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I Loot the Cleric's Body System Neutral Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/09/2016 05:51:27

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 12 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This installment of the I loot the body-series begins with a 100-entry strong table of diverse outfits for clerics: From unusually large powdered wigs to strange brimmed hats, undershirts embroidered to look like ribs and bones (hey, I have one of those!) to thick cloaks of wool covered in angelic feathers and pauldrons denoting church hierarchy - there is an appropriately varied selection of unique vestments here.


The second table, also 100-entry-strong, covers religious objects - and these are just as varied: Clay prayer beads stained with blood, curved knives and jars of leeches, wooden hand drums with painted stars on them, carved knucklebones or fingernails torn from heretics and servants of other deities - no matter the clergy, there is something in here for your clerics.


Finally, as has become the tradition for ILB-files detailing spellcasters, we get a 100-entry-long table of pouch components - and here, the pdf becomes rather creative - scribbled warnings to not trust the owls, sketchbooks containing drawings of locals, leather stripes with defiled holy symbols, copper cases with wax impressions that are shaped like a key - in the tradition of the best of these dressing-files, the entries in this table can inspire further adventures...why did the cleric carry around 3 glass eyeballs?


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Taylor Hubler's take on looting clerics is a fun, diverse little file, with a significant diversity of unique fun tables - and none of them becoming redundant or boring. While not yet on par with e.g. Mike Welham's brilliance, the pdf still can be considered an excellent entry in the series, which means I will arrive at a final verdict of 5 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Cleric's Body System Neutral Edition
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I Loot the Cleric's Body
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/09/2016 05:50:37

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 12 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This installment of the I loot the body-series begins with a 100-entry strong table of diverse outfits for clerics: From unusually large powdered wigs to strange brimmed hats, undershirts embroidered to look like ribs and bones (hey, I have one of those!) to thick cloaks of wool covered in angelic feathers and pauldrons denoting church hierarchy - there is an appropriately varied selection of unique vestments here.


The second table, also 100-entry-strong, covers religious objects - and these are just as varied: Clay prayer beads stained with blood, curved knives and jars of leeches, wooden hand drums with painted stars on them, carved knucklebones or fingernails torn from heretics and servants of other deities - no matter the clergy, there is something in here for your clerics.


Finally, as has become the tradition for ILB-files detailing spellcasters, we get a 100-entry-long table of pouch components - and here, the pdf becomes rather creative - scribbled warnings to not trust the owls, sketchbooks containing drawings of locals, leather stripes with defiled holy symbols, copper cases with wax impressions that are shaped like a key - in the tradition of the best of these dressing-files, the entries in this table can inspire further adventures...why did the cleric carry around 3 glass eyeballs?


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Taylor Hubler's take on looting clerics is a fun, diverse little file, with a significant diversity of unique fun tables - and none of them becoming redundant or boring. While not yet on par with e.g. Mike Welham's brilliance, the pdf still can be considered an excellent entry in the series, which means I will arrive at a final verdict of 5 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Cleric's Body
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GM's Miscellany: Dungeon Dressing (System Neutral Edition)
by Spencer C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/08/2016 23:39:02

I've had the PDF version of the version of this book for some time, but I found myself using it so often that I decided to buy the hardback. It is quite simply the most useful idea generator I have on my desk. If you're a DM I highly recommend you pickup a copy. If you make up a lot of dungeons it's a must. It will keep your ideas fresh and surprising for your players.


If you've got a game in 2 days and don't have anything generated simply read through some of the charts. It will seed you with a dozen stories in no time. I'm a busy guy with a full time job and children so this book has become as important as my DMG.


I highly recommend the hardback as well, it's got a quality binding and frankly the paper is a better quality that the current WotC books.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
GM's Miscellany: Dungeon Dressing (System Neutral Edition)
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I Loot the Druid's Body System Neutral Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/07/2016 03:35:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


We begin this dressing-file once again with a massive 100-entry table of outfits for the deceased druids - from silken robes made from exotic purple moth-silk to leafy branches that are alive, nature itself provides, appropriately, a diverse array of cool entries. Beyond these, vinegar-like smelling rags, boy scout-style achievement studded robes, 101-Dalmation-robes or capes that buzz liek dragonfly wings - this table is not just good...it's superb and breathes more imagination than multiple tables combined.


