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Koboldnomicon
by Russell M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/08/2007 20:55:51
This is a hefty collection of all sorts of kobold silliness. Equal parts fluff and crunch, this book gives plenty of options for a kobold as a player character. The sub-races have a much better survivability than the base kobold, and the Dragonmarked is just way too cool not to play at least once. The Vermin Kin class will make the squeaming in your group cringe, but it's a great class that plays to the dank, underground world of the kobold. The poetry was funny and the stories were cool, but there were too many of them and maybe they should have been web adds instead of in the book.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Koboldnomicon
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Mythos: The Principled Assassin
by Russell M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/08/2007 20:46:41
This seems to be the only one out of the series that focuses exclusively on one god. This weird god of assassins is also responsible for hospitality, which grants his followers a certain amount of flexibility in a fantasy world. If you have a player that's been wanting to play a true assassin but were worried about how to allow it, this product solves the problem. Mostly a fluff product with not a lot of crunch. But if you need ideas on how to run an assassins' guild in plain sight of the law, this is really the perfect product. Lots of well thought out background information to help you mesh this god into your game.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythos: The Principled Assassin
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Mythos: Blessed Ladies of Law
by Russell M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/08/2007 20:42:44
Much like Gods of the Dead, this does a good job of offering some varied new gods with well thought out followings. These three would easily fit into any game setting, and would be really useful for paladin players looking for a little more flexibility in that whole Lawful Good thing. While each goddess is lawful, they all have slightly different ideas of what that should mean. This puts them at odds with each other sometimes, which could make for interesting roleplaying situations.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythos: Blessed Ladies of Law
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Mythos: Gods of the Dead
by Russell M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/08/2007 20:38:51
Nice, original take on gods of death. Each god is a unique entity unto himself, and their churches are well thought out and would mesh well in most games. The few new magic items presented make sense and fill in a few blanks. (So how does a vampire travel cross country with his coffin anyway? No worries, when it's a folding coffin!). The Dhampir prestige class may be a bit unbalancing to allow as a player, but makes for a nice NPC option. But if you are running a powerful game, it won't be an issue.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythos: Gods of the Dead
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Nemesis II: Serial Killers
by Craig S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/13/2007 22:13:58
Very useful product. NPCs are easily added to a game with little planning. Suggested scripts are original and give a personality to the NPCs. The story seeds are more like mini adventures. Some nice links to crime reference books, plus a link to a lengthy article on real serial killers for anyone who wants to seriously run a major CSI investigation. Any one of these serial killers would be great for a CSI inspired game in fact. Few minor typos. Formated in single column not normal two-column style, but text broken up nicely with text blocks for scripts and the blood-splatter or the edges is cool. Character portraits are sweet. For the price, very good value.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Nemesis II: Serial Killers
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Nemesis I: Vampires
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/09/2007 00:00:00
Nemesis: Vampires presents five NPC write-ups of adversaries you can throw at your party. The 48-page PDF, by Bards and Sages, contains some great writing, but ironically is held back and dominated by its own biggest nemesis, bad layout.

Vampires begins by presenting an introduction containing a small disclaimer and a big ?ole retcon. These vampires are not your traditional D&D Monster Manual 1 Vampires. Many of the balancing weaknesses of the monsters such as opposition to daylight and sleeping in a coffin are taken away. This section needed to be given a bit more thought and provided the reader a template for these special kind of vampires. Instead, it simply says to raise the CR by 1, buy the book does not do so automatically. Without the changes to the class, the book does not fly. The changes to the class are too dramatic to not be properly addressed by the author.

The Layout of the book also leaves a lot to be desired. Two versions of this 48 page, black and white book came in my zip. One was 33 mb large and was not much different in style and layout from the other one. That is pretty big for a single PDF with only a few pictures. The pictures, are not embedded in the text and come off as more of an afterthought than an actual integration. Vampires contains book marking, but it is poorly done and does not take advantage of the tree system booking marking of adobe. Instead every section and sub section reads in one straight line with the first NPC not even getting his own unique bookmark.

