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Accursed Player's Guide
by Scott F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/05/2014 14:35:47
The premise of the game (the monsters that try not to be monsters) is a classic formula, but Accursed throws a real spin on it. An engaging background and history, and the potential rises to unseen heights. I thoroughly recommend this to anyone who enjoys playing the anti-hero once in a while. You definitely won't be disappointed.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed Player's Guide
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Accursed
by Luke G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2014 06:44:32
This setting is pretty much what "Van Helsing" and "Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" wanted to be.

I do not have much experience with playing in the Savage Worlds system, so that was not what attracted me to this product. Just the atmosphere and setting concept drew me toward an interest in it. Now, having read through the setting information, I can say it was worth the expenditure on that strength alone.

Anybody who has an interest in the old Universal Horror monster classics, or their Hammer Film dopplegangers will recognize the inspiration for a lot of this book, but the developers went quite a bit deeper than I expected and hooked into some rather interesting myths and legends, with a touch of some classic fantasy as well. The book describes eight of the thirteen witches that came over as part of the Grand Coven and each one is given a very unique style. This ranges from the Djinn, who seems to work her most powerful magic by perverting the wishes others ask of her, all the way to the Crone, a weather controlling witch who seems to have been the driving force behind the invasion.

The setting is dark, but not hopeless. There is every indication that your characters might be able to help turn the tide against the witches and their loyal servants. Oddly, for a setting like this, the morality is fairly clear cut. It is very clear that the witches are evil, and the vaguely Abrahamic "Enochian Faith" is rather pleasantly more tolerant and reasonable than I would expect of a religious establishment in other, similarly grim settings. In Accursed, the "good" generally behaves in a manner that can legitimately be termed good rather than simply being judgmental proselytizers. They aren't perfect, of course, but that just makes them more interesting. Likewise, there's very little grey about the witches. They are inhuman and evil, with motivations that cannot be easily understood.

One would think that the establishment of a clear good versus a clear evil would make this more like a fantasy than a dark fantasy. If the authors had chosen to set the story in the days of the Grand Coven Invasion, this might have been the case. At that time in the setting, most of the Accursed were still under the sway of the witches that created them and the heroes would have been the standard stalwart knight or the grim wilderness wanderer with a clear eye and good musket. What makes this setting dark fantasy, and what makes it so interesting is that there is a clear good and evil...and good lost the war.

The players have in front of them a lot of choices and there's always going to be the temptation of a compromise of their values. Perhaps working with one of the Gorgon's agents is a worthwhile endeavor...if it will insure that the Dark Queen's latest plot fails. Will the characters embrace their curse and become more and more inhuman themselves? Or will they turn aside from their witchmark and seek a return to their time as human. When you're defending a land from the invasion of a great, outer evil, then the "good" choice often tends to be easy. But now that the land is already conquered, being effective and being moral seem to march side by side less and less. It's hard to keep up the fight, at least not without sacrificing something else.

So while the morality isn't the muddled grey you'd expect from dark fantasy, the character choices between expediency and principals makes the situations that much more interesting.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed
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Accursed
by Mark G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/25/2014 12:27:50
Great world. Like a cross between Ravenloft and the old Hammer horror movies, yet still feeling fresh and original. Really enjoyed the book.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed: Long Dead and Twice Slain
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/16/2014 08:27:47
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/04/16/tabletop-review-accurse-
d-long-dead-and-twice-slain-savage-worlds/

Long Dead and Twice Slain is another short adventure for the Accursed campaign setting, which uses the Savage Worlds rules system. Unlike Half-Light which was more a story seed than an adventure and which was very systemless by design, Long Dead and Twice Slain is a fully fleshed out (albeit short) adventure and has Savage Worlds mechanics interspersed throughout the piece. While these are mainly stat blocks for NPCs and antagonists, it’s nice to see that this adventure leans more towards The Banshee of Loch Finnere in quality, giving Accursed a second quality published adventure for GMs to pick up instead of having to homebrew their own.

Long Dead and Twice Slain is eight pages of content (the other two pages are the cover and credits/table of contents); there is a ton of adventuring packed into this short little PDF. While the adventure can be played in a single session (and is designed for such) an enterprising Gm can probably pad things out for a second session if he or she wants to put forth the effort.