The second 100-entry table covers natural accoutrements - spellcasting aids or symbols aligned with their domain over the natural world. And oh boy - from jade ourobos to classic sprigs of mistletoe, from staves bleeding sap to ear muffs of crow feathers - this is absolutely inspired! Interwoven strands of hair, willow fishing poles...awesome.


The third 100-entry-strong table covers the contents of a druid's pouch - from fluttering death's head moths to spoiled, rotten clumps of eggs, twitching frog-legs, skunk puppets, jars containing bull's testicles...absolutely glorious. Have I mentioned the small potted plant that turns to face you? Two packets of identical mushrooms, one of which labeled as "deadly poison", while the other is "delicious"? This table, like the first two, breathes pure imaginative excellence.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized fro screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Well...basically, at this point, all you have to know is that Mike Welham wrote this. He consistently delivers some of the most awesome, inspiring, diverse dressing-files - from the mundane to the magical, from the classic to the weird, from the hilarious to the uncanny, Mike's dressing show a level of diversity that is basically unreached - and this is no different. Each and every table in this book is pure awesomeness and inspires even the most burnt-out GM. This is what these files should be like. Excellence. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Druid's Body System Neutral Edition
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I Loot the Druid's Body
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/07/2016 03:35:13

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


We begin this dressing-file once again with a massive 100-entry table of outfits for the deceased druids - from silken robes made from exotic purple moth-silk to leafy branches that are alive, nature itself provides, appropriately, a diverse array of cool entries. Beyond these, vinegar-like smelling rags, boy scout-style achievement studded robes, 101-Dalmation-robes or capes that buzz liek dragonfly wings - this table is not just good...it's superb and breathes more imagination than multiple tables combined.


The second 100-entry table covers natural accoutrements - spellcasting aids or symbols aligned with their domain over the natural world. And oh boy - from jade ourobos to classic sprigs of mistletoe, from staves bleeding sap to ear muffs of crow feathers - this is absolutely inspired! Interwoven strands of hair, willow fishing poles...awesome.


The third 100-entry-strong table covers the contents of a druid's pouch - from fluttering death's head moths to spoiled, rotten clumps of eggs, twitching frog-legs, skunk puppets, jars containing bull's testicles...absolutely glorious. Have I mentioned the small potted plant that turns to face you? Two packets of identical mushrooms, one of which labeled as "deadly poison", while the other is "delicious"? This table, like the first two, breathes pure imaginative excellence.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized fro screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Well...basically, at this point, all you have to know is that Mike Welham wrote this. He consistently delivers some of the most awesome, inspiring, diverse dressing-files - from the mundane to the magical, from the classic to the weird, from the hilarious to the uncanny, Mike's dressing show a level of diversity that is basically unreached - and this is no different. Each and every table in this book is pure awesomeness and inspires even the most burnt-out GM. This is what these files should be like. Excellence. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Druid's Body
Click to show product description

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Shunned Valley of the Three Tombs
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/30/2016 09:29:05

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This adventure clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC (including tables for statblocks by CR), 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, 1 page of advice on how to read statblocks, leaving us with 20 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This product was moved up in my review-queue as a prioritized review at the request of my patreons.


All right, so what do we get here? Well, first of all, we get a incredibly gorgeous b/w-map of the Duchy of Ashlar: The cartography by Simon Butler, Dan Dyson and Tommi Salama employed herein is...well glorious. Oh, and guess what? If you're like me and get a LOT of Raging Swan Press books to supplement your gaming experience...you'll notice something. The map tells you, which direction the lonely coast is, where deksport can be found - and indeed, in this duchy, you can see Wellswood, longbridge, ashford -some of the unique villages and places my groups have visited and come to love (or abhor) - oh, and the map also sports a wide array of as of yet unexplored places. And, in case you're asking - this whole region, contextualized, can easily be dropped into just about any campaign setting, though theme-wise, settings like Greyhawk, The Lost Lands or the like probably work best - and yep, the Shadowed Keep of the Borderlands is also mentioned.


