form von Auftritten in den zahlreichen Bars und Nachtclubs funktioniert. Zusätzlich wurden einige sinnvolle Vor- bzw. Nachteile ins Spiel integriert die sich insbesondere dem Noir-Aspekt des Spiels widmen. Beispielsweise ist das Spielen eines korrupten Ermittlers oder eines allzu vertrauensseligen Zeitgenossen nun auch durch Nachteile abgedeckt und diese können zum Erspielen von Bennies verwendet werden. Die zur Verfügung stehenden, neuen Vorteile sind mittlerweile Standarderweiterungen, lediglich die berufsbezogenen Vorteile setzen interessante Akzente. Zusätzlich dazu haben auch einige Deadlands-typische Vor- bzw. Nachteile den Weg ins Regelwerk gefunden. Ein kleiner Abschnitt über die Verwendung der mystischen Hintergründe aus Deadlands Reloaded erweitert das Kapitel sinnvoll und klärt mögliche offene Fragen. Die Ausrüstungsliste wartet mit keinen großartigen Überraschungen auf, die wichtigsten Gegenstände sind in der Tabelle dokumentiert, die verrückten Apparate der Patenwissenschaftler unterstreichen den Steampunk-Anteil von Deadlands. Die Charaktererschaffung schließt mit einer graphisch schön anmutenden Karte von New Orleans, deren Beschriftung allerdings sehr klein geraten ist. Kein Wunder, die Karte ist schließlich auch als Poster geplant.


Der nächste Abschnitt beschäftigt sich mit New Orleans im Jahre 1935. In mageren sechs Seiten werden die grundlegenden Informationen wie Verwaltung, Recht und Gesetz und die einzelnen Stadtviertel kurzweilig vorgestellt. An einigen Stellen wünscht man sich aber mehr Informationen. Beispielsweise ist der Abschnitt über das Stadtzentrum eine halbe Seite stark, behandelt darin aber auch die einzelnen Bezirke, so dass für das zentrale Gewerbegebiet leider nur ein kurzer Abschnitt übrig geblieben ist. Da die Totenbestattung in New Orleans deutlich von der Norm abweicht (aufgrund des sumpfigen Bodens werden die Toten überirdisch in Mausoleen bestattet), wird hier in einem kleinen Abschnitt nochmal explizit darauf Bezug genommen. Insgesamt vermittelt das Kapitel einen soliden Ersteindruck von New Orleans und enthält die wichtigsten Informationen, um die Stadtgebiete schon mal grob einschätzen zu können, enttäuscht aber durch mangelnden Tiefgang.


Das kommende Kapitel erweitert die Grundregeln von Savage Worlds um passende Settingregeln. Neben bereits im Grundregelwerk von Savage Worlds vorgestellten Optionalregeln, finden sich in diesem Bereich auch Regeln zu Beinarbeit und Recherche. Es handelt sich hierbei um abstrakte Regeln für Situationen, die nicht unbedingt ausgespielt werden müssen und mit einem Würfelwurf abgehandelt werden können. Interessant dabei ist auch, dass die Regeln den Ermittlern keine Informationen vorenthalten. Es mag den Ermittler ein wenig Geld kosten, oder er könnte auf der Suche nach Informationen aufgemischt werden, aber den Zugang zur Information erhält er dennoch. Auch die Regeln für Soziale Konflikte wurden für Deadlands Noir auf die spezifischen Bedürfnisse angepasst und so existieren spezielle Regeln für Befragungen und schlagfertige Auseinandersetzungen. Darüber hinaus werden Regeln zur Beschattung von Verdächtigen vorgestellt. Informationen zu dem Stand der Kriminaltechnik runden diesen Bereich ab.


