RPGNow.com
Browse Categories
 Publisher Info













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Dungeon Crawl Classics #79.5: Tower of the Black Pearl
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/20/2013 10:23:07

This is a re-tooling of an adventure published by Goodman Games in 2009 for AD&D 1e, now amended to the Dungeon Crawl Classics ruleset by its original author, Harley Stroh... but the cunning and enjoyable plotline remains unchanged.

The Tower of the Black Pearl is a first-level adventure involving the exploration of a tower only revealed at extremely low tide - something that happens once a decade, so grab your chance while you may. Good background material is provided for the GM along with several hooks to get the characters involved. Once in, it's a neat adventure, challenging without being overwhelming, and nicely time-limited... after all, you go there at extreme low tide!

If the traps and denizens of the Tower themselves and the incoming tide are not enough challenge, a pirate by the name of Savage Quenn also fancies his chances at getting his hands on the Black Pearl and any other treasure he can find.

A good solid adventure with that classic feel.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #79.5: Tower of the Black Pearl
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Goodman Games Gen Con 2013 Program Book
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/06/2013 09:49:50

A lot of this is fluff, self-congratulation and advertising... and you may be wondering why you'd want to part with money for that... however the THREE adventures in here are all good and worth the having.

The first is a Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG adventure (only nobody troubled to tag it with the system it's for) called The Undulating Corruption. It's a solid adventure with good rationale and backstory and plenty going on to keep the 5th-level characters it is aimed at busy and entertained for an evening's play.

Next comes a delightful heist caper, again DDC RPG (and again unlabelled as such), The Jeweller That Dealt in Stardust, aimed at 3rd-level characters. This is one where brains and well-considered plans are of just as much use as strong sword-arms and ready spellbooks, a nicely-rounded adventure that gives scope to all styles of play in a city-based sneak that can so easily turn to an all-out brawl.

With the welcome news that X-Crawl will be back, there is also an adventure for it. Complete with introductory notes for those who have not yet encountered X-Crawl - think dungeoneering as spectator sport - and on the new implementation which will use the Pathfinder RPG ruleset, there's the chance to take part in the 2013 Studio City Crawl. It's a real classic, over-the-top and filled with the elements that make X-Crawl fun and almost cringe-worthy at the same time.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Goodman Games Gen Con 2013 Program Book
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #67: Sailors on the Starless Sea
by Steven T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/14/2013 04:35:26

This adventure is a great starting point for any DCC RPG game night or full throttle campaign. Its well written (I read it cover to cover like a comic book it was awesome) and fantastically illustrated. The storyline is simple and straight forward which leaves room for the GM to ad-lib and embellish the plot as they see fit. It really exemplifies what DCC RPG is all about, good, simple, dungeon crawling fun. I highly recommend any of their products.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #67: Sailors on the Starless Sea
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #79: Frozen in Time
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/04/2013 11:52:39

This is a neat and quite unusual low-level adventure, suitable for existing characters or for a less-usual 'funnel' (as per the Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG rules) for starting characters who are primitive barbarians in a world brought low by some cataclysm... or indeed a more conventional fantasy world where the characters come from a barbaric tribe on the far fringes beyond civilisation.

The backstory explains what is really going on, then the adventure starts with the discovery of two dark holes belching green smoke in a recently melted end of a glacier. If you have chosen the 'Barbarian' option, the characters come from the local tribe and are dispatched by the tribal elders to investigate, otherwise the characters are approached in a frontier town by some barbarians asking for their aid, saying that the place is forbidden to them hence the need for outsiders to investigate what is going on.

The adventure then proceeds apace with a lot of unusual features to negotiate - a true test of the character's mettle in both figuring things out and being capable of engaging in combat when necessary. Each location is well-resourced with descriptions and with a range of outcomes depending on what the characters decide to do, with ample provision to aid the GM in troubleshooting potential adventure-stopping accidents. Detailed referee maps are provided, and there is an appendix giving appropriate barbarian occupations for those groups who take the barbarian route into the adventure.