These gripes really take away from the excellent writing of the NPCS. Each contains special, unique abilities obviously inspired by the vampires of Cinema. The statblocks are provided in the good old former statblock form (which I love) and each entry contains long meaty hooks and a deep history of the characters. About the only thing that I did not like was the connection of all of the NPCs. I was hoping that with a book like Nemesis: Vampires, we would get five nemesises, not a nemesis and his flock of henchmen. This is not necessarily a bad thing, as the connections between the NPCs could make an interesting story as your PCs hunt down the lead vampire, Marcus Hayden.

For the DM

You really need to adjust the CR before any of these NPCs are useable. It would not be fair to a party to throw in such powerful adversaries at the level they suggest. The gnome vampire Nissa is one of the most fun characters in the book and her neutral to evil attitude could really cause some conflictions in a party.

The Iron DM
There are a lot of distractions that take away from the enjoyment of Nemesis: Vampire, but the PDF is still enjoyable for its good parts. It provides 5 well documented NPCs that are useable with some tweaking.



LIKED: - The writer was really into his words and there was a lot of detail in each npc
- the old stat block is the best
- the story hooks are like mini adventures without stats
- the artwork is great, very colorful, deep and dark

DISLIKED: - one of the pdfs is too big
- the bookmarking should have been done a little more detailed
- the changes in the vampire class should have gotten its own template, not left up to the DM to determine
- More artwork was needed to breakup the flow of the PDF

QUALITY: Disappointing

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Nemesis I: Vampires
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Adventure Havens: Library Lore
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/13/2007 00:00:00
I like an adventure that encompasses more than hearing a rumor at a tavern and going into a dungeon. Adventure Havens: Library Lore, adds another location element to your Dungeons and Dragons games by providing 12 stocked libraries ready for implementation into your games.

Though not the most well designed book, the writeups of the various libraries are distinct and detailed enough to break the rutt of the Tavern to Dungeon highway.

Adventure Havens: Library Lore, a follow up by publisher Bards and Sages to their equally as informational Tavern Tales, is 50 pages of solid writing. Each Library entry begins with basic stats for the library including owner, floors and number of books. From there, they go into the history and regulars in the library. The writers do a nice job of introducing a feint adventure hook into every few paragraphs. Towards the end of the description, each entry contains one or more adventure seeds that can be used to sprout off adventures. Some seeds area bit more detailed than others, whereas the Gadget Hall had an unexciting seed about Halfling rumormongers, the Grom?s Library had the pretty cool trials in Quest for the perfect Thief.

Hampering the reading of Library Lore, the books layout is most unimpressive. Though it appears to be a similar layout to Tavern Tales, it seems that the entries are more bunched together and hard to distinguish from one another. The book is well-bookmarked with the entry and its elements all just a click a way. If not for this, it would be difficult to maneuver around the book.

Also, enlight of the adventure hook elements of the libraries, descriptions and people, there does not appear to be a ton of stuff to aid in the main purpose of the library, finding and retrieving books. It feels like the libraries are there to generate new stories instead of help move old stories. I would have liked to see a listing of more books, perhaps some new methods to aid current adventures.

For the DM
The North Legal South Library is a different kind of building for a fantasy genre. It houses legality for several regions and could easily fit into a dozen different campaigns. There are several research methods provided as well. This is one of the most well balanced entries. Those looking for a good adventure hook will also enjoy the Astral Fortress, which contains a series of arcing adventure plots. The descriptions are written as such that you can easily place your own items and flavor inside.

The Iron Word
Design snafus aside, Library Lore provides a dozen sound libraries that will bring a unique flavor to a game dulled by the same old thing. Several of the libraries are designed finely enough that they would be worth integrating into a current plot line as well.