There is a second important thing to note about this module: It is explicitly made for (relatively) new players - Core is assumed to be known, but that's basically about it. Hence, the challenges in this adventure are somewhat less pronounced than veterans would expect. At the same time, it should be noted that this pdf does not necessarily feature themes explicitly designated as "kid-theme" - it is not gory or grimdark or anything...it is just fantasy. I tested this module with my kid-group and ran into no issues. This is very much an adventure that allows the GM to utilize tropes of adventuring and fantasy, but sans being inappropriate. So yes, I'd consider this appropriate for all but the youngest and most sensitive of kids. The pdf also provides extensive scaling advice for each encounter - by +1/-1, which means that you can also run this for more seasoned adventurers sans the players becoming bored. One more thing - while this module introduces PCs and players to some of the classics, its structure allows the GM to include ample options for rest...or not, allowing for pretty concise control over the pacing of the module itself. And no, thankfully my most loathed adventuring clichés, the shadow and ogre bosses are absent from these pages. Thank Gygax!


All right, this is as far as I can get sans diving into SPOILERS. Potential players of this module should jump to the conclusion NOW.


...


..


.


All right, only GMs around? Good. We begin this module in the town of Dulwich, with 3 basic adventuring hooks and 4 entries of village lore being provided - this, as a whole, sets the stage for the motivation to explore the valley. A table of 6 rumors, some of which are false, some of which are correct, provide further information and, as a whole, this section of setting-up the module already indirectly teaches the value of doing one's legwork. The overland journey by movement speed has convenient travel durations noted and sports the option of getting lost. a brief 12-entry table of minor events during the journey features mechanically-relevant, fun little encounters that range from woodland critters to deep gulleys and streams.


The valley itself can be pictured as one that sports, obviously, multiple tombs - said tombs are the mini-dungeons in this book, but they are not the only graves there: Cairns can be looted and a table of items can be found there. Similarly, an 8-entry dressing table for the valley allows you to customized the dressing and generate more atmosphere. From the small waterfall to tracks, the valley has several interesting locations as such - but the interesting component, at least to me, would be that the mini-dungeons (usually only a couple of rooms) sport unique challenges: In the tomb of the stone woman, one can, for example, face an animated statue, with some traps that are painful, but not necessarily lethal, teaching this component of adventuring. And yes, from chests to sarcophagi, the level of detail provided in this pdf is excessive and makes running this very easy.


The tomb of the champions features unique adversaries and has a completely different flavor - inside lie the now undead remains of two erstwhile champions of the hobgoblins, emphasizing the component of combat in the exploration here. Finally, there would be a third mini-complex, wherein an owlbear and its young lair - these caves can be seen as introductions to animals and terrain - with bat guano, a bat swarm, uneven footing and the like, the focus here is admirably different.


This, however, is not nearly the extent of adventuring the pdf contains - beyond fully depicted random encounters, the module also sports a rival adventuring group that can act as a major complication for the PCs, feigning friendship and loyalty, while waiting to backstab them. Beyond these low-lives, there is another optional encounter that will introduce the necessity of ROLEplaying to PCs and players alike: The ghost of a perished adventurer haunts this valley's lake and putting her to rest is one of the more unique challenges in this pdf. It's not hard, mind you - but it makes it clear that sometimes, words are more powerful than thrown spells and drawn swords. These add-in-encounters, including an owlbear, obviously can also be used to save the PCs - if the aforementioned adventuring group's too much to handle...well, then the arrival of a pack of wolves or said owlbear may act as a save...and teach the valuable lesson of considering that the world is dynamic. (Fyi, in case anyone wondered: My kids are worse munchkins and power-gamers than my adults and walked all over the combat challenges...but still had a lot of fun, particularly relishing the chance of putting the ghost to sleep!)


