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'Swords for hire # 4'
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Darwin's World: Vault Dwellers
by Ron A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/22/2009 14:33:15
Vault swellers is an excellent resource for Darwin's Word GMs wishing to run a "Fallout" style campaign. I intend to use it and highly recommend it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Darwin's World: Vault Dwellers
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e-Adventure Tiles Mapper
by Robert C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/14/2009 09:23:02
I've been using the crap out of this web app and have to say that its so fast, easy to use and helpful that I wish I'd have know about it a long time ago.

There are some issues I have with it though... the big one is the purchasing model. Pretty much if they decide to stop the program or decide to not update it anymore then I'm out my money. That scary.
Second, I wish I had a little more control over some of the tiles, it would be great to flip or do a mirror image on some becuase some of the shapes make it hard to line up to.
Third, I really wish I could design the map in a seperate window, or expand the size of the view in some way. I feel constrained when making bigger maps.
Finally, when exporting you can choose to export as PDF or HTML and I've found that with the HTML option you cannot clear the grid tiles as you can with PDF. Its not a huge problem but it would be very handy to be able to do so.

Now the good! TONS AND TONS AND TONS of Tiles! All sorts of climates and genres as well and since my games are all over the map as far as settings and time-frames go this is a great boon.
Again, I cannot stress the benefit of speed. I've only recently started gaming via VTT and the ability to make a map in a few minutes and get it uploaded is a powerful thing indeed. I tend to be on the unorganized side so its really important to me to be able to do something at a moments notice!

Over all I am pleased with the mapper, I have Dundjinni and a few other odds and ends mapping programs but nothing really beats the speed and wealth of options I've just accquired with this software.

--- an aside, there is an upgrade to this program available but the detiails are scarce on WHAT the upgrade is. As far as I can tell the mapper alone has all the tiles currently released so what does the upgrade do? I have no clue.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
e-Adventure Tiles Mapper
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Blood and Brains: NCRPC: Most Likely Scenarios for Reanimation
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/24/2009 13:09:45
This free supplement for Blood and Brains is both funny and a cool brainstorm for a zombie game. It portrays a government health organization which is trying to cope with the zombie menace on various levels, and which is trying to develop countermeasures for the living dead. Of course it could be fun for player characters to be part of this group, or to come across them responding to a zombie crisis. Fun and short, it's exactly what free material should be.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blood and Brains: NCRPC: Most Likely Scenarios for Reanimation
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Blood and Vigilance: Modern Superhero d20
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/24/2009 13:01:41
Probably the weakest of the normally top-flight Blood & * series, Blood and Vigilance gives solid superhero mechanics but short shrift to the creation and running of superhero games. Nevertheless, the general quality of the supplement is good and if you are an experienced D20 and superhero GM, you can definitely get a lot of benefit from its formulation of powers and conflict.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Blood and Vigilance: Modern Superhero d20
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Burning Lands: A Darwin's World Novel
by David R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2009 16:07:19
This novel is slow to start, and when it starts get interesting, the author seems to rush to the end. After all the character build-up, they have a dissatisfying end. Overall, the end left me a bit empty and depressed, instead of encouraged for the good guys. This is not another Hiero's Journey.

Burning Lands has grit to it (and in some cases a bit too much). So much more could have been done with this good story idea.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Burning Lands: A Darwin's World Novel
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Cities of Fantasy 2: Racial Neighborhoods
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/23/2009 11:52:51
In designing our fantasy cities, we generally think about merchant districts, where the rich live, a docks, maybe a slum or two, where the temples are and where whoever is in charge lives. This book suggests that, just as real world cities might have a Chinatown or a Little Italy, people of the various fantasy races might well choose to live in districts of their own; and presents five ready-made racial neighbourhoods for you to use or at least mine for inspiration.

The first is the Dwarf Burrow. These dwarves prefer, even in a city, to live underground. Their homes are accessed down a flight of steps situated in the middle of what looks like an empty field (why, I wonder, hasn't someone else appropriated this real estate?). But it's not just homes down there, dwarves also practice their trades - especially smithing and ceramics - and it's the best place to go to purchase weapons, armour, jewellry and other such items. They also maintain warehouses, train their militia and hold worship in temples to their gods. Some dwarves never bother to visit the surface at all! One nice touch is that the history of the typical dwarf burrow is recorded as carvings on the corridor walls. It tends to be dark in all but the places frequented by other races - odd, just because dwarves have darkvision, they do not have to use it all the time! - and can be prone to flooding, although dwarf miners are generally good at avoiding the sewers built by surface-dwellers.

Next comes the Mithril Heights, home to elves, providing an eclectic mix reminiscent of student quarters and retirement homes to the casual observer. It tends to be older - and wealthier - elves who live there, younger ones are more inclined to mix with other races. Many of these older elves are scholars, and any younger ones you encounter are likely to be their students. They often accept students from other races as well, many making a living as educators of the young. Art and music are well-regarded, and it's a good place if you enjoy the arts, or want your work to go on display or to perform. Narrow streets and tall buildings make it a complex place to navigate, and there's plenty of magic about.

This is followed by Halflingtown, quaint and picturesque home to local halflings. They value peace and quiet, a nice place to relax... and public bathhouses are popular. Other attractions include good restaurants, facilities for dogs and ponies, bandstands and at least one festival a week. Larger folks need to remember, though, that most buildings are halfling-size!

The next area to explore is Gnomelight, a sort of fantasy Las Vegas. Characters wishing to gamble, to seek that really special item, to take in a spectacular show or attend a flamboyant party will head here. There's loads of magic, mostly illusions or otherwise part of a show. Crime is low, especially where the gnomes themselves live (but outsiders are rarely welcome there). There's even a few rules for popular gambling games if your characters wish to try their luck.

Finally, you can drop by the Orc Trough. It's a slum neighbourhood, inhabited by the poor of all races, not just orcs. Still, there's a good animal market and other items may be cheaper than elsewhere in town. It's also home to slaughterhouses and other smelly crafts, a good place to find a fight and somewhere to hide. The city authorities rarely come round, so you will be on your own in terms of personal safety and protection from theft, though. If your city has any particular race - or other grouping - that's officially downtrodden and disenfranchised, this is where they live along with anyone else who is down on their luck. People who do have work are generally animal handlers, slaughtermen and butchers.

These five districts hang together well, with some interesting ideas. There are minimal plot hooks for each one, and some sidebar suggestions including ways of making your character a native of that district and how this could influence a city-based game. It's a good way of ensuring that the humanoid races are properly represented in your city, whether you use these districts as-is or mine them for ideas to inspire your own designs.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Cities of Fantasy 2: Racial Neighborhoods
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Two Worlds Tabletop RPG
by Lana H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/04/2009 19:08:18
This is the best FREE product I have encountered on rpgnow. Since this product is FREE, it is a 4.5/5 star. Only thing I would question is.. Why are there a few blank monster image pages, when they likely have images for them. Enjoyed this! Jay from DragonWizards

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Two Worlds Tabletop RPG
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Two Worlds Tabletop RPG
by William H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/25/2009 00:13:03
Very pretty, easy to read, D20-light system. The magic system is not stock D20, and is the primary flavor difference, tho' the races could easily be ported.

Pros:
[+] Short, to the point D20 core book.
[+] Minimum rules clutter
[+] Beautiful renders.
[+] 3 unique races, plus humans, dwarves, and orcs
[+] most of the weirder of the 20 monsters have a beautiful render.
[+] Price: $0.00!!!

Cons:
[–] White text on black bakground; ink hog.
[–] only three classes: Warrior, Mage, Thief
[–] No setting information

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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Darwin's World 2: Survivor's Handbook
by Mathew S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/17/2009 15:27:29
Great game. I really enjoyed it. The book was well written.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Darwin's World 2: Survivor's Handbook
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Blood and Space 2: Galactic Edition
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/31/2009 14:39:13
Of all genres, science fiction is one of the hardest to do “generically.” There are certain basic themes and tropes to all genres, but in regards to science-fiction, these are so many and so varied that it’s really hard to consider any particular brand of sci-fi to be normative. Just look at how different Star Trek is from Star Wars, for example, and you’ll see how no two types of science fiction settings are really the same. The Galactic Edition of RPGObjects Blood & Space line, however, attempts to walk that narrow line of being generic enough for any Future d20 setting, while still having enough flavor to be interesting and appealing. Let’s see how they do.

The Galactic Edition of Blood & Space is basically an updated repackaging of a half-dozen previous B&S products. Unfortunately, I never got any of the previous books in this product line, so I can’t speak to what changes were made. However, this product contains six PDFs, along with a single PDF which is a compilation of all of the others. The filename makes it clear that this seventh PDF is meant to be a printer-friendly version, but it keeps pretty much all of the interior illustrations, which seems to defeat the purpose. Worse, the printer-friendly PDF doesn’t have bookmarks the way the other PDFs do, which is unforgiveable since the printer-friendly PDF is 170 pages in length.

Aside from that, though, the six individual PDFs each have a theme regarding what Future d20 materials they offer. The first PDF, High Flyers and Ground Pounders, gives new character-building options including not only advanced classes, feats, and skills, but also discussion of ranks and promotions within a space navy, among other things. The second half of the book gives a detailed set of rules for running starship combat.

Merchants, Pirates, and Smugglers is the second book. Whereas the first PDF focused on military themes, this one focuses on economic-oriented subjects. New character options are presented here, as in the first one, along with a wealth of new items that are commodities in the future, such as new mecha components, starship equipment, futuristic drugs, and rules for boarding ships and new options for buying and selling things.

The third PDF is the Starship Construction Manual. Shorter than the others, it walks you through the various steps of creating a starship, along with presenting a new variant system for building a new ship (utilizing “invention points”), and talks about what it means to have a prototype starship before presenting new advanced classes and new starship components.

One of the largest PDFs in this group is the fourth PDFs, the Prometheus Rising campaign setting. Set in our solar system several centuries in the future, this book spends roughly half of its page count giving new mechanical options (e.g. a feat system for psychic powers and abilities), while the second half of the book covers the future history of the solar system – which goes over several centuries divided into a number of epochs – along with a gazetteer for various worlds and moons during that time; interestingly, each location also has notes on what it’s like to be there during each period, so you can set your game during any of the major points in time over the future history.

Cosmic Fury, the fifth PDF, is perhaps the most thematic of them all, as it focuses on futuristic martial arts. People who’ve read the Blood & Fists line of products will see a great deal of similarities here, as the PDF uses the same combinations of feats, advanced classes, and masteries to denote martial arts, here for esoteric styles such as “beam sword.” A few NPCs are given almost as an afterthought at the end of the book.

Finally, the last PDF is aptly titled Space Monsters. A short book, it details several alien races that could be used for PC characters, along with other creatures that could only be used for threatening your PCs. There’s also a brief section on new diseases and, interestingly, a short discussion of new starships and NPCs to use in the Prometheus Rising campaign setting and bring it out of the solar system, where they’d likely meet the things detailed here. This was really a nice extra to help bring these monsters to a human-only campaign.

So how does all of this rack up in terms of how helpful it’ll be to your futuristic campaign setting? Again, it’s hard to say because it largely depends on what kind of setting you’re running. However, if you have anything that remotely resembles “classic” sci-fi, in that it has elements of space opera and starship combat, you’ll definitely find something, and more likely a lot, that’s worth your while here. The diversity of material lends itself to a wide variety of applications, even having a campaign setting if you’re in search of one. Blood & Space: Galactic Edition is almost a must-have if you’re seriously interested in Future d20, whatever way you run it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blood and Space 2: Galactic Edition
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Blood and Guts 2: General Edition
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/27/2009 22:04:18
It’s a long-held truism that the military is one of the most fertile grounds for RPG gaming in the modern world. By this, I don’t mean that military groups are more likely to play RPGs (though that may be true also); rather, if you’re playing an RPG set in the modern day, using the armed services as a backdrop for your PCs and/or the campaign gives you almost infinite possibilities for adventuring. In this regard, Blood & Guts 2, from RPG Objects, provides an incredible wealth of material.

I just want to note that, as you may have guessed by the use of 2 in the title, this is an update from the original Blood & Guts. Unfortunately, the original material wasn’t in my collection; given that, I can’t address this review in terms of what’s changed from previous versions. There are occasional sidebars in that regard, however, which makes it plain that some things have indeed changed. Beyond that, Blood & Guts 2: General Edition consists of nine PDFs (the last one being a printer-friendly compilation of the other eight), which I’ll try to go over in some detail here.

The first PDF is the Military Training Manual. Meant to serve as the introductory volume of the series, this covers the history of the American armed services, as well as their organization and breakdown. Already, this is incredibly interesting, even despite this being information that’s readily available elsewhere – I’d always wanted to know how the upper echelons of the military were organized, and now I know (and knowing is half the battle!). After this brief introduction, a series of new advanced classes are introduced, along with new uses for old skills (not new skills, which is nice) and a swath of new feats, including Military Occupational Specialty feats and Advanced Training feats. The PDF closes out with new rules on earning ranks and medals, and what those mean for your character.

By itself this PDF was enough to blow me away…and it was just the first of eight.

Now, a canny player or GM who’s been reading this review will be thinking “Okay, it all sounds cool, but military command has a lot of structure and procedures. That doesn’t lend itself to actual adventuring.” Fair enough – the answer to this is found in the second PDF, Special Operations Command. Basically, this PDF covers the special operations units that are small groups of soldiers sent in to accomplish a specific task in a specific location; the sort of thing that’s right of the alley of an adventuring group. A new advanced class lays the groundwork here, but the listing of a few dozen such groups, along with the benefits for being members of them, are what rounds out this book.

Combat Procedures, the third PDF, is shorter than the other two, but no less packed for what it contains. It starts off with listings for weapons and armor (including armor inserts and armor piercing rules), along with associated feats. But it quickly shifts gears to showcase various optional new rules. These are labeled as being “modern” “gritty” or “true grit,” which are meant to indicate escalating levels of lethality for your characters (and those around them). From hit locations, to mental strain from the horrors of war, to special options regarding vehicular combat, there are a great number of optional rules here that you can use to customize your modern military game. The PDF even ends with a discussion of three campaign options, noting what optional rules they use and what kind of campaigns they are.

The fourth PDF is the Battlefield Unit Combat System. This is exactly what it sounds like, being a short but nicely detailed set of mass combat rules. Surprisingly, this is fairly rules-light, largely being focused on what kind of unit each unit is, how experienced they are, their equipment, and the conditions they’re operating under. The rest of it is unit versus unit combat. I’m oversimplifying, of course, but the rules here do a fairly good job of allowing combat between groups of individuals, with even a sample combat being given at the end of the PDF.

The next three PDFs are all of a piece, so I’ll mention them all at once. On the Ground, Deep Blue Sea, and Wild Blue Yonder all deal with vehicles and vehicular weapons and equipment on land, sea, and air respectively. These books really have everything you’ll ever need in this regard, and quite honestly I doubt you’d ever be able to use all of these even in a full military campaign. I’m not complaining, as I think it’s great to be able to check the hardness and hit points of a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, or know how much damage a Tomahawk cruise missile does. Nothing is ignored here.

The final PDF in the series is War on Terror. The natural concluding piece to the series, this PDF is to give GM’s a listing of people that their PCs can fight. Giving a brief overview of terrorism and terror alert levels, this book lists over two dozen terrorist organizations (which are, like the rest of this book, from the real world), noting their size, usual theater of operations, and what groups they usually target (and thus get bonuses against). It was a bit startling to learn that there are this many terrorist organizations still active across the world, and in so many different countries. Interestingly, larger organizations that have achieved some degree of international legitimacy (such as the Palestine Liberation Organization) are not listed (though they are mentioned in the context of other groups).

If it isn’t obvious at this point, I was pretty well blown away by everything in this product. Between the sheer volume of material presented here, and the quality and diversity of what’s given, this is hands down the best book for a military Modern d20 game. Everything you’ll ever need for any sort of military-themed campaign can all be found here, with expert translations of various real world procedures, items, groups and more given d20 stats. In this regard, Blood & Guts 2 is sets a new standard in terms of what it offers, and nothing else even comes close.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blood and Guts 2: General Edition
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M&M: The Eugenics Brigade
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/24/2009 11:17:38
There is a reason why the Golden Age of comics is still a fan favorite among Mutants and Masterminds players. A lot of the age takes place around the time of the World Wars. The lunatic writings of Hitler and Nazis laid a foundation of speculation for fantasy writers and now game authors. This has led to a flooding of the market on Golden Age Supplements related to WWII Heroes.

The Eugenics Brigade: Villains of WWII by Charles Rice is an inexpensive PDF that produces a team of superheroes working as a special regime for Hitler. Its extreme barebone production prevents it from reaching its full potential, despite being one of the better written WWII villain books.

Fans of alternative WWII fiction will be quite impressed with the brief revamp in history that makes the PDF come to life. There are eight members that are apart of the squad. Rice kept the cheese factor to a minimum, instead creating functional villains that are designed to provide a real challenge for a party, though there is no real innovation in the power uses. The books biggest downfall was the lack of art, which is a staple of a superheroes supplement. It just does not say comic book if there is no art.

For the Gamemaster

Outside of the Eugenics Brigade, there are several other brief additions in the book. The author designed two minion units for the PCs, the Flying squad and the Verhexte. Both provide adequate support for their predecessor. Fans of comics will also enjoy the strong design of the “anti-Captain America” Uberkrieger.

The Iron Word
The Eugenics Brigade is a nicely written book full of solidly designed Mutants and Master Mind characters with one fatal flaw, a lack of art and expert layout work.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
M&M: The Eugenics Brigade
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Blood and Brains: The Zombie Hunter's Guide
by Nicholas B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/16/2009 10:20:56
This was an entertaining look in to the world of Zombies, with plenty of useful bits. Good for collectors of Zombie junk like myself, and also useful for a modern weird campaign with zombie apocalypto mixed in.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Blood and Brains: The Zombie Hunter's Guide
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Modern Mayhem
by Mark G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/08/2009 18:24:12
Everything was orchestrated by a maestro, you and your friends are manacled and sitting on the transport bus looking forward to 30 year of hard labour that to some creative police work (not that you were angels to begin with). When an unexpected accident frees you, will you clear your name or will you become the type of person the courts believe you to be. This is the central question of Modern Mayhem20, the first full-adventure path for the Modern20 system. This 47 page PDF product was written by Charles Rice and published by RpgObjects.

I was caught off guard a little by this adventure path because of preconceived notions I have about adventures, experience and levelling with other OGL games. There are basically 5 or 6 main objectives in this adventure path and for completing each major objective your characters will become more powerful. The format is also a bit different that what I expected, each adventure has an objective with complications and opponents but its written more as a framework for the GM to breathe life into then a scripted story. I think out of the six adventures only three occur in a required order and not all of the six are necessary to develop the story with your players. I think this gives the book a very sandbox-like appeal similar to some objective or non-linear videogames; the encounters allow the players to define their character, establish their humanity and establish themselves within the criminal world. For all the freedom this represents, the author has provided lots of ideas and plenty of opponent stats to cover most situations.