LIKED: - Each library is written and described as so to be unique from the others. YOu get 12 different flavors
- some of the entries reallys and out, and are worth putting in multiple adventures asdifferent versions
- I enjoy the direction of the Adventure havens lines, there are some nice seeds in them

DISLIKED: - the layout was hard to read
- I wanted more research methods and book information
- Too much cartoony artwork came off as cheesy. I don't mind the cartoon stuff in moderation, but some different artwork would have brought out the unique flavor of each entry.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Havens: Library Lore
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Troubleshooters
by Brian C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/05/2007 00:00:00
If you like vampire stories you will like this one. The vampires in this story are likeable in that charismatic serial killer sort of way. And I really liked the little twist at the end which didn't feel forced. Some writers try to get too cute with their stories and end up screwing them up with those "surprise" endings. But this ending is one of those "I should have seen that coming" but didn't ones, which was fun. The only thing is this is a really short story, and it probably could have been fleshed out some more.


LIKED: cool characters and plot

DISLIKED: Could have been longer.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Troubleshooters
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Adventure Havens: Library Lore
by Brian C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/02/2007 00:00:00
Library Lore is worth the price just for the NPCs alone. There are dozens on NPCs in this book, from challenge rating 1 all the way up to 30, and it even includes some dragons as NPCs. Some of the NPCs are generic guards, commoners, and such that are meant as background characters. But most of them come with not only full stats but also detailed histories. There is a nice index that sorts them all by name, race, and level so that if you need an NPC for an X level encounter quickly you can just find it no problem.

But the purpose of this booklet is to make libraries exciting. I think a lot of DMs handwave it when PCs say they are going to gather information or research something, and don?t much think about where they are going to get the information in the first place. This product does a nice job of giving you a reason to actually go to the library and explore it. Some of the libraries, like the Corner Store, are more like a fantasy version of Borders. They serve as an information gathering place for the locals to read books, gossip, drink coffee, or whatever. Gadget Hall is less a library than a gnomish workshop, with not only collections of books but rentable work benches to run experiments and such. Many of the libraries double as something else. Grom?s Library is actually a giant underground proving ground for rogues, as an example. The Halls of Steel are built above a dwarven mine. Which kind of makes sense, since I don?t think a fantasy world would often have a dedicated library system.

Oddly, I guess I was expecting a librarian NPC class or something, but the product doesn?t offer any new classes, and only a handful of new feats. The bulk of the product is to provide locations, NPCs, and ideas. In that, it does a good job. Each library has a listing of seed ideas, and the NPC histories include are sure to inspire ideas of their own. The mini-quests are interesting, though some feel slightly contrived. Many of them are suppose to tie in to a multi-library quest that leads to the discovery of a library on the astral plane. It?s difficult to pick up the clues at first, though thankfully the writer included an appendix that actually spells out where the clues are and how they all connect.

I really liked the art in this. It?s sort of a fantasy cartoonish feel that works with the concept. Layout was nice and easy to read.



LIKED: Plenty of NPCs and ideas. Very nice artwork.

DISLIKED: multi-library quest a bit hard to follow.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Havens: Library Lore
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Mythos: Gods of the Dead
by Michael M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/28/2006 00:00:00
Presentation: clear, variable death cults: helpful, already used in current campaign

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythos: Gods of the Dead
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Koboldnomicon
by Peter I. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/20/2006 00:00:00
The Koboldnomicon is a 64 page pdf product that expands on the lore, knowledge and applicability of the lowly kobold in the fantasy d20 game. It claims to be the ultimate tome of kobold lore, and aims to provide players and DMs alike with a plethora of new ideas, concepts and mechanics to elevate the status of the kobold to something to be reckoned with. Inside the pages of this product from Bards and Sages are new feats, prestige classes, core classes, spells and even something dreadfully more sinister - kobold poetry!

The product comes as a single pdf file. There is no cover, no bookmarks, and very little in the way of anything that makes this product look great and feel very professional. The layout is simple, the editing good although a few things were missed, and the writing satisfactory. From a presentation point of view the only thing that really stands out are the numerous art pieces of kobolds scattered throughout the book. Certainly I felt a lot more could've been done to make the product presentable. If this is supposed to be the ultimate tome of kobold lore, at least let it look the part.