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press' elegant two-column b/w-standard and the pdf features copious b/w-artworks (some of which I've seen before). The cartography is excellent, though no map-key-less versions are included. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and in two versions - one optimized for screen-use and one for the printer. Kudos!


Creighton Broadhurst's Shunned Valley of the Three Tombs is a great example of a first level module I would have loved to have back in the day. Why? Because it actually teaches the basics of adventuring. Watching for traps, not assuming that violence is always the solution, taking care of terrain, knowing that the world's dynamic...all those important little lessons are taught in a pretty concise manner by showing, not telling. The challenges are sufficiently moderate to make sure that the players don't get wiped out while learning these, though this does not mean that they can act foolhardily: This is an adventure and as such, it sports danger. Now granted, veterans may not necessarily be too blown away by the mechanic components, but the dressing and atmosphere may make this a feasible option for these as well, particularly if they prefer a campaign's start to be less lethal than the things to come.


Beautiful in its simplicity and level of detail, this is a great introductory module for the game we all know and love - and for this purpose, it should be considered to be a 5 star+ seal of approval module. Veterans and grognards who have seen it all may be slightly less intrigued, though the old-school vibe and aesthetic employed here may tug at one's heart's string. Still, for experienced and jaded audiences, this may be slightly less compelling and should be considered the equivalent of a 4 star module. One final note: Fans of Raging Swan press need this module -the contextualizing map of the duchy is awesome and truly evocative!


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Shunned Valley of the Three Tombs
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I Loot the Wizard's Body System Neutral Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/25/2016 02:38:42

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


We begin this supplement with a massive table of 100 different wizard pouches and the thing to find are curious indeed - crossword puzzles in foreign languages, partially knit socks, sealed bins of beard balm, holy symbols, colored chalk, ropes made from impossible smooth substances - from the odd and quirky to the foreboding and weird, this table is great.


The second table sports a wide variety of different wizard's robes, 100 to be precise - which range from living cloaks from which grass and vines grow to noble robes made of damask to classic outfits, including robes depicting the stellar constellations. There also are robes with hundreds of tingling silver bells, rough blankets with a hole for head and arms or simply ones with white furred hoods. Overall a diverse array, but one that imho is a bit robe-centric.


The third 100-entry table sports...bonded objects! From amulets made of dried raptor claws to classic amulets or rings, wands of iridescent scales, vials of odd liquid or tiny crystal balls - the selection here is once again a rather inspired collection - no complaints.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Kat Evans' take on wizard apparel to be found on the deceased practitioners of the arcane arts is certainly a fun dressing file - particularly the table on bonded objects is pretty inspiring, not only for GMs, but also for players looking for a different flavor for their bonded objects. The outfit table is somewhat less awesome, but this doesn't really hurt the pdf - overall, a cool, fun dressing file, well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Wizard's Body System Neutral Edition
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I Loot the Wizard's Body
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/25/2016 02:37:57

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


We begin this supplement with a massive table of 100 different wizard pouches and the thing to find are curious indeed - crossword puzzles in foreign languages, partially knit socks, sealed bins of beard balm, holy symbols, colored chalk, ropes made from impossible smooth substances - from the odd and quirky to the foreboding and weird, this table is great.


The second table sports a wide variety of different wizard's robes, 100 to be precise - which range from living cloaks from which grass and vines grow to noble robes made of damask to classic outfits, including robes depicting the stellar constellations. There also are robes with hundreds of tingling silver bells, rough blankets with a hole for head and arms or simply ones with white furred hoods. Overall a diverse array, but one that imho is a bit robe-centric.


