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Legendary Classes: Sacredote
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/26/2016 03:40:09

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the Legendary Classes-series clocks in at 35 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page blank, 1.5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 31.5 pages of content, so let's take a look!


The sacredote base class presented herein gets d6 HD, 2+Int skills, proficiency with dagger, club, hanbo, quarterstaff and no armors - sacerdotes in armor risk arcane spell failure for divine spells when wearing armor/using shields. The class gets 1/2 BAB-progression and good Will-saves. A sacerdote casts prepared divine spells governed by Wisdom as casting attribute from the cleric's spell-list. He may not cast spells from opposed alignments, as usual - however, here's the catch: They have a second spell-list, based on domains: Sacerdotes add 5 domains together from their patron deity/deities and generate a domain spell-list: They gain as many spells from these domains as from regular spellcasting. And no, thankfully, they don't get domain powers from all of the domains. PrC-wise, sacerdotes only benefit from spellcasting progression that extends to all spellcasting, not from those that exclusively apply to divine spellcasting. At 3rd level and every 4th level beyond, the sacerdote receives a bonus feat chosen from metamagic feats, item creation feats and wrath feats - more on those later.


As the more theoretical divine caster, a sacerdote receives Intelligence modifier in addition to the usual attribute used on attack rolls with spells or divine wrath rays, not extending this benefit to e.g. spell-supported attacks like attacking with a magic weapon. Additionally, they may treat spells with a range of touch as though they had a range of 5ft. times class level, using Dex-mod to calculate attack bonus in conjunction with Int for such touch attacks. On misses, the charge cannot be held, just fyi. And yes, the class is smart enough to restrict this ability exclusively to spells granted from the sacerdote class.


Now I mentioned divine wrath - this would be an SP-signature ability of the class: As a standard action that provokes AoOs, sacerdotes may sacrifice a spell f level one or higher and unleashes a burst of divine energy that deals untyped damage (and doesn't damage constructs and objects) equal to 1d6 per spell level sacrificed, +1d6 at 2nd level and every even level thereafter. (At 4th level, divine wrath would hence deal spell level times d6 + 2d6 damage.) This is treated as a spell equal to the level of the sacrificed spell for purposes of counterspelling. Divine wrath can be manifested as either a 20-ft.-cone burst with a Will save DC of 10 + spell level sacrificed + Int-mod for half damage. The ranged touch attack ray has a range of medium (100 ft + 10 ft. per level) and offers no save, but targets, obviously only one creature. This, like spellcasting, requires the divine focus and it counts as channel energy for purposes of haunts, contingencies etc. - nice catch there.


Starting at 5th level and every 4 levels thereafter, the sacerdote gets a manifestation, which allows the sacerdote to modify the divine wrath to generate lines, forked rays, cylinders, etc. and evena snake line. The class also sports a bunch of favored class options that cover not only base races, but also Porphyran races like the dragonblooded or exotic choices like the samsaran. We also get a CR 10 sample furnace elf sacerdote.


Archetype-wise, the class also receives some options, first of which would be the augur: These guys have a similar chassis as the sacerdote, but get a modified spell-list, the exclusive augury domain and no divine wrath - instead, they may at long range, as an immediate action, twist fate, allowing the augur to expend spells to add their level (capping at Int-bonus) to the result of a check, even after the results are made known. Starting at 8h level, augurs may instead also penalize creatures. They gain bonus feats at 2nd level and every 4 levels thereafter. They may also recast divinations yielding unfavorable results, even when that would usually be prohibited. At 12th level, he can 1/day use good omen sans it being an action (2/day at 20th level) and level 16, groups of people requiring concerted effort can benefit from good omens, for as long as the checks happen in the same round. The sample augur provided is an augur at CR 6.


The pdf also provides a druidic version of the sacerdote: These guys get light armor and a limited domain selection, but they do modify the spell list with a list of at least 2 spells per level that can be spontaneously cast. They add Int-mod to natural attacks and may also spontaneously convert spells into summon nature's ally. Wild empathy is of course also part of the deal. The passive abilities like resist nature's lure, venom immunity, timeless body etc. can be found as well. The sample character provided is an atheling at CR 4.


After this one, we also get an elemental-themed sacerdote - with elemental domains, obviously. Instead of the regular divine wrath, these guys can channel energies as blasts and the elemental wrath can be resisted via Ref-saves saves. These guys gain Placate Outsiders at 2nd level. Now the interesting thing from a design perspective: The fewer energy types you have access to, the more scaling resistance you gain to the energy associated with your domains - this value also determines the amount of energy resistance the elemental wrath can bypass. Interesting set-up. The sample character would be a CR 6 half-cyclops.


The invoker would be the summoning specialist herein - with quicker summons, and spontaneous conversion into summoning spells, with available creatures being determined by the domains chosen. Slightly problematic - for summons of usually a casting duration of 1 round, the class should specify the actions available for the summoned creature in the round they are conjured forth. Also interesting - the creature type determined by the domains can also be targeted with an AoE charm/dominate-like effect...but one tied to your HD. The sample character provided clocks in at CR 6.


The healing sacerdote receives a positive energy-based healing variant of divine wrath, aptly called divine weal: This can take two forms, a 40 ft.-cone or the medium range ray that only affects a single target, but always cures the maximum amount. The ability heals 1d6 per spell level converted, +1d6 at 4th level, with every 4 levels thereafter increasing that amount by +1d6. Non-damaging wrath feats may be used in conjunction with this ability. Unsurprisingly, this variant needs to take the Healing domain. They also get +Int-mod to CL-checks to remove a harmful effect or condition with magic such as break enchantment et al. and alsoincreases touch spell range to 5 ft. times Int-mod, using Dex-mod to calculate atk. At 2nd level, these guys may channel mercy and basically add mercy-like condition-removers, with up to 5 conditions removed in one go. 5th level allows for either the application of aforementioned mercies or to gain treat rolled 1s as 6s when using divine weal. Healing sacerdotes get a manifestation at 9th, 13th and 17th level, and it affects divine weal instead of divine wrath, obviously. The sample character clocks in at CR 10.