The adventure begins with the characters already knee deep in action. For some time cauldron-born undead have been besieging the land and rounding up new victims for some unknown experiment or torture. Accursed and humans alike have been fighting back and striking back against the witches and their unholy armies whenever they can. At some point the PCs come into contact with a band of nine human warriors – all that remains of an original fighting force that stood their ground against the witches. The two groups, PC and NPC parlay just long enough to see one of the NPCs die horribly by some mystical means. Together the two bands team up to figure out what is plaguing the humans. Could it be a curse, a ghost, or something else? The only way to find out is by playing the adventure!

The adventure is a branching one, giving players a choice of two beings to question. Neither is right nor wrong, but each provides you with a very different playthrough experience. The beginning and the end of the adventure is a constant, regardless which path you choose, but the fact the middle is quite different gives this adventure some nice replay value if you’re looking for that sort of thing. I prefer the Witch path to the Clock Maker one personally, but only because it’s more atmospheric and Ravenloft-y. Your mileage may vary.

The final battle in this piece is a pretty tough one and some PCs probably won’t make it out alive. Once the battle is dead the adventure wraps up quite nicely and without any loose ends. The end result is a tight little piece that gives more advanced Accursed characters their first published adventure to play through. I suppose the only problem is that the game hasn’t been out long enough for characters to naturally progress to this piece. No one says you can make “Seasoned” characters and just play this though. You’re also getting a pretty good deal here cost wise. Another Accursed adventure, The Banshee of Loch Finnere costs six dollars for twenty-one pages, so Long Dead and Twice Slain gives you a better content to cost ratio, and definitely a better one than Half-Light which is $1.25 for four pages – only two of which are content. Remember though, you’ll need three or four books to play this $2.50 adventure – the core rulebook for Accursed, the Savage Worlds core rulebook, the Savage Worlds Horror Companion and maybe the Accursed Player’s Guide as well. Suddenly, you’re spending a lot more than $2.50, aren’t you? Still, if you’re already invested in Savage Worlds, and/or Accursed, Long Dead and Twice Slain is a great adventure to pick up. It’s well designed, won’t hurt your wallet and most of all – it’s a lot of fun.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed: Long Dead and Twice Slain
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Accursed: The Banshee of Loch Finnere
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/15/2014 06:58:01
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/04/15/tabletop-review-accurse-
d-the-banshee-of-loch-finnere-savage-worlds/

Unlike the short story seed, Half-Light, which I reviewed a little bit ago, The Banshee of Loch Finnere is a full length, fully plotted out adventure featuring an exciting plot and some gorgeous artwork. The cover by Alberto Bontempi is almost worth the six dollar cover price alone. I have to admit that, while both reading and experiencing The Banshee of Loch Finnere, I almost forgot this was an Accursed product and found myself viewing it as a Ravenloft one. That’s high praise indeed. In fact, this adventure has probably surpassed The Festival at Glenelg as my favorite Accursed product.

Caer Kainen is under the control of The Morrigan, as are many lands these days. Although Clan Finnoul has been humbled, decimated and dominated since the end of the Bane War, their mind is on a more pressing horror – that of the Banshee of Loch Finnere. While sitting around nursing old grudges and being on the losing side of the war, a vengeful apparition roams your ancestral home with the single minded purpose of wiping out what remains of Clan Finnoul. At the time of the adventure’s start, three members of the clan have died, and the player characters are there to see if they can prevent any more deaths. What follows is a three act adventure that should last roughly half a dozen play sessions, and it features a nice mix of mystery, intrigue, investigation and violence. GMs running The Banshee of Loch Finnere should be familiar with the Cairn Kainen setting (it’s in your Accursed core rulebook).