The third 100-entry table sports...bonded objects! From amulets made of dried raptor claws to classic amulets or rings, wands of iridescent scales, vials of odd liquid or tiny crystal balls - the selection here is once again a rather inspired collection - no complaints.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Kat Evans' take on wizard apparel to be found on the deceased practitioners of the arcane arts is certainly a fun dressing file - particularly the table on bonded objects is pretty inspiring, not only for GMs, but also for players looking for a different flavor for their bonded objects. The outfit table is somewhat less awesome, but this doesn't really hurt the pdf - overall, a cool, fun dressing file, well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Wizard's Body
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I Loot the Rogue's Body System Neutral Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/23/2016 09:16:36

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


All right - after a brief, nice introduction to the subject matter, we dive right into the first table - which contains 50 sample rogue outfits that range from startling color-combinations to dark vests over white shirts...and e.g. goggles and gas-mask-like outfits for a surprisingly diverse assortment of evocative sample outfits.


Beyond these, rogues, perhaps more so than other classes, sport an important tool of the trade...and if you're like me and tie of saying "you find a masterwork lockpick"...well, then the next table is for you: At 100 entries, you can find cracked spyglasses, brass ear horns with the initials "R.W.D.", spools of copper wire, chains, thin silver wires...now these are inspiring tools beyond the old and tired clichés. Well done!


The third table in this book, then, covers the insides of rogue's pouches - which means that from bottlecaps from diverse breweries to pickled eyeballs of demons and mouse skulls, you'll find a lot of actually interesting material in this table - what poor fey was deprived of its gossamer wings? Why doesn't the box with the hand-crank open? I don't know yet - but these nifty bits certainly make for an inspiring starting point to further develop such angles from!


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Eric Hindley's collection of dressings for the deceased rogues is, in one sentence, a fun, inexpensive and versatile list of tables that enhances the game by providing ample angles for the GM, more interesting finds for the players and a neat combination of the common and uncommon - if anything, however, I do believe that this installment is relying a bit too much on the "find item engraved with XYZ"-gimmick - there are quite a few such entries herein. That being said, overall, this does not tarnish what otherwise is a nice, fun book - well worth a final verdict of 5 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Rogue's Body System Neutral Edition
Click to show product description

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I Loot the Rogue's Body
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/23/2016 09:15:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' "I Loot the Body"-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


All right - after a brief, nice introduction to the subject matter, we dive right into the first table - which contains 50 sample rogue outfits that range from startling color-combinations to dark vests over white shirts...and e.g. goggles and gas-mask-like outfits for a surprisingly diverse assortment of evocative sample outfits.


Beyond these, rogues, perhaps more so than other classes, sport an important tool of the trade...and if you're like me and tie of saying "you find a masterwork lockpick"...well, then the next table is for you: At 100 entries, you can find cracked spyglasses, brass ear horns with the initials "R.W.D.", spools of copper wire, chains, thin silver wires...now these are inspiring tools beyond the old and tired clichés. Well done!


The third table in this book, then, covers the insides of rogue's pouches - which means that from bottlecaps from diverse breweries to pickled eyeballs of demons and mouse skulls, you'll find a lot of actually interesting material in this table - what poor fey was deprived of its gossamer wings? Why doesn't the box with the hand-crank open? I don't know yet - but these nifty bits certainly make for an inspiring starting point to further develop such angles from!


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, as we've come to expect from Raging Swan Press. Layout adheres to the crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. It should also be noted that the pdf comes in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use - kudos for the extra-mile there!


Eric Hindley's collection of dressings for the deceased rogues is, in one sentence, a fun, inexpensive and versatile list of tables that enhances the game by providing ample angles for the GM, more interesting finds for the players and a neat combination of the common and uncommon - if anything, however, I do believe that this installment is relying a bit too much on the "find item engraved with XYZ"-gimmick - there are quite a few such entries herein. That being said, overall, this does not tarnish what otherwise is a nice, fun book - well worth a final verdict of 5 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I Loot the Rogue's Body
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Alternate Dungeons: Frigid Ice Cave
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/02/2016 02:54:38

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Raging Swan Press' Alternate Dungeons-series clocks in at 12 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let's take a look!


