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Other comments left for this publisher:
Fiasco
by Micah B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2014 17:20:09
A small group party game, Fiasco is the most inviting rpg I think I have played. There are no character sheets and every game is a one shot. It's more a session of structured improv than an rpg in reality.

I have played the game twice. Each time with 4 players. It's fantastic. It's great as a double date activity for us nerdy folk.

The downside to the game is that it is difficult to explain the concept to someone which can make it difficult to convince them to play. That being said it's well worth it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco
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The Climb
by Larry O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/28/2014 13:11:34
Played during a ski trip, so easy to get into the spirit!

Virtually all were newcomers to RPGs and we had a fun time. *BUT* we didn't develop enough conflict: there are only a few secrets/leverage/blackmail points. For instance, the Doctor said one of the "best climber" characters was too sick to summit and when she argued "It's my last shot," we all just said "Well, you're too sick, so no." We ended up cutting back the initial play period because we'd all run out of leverage points. The biggest leverage point -- an affair -- was almost instantly confronted and defused.

The walkie-talkie from Camp IV and the Summit was an excellent mechanic and we came up with a good story. One tip: Maybe have one of the Camp IV team be a "Narrator" to clarify things. For instance, the Summit team had a "carefully folded letter" that we decided resolved a conflict, but instead of narrating "So Susie, *you* had written a letter and put it in Tina's parka, wish she found and read, and now wants to talk to you on the walkie talkie..." we just played it out on the walkie-talkie and Susie was "What letter? What are you talking about?"

One *HUGE* question re mechanics: are the tokens (positive/negative events) chosen *in character* or as *player interested in the game*? For instance, I was the Meteorologist and although I was on the Summit Team, I chose the negative token because I wanted more conflict/intrigue. Another Summit Team member said he specifically chose the positive token because his character felt positive that he was summiting.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Climb
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Grey Ranks
by John P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/19/2014 09:58:42
Grey Ranks is an RPG with some story-game elements played in 3 sittings which details the lives of child soldiers in Warsaw in the final weeks of Nazi Occupation. The people of Warsaw lead a revolt against the Germans to take control of their city before Soviet troops arrived to occupy their city again.

Each chapter, the players will be able to participate in a "mission" where each character takes center stage during a scene, and succeed or fail together. Also, each player will be able to call a "personal" scene - which can be a flashback, personal moment, or anything else the player believes will add to the story.

Over the course of the game, characters will "grow up" - as they use their negative traits of childhood, those traits will turn into positive strengths. That "greedy" kid will become "resourceful". That "reckless" kid will grow into a "daring" one.

Characters also have something that they "hold dear", which they will at first call on, then endanger, then destroy as the situation becomes more dire.

This is an amazing game that has changed the way I look at RPGs.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Grey Ranks
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Durance
by Jason P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/29/2013 22:25:42
This is the next game from Bully Pulpit game after the incredible success of Fiasco, and it's a clear sucess. You play in space-australia-style prison colony, with each person controlling both a convict and a jailer. Over a series of scenes, you focus on characters and try to force them to break their solumn oaths. It's thematic, easy to play and fascinating.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Durance
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Fiasco
by Ken C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/16/2013 11:47:20
Fiasco is a hilarious, fun game to play with a bunch of friends. I've played 4 games so far with different groups and each of the play-sets brings even more replayability to an already varied game. This is enough of a 5/5 for me that I already owned this in paperback - I still bought the digital edition!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco
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Fiasco: American Disasters
by Jesse C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/13/2013 12:50:03
Played the office-centric playset and had a great time. Would recommend it. There are others to play besides just that one as well. They also had some pretty interesting trilogy rules that looked fun.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco: American Disasters
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The Climb
by Matthew C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/02/2013 00:00:00
A very simple Freeform with a surprising amount of character.

The game is carefully designed to explore the interactions between characters as they try to progress their own personal agendas. Designed to be played as a Live Action game, it doesn't take much to make appropriate props, and to drop the temperature down in a room enough to make it convincing.

All in all, without giving away too much, I feel that this scenario captures the spirit of Freeform quite well, and the use of Walky-Talkies is quite genius and really adds to the suspense and drama. I'm interested in seeing other offerings from this writer.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Climb
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Fiasco
by Ali E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/06/2013 16:26:37
This is a work of genius. Fast, furious, funny and easy to play. Buy this. You won't regret it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco
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Carolina Death Crawl
by Christopher T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/23/2013 12:08:55
We played this with 6 (four players, two swamp ghosts) and it was a complete blast. It went into some pretty dark places and the characters paid in full for their crimes against humanity (and themselves) so I would absolutely not recommend this for anyone under 12 or so. The game is not balanced--- if you know the cards you will be able to figure out pretty quick who is going to 'win,' except for the Swamp Ghost factor-- who are the great equalizer in the game in that they can make sure certain player's characters die during each act. Players who end up as swamp ghosts hold grudges and make those players lose, usually in spectacular fashion. What it adds up to is a frantic and extremely engaging mutual story telling experience. If nothing else, a 3 hour session of this will make your players better at all other RPG's in terms of character development and discourse. I cannot wait for more sets of cards along these lines.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Carolina Death Crawl
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Fiasco
by Stuart C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/10/2013 17:13:00
Very good, very good.
The "Replay" section helps clarify play greatly, and so you can find yourself completing your first Fiasco within an hour and a half of opening the book.
Great replayability, with plenty of fanmade playlists available online.
Well worth the money.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco
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The Fiasco Companion
by Chuck C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2013 17:50:22
If you enjoyed your first game of Fiasco, but feel like didn't quite "get it", or if you just want you next game to be EVEN MORE AWESOME, you want this book. And it reads easily on a tablet.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Fiasco Companion
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The Fiasco Companion
by Jason A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2013 12:25:59
Some great filler information and different ways to attack the fiasco as it develops.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fiasco
by Jason A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2013 12:25:01
Love it! The one thing that's missing from role playing games today is role playing. Fiasco delivers what I originally fell in love with when I started gaming.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco
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Fiasco
by Marc P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/03/2013 16:07:25
Maybe you've seen Wil Wheaton's Table Top episode, maybe not (if not you might want to check it out, it's fantastic). That's where I first encountered Fiasco, and I'm thankful to Wil for that. Fiasco is a GM-less Role-Playing Game, designed specifically to emulate the kinds of no holds barred disasters as seen in movies from the Cohen Brothers and countless others. Beyond that however, Fiasco presents a way for a small group of freinds to get a role- play experience in a short period of time (one and a half to two hours for three players, longer with more), with no need for a pre-planned session and no requirement for one player to act as GM.

Set up requires only a handful of dice in two colors and some paper and pencils (I find that index cards are really damn near perfect for this). Somebody throws a number of dice into the center of the table and using the dice players take turns slowly determining their relationship with the other players to their left and right (each player having two defined relationships), objects, needs, and locations that are relevant to the game. Tables for each are provided as part of a playset (there are a few in the book, and dozens more available for free online). Dice first establish the broad category of a relationship, object, location, or need, then further dice determine the specific detail. Example:

• Player 1 takes up a die showing 5 and decides that the first relationship is going to be one from the Family grouping.
• Later Player 2 grabs a die showing 1 and establishes that he and Player 1 are estranged siblings.

• Player 3 takes a die showing 6 and establishes that there is a Need "To Get Even..."
• Later on Player 1 takes a die showing 2 and further defines that Need as "To Get Even ... with the one who laughed at you.

The process continues around the table until every player has a relationship with the players to their left and right and there are at least one Need, Object, and Location (more than three players add more Needs, Objects, and Locations, in that order). Once all the dice have been used and/or everybody is satisfied with the setup play begins.

Play takes the form of scenes between two or more players and usually two of the main characters (though sometimes a player may need or want a scene with an NPC character played by somebody else for that scene). The player who's turn it is chooses to either Establish or Resolve. When they Establish the set the scene, stating where, with whom, and why, and then the players play it out. Once complete that other players decide if the scene worked out well for the player or not and assign a die to the player accordingly (if using black and white dice, white are "good" and black are "bad"). Play then continues with the next player.

When a player chooses to Resolve they take a die of the appropriate color and ask the group to Establish the scene for them, with the intended outcome of the scene to be good or bad for their character. Once the group sets the scene it is played out as usual. Regardless of the choice to Establish or Resolve each scene is played out, usually in just a few minutes, and each player gets a total of four scenes that revolve around their character over the course of the game.

After each player has had two turns (and thus two scenes with their character being central to the action) the first Act ends. The remaining dice are rolled and the two players with the highest total on black dice and white dice choose two Tilt aspects to complicate the second Act. Tilt is determined the same as setup with dice being take to determine the category and then the specifics. For instance:

• Mayhem → Misdirected Passion
• Innocence → The Wrong Guy Gets Busted
• Failure → A Stupid Plan, Executed to Perfection

These Tilt aspects will alter the course of events from the first half and inform the second as the players' character begin (or continue) the downward spiral from "Powerful Ambition" to "Poor Impulse Control", or, to put it another way, well laid plans become a complete clusterf&%k. Scenes played out during the second Act need to be more resolution focused so that the story begins to converge on an end, but apart from that play is generally the same as the first Act with the addition of the Tilt.

Once all the dice are gone and every player has played their parts the game moves to the Aftermath. During the Aftermath we find out just what happened to each character after the events of the story. Players roll their dice (those they got from scenes) and consult the aftermath table, which is generally grim, and often worse, to find out generally how their characters' fare. They then take turns playing a die and narrating a brief montage of scenes (usually just a few sentences) that bring their characters' to their ultimate fate.

That's the gist of play in a simplified manner. With three players I've taken part in half a dozen games and none of them were longer than two hours including setup (even the first game where I was teaching the game was only barely two hours). Things are fast and furious with a focus on an entertaining story that twists and turns (often twisting out of the control of the players). The numerous play set options available online mean that nearly any time period, setting, and genre are available from Superheroes to Suburban Housewives.

Closing Thoughts
With genuinely simple and quick mechanics to setup, and direct play and a strong focus on role-playing and improvisation, Fiasco is a perfect game to fill in after a short session of your weekly RPG, or to fill an entire evening with multiple plays. The book is excellently written, conveying the rules clearly and providing a bunch of great advice on what to look for during set up and play to ensure that your game becomes a true Fiasco. The wide variety of FREE play sets available online mean that there are near endless replay options.

Rating: 100% - Pretty much perfect. This game is everything a lite RPG should strive to be, and I find that the more I play the more I enjoy it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fiasco: American Disasters
by Jim H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/27/2012 14:36:33
The thing to keep in mind regarding Fiasco: American Disasters is, "It's only five bucks." It's not brimful of content like The Fiasco Companion was, but it's cheaper. You get 8 pages of "Trainwreck Mode" rules for running mini-campaigns, a one-page Trainwreck-Mode filmography, and then 31 pages devoted to the three new playsets, including the typically gorgeous playset cover illustrations. As a nice touch, the Poppleton Mall playset includes a mall floor plan. The remaining pages are front and end-matter.

The playsets themselves seem top-notch. I haven't tried them yet, but on reading they stand up well to good playsets I have played. Rainbow Mountain especially repays study for how, with its repeated mentions of literal farmer's daughter Cindy Peppering, a playset designer can bake quite a lot of narrative...encouragement into a playset's "random" elements.

But I really bought this for the Trainwreck-Mode rules, and on a read-through the Trainwreck-Mode rules are...okay. They're warranted for up to about three sessions of play. So don't buy F:AD thinking you're going to be able to get four seasons of Breaking Bad-like roleplaying out of it. They're also a little sketchy. I'd have paid more for more depth, such as:

* Trainwreck-tuned Tilt and Aftermath tables
* The same sort of examples of play we got in Fiasco and Fiasco Companion

I'd love to see Bully Pulpit revisit Trainwreck-mode play as a full-bore supplement. In the meantime, what's here will get us started. And considering the price and the excellence of the playsets, this existing supplement is very much worth your money.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fiasco: American Disasters
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