I really loved this adventure. It’s well laid out, offers a decent amount of back story regarding the location and core antagonist, and gives a list of locations in the general vicinity for players to visit and for GMs to craft subquests around. I also liked that the adventure focused primarily on investigation and discovery rather than constant combat. After all, there is a mystery to be solved rather than a dungeon to crawl through. In fact, I counted only eight combat encounters in the whole adventure, several of which can be avoided altogether based on the choices the PCs make and/or how good they are at thinking things through rather than hacking and slashing. Of course, there are gamers out there who want non-stop combat, and Accursed CAN be that type of game if a GM runs it that way, but this is certainly not the adventure for those gamers. Rather, The Banshee of Loch Finnere makes a great way to bring in fans of Call of Cthulhu, Chill, WoD and other slower paced horror gamers into the Accursed fold.

I really liked the pacing and progression of this adventure. It’s slow moving like an old Victorian ghost story, and it really gives the GM a chance to set a somber yet spooky tone for the adventure. As Accursed is a game of monsters fighting monsters, it can be hard to really craft something frightening for the setting. After all, if you’re playing a mummy or a Dhampir, are zombies really going to terrify you? The local townsfolk, yes, but not the PCs. The Banshee of Loch Finnere, however, creates an atmosphere of dread because the PCs really can’t punch a curse in the face or do battle with the banshee directly. For all their combined powers, the PCs greatest weapon against the evil in this adventure is their wits. By the end of the adventure, players may have pissed off two major powers in the Accursed world, as well as either helped the banshee to find peace or destroyed her outright. There are a lot of ways this adventure can unfold, and it’s nice to see this isn’t an on-rails piece where PCs are simply along for the ride.

Again, the core plot piece of finding out who the Banshee is and why she has her heart set on the destruction of Clan Finnoul is straight out of the old AD&D Second Edition version of Ravenloft, as it highlights the power of a curse, how horrific and/or terrifying a run of the mill monster can be if written correctly, and it just oozes atmosphere. It also helps that there are squabbles between the dark rulers of this setting similar, to those that occur in the Dark Domain. Because of this, D&D gamers might want to pick up this adventure as well and do a bit of tweaking so it uses 2nd or 3rd edition rules rather than Savage Worlds mechanics. Note that this is a LOT easier than you might imagine, as the entire adventure is stat-free/systemless except for the last two pages of the PDF, which gives monster stats in Savage Worlds terms.

In the end, The Banshee of Loch Finnere is exactly what I’d give to someone who was curious about Accursed. I’d have them play through this adventure and, if they had fun, lend them the core books to decide if this is a system they wanted to invest in. Of course, Accursed is a pretty expensive game to pick up, as you’ll need the core rulebook, the Savage Worlds core rulebook and the Savage Worlds Horror Companion just to get started. That can be a pretty pricey undertaking. At only six dollars, The Banshee of Loch Finnere is a great way to see if Accursed is the horror fantasy system for you without spending fifty to a hundred dollars in books you might not actually use. There’s absolutely nothing negative I can say about the adventure itself. So if you’re a fan of horror fantasy at all, definitely make a note to yourself to pick up The Banshee of Loch Finnere when you get a chance. You won’t be disappointed.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed: The Banshee of Loch Finnere
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Accursed
by Joseph H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 18:56:41
In the interest of full disclosure; I was a supporter of the Accursed Kickstarter but I am in no way affiliated with Melior Via nor have I received any compensation for this review.

The Accursed setting is one of those rare products where everything comes together in just the right way to create something new and exciting.

The creative team behind Accursed clearly cares about the setting and has taken the time to really give it a life all its own; much like one of the Crone’s lumbering creations!

In Accursed, players take on the role of a Witchmarked, a once-human monster whose sins include helping a group of archetypal Witches, however unwillingly, to defeat the Armies of Light. The Witchmarked (or Accursed) come in several varieties; one type for each Witch. The various types are mostly culled from classic monster movies and the Accursed design team has done a wonderful job at making each fit perfectly within the setting while still maintaining that classic feel.

Accursed has been compared to a combination of Van Helsing, Castlevania, and Ravenloft, with its own sense of flavor added to the mix. While I find this comparisons to be both accurate and informative, I believe it lacks one crucial piece of information. One of the most interesting elements of the Accursed setting is the current state of Morden (the collection of nations which make up the setting) and the heroes who rail against that state, despite being hated and persecuted from all sides. These two elements give Accursed its own life and feel; one which I believe to be both unique and haunting.

