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Kingdoms of Legend: World Map Poster
by Grant M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/11/2014 17:39:55
I use this for fantasy wargaming camaigns, and it is great for that purpose, giving players the opportunity to use both fantasy and historical armies and having a coherent storyline for the games. A friend has run the pathfinder campaign in this world- a great crossover for us all.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: World Map Poster
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Kingdoms of Legend: Knights of France
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/31/2012 11:25:10
IPG continues their hard work on building a coherent world for their Kingdom of Legends setting with Knights of France providing a good resource for knights and for an alternate history/fantastic vision of medieval France. If your campaign has a place for both, this will be an extremely useful source book, however if it only uses one of the other, the material will be of more limited value.

Kingdoms of Legend: Knights of France is a 36-page PDF (33-pages if you remove the covers and OGL page) for the Pathfinder RPG written by Jason Rice and published by Interaction Point Games as part of their Kingdoms of Legend line.

Knights of France is about the knights, and other people, of the France of the Kingdoms of Legend setting (an alternate 14th C with a Pathfinder overlay). It has rules for tournaments, four different ways that knightly character can display their skills including jousting. Six new cavalier orders (for the APG Cavalier class) are presented including the semi-secret Order of the Newt, dedicated to protecting the families of witches. A new skill use for knowledge (nobility) is included and that is the ability to recognize, and create, heraldic symbols.

A friar archetype is provided for the Monk class, leading to an odd blend of western and eastern mysticism. A pair of new weapons, jousting lance and hand gonne, are detailed. Additional information on horses and dogs and rules for various breeds wrap up the rule portion of the book.

The last part of the book is a discussion of noble ranks followed by a region by region overview of France in the Kingdom of Legends setting, including various adventure seeds scattered throughout the descriptions.

Disclosure: As a featured reviewer for RPGNow/DriveThroughRPG, I received my copy of this product for free from the publisher for the purpose of this review.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: Knights of France
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Kingdoms of Legend: Ninja Attack! Adventure
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/17/2012 06:56:39
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/08/17/tabletop-review-kingdom-
s-of-legend-ninja-attack-pathfinder/

“You are being attacked by ninjas, what do you do?”
“I attack the nearest ninja”
“You cannot attack that ninja. He’s a ninja!”
“I cast Dominate Person on one of them”
“The ninja re-ninjafies your spell and dominates you”
“I haven’t even rolled yet!”

In this review, you are being attacked by Kingdoms of Legend: Ninja Attack! a Pathfinder-friendly adventure about a team of ninjas (who are the characters that the players will play with) and the scallywag merchant they have been sent to eliminate (by another scallywag merchant!). This adventure takes place in the Kingdoms of Legend setting, “a medieval fantasy campaign setting … based on an alternate history Earth from the year 1415 CE…”. The players choose from a set of pre-generated ninjas to play and kick with.

Stop the review, you are being attacked! What do you do?

_ Read article

Ninjas do not read! Unless they have to! Then they just look at the symbols and instantly understand whatever is being said regardless of language! The attack has subsided for now.

Your team of ninjas is tasked with finding a way into the merchant’s compound, doing away with him, and drinking all of his iced tea. They drink it up! The merchant’s name is Kulal Pasha, and his compound is in Palmyra, located in what is now Syria. The players will learn this before the adventure even starts, as it is part of their briefing for the mission. If they are successful, a purse of 7,000 gp is theirs (however they do get half of that as a “signing bonus” so they can buy some gear and supplies).

Will you be prepared? You will have one page of map, one page of setting information, six character sheets, and roughly ten pages covering the adventure itself. My reading of this text leads me to the conclusion that it starts out as an infiltration that becomes a dungeon-crawly boss battle.

Enough describing, you will tell us the secrets of the adventure! How do the players find Kulal Pasha?

Alas, I cannot reveal the secrets, for there are many. The players will face deadly, dastardly dangers. It might seem easy to just slip over the wall and take care of business, but no no no no my friends… it is not nearly as easy as that.

Should the ninjas succeed in their task, they will have the option to continue on as assassins or thieves or whatever someone will hire them to do. Ninjas do not work for free!