Despite the rather lacklustre presentation in parts, the product is filled with a lot of content. Included in the product as well are numerous fictions elements as well as something completely unheard of - kobold poetry. The product runs a fine line between being humorous in places, and the serious writing required to portray such a profound book on kobold lore. Somehow the mood and feel of the book get lost a little between the humour, occasional silliness (wolverine battering ram, for example) and the presentation, but that's not taking away from some interesting and very useful content. The fiction is all right, nothing special, and the poetry much the same. I don't think it adds or takes away anything from the book - it's just there, to a certain extent. Where the product really comes out is in the wide variety of new ideas for kobolds presented in its pages, and that's thankfully the majority of the product.

The first section of content takes a look at kobold players characters and introduces a number of useful and interesting kobold sub-races. Good advice on playing kobolds is given, and the three races are distinct enough in flavor to make them stand out from the typical kobold. The races are given plenty of support as well in terms of feats, for example, so they're not just standalone additions to the product. It's always good to see new ideas developed and explored in full.

Next are a handful of new prestige classes. These include the chosen of the dragon father (dedicated warriors of the Gnome Destroyer), kobold trapsmith, and the painted witch doctor (a kobold spellcaster who applies pigment to his face, granting him special abilities). Three different paragon kobolds are presented as well for additional variety, and a new core class, the vermin kin - a ranger variant with a vermin companion and suitable abilities. There are some good ideas here, and lots of potential to catch players off guard with new kobold madness. The mechanics is generally good, and only in one or two places did things look dubious or could've been given more flavor such as the vermin-kin.

The next few sections deal with feats, skills, spells and equipment. There's a very good selection here, although some of the material, in particular the spells, has some rather niche spells that might find limited utility (Speak with Weasels, for example). The feats and skills tie in nicely with the sub-races presented, and give them expanded options that enhance their racial abilities. The pdf introduces a new skill, called Acrobat, that allows the user to add a circumstance bonus to his AC as a move action, and the Kobold Engineering skill.

The equipment section starts by dealing with traps, complete with diagrams, and this was good to see. These should prove interesting for the next time that a DM uses kobolds in his game. The kobold 'bio-weapons' are rather silly, and resort to using live animals as part of weapons. Cats flung by their tails or wolverines tied to battering rams are not exactly concepts that many will find appealing. The last sections of the pdf deal with a kobold pantheon, and a variety of new monsters and kobold NPCs, most of them fairly high in CR, but highlighting the mechanics explored in the pdf.

The Koboldnomicon provides an expansive variety of new ideas and concepts for the kobold-minded player or DM. While there's plenty going for it in the ideas department (prestige classes, sub-races and feats, for example) there is also a lot of lacklustre implementation or less useful ideas (some of the spells and equipment). The presentation is quite poor, which doesn't really enhance the overall feel of the product. Is this the ultimate tome of kobold lore? Not really, but it is a tome, and should provide some fun and exciting options to enhance the kobold in your game.


LIKED: The variety of new ideas is good and useful, and builds on the kobold's strength. The book expands on ideas nicely, illustrating the concepts clearly through, for example, NPCs and additional feats and spells to support concepts. Overall utility is good, as is mechanical balance, and most players and DMs should find some useful material in these pages.

DISLIKED: Presentation is quite poor, and a lot could've been done to improve it. Bookmarks and a flavorful cover would've been a good start at getting that done nicely. From the product thumbnial it looks like there should've been a cover, though I'm not sure what happened to it. Some material is niche, or just not that useful, and one or two ideas could've been developed further (the vermin kin is too 'ranger-like', for example).

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Koboldnomicon
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World Building
by John D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/23/2006 00:00:00
I found this to be a valuable reference work and easy to follow. Highly recommended for those who want a lot of relaity in their world design

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World Building
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Koboldnomicon
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/31/2006 00:00:00
I will never know the faciniation we gamers have with Kobolds. It seems that just about every gamer has a story regarding a Kobold. There?s the one about the Kobold assault, or the one about the Kobold thief or the one about the time that blind half-orc cuddled with a Kobold. Needless to say they are quite popular. Bards and Sages feeds that popularity with the Koboldnomicon. Though it does an adequate job of feeding the hunger for Kobold related material, it tends to overfeed in many places.