As I noted above, Morden’s Armies of Light no longer fight against the Witch’s Grand Coven, for that struggle is long over. Unlike most fairy tales, in Morden, the forces of Light lost the war and the Witches now rule the lands as all-powerful dictators. As fate would have it, the only remaining resistance to the Witches’ rule are the Witchmarked, cast off remnants of the Witches invasion force.

Which brings us to my favorite element of Accursed; the heroes! The only warriors left who possess the power to fight the Witches, even in secret, are the former human inhabitants of Morden who were cursed and pressed into service against their neighbors. Many of the Witchmarked were released at the conclusion of the Bane War (the war between the Grand Coven and Morden’s Army of Light) and left to their own devices. After finding they had no place left to call home, many of the Witchmarked took up the struggle against their former masters. They do this despite being feared and hated by the very humans they seek to protect. They do this despite having little hope of success. Mostly, they do this to save their lost souls, repent their unforgivable sins and because they are the only ones who can!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed
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Accursed: Half-Light
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/11/2014 06:21:59
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/04/11/tabletop-review-accurse-
d-half-light-savage-worlds/

Half-Light is the latest adventure for the Accursed setting for Savage Worlds which was launched in late 2013. This short little two page adventure (the other pages are the cover and legal mumbo jumbo) can be used as a stand-alone adventure or can be used in conjunction with the plot-point campaign found in the core Accursed rulebook. I should point out that with only two pages, Half-Light is more a story seed than a true adventure, as the GM that runs this will have to put a lot of work into fleshing it out and making it playable. There are no stats or mechanics to be had save for a block for a single NPC. As such, purchasers need to know how to put together an adventure almost from scratch, so this wouldn’t be a good fit for an inexperienced GM. I should also point out that while the adventure is only $1.25, to properly run it with the Accursed setting, you’ll need the Accursed rulebook, the Savage Worlds core rulebook and the Savage Worlds Horror Companion. That’s going to get expensive. Because you need three full rulebooks just to run this two page adventure, people who aren’t already heavily invested in Savage Worlds should either look elsewhere or consider taking the 99.99% systemless story seed and converting it to mechanics they already own or know quite well.

The story of Half-Light revolves around the village of Whitetarn, which has been completely slaughtered. Not a single resident has been left standing nor a single drop of blood lies upon the ground. The characters are cajoled into investigating this gruesome genocide by a local priest named Father Dhugal (as opposed to Dougal from Father Ted. They are also aided in the investigation by a dhampir named Sevtlana, who is as talented as she is both brusque and unlikeable. Once the village of Whitetarn is reached, players and their characters must solve the mystery of the strange deaths littering the area. Clues involve a missing ancient tome, a sacrilegious offering of a priest’s corpse and a pretty complicated and insidious plot by a powerful monster.

The adventure is pretty straight-forward aside from one fairly obvious twists that players will figure out before it actually occurs. It’s a paint by numbers style adventure and so any experienced gamer will know what is coming. The question will be whether or not the character’s knowledge and the player’s knowledge will match up. Half-Light should take more than one or two play sessions to complete as much of the adventure consists of investigation or talking heads. There is a bit of combat to be had in Half-Light but how much depends on how cerebral the players are. There isn’t much substance to be had due to the thin plot and short length of the PDF, but enterprising GMs can pad the adventure out to be longer if needed. There’s also a nice map of the chapel players will spend a lot of time in, but it’s much too small to be of any use. The PDF really should have offered this as a full page piece that GMs could then print out and use. Oddly enough a bigger version of the chapel can be found and downloaded directly from the DRiveThruRPG.com link at the top. Why it isn’t included in the PDF proper is a real head scratcher.