Proselytizers are basically a Cha-based variant of the standard sacerdote that is locked into the Community domain. At 3rd level, the class gets Selective Wrath as a bonus feat, but at 5th level and every 2 levels thereafter, he may exclude an additional creature from the effects of divine wrath. At 5th level and every 4 levels thereafter, proselytizers may choose bonus feats (metamagic, item creation, wrath) instead of manifestations. At 7th level, allies excluded from selective wrath gain a new Will-save versus ongoing effects that allow a saving throw, possibly shaking the effect off. Here, the ability is probably a bit wonky - I'm pretty sure this is supposed to only apply to Will-save based effects, but as written, it allows people to shake off ongoing Ref- and Fort-based effects, which would be odd indeed...and render the level 11 ability, which does that for Fort- and Ref-saves obsolete. At 15th level, excluded allies also gain 1 temporary hit point per die of damage of divine wrath. 19th level is brutal: Allies affected by the wrath may take a move or standard action as an immediate action. The sample character is a CR 4 geralite.


The spirit sacerdote is the first of these variants/archetypes that doesn't have its own class table (so yes, the above are pretty complex modifications of the class) and also is governed by Cha and pretty unique: They can change domains by negotiating with creatures, spirits, even the dead, a massive table providing monster types and correlating them to domains - a lot of roleplaying potential here! The sample character clocks in at CR 8.


The theurgist as no access to domains...but can learn ALL domain spells, even opposing alignment domains...but only the spells. Theurgists cast arcane spells. The arcane wrath of the theurgist requires no focus, which is a bit problematic - no disarm or similar tricks will help here. These guys have a cleric spellbook and a domain spellbook. Each level, the theurgist gets +2 cleric spells and 2 new domain spells for free and may learn spells like a wizard. The sample character clocks in at CR 8.


The pdf closes with over 20 feats, most of which belong to the [wrath]-category - these include DC-increases for divine wrath, multiple feats that allow you to placate other types of creatures (like animals, aberrations...you get the idea), gain an extra manifestation...etc. Heightening divine wrath's DC by using it as a full-round action instead is VERY powerful and something I'd nerf. Similarly, there's a save or suck (you won't save) feat that deals no damage to constructs...but dazes them for damage die rounds...considering the crappy Will-saves of constructs a powerful lock-down. Speaking of OP: There is a feat that lets you heal via divine wrath...which means you'll be better at healing raw HP than the Healing archetype (who gets half the bonus die scaling that the damaging version gets). Granted, you can't take away those negative conditions...but still.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are very good - while not always internally consistent (third vs. 3rd), the book, as a whole, is well-crafted, with precise rules-language and only a precious few hiccups. Layout adheres to Purple Duck Games' printer-friendly two-column standard with some niece pieces of full color artwork. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Carl Cramér's Sacerdotes (with additional design by Julian Neale and Mark Gedak) are interesting in that they leave me pretty torn. On the one hand, I actually really enjoy this take on the armor-less divine caster/holy man. The complex domain-tricks and variants are pretty awesome, with divine wrath's power being dependant on spells making for an interesting resource-management game. The fragility of the class is pretty important, and, while it looks brutal on paper, in game, the sacerdote and its variants mean one thing: KILL THEM FIRST. More so than clerics and druids, games with sacerdotes should be aware of the fact that these guys can dish out tons of damage...and heal even more in the case of the healer. Similarly, the invoker can pretty much go all Master Summoner on the table and drown foes in summoned creatures. That is, foes should know in-game to attack these guys like crazy - the fact that they can extend touch spells to range, limited though that may be, also means that they can provide healing more reliably sans getting into danger. When they do end up adjacent to any halfway decent attacker, though, they fold like wet tissues.


In playtest, these characters did yield a surprising result: When they worked, they owned the table - a healing sacerdote, for example, can maintain a front-line of melee barbarians in a manner most fearsome and lets a group withstand tremendous amounts of punishment...but at the same time, they could be squashed very easily. I managed to one-hit the guy. MAD is also used in a rather smart manner to reign these guys in.


The base sacerdote's restrictions are interesting and while I still prefer Interjection Games' ethermagic for warlock-y gaming, for divine blasters, these guys are interesting - though I have to warn against one component, particularly in mid-to high level gaming: Divine wrath is UNTYPED and not subject to SR. There is literally no way to reliably guard against this - even negative energy has a few creatures that are immune/resist it...so I'd very much recommend making this a classic damage type. Similarly, if you had issues with summon-spams in the past, the invoker will exacerbate the issue of creature-spamming. Still, overall, that makes for options that may not be perfect...but neither are they automatically problematic. Being able to learn ALL DOMAINS and the theurgist's arcane wrath feel a bit ill-conceived - the more domains you allow, the worse it gets. The means to extend touch spells to range should imho be restricted to cure/inflict-spells - on its own, that would already be VERY strong; with all the others...well...ouch.


Still, as a whole, I like he frame, if not all the precise details.


Where things get rather wonky would be the feats: The increased DC is VERY strong; Being able to potentially outheal the healing variant of the class for one measly feat is similarly baffling. On the other hand, the placate feats sport some cool ideas (a turn-like one for undead, for example), but vary in efficiency. The fact that you can get significant control over divine wrath AND increase the DC significantly means that you'll consider the ability ultimately much more useful and versatile than channel energy. This pdf, in a nutshell, offers some generally well-crafted options in the upper power-echelons. It imho could have used a bit more streamlining and nerfing and has some bits that can become problematic.


In a nut-shell, the sacerdote has awesome blasting, many spells, (broken) powerful healing (broken if you take the feat...)...and still is about as durable as a wet paper towel. On one hand, this class is arguably OP and gets too much out of being a bad BAB-class - for the nerf, they get more spells, ranged healing (already insanely powerful on its own, even with short range) and then add the superb blasting to the fray. In my playtest, I could take sacerdotes down, sure - but I had to do so...fast.