About ¾ the book is dedicated to adventure options and the last ¼ provides additional mechanics for the "core" Modern20 system by RpgObjects. There are new rules for influence contact, information contacts and contacts who would prefer not to be contacts. There are additional occupations, feats, npc and equipment appropriate for a criminal campaign. To make this product a quick pick up and go type adventure, pregens are also included. The two most interesting additions to the Modern20 ruleset are the Humanity Meter and Heat (Pursuit) Meter. The Humanity meter is a devise used to track the behaviour of the group, based on the player character's actions. Unlike alignment it doesn't restrict player action but instead shapes the format of the ending (uplighting, mercenary, depressing) almost like a karmic adjustment. I think this mechanic (which is OGC) is exportable to many other games and genres. The Heat meter is an abstract chase/pursuit mechanism to track how close the player characters are to getting caught by the police.

Overall, Modern Mayhem20 provides well-developed and supported adventure for gamers looking for a Rocknrolla or GTA type experience. It is further supported by a sample modern map pack from the fine guys at 12 to Midnight and Fabled Environments providing the "All Saint's Church", "Argent National Bank", "The Marguerite Apartment Homes" and "Joe's Diner".

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Modern Mayhem
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Cities of Fantasy 2: Racial Neighborhoods
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/28/2008 13:01:53
It’s all too often a staple of fantasy communities that they all tend to look alike. While some famous NPC may live in this city, or that one’s sewers lead to the Dungeon of Even More Doom, for the most part, they all seem to be copies of each other. This is especially true in regards to their demihuman populations. Sure, elves live in forests, and dwarves live underground, but why is it that when you put these races in a human city, they’re living in houses just like everyone else? Cities of Fantasy 2: Racial Neighborhoods presents demihuman populations as having their own ethnic districts in existing cities, shaping them to be more like their natural homes.

The book is divided up into five sections, one each for elves, dwarves, gnomes, halflings, and orcs. Each section goes over the role the district plays in the larger community, a description of the general appearance and architecture found there, the history of such an area, some of the inhabitants you’d find there (these are described in terms of roles, rather than individuals: e.g. “instructor” rather than a specific NPC), magic (this is just a brief listing of some existing spells and items with one-sentence descriptions of what they’re used for in the community), special rules (the crunch of the book; this has things that grant small bonuses or penalties, new equipment, etc.), and plot hooks. Most pages also have small sidebars covering a related topic in a few sentences.

Overall, the book does a good job of making each district have its own feel, while still making them easily referenced by using the same format for each. Dwarves, for example, tend to create an underground community that often grows into a city in its own right over the centuries, whereas orcs tend to be pushed into the slums, creating a “ghetto” area that’s often the target of harassment from law enforcement.

However, the book isn’t perfect in what it does (and doesn’t do). Many of the mechanical aspects of the book – the “crunch” – felt tacked-on, offering bonuses or penalties seemingly so as to make sure there was enough of that present overall. PCs take a -2 circumstance penalty to “gambling checks” involving mechanical gambling devices built by gnomes? That seems a bit…specific. Also, speaking of mechanics, it would have been nice if there were bookmarks here; weighing in at almost forty pages, something to make navigation easier would have been helpful. I won’t mention the lack of a printer-friendly version, as there is a decent amount of art to be found here.

Despite these little things, however, I found myself liking the book for what it presented as a whole. After all, while cities do tend to be melting pots, they shouldn’t all look so similar, despite the different races living in them. Presenting racial districts that “feel” elven, halfingish, etc. is a great idea, and this book does a nice job in making that apparent in what it presents.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Cities of Fantasy 2: Racial Neighborhoods
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03.Blood and Fists: Modern Martial Arts
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05.Blood and Space: d20 Starship Adventure Toolkit
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