Nicely thought out and unusual adventure.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #79: Frozen in Time
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #78: Fate's Fell Hand
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/02/2013 08:32:45

Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/09/02/tabletop-review-dungeon-crawl-classics-78-fates-fell-hand/

It’s been a while since I’ve had the opportunity to review a Goodman Games release for Dungeon Crawl Classics. The last first party release for the system I reviewed was #72, aka Beyond The Black Gate, back in September of 2012. That’s nearly a year ago! I have reviewed eight other releases for DCC since then, but they were all third party releases (two from Purple Sorcerer, one from land of Phantoms, one from Dragon’s Hoard, and four from Brave Halfling), so it’s nice to take a look back at a release from the people behind it all. I’m glad I chose this one to delve back into Goodman Games’ releases, as Fate’s Fell Hand is an amazing adventure, albeit a complicated one. The end result is an adventure that takes an expert GM to pull off, but the end result is well worth it.

Fate’s Fell Hand is an adventure for four to eight Level 2 characters, along with a stream of henchmen. In this adventure, players are sucked into a demiplane (no, not Ravenloft) where three powerful wizards (one of which bears more than a passing homage to Lovecraft’s scribe of the Necronomicon) do battle in an attempt to escape this prison of their own making. Only when one Wizard obtains all twelve cards from the deck of fate will they have enough power to escape. The catch is that each day, the armies of each magic-user are reset and reshuffled, meaning victory is all but impossible. That is, until the PCs are sucked into the demiplane as well, upsetting the ancient balance. Now the party has to decide which of the three wizards to aid, or if they want to capture the cards themselves and let their own magic wielding allies set the team free. Who knows? The party could even split between the armies! Once allied with one of the three spellcasters, the PCs must play by the rules of the location, meaning that each day, their alliances could reset.

At the same time, the same act of eldritch power that brings the PCs into the demiplane has also caused the magic powering it to take the form of giant hideous worms bent on eating this plane of reality until there is nothing left of it. This means not only do the PCs and mages have to deal with the daily resets, but they are now stuck with a finite amount of time. Can anyone escape the demiplane before the worms devour it into non-existence? That’s a heavy plot to be sure!

Although the adventure sounds like a guaranteed TPK (even for a DCC affair), there are actually a lot of ways to get some, if not all, of the adventuring party out alive. Unlike a lot of DCC adventures, where the entire piece is a dungeon hack favoring roll-playing over role-playing, this is definitely one adventure where you can’t just stab your way through things. A solid, well thought out game plan is needed to survive. It’s refreshing to see a DCC adventure where players have to rely on their wits rather than their stat blocks and magic items to make it through things. The adventure is just rock solid from beginning to end, and it’s easily one of the most memorable adventures for the system. It’s a very long adventure with a lot of potential encounters (that could be repeated many times over due to the nature of the demiplane).

I’d be remiss in not mentioning the art in this adventure. Sure, Dungeon Crawl Classics is well known for the quality of the art accompanying its adventures, but wow, are things turned up a notch here. I just absolutely fell in love with the cover to Fate’s Fell Hand. It’s so striking. I decided to pick this up just because of that cover, and that’s an extremely rare impulse decision for me to make. The rest of the art is equally impressive, and of course, like all DCC adventures, the accompanying maps for this adventure are amongst the best in the industry today. Most DCC adventures just have one or maybe two maps if it is an especially long adventure. Fate’s Fell Hand has FOUR. That should give you an idea of the size, length and scope of this piece. The adventure even contains twelve half page size cards to represent the playing pieces from the Deck of Fate. These things are gorgeous, and I’m glad I have the PDF version of this adventure so I can print and cut out as many are needed. I’d hate to ruin a physical copy of this thing.