The frigid caves of eternal ice inspire anyone who has ever ventured atop a glacier and beyond that - as a dungeon backdrop, they present unique challenges, which this pdf is designed to address: With cliffs and their scaling DC, chasms and ice-sheets, ledges and levels, there is a lot of cool terrain to consider, all presented with tight and concise mechanics to back up the evocative imagery. Similarly, this acts as a concise GM-cheat sheet, listing the effects of environmental cold, starvation and supplies and crumbling columns and stalagmites, going so far to even include the dangers of ice-cold water.


As has become the tradition with this series, we do receive information regarding the sacking of the dungeon - from the mundane (deceased explorers) to sunken vessels and objects encased in ice, this section has a lot to offer in terms of considerations for the GM. Similarly evocative would be the section discussing the function of the caves - whether to act as a place that houses ancient guardians or an elemental conduit, the ideas are intriguing...or let's flip that, shall we? Perhaps the caverns are more hospitable and thus offer shelter to hibernating creatures...or are subject to a sympathy spell that may attract creatures...perhaps to recruit guardians or for more sinister purposes, only the GM knows and decides...


As always, the pdf does feature a dressing-table, here spanning a whole page - though the reader will grin here, probably more than elsewhere. Why? Because the table sports a plethora of rules-relevant modifications - whether it's chilly blankets of mist, unstable ice that can be detected by Knowledge (engineering) or ominous stalactites that threaten to fall (and potentially crush the floor) in response to loud noises - this table goes one step beyond and is a joy to read.


Now the sample denizen section sports the usual suspects from frost giants to remorhazes and yetis, yes, but the pdf also features the wendigo and in some cases offers apt guidelines that even veteran GMs may use. Have you ever thought about reskinning goblins to be blue-skinned (no, they don't have to have psionics as per this pdf...but while we're at it...why not?) walrus-riders? Yeah, me neither.


Where the pdf goes the extra mile would be with the rather evocative hazards-section -from avalanches to cracking ice ledges and chilling winds to ice that acts like mirrors of life trapping, this page alone may be worth the fair asking price for the mundane and magical hazards collated.


Finally, we end this pdf with 3 adventure hooks - incursions by frothing mad yetis would be well...but what if a wendigo chased survivors to a dead-end, to watch them struggle and either become ghoulish undead or food to their erstwhile brethren? Yeah, that makes for an evocative survival adventure. Oh, and have I mentioned the dread gnomish necromancer demanding tribute, carrying his undead hordes in the belly of an undead worm to discipline settlements that fail to provide their tribute? Yep, these hooks are versatile and well-crafted.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press' elegant 2-column b/w-standard and the pdf features several nice b/w-artworks. The pdf comes in two versions, one optimized for screen-use and one optimized for the printer and both are bookmarked for your convenience.


Daron Woodson's frigid ice caves are a truly wondrous, wonderful environment to adventure in - whether it's via Frog God Games Northlands Saga, AAW Games' Rybalka or a similar environment, I can't wait to whip out this well-crafted pdf to supplement my next icy dungeon. Evocative, considerate and well-crafted as a whole and in the respective details, this is a shining example for the virtues of the series. It also shows how exceedingly useful this product line can be - for a ridiculously low price, you have great cheat sheets and all the tools to craft yourself...or simply reskin an otherwise less than interesting adventure. A fantastic supplement, well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Alternate Dungeons: Frigid Ice Cave
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Village Backdrop: Wellswood System Neutral Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/26/2016 03:31:34

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of RSP's Village Backdrop-series is 11 pages long, 1 page front cover, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 5 pages of content, so let's take a look at the settlement


In this installment of Raging Swan Press' by now legendary series, we travel to the village of Wellswood - which is aptly-named: Situated in the midst of a gorgeous forest, the settlement sports numerous wells - both natural ones and those crafted by dwarven hands, for the settlement sports a significant dwarven population, who faithfully serves the local dour and somewhat greedy, but none too unpleasant lord Ilmari Issakainen.