Mortal Combat

The ninjas will need to fight. The only part of the adventure after initial infiltration that doesn’t involve fighting involves traps. Prepare to fight!

I have been pleased with the way this adventure was written: in blood! No not really, it’s simply typeset electronically. The author has taken care to let the GM know how things are likely to work out should the adventure go one way or the other. He provides box text and descriptions for different outcomes of the party’s efforts. Do not expect art, expecting much art in this module would be to fail, and to fail would be death. However, in the pen lies strength, and for the product as a whole I say well done.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: Ninja Attack! Adventure
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Kingdoms of Legend: The Hidden Threat
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/07/2011 11:29:25
This pdf is 36 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page advertisements (also featuring the map index and 1 page back cover, leaving 32 pages of content.

The Kingdoms of Legend are Interaction Point Studios' very own campaign setting, which is loosely based upon our own world and subsequently not too high magic. A central part of that world's mythology revolves around the downfall of old gods and the replacement via 12 new ones. Clerics of the old gods still abound, though they can only regain spells when in proximity or in possession of a relic of said fallen god. This is important for the meta-plot of this adventure, hence I mention it.

The overall feeling the adventure evokes is very old-world-style, but not as gritty, desolate or wild as in e.g. Raging Swan's Lonely Coast mini-setting while still being aimed at old-school-style games.

This being the first part of an adventure trilogy,

SPOILERS

will abound, so potential players please stop reading now and jump to the conclusion.
Still here? Ok!

This adventure kicks an adventuring career off with a humble task - strange noises have been heard from one of Turnberry castle's cesspits and the PCs, hapless newcomers to trade as they are, are supposed to climb down into the refusal pit and eliminate whatever creature has been causing problems there before the lord arrives. What begins as a simple extermination task, turns sour rather fast: The creature is a rockgrub, a huge grub that feeds on rock and is currently happy undermining the castle. Oh yeah, the beast is not native in these parts. A quick search leads the PCs to a nest of eggs and the worms mate as well as a slave-driven, hidden enclave of hobgoblins that tries to excavate a temple of the old gods that has been lost in the rocks under the castle.
Why? Well, because someone hired them, of course, and that someone also provided them a kind of relic to find the temple. The mysterious employer also tried diplomacy and an assassin (who now languishes in Turnberry's dungeon - not the best one, it seems) prior to this, but that is part of the metaplot and not relevant for this adventure.

From a rat-swarm to a huecava (escaped from the buried complex) and smart fighting foes, to some minor traps and even the possibility to stealthily approach the final battle(s) through a subterranean mushroom forest (including a d20 table for eating unidentified fungi) the enemies and obstacles in this adventure are generally smart and feel like a nice little humanoid force, complete with an ogre. Yep. Who would have thought that. A 1st-level mini-dungeon with goblinoids and an ogre at the end. Déjà-vu, anyone else apart from yours truly? It's a pity that e.g. the mushroom forest is not utilized as a cool place for a final showdown - jumping atop an ogre from a mushroom cap is, after all, quite cool.

We also get the new rockgrub-monster (CR 2, btw.) and 3 minor and nice magic items. Said monsters are the coolest part of the adventure, providing the possibility of a collapsing tower in part 3 of the adventure as well as the possibility of the PCs raising one of the grubs. However, no sample DCs are given for said task, squandering a rather cool idea.

We also get 2 pages of full-color maps with grids that cover each and every encounter in the dungeon, which is nice. What's not so nice is that my players won't get to see them, because they feature encounter numbers and I consider these to be immensely distracting from immersion. Quite frankly, I don't get why in this day and age where a simple layer can take care of them, they are still in almost every map. I could continue now with my patented Endzeitgeist-hates-maps-with-secret-doors-and-numbers-ramble-
s, but for your and my sanity's sake I'll refrain from doing so. We don't get a map of Turnberry castle and the non-combat areas, though.
The pdf also comes with 4 pregens on one page and 2 pages of campaign world information.

Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to a classic two-column standard and the b/w-artworks are nice and help establish the very traditional feel of the module. The pdf is extensively bookmarked.
Old-school indeed. That's clearly the design-goal here, as the adventure itself is rather humble - nothing too flashy, nothing too extravagant. However, that's also the problem: Reading this, I thought I liked the adventure. That there's nothing wrong with it. That's what makes rating this pdf so hard.
Apart from the set-up the module delivers for parts 2 and 3, it has nothing UNIQUE or tremendously exciting going for it. While the writing is concise, the items, the setting-specific, minor details and the foes are well-crafted, this adventure felt very "Been there, done that" - catacombs below a castle? Check. Enemy-roster? Double check. Especially the final fight and the opposing forces are just so incredibly...run-of-the-mill. No unique mounts, no special tactics and the environmental complications and challenges, while nice, also are nothing too special.

A central problem here is, that while I'd usually rate this adventure somewhere between 3 and 4 stars, there are _MANY_ VERY good adventures out there and unfortunately, e.g. Raging Swan's "Retribution" blows "The Hidden Threat" clean out of the water. I could also mention several other adventures, but I guess my argument is clear - I just can't bring myself to recommend this. It's too formulaic, too run-of-the-mill and that's a pity - Brent Evanger knows how to write and the adventure has some angles (fungi, rock grubs etc.) that would have made for a truly cool experience. As written, though, my final verdict will be 2.5 stars, rounded down to 2 for me personally, rounded up to 3 if you like these very old-school, down to earth modules. If you want to run the whole trilogy, this might be better for you. I, for my part, will take a look at the sequels and hope the build-up leads to a cool pay off in Part 2 and 3.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: The Hidden Threat
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Kingdoms of Legend: Knights of France
by Rachael S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/07/2011 18:00:33
Product review:
I have only 1 real complaint with this whole series of Kingdoms of Legend and that is the lack of printer friendly options. If you use a layer approach to the background color cover that we can turn off that would move this to a solid 5 rating.

Content review:
I like the content of this product well. I would like there to be formatting options for 3 hole punching such that i could have one page to one topic/area/country so that I can easly keep all my data relevant to my current game together. The inside front cover is a really good map of the area i'm running in. I would like to see layers used on this level of map with roads, villages, and other such items. Adventure locations would be good also. (abandoned towns/towers, ruins, graveyards, dungeons, mines, etc).. This gives me a really good feel for a long running campain world as long as this publisher focuses on the DM customizing/maintaining our games with their support.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: Knights of France
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Kingdoms of Legend: World Guide
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/05/2011 10:08:15
This pdf is 36 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving 32 pages of content, so what is this setting of Interaction Point Games about?

After getting a neat 1-page full color map, we are introduced to the basic premise of the setting, for which this book can be considered the gazetteer, the Kingdoms of Legend. The basic premise of the setting is that the Kingdoms of Legend are an alternate version of our own world in which races like elves, dwarves, orcs etc. exist and magic works. That also means that we'll get the new half-dwarf and half-gnome races, which are okay, design-wise, but nothing to get too excited about.

Oh boy, after reading that, I was almost positive that there would be some aspects I wouldn't like. Turns out that author Brent Evanger has invested quite an effort into not just lazily slapping "fantasy" on our history and painstakingly researched 4 different sets of names for the twelve gods of the setting.

In fact, the category where I was absolutely sure this pdf would fail makes for the perhaps most compelling part, a t least for me as a language-nerd - In the language-department, thankfully the terrible idea that is the common tongue has not been slapped on poor Europe. Instead, we get 3 lingua franca and a vast array of different languages, all neatly categorized with alphabet, sample names etc. Even better, the at least in my games, never applied rule that everyone would be literate is not used - rather literacy is rare and something you have to work for (by investing at least a feat if you don't belong to the literate classes like wizards etc.). This expansion of the linguistics-rule also comes with sample DC-modifier to verify and understand documents etc.

This painstaking level of detailed research is also applied to the respective geography and a vast list of Kingdoms, city-states etc. is provided along information on largest settlements, capitals, population, allies, enemies etc., making for an interesting interwoven tapestry of political alliances and potential adventures.