Fate’s Fell Hand is one of the most impressive and comprehensive adventures I’ve encountered this year. It is definitely not for an inexperienced GM and/or newcomers to Dungeon Crawl Classics though. This adventure is best left in the hands of a very experienced GM willing to put in a lot of extra effort to make this run smoothly, take copious notes about the ever changing alliances and plaque locations and so much more. In the hands of an inexperienced GM, Fate’s Fell Hand will simply fall apart and be a disappointing disaster for all involved, so be very sure of your ability to run a DCC game before going through with this one. It’s still a blast to read through, as well as for viewing the art, but I can’t express enough just how detail oriented a GM has to be to make this work. It’s one of my favorite adventures of the year, but Fate’s Fell Hand certainly needs a specific person to make it reach its true memorable potential.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #78: Fate's Fell Hand
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #77: The Croaking Fane
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/29/2013 01:04:31

Michael Curtis' The Croaking Fane doesn't have the fantastic epic-swilling heights of insanity of a Harley Stroh's DCC adventure, but is a highly thematic dungeon crawl nonetheless. The party hears of an abandoned fane, enters, and fights froggy things. The Croaking Fane has something of a backstory of two amphibious factions fighting it out, but I'm not sure how well it affects the dungeon-crawling gameplay of the adventure. Still, players wanting a good, highly-themed, froggy crawl should enjoy The Croaking Fane.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #77: The Croaking Fane
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
by Nicholas J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/07/2013 00:02:35

There are an awful lot of favorable reviews floating around out there - for good reason. This is an absolutely brilliant system. It's like B/X D&D and D20 had a baby, midwifed by Michael Moorcock, H.P. Lovecraft, Robert E. Howard and Clark Ashton Smith.

The positives are numerous, but these immediately stood out to me.

  1. This book is packed with fantastic old-school illustrations and many of the classic TSR artists of yore contributed pieces for it (Easley, Otus, Nicholson, Roslof, etc.)
  2. System complete. Everything in one book; no need to buy a ton of splat books or accessories to get a complete game.
  3. Table heavy, but rules-lite. This might seem contradictory at first, but despite the array of lookup tables for critical hits and spell effects, it plays a lot more intuitively than you would think (especially if you track down some of the excellent player made reference sheets or purple sorcerer's excellent table/smartphone app).
  4. Magic done right. It's dangerous, it's unpredictable and it immediately brings to mind the dark sorcery of the Conan or Elric novels.
  5. Warriors are finally fun. Too often the humble fighter in RPGs is relegated to simple die rolls and not a lot of flavor, or they are overly burdened with feats and skills that feel rigid and narrow. Not here. The warrior with his "mighty deeds" gets multiple opportunities per combat to shine and the system actively encourages players to be creative, inventing and describing the deeds they want to attempt.
  6. Race as class done right. Some people might balk at being "just a dwarf" or "just an elf," but mechanically and stylistically they have just the right amount of flavor and uniqueness to allow a player to really stretch into a role and make it their own.

Downsides? For me it's possibly the best game I've purchased/played in years. However, no game is perfect for all people and DCC RPG is no exception. If you really enjoy long-lived characters that you carefully plan from level 1 and abhor randomness in an RPG then this probably isn't the game for you. DCC is unabashedly old-school in it's design with it's 3d6 in order, 0-level character (death) funnel, corruption effects for wizards and its utter and complete disdain for encounter and character balance. (Here's a hint: If you feel like you're losing, then run!)

In short, this game is ideally suited for people who love classic swords and sorcery (appendix N) role-playing. If you favor more Tolkien-esque fantasy RPGs, with predictably scaled encounters and magic that functions according to very static and dependable rules, then I'd definitely look elsewhere, because DCC RPG is not that game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #76: Colossus, Arise!
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/21/2013 02:36:33

One axiom of good dungeon design is the "method behind the madness". Yet, despite this adventure advice, most dungeon crawls hand-wave their background with the simple "abandoned caves with monsters who wandered in" trope. I look forward to Harley Stroh's dungeon adventures because this never happens. Instead, Stroh will take an adventure cliche and run it to its insane yet consistent conclusion. In "Colossus, Arise!", that trope is the "Cycle of Mankind".