On the other hand, the framework and system presented here is neat, fun and lends itself to easy modification. Still, I can't just rate this on potential and have to rate it for what it presents, no matter how easily one could fix the hiccups and retune the balancing issues. As much as I like this book, I think it does overshoot the target significantly. My final verdict will hence clock in at 2.5 stars - if you think you can fix the aforementioned balance-issues or have a high-powered game, round up; otherwise, round down. For the purpose of this platform, I will round up due to in dubio pro reo.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Classes: Sacredote
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Maiden Voyage of the Colossus (OGL/DCC)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/24/2016 23:25:14

This adventure is advertised as compatible with both DCC and the d20 OGL systems (Pathfinder, for example). However, the adventure suffers from one rather glaring problem, one which is more prominent if you wish to use it with DCC, as I did.


First, very little is said about the campaign setting or integrating the adventure with other campaign worlds. There's a flying ship, and the company which owns it hires your characters to safeguard it from sabotage at the hands of a rival coorporation (which is also only scantily described). The main reason I bought this adventure is because I'm a big fan of the airship theme (I loved the Princess Ark series that ran in Dragon Magazine back in the day), but such implies a more "high magic" setting where magic is more common and can be used fairly reliably.


DCC, on the other hand, is a weirder and darker setting where magic spells are closely guarded secrets that can be dangerous to both the wielder's body and soul. So, naturally, I was intrigued as to how the author would reconcile the two...but no such effort was made, which I find very disappointing. The adventure helpfully points out that you can buy the campaign setting to learn more about what exactly is going on here, and I realize this isn't supposed to be a complete setting, but a page or two where the author explains their assumptions regarding the setting where they imagine the adventure taking place in would have proved welcome. This is particularly important for game masters using published DCC modules with the assumed weird, fairly low-magic vibe to make the sudden inclusion of airships and big corporations less jarring.


Certainly a seasoned game master can come up with an explanation of their own (the Crawljammer setting provides a good model for how it can be done whilst retaining the DCC "flavor"), but I buy modules like this to reduce the amount of preparation I have to do by providing good ideas and suggestions that inspire me. This adventure didn't do that, which makes me wonder if the author and publisher really considered the matter of why this adventure should be used with DCC.


Second, the adventure does contain DCC conversion notes, as advertised, but it seems to me that these were an afterthought, and not well-designed. The DC numbers to accomplish most tasks in the adventure are pretty high for DCC characters, who generally only add an ability modifier of +1 or 2 to most such rolls (if they get to add anything at all, and sometimes they'll be applying a penalty of equal value), making the 15 (and higher) DCs extremely problematic (expect to fail a lot). This isn't an insurmountable problem (you can lower DCs quite easily), but it's further evidence of what I suspected above, that DCC support was an afterthought and not enough time and effort was devoted to it.


That being said, the rest of the adventure is tolerable, though fairly bland. I rate content based on its usefulness to me; a 5 is something I can't wait to use, and a 1 is something I have no use for, which is unfortunately where this adventure falls for me.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Maiden Voyage of the Colossus (OGL/DCC)
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FT 1 - Creeping Beauties of the Wood
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2016 15:48:16

This is an excellent product. I am using the Faerie Tales from Unlit Shores series with 2 different groups. One group is made of more than half new gamers and the other is made of experienced gamers who are new to DCC. It works well for the latter but exceptionally well for the former. Here's why: the familairity of the faerie tale tropes helps to mitigate the learning curve re: new mechanics and becoming comfortable with roleplaying.


The module is jam-packed with awesome encounters and great setting detail. It is a lot of material for the price and it's totaly worth it.


I have two caveats I would make buyers aware of:


1.) While FT 0: Prince Charming Re-Animator was easily read, digested, and run in one go, this module was not. It takes several sessions to run (3-4) and it is as much a mini-campaign setting as it is an adventure. It is a hexcrawl with lots of random and placed encounters. One needs to be able to quickly decide when a random encounter is appropriate or not and when the group just needs to be sped along. One might also want to be able to move the placed encounters around if things are getting stale without tampering with the overall plot sequence. Moreover, because it is hexcrawl, players might want to travel to Portsmouth at some point during the adventure and if you don't have FT 2: The Portsmouth Mermaid, you might find that your on-the-fly Portsmouth description and NPCs don't match up with what comes out in the next module (this might have happened to me...). While this is easily retconned or altered later, it's something to be aware of. The Goblin Market is also pretty complicated and required more than one read through before I felt comfortable running it for Players, but it was totally worth it - they loved it and can't wait to go back! Tl;dr: while I felt FT-0 would be a great adventure to GM (Judge) for someone who is new to DCC or has never GMed an RPG, I can't say the same about FT 1 even as someone's second time.


2.) The overland map is really cool but I didn't feel a Players' version was necessary. Since my PCs were all peasants from Westlake I doubted they knew the layout of the Grimmswood and the road to Portsmouth. For hexploaration, the slow reveal of drawing the map as they moved around had a lot of payoff, especially for the new gamers who had never been in a hexcrawl before. Now, if one were running FT 1 on an online platform with fog of war, the Players' version would be very helpful. Because there is both a Players' and Judge's version of the map, I felt it would have been better if the Judge's version had both the letter and the name of the encounter site written on it. I found myself writing the names of the encounter sites onto a print out of the map. This was also the case with the map for FT 2: The Portsmouth Mermaid. If possible, I would encourage Mr. Bishop to make this change to any similar maps he may be planning for FT 4: The Twelve Dancing Princesses and/or FT 5: Within and Upon the Beanstalk.


Neither of these does too much to take away from the awesomness of this product. I plan to run FT 2 and I recommend anyone who likes DCC, Faerie Tales, Lovecraft, and RPGs in general buy this product. As stated before, the series is especially good if you have players who are new to RPGs.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
FT 1 - Creeping Beauties of the Wood
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Purple Duck Storeroom: More Magic Pants!
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/08/2016 07:37:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Purple Duck games' short, inexpensive experimental pdfs clocks in at 15 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 13 pages of content, so let's take a look!


In case you missed my review on the first magic pants supplement: Yes, these pdfs invent a leg-slot. Yes, they are cognizant of this. Yes, the authors probably have collected the 3 unique leggings in the Baldur's Gate saga....and yes, I consider the idea well worth it. So here are more pants!


The first of the pants is the bell-bottoms allows the wielder to perform secondary kick attacks that have the thundering quality and 1/day duplicate shout...though unfortunately, I have no idea as what action - standard or free?


Awesome: The Black Widow's Garter - it contains an extradimensional space where you can put poisoned weapons, which then have their potency enhanced. And yes, the item gets it right -you can't just store a crapton of poisoned weapons inside. AC-enhancing boxer shorts that can 1/day convert lethal damage to nonlethal damage also are pretty awesome, while kaber kilts help throwing oversized weapons.


In a hilariously bad pun, cargo pants sport limited bags of holding in their pockets and obviously, camo pants enhance your Stealth. Daisy Dukes help Diplomacy and allow you to 1/day fascinate a target, while high-water pants let you...bingo! Water Walk.


Hot pants protect versus the cold...and can be activated to engulf the wearer in a flaming aura - and yes, the activation action is properly codified. And it's hilarious. Leggings of coiling plants can create massive undergrowth and the loincloth of the jungle helps with Tarzan-like stunts - though activation of the spell included here is not perfectly clear - I assume the default standard action of use activation/spell-trigger and spell, but still...would have been nice.


More interesting - what about leggings that 1/day allow your legs o elongate to 20 feet? The benefits regarding obstacles, terrain etc. are concisely covered, the imagery is awesome and the usefulness undisputed. Damn cool! In an homage to Rogue genius Games, I assume, bright red pantaloons allow for a temporary increase of mental faculties - somewhat akin to a mental attribute-based version of a barbarian's rage - nice. Also rather cool - the focus on the mental similarly mirrors the effect in an inability to engage in physically stressful situations while in the throes of the pants. Unlike a rage, though, the wearer is left energized by the pants - pretty cool overall design.


The Pants of the Hammer Master allow the wielder to command foes to stop..and be bashed with a hammer. Yep. Hammer Time. XD Rage-enhancing purple pants of fury, rebellious longstockings that allow you to ignore confinement like Pippilotta Viktualia Rullgardina Krumsnyta Efraimsdotter Långstrump and yes, if the wearer has a horse or monkey as animal companions/mounts, they can learn more tricks. Roadrunner pants allow you to air walk and move faster while running. Smelly pants allow the wielder to be...well...smelly and unleash stinking clouds.


With Perform (Dance) and sparkle pants, you may AoE dazzle foes (hey, that rhymed!), not all pants are benevolent - there are a bunch of cursed ones inside as well - for example swimming pants that attract aquatic predators, pants that make you bossy or crabby and britches that make you sassy...and particularly loathed by vendors...oh, and what about fear-the-dark scaredy pants? Yeah, nice!


Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are top-notch this time around - I noticed no significant formal glitches. Rules-language-wise, there are some minor instances where activation actions of spells-in-a-can could have been clearer. The pdf's layout adheres to Purple Duck games' no-frills 1-column standard for the series and the pdf has no artworks, but comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Jeffrey Swank and Jacob Trier's array of magical pants made me laugh very hard - but rest assured that this is anything but a joke product - in fact, there are several benefits and mechanical operations in the crunch here that can be considered to be rather complex. While not always perfect, I still can't bring myself to rate this down - for the low asking price, you do get a rather cool array of magical pants - well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars...and since the crunch itself sports some unique ideas and particular mechanical executions, I'll round up for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Purple Duck Storeroom: More Magic Pants!
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Purple Duck Storeroom: Heraldric Devices
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/07/2016 04:01:42

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Purple Duck games' inexpensive series of experimental mini-pdfs clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of SRD, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let's take a look!


So, what are heraldric devices? Well, basically, they are add-ons to your shield. They are activated via command word and as a standard action unless otherwise noted. At a GM's discretion, they can be added to heavy armor as well. Item Creation-wise, they are wondrous items and have no effect on their own when not attached to a shield. Cursed heraldric devices exist and cannot be simply removed from the shield.


So what do they do? Well, let me give you an example: The Bat-device nets you blindsight 40 ft for 10 rounds, usable 3/day. A cursed device may bite you and centaur-devices allow you to expand your movement rate a limited amount of times per day. Petrification added to shield bashes, spell-in-a-can effects, energy protection and 1/day fear or 1/day insanity...or what about unerring hydra-heads of force? Grappling tentacles? Hungry pits beyond the maws of purple worm-devices? Yeah, the effects are awesome.


It should be noted though, that the rules-language often deviates from the proper phrasing - when I read "as if the wielder had the Improved Uncanny Dodge ability (at the 8th level of skill.)" [Sic!] something in me cringes...hard.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are good on a formal level; on the rules-language side, it is functional - you get what the text means and the respective wordings don't sport problematic ambiguities...but if it can deviate from how rules syntax and semantics work, it does. So yeah, I did cringe a couple of times...but at the same time, I can't really complain about any significant issues springing from said deviations. Layout adheres to Purple Duck Games' printer-friendly no-frills 1-column standard for the series and the pdf sports a nice piece of full-color artwork. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Okay...this is an odd one. Sam Hing's published work usually has a more precise rules-language. Still, know what? I actually really like the item-class introduced herein. The heraldric devices are unique enough and make sense...and they make shields more interesting to have around. In spite of the deviations from rules-language conventions, I couldn't really help myself - I like this little pdf and I sure hope we'll see more devices! Is this perfect? Nope, and I can't rate it as highly as I'd want to - but for the fair price, I can still recommend to check this out. My final verdict hence will clock in at 4 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Purple Duck Storeroom: Heraldric Devices
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Kineticists of Porphyra II
by Elexious C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/06/2016 08:33:03