Im Kapitel Magie werden die vier mystisch begabten „Klassen“ des Settings vorgestellt und mit Zaubersprüchen oder verrückten Maschinen versorgt. Auch in diesem Punkt beweist John Goff ein Händchen für stimmige mystische Hintergründe: Die allseits bekannten Verdammten, lebende Tote, die einen täglichen Kampf gegen ihren wortwörtlichen inneren Dämon, Pardon, Manitou führen. Den verrückten Wissenschaftlern, die seit dem unheimlichen Westen den Schritt zu Patentwissenschaftlern vollzogen haben, betreten nun auch Voodoo-Priester und Grifter die übernatürliche Bühne. Während die Voodoo-Priester bereits in Deadlands Reloaded eine kleine Rollen gespielt haben und jetzt eine Aufwertung zum vollwertigen mystischen Hintergrund erhalten haben ist der Grifter eine neue Rolle, die es nur in Deadlands Noir gibt. Im Kern handelt es sich bei den Griftern um eine Mischung aus den aus dem unheimlichen Westen bekannten Huckstern und indianischen Schamanen. Das bedeutet, der Grifter muss regelmäßig seinem Laster frönen, wenn er seine Kräfte nicht empfindlich schwächen will. Eine clevere Idee, den naturverbundenen Schamanen in das Großstadtgewirr von New Orleans zu verpflanzen. Die Regeln hierzu sind allerdings ein wenig dünn; entscheidet sich der Grifter, seinem Laster nicht mehr nachzugehen verliert er seine Kräfte nicht vollständig, sondern regeneriert sie nur langsamer, was aber in der Praxis keinen großen Unterschied machen dürfte. In Summe sind die mystischen Hintergründe aber sehr stimmungsvoll und passen gut zum Setting. Die Regeln sind klar formuliert und verändern die zugrunde liegenden Savage Worlds Regeln kaum.


Der Spielleiterbereich beginnt mit einer Weltbeschreibung für den Spielleiter mit einem groben Überblick was die Welt im Moment bewegt und vermittelt einen groben Überblick über die Geschehnisse von Deadlands: Reloaded.


Ein großartiges Kapitel ist der Game Master's Guide to New Orleans, ein 15 Seiten umfassendes Kompendium mit Hintergrundinformationen über Organisationen, Personen und Stadtviertel. Dieser Guide ist sehr ausführlich gehalten und – Kickstarter sei Dank – mit zahlreichen Bildern ausgestattet. Als Kickstarter-Backer hatte man die Möglichkeit, sein Konterfei als Spielleitercharakter in das Regelwerk zu bringen. Eine Idee, die zahlreiche Backer wahrgenommen haben und die nun das New Orleans von Deadlands Noir bevölkern. Ein „Highlight“ für deutsche Spieler dürfte wohl „Dr. Kettensäge“ sein, der, wie mir John Goff versichert hat, auch eine Vorgabe eines Backers war. Die Weltbeschreibung ist in bester Savage Worlds Manier gehalten: Der Guide hat dieselbe Reihenfolge wie die Beschreibungen im Spielerteil des Buches und kleine Symbole weisen auf mögliche Savage Tales hin, die sich in diesem Bereich der Stadt abspielen können. Die Stadtbeschreibung ist sehr umfassend, lässt aber bei den in New Orleans operierenden Organisationen und Unternehmen leider Lücken, mit denen der Spielleiter alleine gelassen wird.


Ein echtes Juwel dieses Buches ist aber der „Mysteriengenerator“, der sich an den Guide anschließt und die Deadlands Noir Variante des Abenteuergenerators ist. Er soll dem Spielleiter bei der Entwicklung spannender Fälle helfen und erfüllt seine Aufgabe als Inspirationsquelle tatsächlich sehr gut. Er verfügt über Tabellen für den Aufhänger, das Ereignis, den Täter, das Motiv, mögliche Beweise und optional noch den Schauplatz des Verbrechens sowie Schwierigkeiten, die die Ermittler behindern oder den Fall komplett auf den Kopf stellen können. Nach wenigen Würfelwürfen hat man auf alle wichtigen Fragen eines Falles eine Antwort, was genug sein sollte, daraus einen spannenden Fall zu konstruieren. Außerdem enthält dieses Kapitel weitere Hinweise, wie man mit Mystery-Abenteuer umgeht, welche Arten von Beweisen es gibt, oder wie Spuren im Spiel vermittelt werden sollen. Leider beschränkt sich das Kapitel auf die Erstellung von einzelnen Fällen. Das Design einer größeren Verschwörung, die sich über mehrere Fälle zieht, wird leider nicht behandelt. Eure Teilzeithelden waren aber auf der Suche und haben diesen Forenbeitrag (in englisch) aufgestöbert, der sich mit diesem Thema umfassend beschäftigt.