Sounds awesome and like a wholesale recommendation? Unfortunately, no, as there are some problems: I did mention the twelve gods and it is in this area the setting somewhat falls flat on its face: There are 12 gods and the fallen (old) gods as well as primordial, savage evil deities even older than the Fallen and a lot of the motivations/tensions are supposed to be results of an old/new-struggle, somewhat similar to the Scarred Lands of 3.5., but minus the cataclysms, deities walking the earth etc. - this is a rather low-magic setting, after all. The first problem I see is that anyone only half-versed in mythology realizes that just saying "Odin is the same god as Hermes, just in Germanic" does not work. At all. While I could live with Greek and Roman gods being the same, the transition to Germanic and Celtic gods does not work and the approximation falls flat on its face.

Even worse, though, is something you may have noticed by now: Christianity, Judaism, Islam - all the "big" religions in Europe are absent from this world - Were they as influential as the average religion in a fantasy setting, that would be one thing. Taking into account how these religions essentially provided the drive for the crusades, inquisition, political maneuvers, excommunicated kings etc., this is a problem. The whole social order of medieval Europe, the political landscape etc. - almost everything was influenced by the church, be it positively or negatively. The fact that these religions actually DID persecute and convert people of the old beliefs makes this decision baffling at best for me: The concept of old vs. new in religious history and Christianity's replacement of the habits of old, their monastery structure etc. provided the driving fuel for not only religious, but also racial tensions and the different sub-sets of Christian beliefs also would have provided for ample, cool roleplaying opportunities. I mean, come on, even I as a die-hard atheist would LOVE to play a Catholic inquisitor rooting out vile cults! I gather that if I had a hardcore Christian in my group, he surely would enjoy kicking ass in the name of the Lord - after all, there are awesome quotes a plenty in the Good Book and why not showing off how cool religion can be in a friendly environment?

If you think I'm exaggerating, just think how our holidays impact our daily lives and consider how the whole social order, the whole calendar of people, their daily lives, revolved around these holy days. How the church was a place for research and training for people, a means to escape the rigid social hierarchy. Which is another problem: The class-system was quite rigid, imposing e.g. restrictions on the colors of dresses that were worn, most famously making e.g. purple exclusive for royalty or yellow the color of prostitutes. Marriages and power-bases were heavily influenced by one's class and connections and there simply are no pieces of information given for that - shouldn't e.g. Wizards be rather exclusive to the upper class? Making the learned arcanists tied to a class would make sorcerors and witches more interesting and would offer a dimension of class-struggle/conflict to the character classes, perhaps even with hunters. Unfortunately, though, the class-system is tied to racism, discrimination and, again, the church.

Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to the 2-column standard and the b/w-artworks are nice. There are onyl 2 bookmarks here, which makes navigating the pdf harder than it ought to be.
On the plus-side, I really loved the information on languages and the web of intrigue that one can weave via the concisely presented statblocks of the individual kingdoms/states.
While I understand that these mature topics like discrimination, religious strife etc. have probably been consciously left out to avoid offending anyone, I maintain that this essentially breaks the campaign setting. At least it did for me. Not only does the omission eliminate perhaps one of the vastest potential resources for adventures imaginable, it also breaks my suspension of disbelief - I simply can't picture a Europe that similar to ours sans these concepts. A courageous stand and a side-box that talks about handling these topics in a mature way could have made this setting plain awesome.