The last Kineticist of Porphyra filled in some blanks allowing the Kineticist to grow to be as robust as other classes. These blanks were pretty obvious but now we get into the slightly odd choices and elements that expand a bit past the 'bender' feel of the class. This starts with the first archetype, the Divine Conduit, that is somewhat of a Kineticist given it's power through divine intervention. It has to be good, has an aura of good and gets 'Kinetic Smite', effectively a Smite Evil for Kineticists. The rest of the powers pull a lot from the Paladin in some way except for a growing DR. Overall it gets cool powers that are well worth what they give up; elemental defense and a few wild talents for a mount, healing, smite, a defensive boost and DR. All in all I'd go for it over any kind of elemental cleric for the streamlined theme. The Dragon Pact Kineticist is a bit hard to read being littered with exclusive wild talents that give it various dragon form abilities and breath weapon abilities making separating wild talent rules text hard to separate from class feature description until you run into a new class feature. once the whole thing is sorted out you're left with a sort of spell-less Dragon Disciple. I like it well enough where I'd put it above normal Dragon Disciple, again for the streamlined theme. The fusion Kineticist is a bit of a yawn. Nothing wrong with it but it's just a basic 'two elements at level one' kind of deal which is great for early levels but it's not like you're lacking in that kind of option at mid levels for normal Kineticist. Its a grid to fill. The Hex Kineticist continues the theme of side-jumping Kineticist into mimicking other classes, this one obviously being a witch. By now this habit gives me the feeling that the kineticists non-spell magic system is being used to replicate a pseudo-Spheres of Power effect. They get a familiar that can later be an elemental gun, and Hexes.


There are new elements. Poison and whatever Viscera is supposed to be. I had to google that and I still don't quite follow how a viscera 'element' is supposed to work. I'm going to go with 'gross body kinesis' based on what the element does, but the point is that we're getting deeper into the non-element territory of elements to manipulate/produce and leaning closer to Pokemon elements. Poison gets an acid blast and Viscera shoots bones I guess.(I'm thinking Marrow from X-Men). The new composite blasts are obvious given the new elements but the new elemental defenses being a bit cool and powerful but a little situational depending on what you're doing so no better or worse than normal elemental defenses. It does open spell resistance and rotating energy damage resistance which is nice.


The new infusion wild talents have some of the same criticisms I had last time. Some of the talents are pretty powerful for what they do and at what level although I have to say that all of the overpowered looking ones seem to have an insane burn cost. If you're set on using them they can end a fight pretty fast but you're not going to be doing anything too interesting later. These are mostly status effect kind of deals like dealing ability score damage or continuous damage (crippling to enemy casters). The utility wild talents are less extreme but definitely keeps kineticist on the path of a themed caster rather than a thing-bender opening up things like making zombies. It also kind of sets it off more anti-caster abilities like the ability to force concentration checks, counterspells and continual damage.


Between all the new wild talents there's a focus on beefing up the new elements but lots of elements get some love with some cool effects so you're going to have to go digging even if you're just a vanilla kineticist focusing on one of the main elements.


From there we have some new feats. Some things that are pretty fun. There's one that I have a bit of a thing against, mainly because it opens cans of worms for cross company utility talents than anything abusive I can think of within normal or Porphyrian Kineticist options. There are some new magical items. Well a lot. Some of them I had expected to already exist but apparently they don't so there's a bonus on that front. After that we leave off with a sample Dragon Pact NPC before OGL text.


I felt like Kineticists of Porphyra had the theme of grid-filling, expanding the Kineticist class to elements and archetypes that seem like a natural fit or a logical extension for the class. Meanwhile KoP2 goes a bit off the reservation with it's elements and if I were to describe a theme it would be a distinct hatred of casters. On one front, the archetypes creepily seek to replace other casters and replace them as doppelgangers. Despite lifting mostly from the Paladin, if you're good aligned the divine archetype is a suitable replacement for divine casters in terms of themes. Then there's the Witch and Dragon Disciple branded ones. On another front a number of the new wild talents replicate spell functions to the extent that you can even perform some necromancy. If you can sort through the fiddly bits you basically can replace all casting with wild talent 'casters' and the flavor remains untouched. Then there are the talents that outright do bad things to casters, numerous ways to deal continuous damage, spell resistance, good counterspelling. Its like the Kineticist not only wants the option to beat casters to a pulp but take their place as a less diverse but 'all day' caster.


Whether or not this is bad depends entirely on how you feel about the Kineticist in general. If you love the class and want it to be a bit more thematically or to do something other than being a blaster caster then this is a pretty decent product. It gives you new and exciting things to do and although I mostly did a single read through, I have not found any real problems in terms of rules and typos.


I would give this 5 stars out of 5. I have somewhat of a sarcastic tone with this product but it really does open up quite a bit and gives more utility to handle more esoteric problems and do cool things. This book kind of brings them up a bit past simply being an elementalist which does kind of bring it out of it's niche but also evolves the class a bit. During the playtest I felt like the Kineticist and it's Wild Talents felt like Spheres of Power-lite and I can definitely feel it here as the class branches itself. These are things that I really like, hence the five star rating.


You can find this review and more over on malwing.blogspot.com



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kineticists of Porphyra II
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Kineticists of Porphyra
by Elexious C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/06/2016 08:31:41

Since Occult Adventures came out I've seen a few products crop up to support the new psychic classes to bring them up to the bulk of options that other base classes enjoy. This product from Purple Duck Games is based on the Kineticist.


After some fluff to explain how kineticists work in Porphyra we kick off with new archetypes for the kineticist. There are four. Some are obvious ones such as the Elemental Avatar that controls earth, air, fire and water, and the Elemental Scion that focuses on one element. The other two feel like they represent the ends of the martial caster spectrum where the Cerebral Kineticist that gets mental buffs instead of physical ones and changes it's main ability score from Con to Int, then there's the Kinetic Duelist makes for a straight melee battler kineticist. The ones that need them, Elemental Avatar and Kinetic Duelist get some archetype specific wild talents to support them. Honestly I'm a little concerned that these types of archetypes weren't the first that Paizo made when I did some light digging to check for redundant concepts. Beyond the archetypes that needed obvious representation the same could be said for the new elements in here, Light, Sound, and Time.