Beinahe 40 Seiten sind daraufhin der Plot-Point Kampagne Red Harvest und einem starken Dutzend Savage Tales gewidmet. Die Plot Point Kampagne macht einen sehr ordentlichen Eindruck. Sie hat keinen Weltrettungsplot, sorgt aber auf dafür, dass die Ermittler in New Orleans herumkommen, einige Kontakte gewinnen oder verlieren können und lässt sich wunderbar mit weiteren Fällen strecken. Die Story ist gut gemacht, ist aber deutlich eher Deadlands als Noir. Das bedeutet, dass den Spielern wenige wirkliche moralische Dilemmas entgegen gesetzt werden sondern die Ermittler doch eher eine heroische Rolle einnehmen. Die restlichen Savage Tales bieten eine Auswahl typischer Detektivfälle. Von Mord über Diebstahl zu Kidnapping ist so ziemlich alles in unterschiedlichen Ausprägungen mit dabei. Selbstverständlich ist auch der Horror-Aspekt von Deadlands mit in die Geschichten geflossen und in mehr als einer Geschichte sehen sich die Ermittler übernatürlicher Opposition gegenüber.


Der Anhang des Buches besteht aus ungefähr 20 Seiten Charakterwerten, Bodenpläne dem ansprechend illustrierten Charakterbogen und einem sehr brauchbaren Index.
Multimedial ist das Buch auf der Höhe der Zeit; es verfügt über ein elektronisches Inhaltsverzeichnis, ein voll verlinktes grafisches Inhaltsverzeichnis sowie einen verlinkten Index. Es ist in Layern aufgebaut, so dass der Benutzer Inhaltselemente wie Grafiken oder den Hintergrund für den Ausdruck ausgeblendet werden können. Leider existieren keine Links im Text. Insbesondere die Verlinkung der Spielleiterbeschreibung eines Ortes mit der dazugehörigen Savage Tale hätte sich hier angeboten.


Fazit


Deadlands Noir ist ein gut durchdachtes, spannendes Setting mit Potential. Der Einstieg als Kickstarterkampagne war sehr gut gewählt, die Qualität des Buches hat davon eindeutig profitiert. Kleine Schnitzer, wie unpassende Spielleitercharakter-Namen sind leider die Kröte, die man bei einem solchen Vorgehen schlucken muss. Deadlands Noir gelingt es, das bedrückende Großstadtfeeling eines Noir-Romans mit der Welt von Deadlands zu verbinden. Die Regeländerungen sind sinnvoll, verleiten aber auch dazu, große Teile eines investigativen Abenteuers auf einen Würfelwurf zu reduzieren. Dies ist nur einer von mehreren Gründen, wieso das Setting nur erfahrenen Spielleitern uneingeschränkt empfohlen werden kann.


Unsere Bewertung


Erscheinungsbild: 5/5 Tolle grafische Gestaltung, sehr gut lesbares Layout, super Illustrationen. So macht Lesen Spaß!
Inhalt: 4/5 Spannendes, unverbrauchtes Setting, genialer Abenteuergenerator
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis: 4/5 Tolles Artwork, viel Inhalt: Hervorragend!
Gesamt: 4/5 Ein wundervoller Settingband, der bereits beim Lesen Fantasien weckt.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 121 to 135 (of 611 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG