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A Single, Small Cut
by Rob M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/09/2014 08:14:54
A short but effective encounter, perfect for when your PCs inevitably need to get to a church for healing or curse removal.

A Single Small Cut is not so much an adventure as it is an extremely detailed description of a particularly sinister magical item and the shambling monstrosity that it summons. Simple and to the point, this will likely take an entire game session to resolve, but would require minimal prep by the Referee.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
A Single, Small Cut
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Better Than Any Man
by Jim M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 23:36:45
Although I am not a big fan of LotFP overall, I found BTAM to be well written, if gory, adventure. Despite the claims of many, the adventure is really just an "against the evil cult" plot line. The quasi-historical setting and the invading army as time pressure device are both interesting elements that help make the story feel a little different. The former may be unique but the latter has appeared before. The BDSM/torture porn aspect is a little heavy handed and overdone but that is pretty typical of LotFP.

So what are the good and bad points? In its favor, the adventure is well constructed and the production is good, with excellently drawn illustrations and maps. I plan on using it pretty much as written with the exception that I will be putting it in a more medieval fantasy setting. If you scratch the surface, it is easy to see the basic bones of the plot and that the Thirty Years War setting is just a frame that can be adjusted at will. Interestingly, many of the individual encounter areas, particularly The Infinite Tower and Goblin Hill can easily be removed and used by themselves in other places, making the adventure even more useful.

On the downside, if you aren't into the gimp/dominatrix vibe, it's a little hard to eliminate some of the content but certainly not impossible. Jumping into an orgy to get info is just one example, I also feel that, considering some of the supposed influences, the adventure is lacking in terror. There is nothing in here to terrify characters (things that go bump in the night) even if there is plenty to horrify them (severed body parts and bloody disemboweled corpses).

Final thoughts: Honestly, BTAM represents a huge amount of usable content for free (unless you want to pay). Just don't leave it lying around; some people just wouldn't understand.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Better Than Any Man
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LotFP Rules & Magic Free Version
by Jim M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 21:44:16
Let me start by saying it's free! Download it for curiosity, if for nothing else. Check out the 1st level MU spell Summon. If you are feeling generous, download the full version for $5.
I won't go into a review of the mechanics of LotFP, as others have done that well enough, both here and elsewhere. As others have pointed out, it's basically a D&D B/X retro-clone. LotFP is well written and has nice production but is otherwise pretty standard. There isn't even anything particularly "weird" about it.
The areas that separate it from other RPGs are it's style and tone. The authors seem to have a greater than average preoccupation with sex and violence. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy both sex and violence in my RPGs, just not together or in such prevalence. LotFP feels more S&M/B&D than weird fantasy and if that's your thing, go for it. For me, it's a little much and seems to be bloody just for the sake of being bloody, not for any particular purpose. It does fit a particular, if small, niche for hyper-violent games. It's sort of a genre in and of itself. It occupies the same position in the world of RPGs as Norwegian Viking Black Death Metal does in music: Some people really love it, most do not.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
LotFP Rules & Magic Free Version
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Forgive Us
by Jonas M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/28/2014 13:45:11
Forgive Us feels like D&D adventure that would have collided with Call of Cthulhu adventure. So it is pretty much perfect for LotFP or some other roleplaying game that does grim and perilous adventures well. I could imagine this as good scenario for The Savage World of Solomon Kane RPGe or WHFRP. It would be interesting to see more from Kelvin Green in role of designer and not as illustrator he is no doubt already familiar to many.

If you like old Warhammer adventures like Death on the Reik or the sort of material that appeared in White Dwarf back when it roleplaying game magazine you might like this.

I can not comment on quality of the conversion notes as I am not familiar enough with the system they are for.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Forgive Us
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Forgive Us
by Ben F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/16/2014 16:44:21
I played this in the original playtest run by the author, Kelvin. Thus personal bias may creep into this brief review of the main game (I have not played the mini-games yet).

The main game is a fun murder-mystery story riffing off The Thing as a previous reviewer rightly said. See their review for details on the plot etc etc. All spot on. Although it was nearly 2 years since we played it - it was an interesting adventure with a variety of ways in which it could be solved.

It is lovely having the book. It is a high production OSR/ early WFRP feel / look product - one that would have set well in the days of Hogshead/ Green Ronin's publication schedule for example.

Kelvin has done an excellent job of creating a total art piece - the maps, graphics, art and text all sit well together and complement each other. The A5 format works very well too with the adventure - something that one could easily put into your cargo trousers/ coat pocket. Fading Suns - whilst looking totally different - was another game which comes to mind which had the same art/text synergy. Handy when the writer can draw and does the art. Too often art in rpg products is poor unless it is done by a major company.

Great example of how to create an rpg product. And a bargain at that!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scenic Dunnsmouth
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/14/2014 07:32:32
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/03/14/tabletop-review-scenic--
dunnsmouth-lamentations-of-the-flame-princess/

Some published adventures are more fun for the DM than for the players. Now I don’t mean adventures where the DM actively tries to murder all the PCs and has fun running the game for everyone else. I mean the type of published adventures that turn planning the adventure into a game. Usually these type of adventures involve some sort of random generation so that the DM and players can reuse the same product and get a different experience each time. The first of these adventures that I can recall is the classic In Search of the Unknown by Mike Carr for Basic Dungeons & Dragons way back in 1979. There’s something special about that adventure if you’ve ever run it, although it’s fairly generic if you’ve ever just played it.

Which brings me to Scenic Dunnsmouth for Lamentations of the Flame Princess. Like In Search of the Unknown, a good portion of the adventure is generated randomly although everything else about the two are completely different. In Search of the Unknown is your basic hack and slash dungeon crawl and all that randomizes are the monsters in different locations. Scenic Dunnsmouth is a mash-up of D&D and Call of Cthulhu in the same way the name is a mashup of two popular Lovecraftian locations: Innsmouth and Dunwich. The end result is a very weird and creepy location for the PCs to explore, which will harbor at least one, but possibly two or more other secrets to uncover. Dunnsmouth is in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by the one-two punch of mountains and seemingly endless swamp. The residents are similar to the stereotypical backwoods inbred rednecks, but obviously not all is what it seems here.

You’ll find no maps or the like in Scenic Dunnsmouth. After all, the DM has to randomly generate the town, meaning he or she will have to make their own maps and layouts based on the way the generation occurs. To make the town you’ll need a deck of playing cards and fourteen dice. To be specific you’ll need 10 d6s, a d4, a d8 and two d12s, each of which has to be a different colour (the text suggest red and black, but they don’t have to be. You just need to be able to tell them apart). You’ll need a sheet of paper, with the size of the paper determining the boundaries of the location and then you let your dice fly Make sure to roll them all on the center of the sheet and let them fall where they may. The text says nothing about what to do if a die rolls off the paper and/or surface area. I would assume re-rolling, but I suppose you could count that die as non-existent for determining your Scenic Dunnsmouth if you choose. Each die represents a different important location in the town and the number than lands right side up determines a specific factor about it. After you roll the dice, you take your deck of playing cards and draw a card for each d6 (and possible d12) location. What you draw determines yet another factor for the location. As you can see this whole process is extremely random, providing a DM with an adventure it can reuse numerous times, while wielding extremely different results and layouts – even for gamers that have already played through the adventure before! That’s very cool. As I said earlier, the whole process of seeing what kind of town you’ve created is a lot of fun for the DM as you look up the results and see the town come to life before your eyes.

The actual content of Scenic Dunnsmouth ends up being mostly background text and rules for how to generate your town. There are some sample towns to look at too if you can’t quite get the hang of what you are supposed to do here. After the town is generated, you look up the results for each die such as locations, buildings, layout and townsfolk and it is then up to the DM to tie everything together into a cohesive package. All this means that while Scenic Dunnsmouth is fun for any DM, it takes a somewhat experience and organized one to run this thing efficiently. Taking notes on what you have created is a VERY good idea.

So after you’ve created your town, what is left? Well, you need to create a solid hook to get your players to travel to Dunnsmouth. The text gives you some ideas, but you might have a few ideas of your own which would get the PCs in your troupe to travel to such a remote and inaccessible location. Once there they might discover a strange mystical artifact that warps time and space. They might also find a loathsome cult and/or a town full of mutants. There is even a strong chance a PC or two might join the cult willingly based on what happens in your playthrough. For players, it’s a pretty standard but creepy adventure for low level characters. There’s some hack and slash potential, but it’s mostly Call of Cthulhu style detective work where the PCs discover what is so ominous about this location and what they can do, if anything, to stop it. The town and potential plot points are enough to keep your characters in Dunnsmouth for several play sessions, if not longer. Heck, getting to and from Dunnsmouth could be an adventure in and of themselves.