The new elements of course come with a whole list of wild talents which take up most of the rest of the document, about 30 pages worth of talents. If the previous paragraph sounds like a lot of grid-filling, it certainly feels like it, and the wild talents follow the same route. Not that this is bad, particularly since these are grids that should have been filled from the beginning, but nothing particularly exciting happens if you're familiar with tropes of the new elements. If not then you'll have a blast (heh) because most of the effects are worth having making choosing actually pretty difficult. In some cases they're almost be too good since there are so many paizo wild talents that I'd gladly pass on. I'm also just wary about any status effect infusions since you risk handing out status effects like a witch hex only with more damage. Of course I could not playtest all of these as there are quite a few of them so for the most part I had to make guesses so your milage may vary. (As a side note, sometimes Kineticist Abilities are hard to judge. Comparing them to spells they resemble is one thing but you also have to take into consideration burn, burn mitigation, the fact that the Kineticist barely does anything outside of it's Kineticizing. ) Some you do have to suspend a bit of disbelief like Calming Tone, a utility talent that functions as Charm Person that's associated with sound. The Wild talents aren't limited to the new elements. They cover up to Occult Origins in element considerations which is nice.


After the new wild talents are a few feats the probably should have been printed by now. One to reduce how much burn you get and one to gather more energy among other very obvious ones. Then the product ends with a Kinetic Duelist NPC stat block.


This product seems to have some new and exciting things in it but it mostly achieves this by filling in concepts that I had expected to see in a Paizo book rather than something high concept and obscure. Especially things like Elemental Avatar due to the popularity of things like Avatar the Last Airbender. Sure you can achieve a similar effect with vanilla Kineticist but its not the same. But the fact of the matter is that Paizo did not print these concepts yet and these fit in pretty well without being trap options so the gridfilling is all positive leaving me with new ideas for characters and material to bring them to life, which is what a product like this is supposed to do. If I had an actual criticism it would be that I'm suspicious of how good some of the options are, or at least I would be if I had some faith that the kineticist chassis had a real way to abuse these things so I'm willing to give it 5 out of 5 stars until something comes up at the table.


You can find this review and more over at malwing.blogspot.com



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kineticists of Porphyra
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Purple Duck Storeroom: Magic Helms of Porphyra
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/04/2016 03:53:16

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Purple Duck Games' inexpensive Purple Duck Storeroom-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages SRD, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let's take a look!


Okay, so most helmets are assumed to be part of the armor, right? Well, this experimental pdf goes one step further (or backwards through time, depending on your perspective) regarding the measure of protection helmets offer. The pdf does this by introducing an item, the greathelm - this helm, when worn sans armor and only a shield (or no shield), grants a +1 armor bonus on its own, but also penalizes Perception by -2. More importantly, it offers a 10% chance to negate sneak attack damage or the bonus damage incurred from a critical hit.


Basically, it has limit 2 and fortification 10% - two new scores introduced here; the first denotes how the senses are limited by the helm; the second denotes the chance to negate critical hits et al. - and no, I have no problem with finer distinctions regarding fortification than the ones provided by the base rules. Each item also has a chance to incur the broken condition upon negating a critical hit. Such helms require heavy armor proficiency to grant their benefits, just fyi. So that would be the mundane foundation.


The pdf continues to build on this foundation with numerous helms - the first of which allows for blur in increments as well as helping versus death attacks. I would have appreciated information on whether this is a spell trigger item or use activated item regarding activation of the blur-effect, though - the latter would also pose the question of whether it can be activated as a standard or free action.


Thankfully, a scorching ray emitting tiara does get the activation right. A bascinet allows the wearer to treat one hostile creature as dazed for the purposes of flanking, which may also be dazed on an easy failed save and call forth a swarm of ravens (statblock provided) - unfortunately, once again sans specifying which action the summoning takes. I also would have appreciated information on whether saving versus the daze negates the flanking benefit - I assume no, but the wording could quite frankly be clearer.


A combination of scroll-enhancer and spell-in-a-can works perfectly and the erkusaan helmet that enhance leadership and helps intimidate humans sports 8 delightfully chaotic effects. There would also be a brain-case that enhances Intelligence, grants low-light vision and allows for limited communication with constructs. The Lion-King's Greathelm with its stacking AC-bonus is neat and negates charge-penalties - it also provides a 1/day cone of sonic damage...that lacks the activation action. What about a crown that can unreliably absorb spells, transmuting them into a time shudder?


Fans of Porhyra will like a helmet that helps bypass sanctuary, repulsion, etc. - but most importantly, the porphyrite borders while also minimizing the damage caused by wall-spells (sans prismatic wall)!


A helmet that replaces spellcasting for the full-round weapon display of Dazzling Display also makes sense to me and is actually rather intriguing! Similarly, a multi-veiled turban is nice.


The pdf also sports two cursed helms...but I'm not spoiling their effects here, in case players are reading...


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are very good on a formal level; on a rules-language level, they are good, if not perfect. Thankfully, one can usually ascertain what's meant sans ambiguity, even though syntax etc deviates. Layout adheres to Purple Duck Games' printer-friendly no-frills 1-column purple/black/white-standard for the series, with no artworks and the pdf actually is fully bookmarked - kudos!


The one reason this pdf does not get a higher rating can be summed up in two words: Activation action. Quite a few of the items herein fail to specify them for the spell-in-a-can-effects that accompany some helmets and while a spell-trigger's standard action can be assumed, I can't be sure. That being said, I like the finer fortification and the play with Perception penalties exhibited here - they make sense to me and the helmets themselves are sufficiently varied and sport interesting ideas. While formally falling short of always functional and precise rules-language, Perry Fehr's helmets do offer some rather cool ideas a GM can further use, enhance and tweak. My final verdict will hence clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 due to the low and fair price point.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Purple Duck Storeroom: Magic Helms of Porphyra
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Kineticists of Porphyra II
by Robbie H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/30/2016 02:53:21

KoP II manages to deliver new material that is worthwhile. The Corpokineticist, a standout, promises to make interesting enemies, or, if you are more adventurous, PCs.
While the book has plenty in the way of Archetypes and Wild talents.. the part that got most of my attention was the new Feats... I was pleased to see new ways to incorporate Constitution included.