The last remnants of the Ur-Lireans, divine, statuesque titans of the second age, wish to bring the next cycle forward. This isn't good news for your adventurers, quite content to keep the third age going as long as possible, thank you very much. Your heroes come late to the scene, as the Ur-Lireans have already "uplifted" men from the current third age into so-called "Sons of the Second Age", and they're not exactly making themselves unknown around the area.

Several desert encounters provide background of the reach of the Ur-Lireans. Then, after infiltrating past the Second Sons, the party arrives into the lair of the Ur-Lirean cult. The Ur-Lireans are quite busy sacrificing victims, uplifting third age men into Sons through horrible ceremonies, and engaging terrible magics and powerful artifacts to animate the dead titan (and his frickin' autonomous BRAIN) from the first age. You know, because the 484 soon-to-be-hatched bloodthirsty worm-men of the fourth age aren't enough. Good luck (and good bye), third age.

Subtlety this ain't, but the previous DCC adventures should have told you that. Instead, DCC presents us yet another momentous world-shattering epic adventure that should keep your players busy. Or, at least, very very dead.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #76: Colossus, Arise!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #77: The Croaking Fane
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/17/2013 12:01:10

The first player-handout is enough to send you screaming...

The backstory tells of unspeakable toad-worshipping cults infesting primeval swamps, which most had thought safely confined to antiquity. Yet their squabbles continued in secret and recent astrological signs suggest to them that it might just be time to once again walk in the light... and various suggestions are provided to enable the judge to weave this into the campaign until ready to unleash this adventure on the party.

The adventure proper begins with the characters venturing into the depths of a swamp to locate a cult place of worship, the Croaking Fane of the title...

Once inside, it's pretty much a dungeon crawl, but one presenting plenty of challenge with lots to look at and figure out as well as to fight. Those who pay attention might even survive. There is a lot of detail here, which will provide a memorable adventure.

Apart from one typo on page 3 ("Players unwise enough to take advantage of this respite have no one to blame but themselves if the PCs perish within the Croaking Fane"... a missing 'not'), it is well-presented and laid out with some atmospheric illustrations to go with the evocative descriptions, including that player-handout and a couple of clear maps for the judge.

Overall, this is a real cracker of a 'crawl, and well worth running.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #77: The Croaking Fane
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #76: Colossus, Arise!
by Jon M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/14/2013 12:46:35

Harley Stroh is consistently one of the finest writers in the business, and this is some of his best work. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #76: Colossus, Arise!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #75: The Sea Queen Escapes
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/29/2013 06:28:25

Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/05/29/dungeon-crawl-classics-75-the-sea-queen-escapes/

Every gamer, regardless of medium, shudders at the thought of a water level, and they do it with good reason. Wading through water that slows you down, trying to swim down and back up before you drown and fighting in water, all of these elements are present in this adventure.

Half a century ago the wizard Shadankin befriended the seas and oceans and all its inhabitants. He never sought to rule, merely to discover and increase his knowledge of life beneath the waves. But not all is what it seems under the calm of the sea. Dangerous entities constantly seeks entrance to this realm, and their reward is maybe too much to ignore, and so Shadankin had to take measures. Gathering allies from the mighty oceans, Shadankin created a prison, but the prison is breaking. A beautiful queen reaches out the heroes and cries for release. And so the story begins.

That being said, this adventure made for Level 3 characters is classically designed. The environments are creative and something new for those that usually do normal dungeon crawls. The artwork is what you are used to from Goodman Games, and as always reflects the retro-feel of DCC. The maps especially are beautiful and imaginative.

The author, Michael Curtis, is a competent writer, but spread throughout the text complicated words and long names appear. Regardless of how much fun it is to see trapezoids used outside the context of a classroom, it doesn’t really add anything to the narrative, or the exposition. Describing a surface as “isosceles trapezoid” will only create confused looks on your player’s faces.