I really had a blast with Scenic Dunnsmouth. It’s a great idea and while it’s still definitely an adventure that is probably more fun or memorable of an experience for the DM than the players, everyone involved will still have a great time with this adventure – as long as they’re not looking for a straight up dungeon crawl. This is a great adventure to bring fans of games like World of Darkness or Call of Cthulhu over to LoTFP or various D&D retroclones, showing that fantasy games can be just as much about role-playing as they are roll-playing. Scenic Dunnsmouth is one of the best thought out and designed adventures I’ve seen this year. I was thoroughly impressed by the level of background detail given to every little thing in the town. The adventure things of everything, from a wide array of townsfolk to encounter to even what happens if you don’t use the deck of playing cards correctly. Personally I love some of the occurrences that happen when you leave the instructions and/or Jokers in as it’s hilariously bizarre –even for this adventure. I can’t recommend this adventure highly enough. Even if you don’t normally pick up Lamentations of the Flame Princess products, Scenic Dunnsmouth is well worth the cover price just to see how well made the adventure is from cover to cover.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scenic Dunnsmouth
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Forgive Us
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/11/2014 06:21:59
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/03/11/tabletop-review-forgive-
-us-lamentations-of-the-flame-princess/

Forgive Us is a collection of three adventures for Lamentations of the Flame Princess. There is one fully fleshed out adventure with a map in Forgive Us, while the other two are more like story threads than true adventures, since the DM will have to flesh them out fully in order to make them playable. All three adventures are really well done, though, and are pretty memorable affairs. Even if you don’t normally play Lamentations of the Flame Princess, you still should consider picking this up, as the adventures are fully playable with many a Dungeons & Dragons retro clone, and your purchase even gives you a second PDF which gives conversion stats so that Dungeons & Dragons 3.0/3.5 and Pathfinder fans can take part in the experience. That’s a really nice touch that allows Forgive Us to reach a much wider audience. Who knows, it might even help convert some of those Paizo and WotC holdouts to peer deeper into the madness that is LotFP. I should also point out that all three adventures take place in England during the year 1625. Of course, it is a fictional England, since there will be magic users, cursed artifacts and the like, but if you don’t like using our reality as the basis of a role-playing game, you can always change the location to some generic fantasy world. It won’t have the same effect mind you, but it will shut up the person who absolutely has to play an elf in every game you run. It’s also worth mentioning that, while all three adventures take place in the same year and same general vicinity of the world, they are NOT connected. Each one is designed to stand-alone, but an enterprising DM could connect the three with a little bit of effort into a mini-campaign.

Our first adventure, Forgive Us, bears the same name as the collection, and it is the only adventure to be fully fleshed out. You get full stats, maps of locations and randomizing tables, and it takes up thirty-five of the fifty pages in this collection. The adventure is a definite tribute to The Thing (the John Carpenter movie) and players will no doubt figure that out around the climax of the adventure, when they encounter the horrible monstrosities waiting to convert or kill them. Forgive Us also works best with characters under 4th Level. This way, no one has access to Cure Disease. If characters have ready access to this spell, the adventure loses a lot of its tension and terror since the entire experience revolves around a disease transforming people into hideous thingies. Make sure your players can suffer from the potential affliction that awaits them – otherwise, this can easily turn into a run of the mill dungeon crawl, and Forgive Us is too cool of an adventure to be relegated to such a fate.

In Forgive Us, the PCs will be tasked with one of several reasons to enter a full city block of Norwich that appears to have gone both silent and empty. As players root around the area, they will discover creepy mutants, a hideous disease and the failed machinations of a guild and the horror that it has caused. There’s not a lot of combat until the very end of this piece, with Forgive Us really relying on the DM’s ability to describe what the players see and creating an atmosphere of foreboding doom. The end result is an adventure that will feel more like a Call of Cthulhu piece, where characters are playing detectives more than monster slayers. Well, at least until the climax, when the adventure feels more like Alien. In the end, the PCs will have some tough calls to make, and the potential for a full TPK is high… although it might be by the player’s own hands rather than the monsters if the adventure goes “right.” All in all, a truly great experience from the core plotline to the wonderful art littering this piece.

The second adventure in this collection is In Heaven, Everything is Fine. The author states it’s a bit of a Silent Hill meets The Colour From Out of Space mash-up. I definitely see the later, but not the former. It’s hard to describe this adventure without massive spoilers, and it really is something best left experienced rather than read about. Suffice it to say, the adventure’s concept is an exceptional one, but as it is more a story thread or adventure seed, a good DM needs to really flesh this out before presenting it to players. In the hands of a good DM, it will be a very memorable adventure, but in the hands of a bad one, it will come off lame or just annoy players.