A Great and Informative read. A worthy follower of its predecessor Kineticists of Porphyra.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kineticists of Porphyra II
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Alchemist Codex
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/24/2016 04:13:17

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This collection of NPC-builds clocks in at 23 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with exactly 20 pages of content, so what do we get?


Well, the answer here is pretty straightforward - we get 20 alchemist-builds, one for each level.


All right, that was an old and pretty lame joke the first time around; now, it's ridiculous. Sorry. So, much like the previous codex detailing sample kineticists, this one instead tackles alchemists and aims to give the GM sample builds to throw at characters, while also providing an interesting background story for them. Additionally, the reader can glean at a cursory look that thankfully, the helpful boon-entries for befriending the characters are still part of the deal.


Now, the previous codex excelled in the diverse selection of unique races and archetypes it employed - and the kineticist is a young class that doesn't yet have this much fodder for diversification. Well, the alchemist does not suffer from this restriction and hence, we get a solid array of options - mindchemists, psychonauts, chirurgeons, grenadiers, preservationsts, clone masters, reanimators and beastmorphs all get their due with a fitting character - oh and obviously, the level 20 vicisectionist is FEARSOME. Damn, this creature is BRUTAL: Hunter Dark, psychotic lizardfolk killer...who may just be willing to help you...provided he may eat the dead.


So yes, archetype-wise, we have a rather rich diversity here. Similarly, there are plenty of unusual races represented here: Living ghouls, for one. And yes, muses, saurians, gnolls...quite an array. It should be noted that this time around, there are no psionic races utilized, though one of the Porphyran xelusine drow is used.


Now the last codex had, as mentioned in that review, less diversity in the feat-department - well, guess what? This book does A LOT better regarding build-diversity - granted, in part due to the simple fact that the alchemist is a more versatile class regarding the ways you can take it: From bombing-specialists to more melee-centric builds that rely on extracts and mutagens, the build (and feat) diversity is significantly higher here and leaves nothing to be desired - kudos!


Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are pretty good, though there are some typos and similar glitches in the book - "bolster" instead of "bolstered" and the like. Rules-wise, there are a few very minor hiccups here, but overall, the statblocks are solid and ready to be used. Layout adheres to Purple Duck Games' two-column full-color standard and the pdf has no artwork apart from the cover, but comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Brian Jolly's collection of alchemist builds is diverse, intriguing and sports some truly unique characters. While the at times a bit rushed editing takes this down a slight notch, this still can be considered an inexpensive, nice collection of alchemist statblocks. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Alchemist Codex
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Kineticist Codex
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/22/2016 04:49:55

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This collection of NPC-builds clocks in at 23 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with exactly 20 pages of content, so what do we get?


Well, the answer here is pretty straightforward - we get 20 kineticist-builds, one for each level.


...


What, you want to know more? All right, all right...So, the first thing you'll notice is that, as denoted by the huge Porphyra-logo, the characters herein sport fluff that is tied to Porphyra, firmly rooting them in Purple Duck Games' patchwork planet, though that does not mean that they don't work in different contexts. The second thing you'll notice is that each of the characters featured comes with a cool boon-entry that provides benefits for PCs engaging n friendly ways with the respective character. A closer look at the respective characters and their set-up will show you another rather interesting component - the characters themselves tend to be diverse. No, I mean REALLY diverse.


As in "Genderless oakling elemental ascetic"-diverse. As in Ultimate Psionics-Elan brothers. As in a kitsune overflowing soul. As in a god-of-war CR 20 forlarren or as an arrogant, superbly powerful genius half-elven artist of death in exile from court. The concepts of the characters are truly diverse and captivating and the builds themselves show Brian Jolly's experience regarding the creation of powerful characters - I can see pitting these versus my players sans them erupting in yawning matches. As for the exotic races used, you can access them for free, so that does indeed not constitute a detriment in my book.


That being said, the builds of the characters, while diverse in races, do not sport the same level of diversity in their feat-choices, where the obvious Toughness, Weapon Focus, etc. reign pretty much - a bit more variety for different concepts would have been neat here. While there are some minor hiccups here and there, over all, the statblocks are well crafted, though quite a few avoidable glitches like e.g. "kimetic"[Sic!] blast have crept into the book.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are generally solid, though not perfect - I noticed several typos and minor glitches. Layout adheres to Purple Duck Games' two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The pdf has no art apart from the cover.


I enjoyed Brian Jolly's humble collection of kineticists more than I thought I would - while the statblocks aren't as flawless as those of some statblock wizards out there, we get a healthy dose of diversity in this book, with numerous uncommon character concepts and flavorful ideas. The write-ups actually make the beings portrayed here feel like proper characters, something I deeply appreciate. The kineticist builds themselves are pretty varied as well, though obviously beholden to the more effective options available for the respective direction. Beyond class abilities and races, diversity isn't that pronounced in the respective feat-selection, though we do have e.g. a crafter (with proper skills and feats), a half-giant with wild talent and the like - there is variety here, it's just not as diversified as for the rest of the respective builds. All in all, this is a nice, inexpensive, if not perfect collection of kineticists - my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kineticist Codex
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Random Encounters Remastered: Porphyra
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/18/2016 04:16:55

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the glorious Random Encounters Remastered-series clocks in at a massive 48 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 3 pages of SRD, leaving us with a whopping 43 pages of content - quite a bunch, so what precisely do we get?


Well, first of, the obvious: All RER-installments so far have been setting-neutral, though NOT generic - the environments covered have been evocative and interesting throughout the series. Thus, it is a natural fit to expect to see Purple Duck games' patchwork planet Porphyra with its unique environments to get its due, right?