Instead, we get the 12 and the Fallen, which, while ok, are simply not compelling enough to make up for this loss - due to the limited amount of space available, they remain blasé and comparatively boring when seen in direct comparison. As a gazetteer, this pdf does an ok job, but not a great one - while there is a lot of information, there also are blank spaces galore in this book, which essentially make it impossible to concisely use the setting for one's game and still make it feel like a unique take on our world rather than just another generic fantasy world. In the end, I see good research, but some unfortunate decisions that, like dominoes, create some inconsistencies the pdf can not close in the limited amount of space available. If there ever is a campaign setting, I'll be sure to check it out to see whether the my concerns have been addressed in more detail - the potential is immense. If you're a history-nerd like yours truly and are as concerned about world consistency as I am, this pdf is not for and probably 1 star, in spite of the great linguistics section. If you're set on playing in an alternate version of our world and are willing to invest some time into making the setting's consistency work (or are easily offended by displays of religion etc) , this might be 3 stars for you. My final verdict will be 2 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: World Guide
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Kingdoms of Legend: The Elusive Foe
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/29/2011 09:11:37
Iron Nugget
The Elusive Foe is the 2nd in a trilogy of adventures published by Interaction Points Games and designed for their campaign setting Kingdoms of Legends. The idea of dungeons and dragons using too common modern elements like England and France does not make for my cup of tea. Despite the setting, Elusive is a nice series of chase scenes that attempts to include two adventures in one. The adventure is both written for players who are following the trilogy and for players who are using it as a stand alone game. IN some places, this works great, in others I wondered why they didn’t just include a few notes, as the separate hook for the standalone adventure is unnecessary if you give the write advice in the Adventure Summary. It also made no sense that the stand alone adventure still uses the Kingdoms of Legends setting, which makes for a bit more work to use in a traditional campaign.

It’s a shame too because the extra text hampers an otherwise fun romp for your PCs as they chase a series of thieving killers throughout the country side and attempt to block their escape. The writers do a solid job of developing nice encounters to slow down and hamper the PCs. There are also lose conditions for the adventure, which add a since of urgency to the adventure.

Iron Word
I scaled this adventure down and used it as the “intro” adventure to the Zeitgeist campaign. Despite the extra text, the adventure is fairly solid and a nice way to get a group together and accomplish a task under duress---taking a bunch of PCs on traditional guard duty and giving them a chance to shine by chasing down some thieves.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: The Elusive Foe
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Kingdoms of Legend: The Hidden Threat
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/17/2010 14:32:21
Kingdoms of Legend: The Hidden Threat (Relics of the Lost Gods, part 1) is a 36-page PDF (33-pages if you remove the covers and OGL page) Adventure for the Pathfinder RPG written by Brent Evanger and published by Interaction Points Games. This product is the part of IPG’s Kingdoms of Legend line.

The layout is a standard page in two columns (except for the introduction and fiction). Two pages of full color maps (where the inside front covers would be in the print version). The interior art is limited and in black and white but supports the product well.

The Hidden Threat is the first part of a planned set of three linked adventures but it is a complete adventure in and of itself. Set in the Kingdoms of Legend setting (an alternate 1415) it should be simple enough to convert over to any other standard fantasy setting (though an appendix covering the basics of the setting is included as well). Designed for 1st level characters (pre-generated characters for the setting and adventure can be found at the Interaction Point Games webpage) it is a fairly straightforward adventure though players might be a bit reluctant at first at it starts with the characters being hired to investigate a threat under a castle’s privy.

The adventure is fairly linear, as is standard for a low level adventure, and sets the stage for the further adventure. The product includes six new magic items and one new creature (the rock grub) which plays an important role in the adventure. Lastly, there is a random table for those brave(?) characters who choose to sample some of the bizarre underground mushrooms.

Overall, The Hidden Threat is a solid adventure, nothing particularly novel but perfectly serviceable especially for an introductory adventure. A few more suggestions on how to tie characters into the setting and adventure would have helped to have made this adventure even better but it is a good starting place.

Disclosure: As a featured reviewer for RPGNow/DriveThroughRPG, I received my copy of this product for free from the publisher for the purpose of this review.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: The Hidden Threat
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Kingdoms of Legend: World Guide
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/15/2010 19:52:25
Kingdoms of Legend: World Guide is a 36-page PDF (33-pages if you remove the covers and OGL page) for the Pathfinder RPG written by Brent Evanger and published by Interaction Points Games. This product is the part of IPG’s Kingdoms of Legend line.

The layout is a standard page in two columns (except for the introduction and fiction). A full color page-sized map is included as is a full color jpg of the map in a separate file. The interior art is black and white but supports the product well.

Kingdoms of Legend is set in an alternate version of Earth, c. 1415 CE, with gods, magic and various humanoid races. This product provides an overview of the setting, providing the basic information needed for a campaign in the Kingdoms of Legend.