Characters of ANY level can experience In Heaven, Everything is Fine and still be challenged. There’s a spooky ghost, a tower that can be modified to whatever players (or player characters) want it to be, a bit of sleuthing to be had and a climax that revolves around a morale puzzle which could cause some temporary in-fighting with the party. Of course, most of all, the adventure really shakes up what the players consider to be reality. At best, you’ll have created a spooky little adventure that can go multiple sessions, but at worst, more sensitive players that treat RPGs as something “to win” may get pretty pissed off at the DM by the time everything is done.

Our final adventure in this collection is Death and Taxes. It’s meant to be a straight forward one session experience, and works great as a first adventure for a new party or even new players. A close friend of the PCs has died, his daughter has disappeared and a group of tax collectors are accusing the late man of theft. Players have to figure out how all these things tie together while also stopping the servants of the Conqueror Worm. It’s a short but fun piece, and if you have people who have new done a tabletop RPG but have shown interest, Death and Taxes might be a good choice to help them get their feet wet with.

Overall, I really enjoyed the Forgive Us collection. You get three very interesting adventures and some fun cartoony yet horrific artwork. This collection is definitely worth the current sticker price attached to it, and it serves as a great introduction to the mood and themes LotFP likes to present to its audience.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Forgive Us
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Scenic Dunnsmouth
by Scott W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/05/2014 14:56:37
This will be a short review, but I will tell you in no uncertain terms, purchase this now. The sheer insanity of its genius is breathtaking and I can see using it in so many ways to generate other locations. I can couple it to my Character Location Cards and to other Location Card sets. I can couple it to the Tarot...Congrats, you provided the RPG world with an incredible toolset that goes well beyond the intended purpose.

The Savage Cheerleader

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scenic Dunnsmouth
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Qelong
by Jamie W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/03/2014 22:37:31
Quelong is great. Picked this up in the LotFP sale and it's far and away the best product I copped. It's Ken Hite doing old school D&D in a magickally wartorn South East Asian setting. What more do you need ;)D Great setting, great rules, great monsters. Get this one.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Qelong
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The Seclusium of Orphone of the Three Visions
by Jason P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/29/2013 22:40:57
This might be one of the most evocative and fascinating book that explains Vancian magic within a context of fantasy adventures. It provides a framework for creating detailed, comprehensive and fascinating wizard's towers, ripe for plunder and exploration.

And it was written by Vincent Baker. If you have read Dogs in the Vineyard or Apocalypse World, you know that is a sign of quality.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Seclusium of Orphone of the Three Visions
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LotFP Rules & Magic Full Version
by Damon D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/26/2013 16:41:30
I began my adventures with Lamentations of the Flame Princess when I first bought the Grindhouse Edition a couple of years ago, drawn in by the promise of a crazy, weird-fantasy take on the original fantasy roleplaying game. What I got wasn't bad, but not quite what I was promised.

LotFP is a "retro-clone" system, using Wizards of the Coast's Open Gaming License to reverse engineer the rules of early fantasy roleplaying games, in this case, the Basic and Expert boxed sets of the original game, with a few adjustments to make the system easier to learn and play, particularly the use of ascending armor class in a similar fashion to the 3rd Edition SRD, and a simple, effective, and unobtrusive encumbrance system. While these are fairly nice additions to the old-school formula, the system still seems bare, containing only the core classes, without any sign of the more colorful sub-classes. In addition, the fighter is the only class which gets an increased to hit chance as he or she increases in experience. While the attempt to make the fighter more effective at higher levels relative to spellcasters is certainly noble, it seems like a crude patch which could have been much more carefully balanced without such a huge disparity in fighting ability between classes.

"So," you must be wondering, "where does the weird fantasy come in?"

Well, to be honest, I'm not sure. There's very little in this system that gives it any sort of identity other than an old-school revival RPG. There are no "weird" character classes or abilities, no particularly "weird" spells (most, if not all, of the spells will be very familiar to fans of the original games), and no collection of monsters whatsoever. At least, this was true of the Grindhouse Edition release, who knows, maybe monsters will be included in the referee book, which has yet to be released at the time of this writing.

Maybe I'm overreacting, but I feel the spell list and monster list would have been prime territory for illustrating a weird-fantasy world unlike anything you've seen before in a fantasy RPG. Instead, what I got was a fairly bare-bones retro clone.