The Koboldnomicon is 64 pages and is organizaed about as chaotically as Kobold would organize a book. There is a ton of prose mixed in to the chapters. One minute, the book is displaying Kobold races, the next it?s a bad poem about a Kobold knight. There are also no bookmarks, which makes reading through it more difficult. Sad thing is, the book has some really great stuff for Kobold players and DMs.

For the Dungeon Master

The book contains quite a bit of flavor to begin a Kobold campaign, but you will want to refer to other sources such as the SRD for more detailed cultural Kobold information. The different races of Kobold is quite interesting, especially the Dragonmarked, a Kobold subrace which actually makes a Kobold fighter class viable without weapon finessing it out. There is also the Tamarin, a monkey crossed Kobold that has the flavor of the Jurassic Park Raptors. Also, there are several NPCs in the back of the book that have a ton of character in them. I can not see a DM in this world whom would not want to run Vextor, the Kobold ninja.

For the Player

Face it, this is a player?s book. The kind of book you can throw in your DM?s face and say ?see I can too play a Kobold?. The feats, classes, prestige classes and traps are all written very flavorful and provide the feeling of the quirky Kobold. My favorite feat is actually not a feat for Kobolds at all. Your DM will not let you run a Kobold? Put the Raised by Kobolds on your humanoid character. It allows you take on some of the traits of a Kobold while simultaneously sticking your tongue out at the Dungeon Master.

The spells listed do not quite equal up to the ingenuity of the feats and traps. Most of them you can find in other books and really do not speak to the user as Kobold. I found this most disappointing considering the Kobold?s favored class is Sorceror.

The Iron Word
If you are a fan of Kobolds or want some viable options to use the little dragonoids as playable characters, there is enough material in here to help you out. Though if you are looking for in depth ecology this may not help you. You will also have to deal with the chaotic structuring of the book, but if you like Kobolds, you obviously love chaos.



LIKED: -The Feats are AWESOME for Kobolds
- Makes trapmaking for any class viable
- Great races, finally a Kobold fighter
- The Vermin Kin is a cool ranger varient, wish there could have been varients of all the classes

DISLIKED: - bad organization
- too much fiction
- spells aren't creative


QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Disappointed


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Koboldnomicon
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Challenges and Rewards
by Robert H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/29/2006 00:00:00
The CR for Skill use rules are poorly designed.

Without giving away the intellectual property content, the fact the CR is built specifically on character level/skill level based factors violates the d20 design principle that CR's are absolute (a given creature's CR is constant whether facing a 1st level character or 20th level).

This translates into the flaw that a target skill check that is 1 point over character's roll is the same CR regardless of whether it is 1 point over a 1st level or 10th level character's expected roll. Thus the 1st level character gets experience but because characters do not get experience for defeating obstances of CR 8+ below their own, the 10th level character gains no experience.

The sample in the text where a 10th level character "will earn XP for CR 1" encounter (zero) demonstrates this flaw.

You can find better "translate skill check DC into CR" rules in d20 modern rules (page 206 of Hardcover).





LIKED: Addresses area of non-combat rewards, which needs addressing.

DISLIKED: Botches the crunch test in its value (fluff ideas nice, but crunch rules aspect poor). For a low page count product, tolerance on such is also low.

QUALITY: Poor

VALUE: Disappointed

[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]


Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Challenges and Rewards
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Koboldnomicon
by Derek K. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/28/2006 00:00:00
Kobolds can either be a lot of fun or a huge annoyance; Bards and Sages? ?Koboldnomicon? seems to try hard to land in the ?lot of fun? camp. This 64-page sourcebook presents variant kobold subraces, spells, feats, weapons and even a kobold-handful of deities.