Overall, Half-Light is a thumbs in the middle. It’s a decently written piece and at only a dollar, it’s not going to break anyone’s bank. However it’s extremely straightforward and uses the same basic plot we’ve seen in many an adventure across pretty much every system ever. As such, it’s really only fun in the hands of a GM who can truly flesh this out and/or when played by very inexperienced gamers who won’t see the plot progression coming a mile away. I was more than a little disappointed this wasn’t a more original affair, but what can you do? As such, I can really only recommend Half-Light for diehard Accursed completionists.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed: Half-Light
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Accursed: Patchwork
by Mikael H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/19/2014 15:11:05
Not an aspirant for the Nobel prize this is still a compelling novella that is to short. The the first three quarters moves along with a good and steady pace, but the end feels rushed and... stitched on.
It really reads like a presentation of the game, which may annoys some and is a bit pricy for the page count, which annoys me.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed: Patchwork
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Accursed
by JR T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/14/2014 21:33:57
I'm a Gamer of Habit so I tend not to get interested in new settings. After opening the Accursed RPG all that changed because I realized it has the potential to be a cultural phenomenon that returns the 'Non-Sandbox RPG' genre to the masses with this Dark Fantasy Action revolution. This is done through a masterful job of balancing the classic monsters we know with a new and innovative over-world theme. This is done by casting the heroes as monsters that have to either fight their new instincts or embrace them as they fight for revenge against this plague upon their lands. No matter which choice the players make, the rules still work flawless with a sense of reason and logic that has been lost in older rule systems that I won't mention by name. All of the options are intriguing, but the Vargr are my favorite! That is why you should be playing this Savage Worlds setting. Also the art and details are epic, there's no better word for how much work and love apparently went into this masterpiece. That is why, even if you are not currently in a gaming group I highly recommend buying this book just for the pleasure of reading it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed
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Accursed: The Festival at Glenelg
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/16/2014 08:14:10
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/01/16/book-review-the-festiva-
l-at-glenelg-accursed/

The Festival at Glenelg is a new piece of fiction for the brand new Savage Worlds setting, Accursed. Like many RPG of this era, Accursed was a successfully funded Kickstarter project. Unfortunately for the game, it came out the same time as Blood and Smoke: The Strix Chronicle, four different Werewolf: The Apocalypse releases, two Shadowrun supplements and a Numenera piece so I don’t know anyone who has really given the game a lot of attention. In flipping through it I have found it to be interesting, but not especially compelling. It feels rushed and disjointed but I do like the mix of White Wolf’s “You play as the monster” with a dash of Ravenloft‘s mood an atmosphere and a hearty dose of various monsters from across folklore. You have a world where at some point the Black Cauldron style undead of the UK met up with Russia’s Baba Yaga, for example. Maybe my opinion will change once I’ve spent more time with Accursed. However, this is a review of the novella not the game, so let’s get on with it.

The Festival at Glenelg is by Richard Lee Byers who is best known for his Dungeons & Dragons novels. He’s one of my favorite fantasy authors and I mainly picked this up because I had another month until his Sundering novel, The Reaver comes out, I needed something to tide me over. I should point out that unlike most RPG novels purchases that you pick up from DriveThruRPG, The Festival at Glenelg only comes in .epub and .mobi formats rather than offering a third version via PDF as well. This isn’t a big deal in the scheme of things, although because of the formatting, you can’t tell how many pages long the novella actually is. It took about 100 “clicks” on my Kindle to read through it, but since everyone sets up their e-reader differently saying “100 pages long” is far from accurate. I can however say that this is very long for a short story/novella, especially compared to a lot of Savage Worlds that I pick up like the Weird Wars Rome or Deadlands Noir dime novels. So although the price tag for this novella might seem rather high, you’re not just getting one to two dozen pages here. It’s a full on read in and of itself.

The Festival at Glenelg focused on a small corner of the world Accursed takes place in. It’s very similar to a Scottish town in our own world, using similar names, styles of clothing and jargon. Our main character is one Erik Nygaard. He is attending a highland games festival in the town of Glenelg, although he has not revealed his real name, nor his true nature to the locals. Interestingly enough, while we learn early on that Erik is a dhampir (although neither one according to folkloric tradition nor those akin to say Vampire Hunter D), we never are told the name the townsfolk of Glenelg know him by. The festival is off to a fine start until a band of undead in service to The Morrigan (the leader of this part of the world. Think a Darklord in Ravenloft) comes to town to join in the celebration. By joining in, I of course mean turn the games into an unwilling tryout for new members of their deathless legion, horribly scarring the brains of children for the rest of their mortal lives and at least one rape. It’s not pleasant by any means, but this is the world of the Accursed however, so you had to have seen that coming. I would like to read at least one story where a band of undead does indeed come to town simply to partake in the festivities. This is not that story though.