The uncommon occurrence of a forest-bound dwarven clan also results in a surprising amount of fortified stone buildings jutting forth from the massive forest. While secure, the rather significant taxes imposed are not to be trifled with, though merchants and travelers won't have too much of a problem paying them. No less than three inns (all coming with information on accommodation-prices and food) are detailed within these pages, as befitting of a village under the auspice of a church of travelers - which btw. includes a brief deity-write-up. Industry-wise, the local lake with its fishing (requiring permission of the lord...which is, again, taxed) is based mostly on the massive influx of travelers passing through.


Oh, but I've failed to mention the interesting component here: You see, aforementioned lake, much like the hold of the dwarven clan, is subterranean and heavily regulated - though that does not mean that there are no means of getting down there sans the lord knowing...if you know whom to ask. Yes, the subterranean lake actually writes adventures of itself, considering the plethora of potential dangers there and the mere presence of it makes a potentially cataclysmic earthquake all the more dangerous - so yes, plenty of development options are provided here, from the local color (the village sports notes on nomenclature, clothing, magic items for sale etc.) to more massive storylines - after all, there is a reason the dwarves are here - but to know that, you'll have to travel to Wellswood yourself!


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to RSP's smooth, printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes with full bookmarks as well as a gorgeous map, of which you can, as always, download high-res jpegs if you join RSP's patreon. The pdf comes in two versions, with one being optimized for screen-use and one to be printed out and sports a great artwork of a fishing trip on the subterranean lake.


Creighton Broadhurst's Wellswood is a compelling settlement that manages to strike a precarious balance: On the one hand, it is a pretty pleasant place that, in itself, is not yet an adventure and the lack of a central conflict means that you don't have a streamlined narrative cut out for you. However, unlike many a supplement with such a broad focus, Wellswood still manages to retain a sense of holistic integrity, a feeling of concise options, ready to be explored at any time. From politics to potential threats, whether as just a waystation or as a new home for the PCs, the village manages to support and accommodate threats both significant and trivial. While the supplement does not achieve the highest echelons of the series, it remains an excellent book that does offer a significant, tight array of interesting options for GMs and players to explore and, more important, a tight and unique place to visit. The system-neutral version loses nothing of the brilliance that made me love the original iteration - hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Wellswood System Neutral Edition
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GM's Miscellany: Village Backdrops III (Free Version)
by Peter C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/22/2016 14:35:09

This is a handy free sample of several villages in Pathfinder settlement format. I've glanced at each village and I can definitely see lifting bits from each one to flesh out my own settlements in my Pathfinder campaign.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
GM's Miscellany: Village Backdrops III (Free Version)
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Village Backdrop: Coldwater System Neutral Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/20/2016 05:09:22

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of RSP's Village Backdrop-series is 11 pages long, 1 page front cover, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 5 pages of content, so let's take a look at the settlement


Coldwater is perched upon an inhospitable, mud-drenched coast, with one access by land, its harbor is in the delta of a miserably stream that empties its contents into the sea - and if that does not reflect a place you'd like to visit, then that's pretty much a representation of how most folks see this place. Nearby caverns sport strange stair-like features that only rarely become visible and the inhabitants of the village are just as sullen and unfriendly as the weather suggests. The village lore reflects the relative hostility and rugged nature of the village rather well, while a Finnish-inspired nomenclature emphasizes an association with the colder climes.


Indeed, the rustic and eccentric locals e.g. sport a man named Holg, who has a well-stacked ware-house, but lets no one in - you have to tell the old man what you're looking for and mysteriously, more often than not, he procures the object from within the depths of his dubious "locker." Indeed, one cannot really fault the locals for their sullen outlook on life: As the events and the subtle wrongness in the tides underline, there is something wrong here - there are the deformed, both in mind and body- how and why the poor folks of this village are struck by this curse ultimately is up to the GM, but the presence of the template and its varied effects alongside the stigmatization such folk may experience should drive home pretty well that something is wrong here...


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to RSP's smooth, printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes with full bookmarks as well as a gorgeous map, of which you can, as always, download high-res jpegs if you join RSP's patreon. The pdf comes in two versions, with one being optimized for screen-use and one to be printed out.