The product begins with a short introduction to the setting and then moves onto the first section which is a history, from ancient legends to the current era, ending with a brief overview of the current situation in this version of Europe.

Next is a section of races which include two new ones, half-dwarves and half-gnomes, as well as the minor changes to the standard Pathfinder races. The half-races are interesting in this setting as they are only partly from interbreeding, if a group of dwarves chooses to worship the human pantheon (more about which later) they slowly become more human as well, first becoming half-dwarves and then, over the generations, just human.

The section on classes details the changes to the classes (most quite minor) and the most likely place in the Kingdoms for characters with the various classes to come from. Clerics have the most changes as they are followers of the dominant Twelve (a syncretic pantheon aligning the Romano-Greek deities with their counterparts in Celtic and Germanic belief), who are the gods of humankind or the Fallen or the Primordials (the Titans). Clerics who are not followers of the Twelve need a physical tie, a relic, to their gods to be able to easily cast their spells which has some interesting roleplaying and adventuring possibilities.

There is a full chapter devoted to languages in the setting, as it is modeling a historical period there is no ‘common tongue’ and many languages around. There is some discussion about the lingua franca available and ways for characters without a shared language to communicate. Along with each of the major languages is a handful of names (useful for on the fly characters).

The product concludes with a geography chapter that lists the major political entities in capsule form along with places of interest (potential adventuring sites). A full page chart listing the gods is also included.

The Kingdoms of Legend: World Guide is a solid starting point if one is interested in this sort of campaign. For those without as much interest in a quasi-historical, it can be useful as a resource for languages and ways of organization.

Disclosure: As a featured reviewer for RPGNow/DriveThroughRPG, I received my copy of this product for free from the publisher for the purpose of this review.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: World Guide
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Kingdoms of Legend: All Hands on Deck!
by Darren C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/28/2010 00:38:01
Recently played a couple of nautical adventures with my local gaming group, and with that in the back of my mind while reading this supplement there are a couple features that stood out to me as being particularly useful.

On the inside front and back covers there are authentic floor plans for two types of medieval sailing vessels, which is a handy feature for DM's setting the scene for shipboard actions. These are scaled for miniature combat as well.

Another useful development in this book is the use of the "crew" monster type, which simplifies ship to ship actions by consolidating multitudes of crew members into one unit for combat purposes, and there are several examples of distinct crew types that are grounded in the "Kingdoms of Legend" setting but are general enough (as is the rest of the book) to fit well into any late medieval/early renaissance campaign.

Also includes a new class type of mariner as well as three unique prestige classes. The late medieval firearms rules seem well developed as well.

As far as negatives go, the artwork did not all download (which was noted by another reviewer as well). Overall, perhaps 90% of the information in this book seems to be generally applicable to any campaign setting in the appropriate era, with just a small amount specific to this particular campaign setting. I think this makes the book more useful to the gaming community rather than less, although some users may be hoping for more fleshing out of the "Kingdoms of Legend" setting than is so far available. Also, while the rules are relatively generic so far as setting is concerned, they very much build upon those of the Pathfinder/3rd edition game system, and may not be especially useful for players using other rule sets.

Altogether, in my opinion, a well written and useful rules supplement for gamers looking to adventure on the high seas using the Pathfinder/3rd edition rules.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms of Legend: All Hands on Deck!
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Kingdoms of Legend: All Hands on Deck!
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2010 23:11:55
Sometime back before 2nd Ed, my DM and I wanted to do a nautical series of adventures. It never panned out really because we were lacking some reallybasic information. All Hands on Deck would ahve been the perfect product for us. Inside are details on how to run nautical based adventures in your Pathfinder (or 3.5) game. We have a new class, a few new prestige classes and how the different races adn classes adapt to this new life. Plenty of information on ships and ship combat. Some skills. My knowledge of this area is very limited, so I am thinking there could be a lot more that could be here, but this looks like it covers all the basics.
My copy is missing some art, but since it was just uploaded I am sure it will be fixed by the time this review is posted. I might have to see if I still have the crew of the "Sharkey" and maybe run that game some 20 years later.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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