The first couple of pages are devoted to an introduction from the publisher and then another introduction from someone named ?Simon.? Apparently, Simon is the poor soul who first stumbled across this strange collection of kobold lore, and his cautionary tale serves as a warning to all those who dare read this supplement.

What?s unfortunate is that for a supplement so designed for a ?Dungeons & Dragons? game, Simon?s introduction feels better suited to a game of ?d20 Modern.? The fantasy-trappings that make D&D what it is are missing from this introduction.

However, the opening chapter of the book does an excellent job of providing the gamer/reader with an idea as to what is to come. ?Love Slave of the Kobold Queen, Part 1,? by Johnathan M. Richards, is a first-person narrative of poor soul named Mallen who?s relating his kobold experiences to his fellow adventurers.

A page is devoted to adapting the kobold as a player character race. The mechanics are the same as the mechanics from the ?Monster Manual,? but a bit more information is given here to help players if they decide to choose kobold as their race. ?For player characters, playing a kobold means living with the fact that you are generally going to be looked down upon my [sic] members of other races . . . The kobold PC needs to make a choice.? The choices presented address how a kobold PC might approach any of the core classes from the ?Player?s Handbook.?

Three kobold subraces (the most interesting is perhaps the quahali kobold who embrace death gladly for they believe in reincarnation) and an ?Ode to a Kobold Sentry? (also by Richards) later, we?re given three prestige classes (the most interesting ? the painted witch doctor, who paints his or her face in such a way that he or she can paralyze, petrify or even kill his or her opponents ? isn?t even kobold-specific and can be played by any tribal race), three kobold paragon classes (one generic and two variants), and a new 20-level player class called the vermin kin (a variant ranger that is more vermin-based than animal-based). The vermin kin is the stand-out here; great care was taken to not just replace any reference to an animal companion with a vermin companion. Instead, the vermin kin gains class abilities like ?vermin scouts,? which allows him or her to, by observing and understanding how vermin behave, to gain a bonus to a Knowledge (nature) roll. (?For example, he may be able to discern how far ahead an adversary is by calculating how long it would take a spider to re-spin a web that had previously been disturbed.)

There are a handful of kobold feats and a new skill ? Acrobat ? presented here, and then we?re treated to four pages of new spells. The feats are mostly kobold-specific, and while the spells aren?t necessarily designed only for use by kobolds, most of them definitely have that ?kobold flavor.? There are three new ?Power Word? spells here (Backstab, Lie and Tire) that seemed a bit out of place (the spell descriptions don?t explicitly state these were kobold-specific or ?devised spells, but my human brain had a hard time wrapping my head around the idea that ANY ?Power Word? spells warranted inclusion in a book of kobold-lore).

Two more short fiction pieces (?Dinner? and ?The Trap? both by Peter Schaefer) lead to the section on kobold equipment and traps, and then the book wraps with a few sample NPCS and five kobold deities. ?Love Slave of the Kobold Queen, Part II? brings this supplement to a close.

Overall, there IS some good material in ?Koboldnomicon,? but the supplement is inconsistent in its tone and presentation. Some material is clearly meant to be humorous (right down to the disclaimer at the end ? ?we only test on humans, who are willing to be experimented on in exchange for XP?), while some of it is presented as straight game material. While the idea of a kobold PC might illicit a few snickers, this is a supplement that can?t seem to make up its mind if it?s in on the joke or trying to rise above it.


LIKED: As a fan of new and well-designed player classes, I enjoyed the amount of thought that went into the paragon and prestige classes, but especially the vermin kin. It's a unique spin on the ranger that I'm eager to play myself!

When the "Koboldnomicon" is trying to be funny, it hits it mark, and wrapping the book with Parts I and II of "Love Slave of the Kobold Queen" was a wise choice.

DISLIKED: There's no cover! Additionally, this product is spotted with typos and grammatical errors (there aren't any actual misspellings - just cases in which the wrong, correctly spelled word was used).

Also, as mentioned in the actual review, this supplement seems to waver back and forth between trying to poke fun at the kobolds and presenting them as a serious player option for the game.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Disappointed


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Koboldnomicon
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