The Sea Queen Escapes relies heavily on the usual fantasy tropes, and the more ‘specialized’ ones regarding oceanic adventures. A beautiful royalty reaches out for help, her only hope. The heroes must travel to shores unknown and discover the true purpose of their visions. Because of all this the underlying story is filled with clichés. This doesn’t have to be bad. There is a reason something becomes a cliché, it answers to universal thoughts and feelings. The story is highly adaptable, but can easily stand on its own well-defined webbed feet. There is of course a small twist at the end, but I’ll keep that for myself for now.

All in all, I liked it. I would however change things up a little before running it with my group, but that’s the beauty of all the OGL material being published. You can twist, turn and refurbish anything to suit your needs, and The Sea Queen Escapes will definitely see some action in one form or another in my group.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #75: The Sea Queen Escapes
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #67: Sailors on the Starless Sea
by Vance R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/03/2013 12:43:23

One of the most unique things about Dungeon Crawl Classics is the character funnel. Run a bunch of 0 level nobodies through the meat grinder and see who comes out on top. This adventure is a great example of how to write an adventure for just that purpose.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #67: Sailors on the Starless Sea
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #75: The Sea Queen Escapes
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/09/2013 03:36:53

I pretty much look forward to a new release of Dungeon Crawl Classics, at least those by Goodman or Stroh. The best ones injected a good dose of weirdness to your typical fantasy RPG, but with a coherence that gave a "method to one's madness". Most adventures I've read do either one, but few do it together like DCC.

Unfortunately, Curtis' The Sea Queen Escapes does the weirdness well, but lacks any structure or meaning behind it (cf. the cultist's tentacled lair in People of the Pit). That still puts this adventure on the level of some of the great AD&D adventures, like White Plume Mountain, or Expedition to the Barrier Peaks. The encounters, while linear, are immensely creative, and highly themed to the adventure (a water vault, followed by an earth prison). Additional useful rules are provided for water-based dungeoneering. The adventure has about twenty encounters, including the climax.

I would suggest DCC's Jewels of the Carnifex over this adventure, but if your players need some more experience, your group will enjoy this adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #75: The Sea Queen Escapes
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Dungeon Crawl Classics #75: The Sea Queen Escapes
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/08/2013 11:52:20

This is an intriguing adventure involving the watery depths, a beautiful sea queen pleading for release... and much that is not what it seems to be at a first glance. Plenty to tax the brains, as well as the sword-arms, of your adventurers.

It all begins with dreams brought on by possession of an artefact - which makes it easy to embroil any party by placing said artefact in the next treasure hoard they discover, or amongst the possessions of the next individual they loot or rob. Provided they are in a coastal town, finding out a little more, just enough to set their feet on the path to this adventure, should not be too difficult... and the adventure is afoot!

To rescue the beautiful captive, they need to infiltrate a sorcerer's lair... by third level, this ought to be within their capabilities provided they are careful and use their skills and resources wisely. It is a weird place, the former residence of someone fascinated by the sea and redolent of the strangeness that is to be found beneath the waves. Being able to swim, at the least, will be an advantage against some of the foes encountered... and of course, this is but a stepping-stone to finding out what next must be done to effect the rescue.

Boat rides and even more exotic places. strange curses and more await the intrepid adventurers in an epic sweep of events that should serve to remind the players that their characters are in a truly magical world quite unlike the real one - and yet, within itself, consistent and real enough to care about as well as stare at in wonder. Plenty of challenge awaits under and around the sea in this memorable adventure which will give those who survive and succeed a feeling of accomplishment.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/27/2013 07:30:37

Dungeon Crawl Classics (im Weiteren: DCC) erinnert mich an die Zeit, als ich ein ganz altes Dungeons & Dragons Basisbuch bei jemand auf Besuch aufgeschlagen habe. Wie bei einer Zeitreise fühlt man sich zurückversetzt. Als das erste Abenteuer in einen Kerker mit Goblins führte. Als man sich noch nicht fragte, wie Flugdrachen unter die Erde kommen und wo eigentlich das Klo für kleine Monster ist...