Creighton Broadhurst has skill - and this one shows it pretty well. The mastermind of Raging Swan Press delivers what I'd like to call a wide open sandbox: We are faced with problems and the respective NPCs mentioned can be used to exacerbate it, change it...all depending on your whims. Basically, this is one of the village backdrops that is so compelling, it can make PCs pretty much write their own tale: Throw them in and watch what happens. In this aspect, though, this one is slightly inferior to Kennutcat. However, at the same time, it sports local color that made me think of the slight surreal elements that made Twin Peaks so compelling, at least for me -from the dwindling fortunes of one family to female, hard-working and drinking half-orc, there is a lot of quirkiness, a lot of unique bits and pieces here; enough, to make this thoroughly compelling. The system-neutral version loses nothing of the luster of the original and is well worth 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Coldwater System Neutral Edition
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Places of Power: Valley of the Rocks
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/15/2016 06:26:57

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the Places of Power-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This review was moved forward in my review-queue as a prioritized review at the behest of my patreons.


Sheltered away within the wooden ranges of hills untouched by current civilization, a steep-sided, deep valley's ancient, sculpted rocks bear witness to the ages, remnants of a civilization long gone, flanked by majestic cliffs and clad in perpetual shadows. A living, breathing temple to nature itself, the wondrous valley contains huge falls where the Malinrae river tumbles down the steep cliffs.


Within the shadows of this gorgeous place, moss-covered lupine statues, untainted pools and mystic rocks carved in the likeness of deer and bear await the intrepid explorer, while willow-fringed Lake Vontyr awaits explorers. PCs versed in ancient lore may unearth some intriguing facts about this place - like that it actually is the site of an ancient elven realm or that it in fact is built on a place of power. The few explorers who dared venture into this place can provide one of 6 rumors - but is it true that this place was created when two gods met in fierce battle? Or that the strange sculptures come alive at night? You'll have to travel there to find out!


And while you're there, you may encounter 6 sample events that exemplify the beauty and marvel of this place...speaking of which: This pdf actually contains a mini-dressing table of 12 entries that helps you bring alive this wondrous place...and not all is mist-clad branches and crystal waters: You see, the custodians of this place roam its breadth still: Using both age-categories and even multiclassing, two of the 4 characters are fully statted herein (the others get RSP's neat fluffy treatment covering mannerisms etc.), as the powerful guardians stand in their eternal, ghostly vigil. While, for the most part relatively benevolent (unless you despoil the place...then run for the hills!), one of them has more of a hardliner stance regarding trespassers. As in: "Stalk and kill them all"-hardliner-stance.


As always - beauty and danger are close compatriots...


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed not a single glitch. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press' crisp and printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The pdf has no artworks, but needs none and comes in two versions - one optimized for screen-use and one optimized for the printer. The cartography of the valley by Tommi Salama is absolutely GORGOEUS and may be worth the asking price all on its own.


With Creighton Broadhurst, chief of Raging Swan Press, most embroiled in the nit and grit of publishing, it can be easy to forget how exceedingly talented he is in the fields of writing. Back in the day, when there was only ONE Raging Swan Press product out, Retribution, I bought it on a hunch and was blown away. If anything, Creighton has honed his craft. This pdf is quite frankly better than it has any right to be at this page-count: In a superb example of concise writing, with each word carefully chosen, Creighton takes us on a tour into a truly wondrous, lavish place of natural beauty. The "valley of rocks" sounds none to impressive on paper and is a prime example of British understatement - what we receive here is a truly gorgeous, fantastic place that could be used in pretty much any campaign - heck, replace elves with humans and this would work in our world.


This is not what sets this apart, though: While reading these pages, I could perfectly envision the majestic cliffs, I could almost hear the proud Kanae Falls. This is an exercise in stellar prose and a truly superb location that deserves being added to your campaign. Get this now! Oh, and yes, final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval, obviously. Now excuse me, I need to dream of visiting a gorgeous place, where lichens cover sculptures that tell tales of ages long past...


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Places of Power: Valley of the Rocks
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