So, since it has been A LOT of time since I covered an installment of this series, let's begin by recpaitulating how this system works, shall we? Each installment provides numerous adventure areas/terrain types - from the steppes to primeval woodlands and tainted estuaries. The areas themselves can be customized by providing unique hazards and terrain features. The system is dead simple: Choose a CR, multiply that CR with 20, add that value to your d%-roll...et voilà, there you have an encounter suitable for your designated target CR. One roll, simple math, HUGE tables. This elegant system is enhanced in its usefulness by several components: 1) Advice on how to best use random encounters, particularly useful for novice GMs, obviously. 2) The why-hasn't-this-been-in-the-GM's Guide-level of smart disposition-system.


What's that, you ask? Well, it's pretty much the base set-up for the adversaries - they can be charmed, disarmed, etc. - perhaps they just want to flee or are injured...or subject to a mayday on water. The system may not sound like much, but its inclusion in this series actually expands the variety and focus of random encounters significantly.


Where was I? Oh yeah: 3) Terrain features. If you've been following my reviews, you may have noticed that I very much look for interesting terrain in modules, encounters, etc. - why? Because it makes the fight more interesting...one could claim that it actually defines the fight as much as the combatants: Think about it, whether it's sieges, any swashbuckler-movie ever made or simply the tired old Luke-Vs.-Vader-showdown-comparison: Could you imagine that working in an even, bland room? Exactly. Hence, terrain is important - exceedingly so. There is a reason Raging Swan Press' dressing files are as beloved as they are. Well, this one here focuses more on rules-relevant terrain modifications - from fey-based hazards to quicksand, reefs and shifting dunes, there is a significant variety of evocative material in that regard, all ready to be inserted into your encounters at a simple glance - and yes, it also sports a table for random tunnel direction turns, widowmakers, mirages...you get the idea.


Beyond this general and awesome set-up, however, the respective environments and their massive tables also feature recommended dispositions and terrain features as well as building blocks you can use to further enhance the random encounter you create - and yes, if you're doing your task right, players will not notice that they're fighting a random encounter. A quick glance of the respective table-short hands will provide the discerning user of this supplement with a nice surprise: Both Purple Duck Games' rather impressive Monsters of Porphyra and the fourth Bestiary have been included in the creatures featured in these exceedingly-detailed tables, though the lack of neither of them will prove detrimental in a significant way to you when using this book: There are so many encounters herein, the tables are so big, that the entries featuring both books could be skipped, should you elect to do so.


As far as terrain-types are concerned, we have a field day: God-blasted wastelands, haunted seas, spirit-watched countries, tainted estuaries and underdeep ruins alongside primeval woodlands provide pretty much an all-killer, no filler selection of environments that imho prove just as useful beyond the confines of Porphyra as on the patchwork planet.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Purple Duck Games' printer-friendly two-column full-color standard with some exceptional artworks from Monsters of Porphyra being used in this book as well. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience.


David Nicholas Ross' Random Encounters Remastered-series is pretty much one of those useful to have time-savers for the GM - having these pdfs at your beck and call makes the creation of random encounters a) faster b) more rewarding and c) results in more detailed, fun random encounters. While the very notion of the random encounter has been much maligned, my experience has been that they make the game more interesting, versatile and ultimately, more organic - they help create a more concise illusion of a world that's alive. This installment sports not only concise dispositions and fun hazards, the lists themselves are also exceedingly versatile - and what more can you ask for? I encourage you to check this one out and remain with a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Random Encounters Remastered: Porphyra
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Stock Art: Female Blue Goblin Hunter
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/10/2016 14:47:56

Very nice piece of goblin artwork. The illustration is 1275 x 1649 pixels, or 862 x 1616 if you trim the empty space.
There are actually four images: line art on a white background, gray scale on a transparent background, colour on a white background, and colour on a transparent background.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stock Art: Female Blue Goblin Hunter
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Kineticists of Porphyra
by Joshua B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/04/2016 09:50:32

I'm a big fan of Kineticists (i've got some problems, but i can overlook them for the most part). However, one of my key issues with the class was that I wanted more elements. Occult Origins helped out a bit, but I still wanted more to work with. Additionally, there wasn't a huge selection of feats to pick from either. There were maybe 2-3 feats in the Occult book about this.


That's where Kineticistis of Porphyra steps in. It introduces 3 new elements (time, sound, light), while also increasing the abilities of the ones from the Paizo. There's plenty of support for mixing both too! For example within composite blasts, you have Crystal Blast, which mixes earth and light. Or you can pick something like Alteration Amplification which would turn any regular blast from a bunch of d6's to d8's.


There's plenty of new infusions to support the blasts as well. Beacon Infusion works for almost all light focused blasts, and lights your enemy up like a beacon, granting allies a bonus to hit, and if you accept another point of burn, bonus to damage as well. Or the leech infusion for void blasts where you gain life back from enemies you hit. A lot of stuff to work with. There's a lot here and they seem well-balanced compared to the core offerings. There's a lot of new wild talents as well, but I have not look too deeply into them. Nothing immediately stuck out as problematic though.


As for the feats, this book offers plenty of pickings that are genuinely useful. Burn Resistance allows you to take less damage from piling on burn, Kinetic Sniper allows your blasts to extend even further, or Precision Blast so you don't have to blast your friends if you use an AoE ability.


All in all, there's a huge amount of stuff in here, so anyone interested in kineticists should check out this book.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kineticists of Porphyra
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CE 2 - The Black Goat
by Andrew S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/01/2016 15:35:50

This is a fantastic piece of drop-in gaming content. The location sits in the middle of a trail in the mountains and can be added with no change or adaptation whatsoever to many adventures. The creatures introduced can serve as interesting and highly imaginitive one-offs, or become recurring parts of a campaigh. The CE series by Daniel Bishop excels at this sort of thing, but the Black Goat is probably the greatest one yet. This is an incredible steal at the price, and I have read it several times purely for the enjoyment of this novel mini-setting.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CE 2 - The Black Goat
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