If you already own the Grindhouse Edition, the new Rules & Magic book's only major addition is the inclusion of firearms rules, which was nice, but nothing that interested me particularly.

Honestly, if you're looking for weird fantasy, look to Astonishing Swordsmen and Sorcerers of Hyperborea. The weirdness is baked right into the system, all the way from the classes, straight through the spells and to the monsters. It's another retro-clone system (This one emulating the Advanced 1st edition of the original game), so you'll be able to scratch that itch.

If you're not interested in the weird, and looking instead for a refinement of the Basic/Expert editions, my personal favorite is Adventurer Conqueror King System (ACKS). It is easily the most streamlined, well-designed, fun retro-clone I've played to date. Instead of looking to the 3rd Edition SRD for inspiration, the author took the original rules and found his own way to streamline the system while keeping its essence intact.

I know I sound harsh, but LotFP is not a bad game, it just didn't do much to impress me. For what its worth, the encumbrance system is the best I've seen in an old-school revival product, and one I've house ruled into many similar systems. If you're looking for some inspiration, it may be worth picking up for that reason alone. If not, read the free rules, see how you like it, and make the choice for yourself.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
LotFP Rules & Magic Full Version
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The Seclusium of Orphone of the Three Visions
by Jeremy Z. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/18/2013 04:36:06
This is one of those products where its value depends on what you want from a sourcebook on a subject, in this case wizard's towers.

Do you want a book with crunchy rules for construction and fully detailed and mapped examples? Well, this product isn't for you.

OTOH, if you want tables and flowcharts with general ideas and tips to inspire you to do design wizard towers, well, this could be helpful, but if you have an imagination, most of this will be superfluous. There really isn't anything mind blowing here. Was the wizard a man or a woman? What color was her hair? What were its kitchens like? So and and so on, you just roll or pick from a short list.

All in all, disappointing because it's just dull. Not what you expect from the product line.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The Seclusium of Orphone of the Three Visions
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Carcosa
by Noah S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/08/2013 22:52:07
Beautifully crafted, horrible sinister in purpose, and if you look, there - just across the lake Hali - you can see the doom'd city come for you.

Tightly integrated Sci-Fi/Fantasy Swords 'n' Planets thing, chock full and brimming with horrible Ancient Things and the mulit-hued men and women and other things that serve them. Take up blaster, power armor, psionics, and the most horrible of horrible rituals in your bid for domination, or whatever it is a proto-simian in your position would want

One of the nicest-made PDFs I've come across and smart use of layers to make a pretty thing very practical to print

Worth it, although to my mind some might object to the blatant Dire Motives and evil things to do in the rituals, but hey, this isn't Oz and once the kiddies are asleep you can crack this and slaughter your neighbors (in the fantasy narrative, please) to your Black Heart's content

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Carcosa
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Qelong
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/23/2013 11:11:26
This is a rather fine classic 'exploration' adventure, a setting that is adventure of itself and rather fun to wander about in, discovering the wonders and horrors of a far-off land.

The land has been squabbled over by a couple of extremely powerful ancient beings who really ought to know better, who have left it in a bit of a mess - ripe, of course, for brave and intelligent adventurers to profit from exploring and discovering here. Loads of detail is provided to help you make the setting come to life as the adventure proceeds, provided that is you can read it through overly-heavy background 'ghosted' images behind the text (fortunately, the PDF is layers and you can turn this off), and can get the PDF width right with an awkward double-page spread (pages 2-3) which throws everything off and will be a pest to print.

There are loads of rumours to whet the party's appetite, judiciously spread around their normal stamping grounds they will be begging you to run adventures here. Once they do arrive, there are copious notes about the environment and other dangers with which they will have to cope (inculding a really nasty environmental poison...). A wide river, lotus fields, canals, strange edifices called stupa (temples to ancient gods) and more dot the landscape, and there are encounters aplenty wherever you go. There is also an extensive bestiary replete with angry ghosts, armour-stealing peasants, elephants and other creatures that'll eat you, dead or alive.

It is very much a sandbox: you are provided here with all the tools to enable the party to explore Qelong and have many an adventure wherever they decide to go. There is a beautiful map showing you where notable locations are, coupled with vivid descriptions of what is to be found at each one. Enjoy your travels.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Qelong
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Better Than Any Man
by Jonas B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/04/2013 13:25:23
Amazing adventure. My first exposure to Lamentations of the Flame Princess, but after reading this, for sure not the last.

Very dark and funny, and a great read in itself.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Better Than Any Man
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