Erscheinungsbild Das PDF ist mit Ausnahme von fünf Seiten in Schwarz und Weiß gehalten.

Die Illustratoren haben schon zu vielen alten D&D-Regelwerken beigetragen. Leider ergibt sich der Eindruck eines Sammelsuriums, und mehrere Stile sind wild durcheinander gemischt. Manchmal untermalen sie den Text, manchmal wirken sie wie Füllmaterial. Da wurde zu viel gemischt, und es ergibt sich keine Stimmung. Viel ist eben auch nicht unbedingt gut. Nostalgie ginge auch anders.

Der Text ist gut gelayoutet und gut zu lesen. Die gewählten Schriften sind ansprechend. Mehrstufig gestaffelte Bookmarks erleichtern das Auffinden wesentlicher Inhalte. Der Index und die Auflistung der Tabellen enthalten nicht die korrekten Seitenzahlen des PDFs, sondern die des Buches (Versatz von drei Seiten). Außerdem sind sie leider im PDF nicht anklickbar, was gerade bei dem Index für Tabellen ein echtes Manko darstellt.

Die Spielwelt

Kurz gesagt: Es wird keine mitgeliefert. Das liegt an der Historie des Systems selbst:

In den ursprünglichen D&D-Regelwerken gab es einen Anhang N. Dieser war eine Bibliographie all der Fantasy-Werke, die als Inspiration für das System gedient hatten. Die gleiche Inspiration liegt auch DCC zugrunde – mit dem Unterschied, dass DCC geschrieben wurde, um in den Welten des „Appendix N“ zu spielen.

Das Setting ist somit variabel und nicht im Basisbuch enthalten. Es gibt ein paar Tipps an den Spielleiter zum Entwerfen einer solchen Welt. Es sind ein paar Gottheiten, Schutzgeister und -dämonen enthalten. Und es gibt drei typische Fantasy-Rassen. (Die man ja auch unterschiedlich ausspielen kann.)

Die Regeln

DCC stellt sich in vielerlei Hinsicht in die Tradition des klassischen D&D. Es gibt Klassen (Warrior, Wizard, Thief, Cleric) und Rassen (Elf, Halfling, Dwarf). Ein Elf ist eine Variante des Magiers, ein Halbling des Diebes, und ein Zwerg des Kriegers. Es gibt ihn also wieder: den Elfen der Stufe 1. Die Rassen bringen noch andere interessante Aspekte ein, setzen sich also von den Klassen etwas ab.

An weiteren Ähnlichkeiten wären da die Zauber, die man pro Stufe lernt. Trefferpunkte, die man auswürfelt und ebenso pro Stufe dazugewinnt. Man hat relativ übliche Hauptattribute wie Strength, Agility, Stamina, Personality, Intelligence und Luck. Diese bringen Zuschläge und Abzüge auf Würfelwürfe. Das Hauptziel ist es für gewöhnlich, eine Zahl mit einem W20 zu erreichen oder zu übertreffen. Auch die Rettungswürfe (Reflex, Fortitude und Will) gegen verschiedene Bedrohungen gibt es. Und auch drei Alignments (Lawful, Neutral, Chaotic) dürfen nicht fehlen.

Soweit recht bekannt und sicherlich nichts Neues.

DCC ist aber kein reiner „Old School Renaissance“-D&D-Klon (im Weiteren: OSR). Die Wurzeln des Produkts gehen bereits auf 2003 zurück, wie der Autor betont. Er sieht es damit zeitlich vor der eigentlichen OSR-Welle. Während viele Spielmechaniken auf Altbewährtem basieren, gibt es doch deutliche Unterschiede im Detail. Besondere Mechaniken Zentral für das Spiel ist die sogenannte „Würfelkette“ (Dice Chain), die auch ungewohnte Würfel umfasst:

[box]W3 – W4 – W5 – W6 – W7 – W8 – W10 – W12 – W14 – W16 – W20 – W24 – W30[/box]