Erik, due to his quasi-vampiric nature has an opportunity to get out of Dodge before the dead realize what he actually is. Erik is not a hero by nature but as he is both a bard and a not quite vampire, he does have powers and abilities far beyond those of mere mortal men. He also doesn’t feel like being fully undead either. By happenstance, Erik runs into a shadowy band of other like minded monsters with hearts of gold that call themselves the Penitents. It’s kind of like the Howling Commandos remake Marvel did a few years back or the Creature Commandos (most recently seen in DC Comics highly underrated: Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E.). This team of characters just HAPPENS to highlight several of the different character options for you in Accursed, even if some of the choices seem more than a little out of sorts for the Scottish type setting of the story. You’ll mean Glynis the Scarecrow (a golem), Niels the Revenant, Yakov the Vargr (lycanthrope) and Sitamun the mummy. Sitamun quickly became my favorite character in the story and I’d love to get a full novella detailing her back story and how a mummy ended up in this part of the world. Sadly, the mummy is generally considered the least fleshed out of the classes in Accursed so it’s odd that the class Byers made me love the most is the one that needs the most touching up in the core setting.

I really liked how Byers was able to take the setting and make the inclusion of particular vernacular for the game feel natural instead of “LOOK I AM INSERTING GAME TERMS INTO THIS STORY SO YOU KNOW IT IS ABOUT A GAME. BUY THE GAME.” Like we saw with Devin Grayson’s recent train wreck in Rites of Renown: When Will You Rage II. One of the reasons I love Byers’ writing is at no time do you feel you are reading a piece of licensed fiction. I could hand say, The Haunted Lands Trilogy over to my wife whose only exposure to Dungeons & Dragons are the Dragonlance novels and she wouldn’t have to ask me a single question about the Forgotten Realms setting. The same is true about The Festival at Glenelg. The story sells you on the game, or at least makes you curious about picking it up – even if you’re not a Savage Worlds fan. At the same time, you can read this story without ever feeling the story is doing a hard sell of the game. It’s a fine balance that a lot licensed fiction authors simply can’t pull off.

It was interesting to read a story by Byers where the entire tale is told from a single character’s point of view. I’m so used to him have a ensemble cast where the story goes back and forth between the characters that this was a bit jarring. I kept expecting the tale to go off to another character, especially when the Penitents came into play, but it never happened. It’s neither bad nor good that the story was written this way – merely a head’s up to other people who read (and possibly review) a lot of Byers’ tabletop based fiction.

Overall, I really enjoyed The Festival at Glenelg. It was a fine introduction to Accursed and it hits all the tropes and core aspects of the game setting. The story dragged a little bit at times, but for the most part it was a fun read and I found both the Penitents and the antagonists well written. I’d love to see more stories set in the world of Accursed by Richard Lee Byers, but then I also would love to see him writing something for Chill, Vampire: The Masquerade and Spelljammer, but those things aren’t likely to happen. Come on, you know you want to see Aoth Fezim on a Giant Space Hamster. Is this Byers’ best work? Well, no. Of course not. It’s his first time writing for this new Savage Worlds setting and so it’ll take time to get his bearings. Heck, Accursed is so new, that would be a problem for anyone taking on the same challenge. What I can safely say is that The Festival at Glenelg is very well written, a lot of fun to read and worth the cover price. Am I going to run or play a game of Accursed any time soon? No, probably not. Will I pick up more Accursed fiction? Probably, especially if Byers is the author.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed: The Festival at Glenelg
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Accursed
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/07/2014 23:16:35
Accursed has an interesting spin on the traditional dark fantasy formula by making heroes of the monsters. Players take on the role of the Witchmarked, twisted monstrosities and victims of the Witches that serve as the primary bad guys of the setting.

To just hit the finer points of the history, a group of powerful Witches attacked the world of Morden with armies of monstrosities, and won at great cost. Humanity had lost to the bad guys. The Witchmarked are the few monsters that have struggled to retain their humanity, and are using their powers to fight back against the rule of the Witches, to protect humans that fear and hate them for what they are.

The Witchmarked come in several forms, including the vampiric Dampir, artificial Golems, patchwork Mongrels, ancient Mummies, deceptive Ophidians, wrathful Revenants, ethereal Shades and animalistic Vargr. Each of these present a host of different abilities that make them well suited to the strategies of the Witches responsible for their creation.

Overall, the Witchbreeds are imaginative and interesting, and I can see how a group of these would come off as a formidable team as opposed to a parody of the Universal Studios monsters. Each Witchbreed has a starting package of abilities and weaknesses, and a further list of Edges that they can choose from.

As with most Savage Worlds games, Accursed shouldn’t be mistaken as a horror game. Sure there are monsters and such, but the way that the Witchbreeds are laid out and the role of the player characters are described, the game will swing towards Dark Fantasy Action than anything else. Kind of like what would happen if Alucard from Castlevania decided to go all Solomon Kane on a fantasy world.

Overall, Accursed presents an exciting and interesting setting with all the hallmarks of Gothic fantasy with enough Pulp sensibilities to make it action-oriented and fun. There’s room for swashbuckling monsters righting wrongs, and I certainly can’t complain about that. The artwork is stunning, and the writing is solid. Definitely looking forward to further releases for this line.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed
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Accursed
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/30/2013 02:23:17
WHAT WORKS: The art is gorgeous. The "Heroes as Monsters" bit hasn't been overdone in Savage Worlds, and Accursed sets the standard pretty high in that regard. The level of detail in each Witchbreed is very cool and very evocative, and the Witchmark rules, providing reasons to both embrace and reject power, are great as well.

WHAT DOESN'T WORK: Some of the Accursed seemed to get the shorter end of the stick than the others, with Mummies having fewer cool bits to play around with. This is essentially a three book purchase, rather than the two book purchase that most Savage Settings are. Savage Tales to go along with the Plot Point Campaign would have been welcome. The editing in my PDF was still pretty rough, but it was updated after I downloaded it and I just caught that as I was finishing this review.

CONCLUSION: I was provided a preview copy of the Playtest rules and almost immediately made a pledge on the Kickstarter. I like Accursed enough that I put my money where my mouth is, I'll be getting a print copy and I may even spring for both poker decks. People who believe that Savage Worlds should always be as minimalist as possible aren't going to like the extra bits of crunch added to Accursed, but I personally think it's one of the coolest settings I've seen, and it will hit my table after the print version arrives, if not before. Melior Via made the game I've always wanted to play.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2013/12/tommys-take-o-
n-accursed.html

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed
by Jonathan M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/29/2013 10:03:21
This is an excellent game, and I highly recommend it to anyone who likes a more Gothic, action-oriented games in the vein of Castelvania, Solomon Cain, or the Rippers settings. The hook of playing "monster" characters is great, the details about the witches is great, but the added elements of acceptance and defiance are truly amazing, and definitely lend to a longer campaign. The artwork in this book will blow you away, as will the amount of detail spent on the game setting itself. I believe this is the best pick of 2013, and look forward to seeing it grow.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed Player's Guide
by Jonathan M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/29/2013 10:02:47
This is an excellent game, and I highly recommend it to anyone who likes a more Gothic, action-oriented games in the vein of Castelvania, Solomon Cain, or the Rippers settings. The hook of playing "monster" characters is great, the details about the witches is great, but the added elements of acceptance and defiance are truly amazing, and definitely lend to a longer campaign. The artwork in this book will blow you away, as will the amount of detail spent on the game setting itself. I believe this is the best pick of 2013, and look forward to seeing it grow.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Accursed Player's Guide
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Accursed Player's Guide
by JR T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/20/2013 15:03:50
I am a Gamer of Habit so I tend not to get interested in new settings. After opening the Accursed RPG all that changed because I realized it has the potential to be a cultural phenomenon that returns the 'Non-Sandbox RPG' genre to the masses. This is done through a masterful job of balancing the classic monsters we know with a new and innovative overworld theme.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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