Würfel, die im Spiel verwendet werden, werden manchmal „hochgestuft“ (stepped up) oder „runtergestuft“ (stepped down). Damit verschieben sich die Wahrscheinlichkeiten etwas zu Gunsten oder Ungunsten des Spielers. Zum Beispiel können Halblinge mit zwei Waffen angreifen. Sie würfeln dabei aber beide Angriffe mit W16 und müssen doch dieselbe Zielzahl erreichen. Ähnlich wird die zweite Attacke oder der zweite Zauber höherstufiger Charaktere behandelt. Oder das Schießen über große Entfernungen, Geländenachteile und Waffen, mit denen der Charakter nicht umgehen kann. Nicht alle Nach- und Vorteile sind durch ab- und aufsteigende Würfel modelliert, sondern geben feste Abzüge oder Zuschläge.

[box]Beispiele:

Ein Bauer, der mit dem Langbogen schießen will, ohne Ausbildung an der Waffe und auf große Distanz, der würfelt eben W14 statt W20. Sein W20 wurde entlang der Würfelkette zweimal herabgestuft: W20 => W16 => W14. (Duckt sich der Gegner dabei auch noch, ist die Formel W14 – 2.)

Ein ausgebildeter Krieger der Stufe 1 kennt den Langbogen. Krieger erhalten keinen festen Attackezuschlag, aber einen Extrawürfel, den Deed Die. Der Krieger schießt auf lange Distanz, also wird sein W20 zu W16. Sein Deed Die auf Level 1 ist W3. Sein Wurf für den Schuss ist W16 + W3. Ein Krieger Stufe 5 dürfte nicht nur mit W16 + W7 werfen, seine zweite Attacke darf er normalerweise mit einem Basiswürfel von W14 durchführen. Also kann er sogar noch einen zweiten Schuss mit W12 + W7 hinterher feuern.

Ein Zauberer der Stufe 5 ist ebenso am Bogen ausgebildet. Er schießt auch mit W16 auf die große Entfernung, darf aber +2 Attacke-Bonus aus seiner Stufen-Tabelle hinzuaddieren. Damit schießt er mit W16 + 2 für den gleichen Angriffsversuch.[/box]

Die zu erreichende Zahl bei solchen Angriffen ist die Rüstungsklasse. Diese verhält sich ganz unklassisch wie bei der 3rd Edition von D&D und steigt an. Der Basiswert ist auch hier ohne Modifikation 10. In der Lederrüstung wäre das schon 12.

Ein ebenso zentrales Element stellen Tabellen dar. Vieles im Spiel wird auf Tabellen ausgewürfelt – der Glücksbonus eines Charakters, kritische Treffer, die Folgen eines leichten Fehlschlags beim Zaubern (Misfire) oder ein echter Patzer (Corruption). Manchmal wird einfach mit einem Würfel passender Größe auf eine Tabelle gewürfelt. Manchmal wird das Ergebnis des vorigen Wurfes modifiziert. Ein paar Tabellen sind dabei so groß, dass sie den W100 verwenden.

Magie

Auch bei der Magie lehnt sich DCC an D&D an, ohne das gleiche System zu verwenden. Zauberer und Kleriker kennen bestimmte, unterschiedliche Zauber. In D&D hatte man Spell Slots - man konnte den Zauber zuverlässig wirken, aber dann war er bis zur Regenerierung verloren. Außerdem musste man sich während einer Rast entscheiden, welche Zauber man sich einprägte. Dies stellte eine wirkungsvolle Limitierung der Macht besonderer niedrigstufiger Zauberer dar, war aber nicht unbedingt die stimmungsvollste Spielmechanik. Sie konnte dazu führen, dass ein Zauberer sich nur einen Spruch merken konnte und dieser eben so gar nicht zur bespielten Situation passte.

DCC verfährt da anders. Es sind dem Wirken von Zaubern, die man schon kennt, erst mal keine Grenzen gesetzt. Solange man Erfolg hat...

Kleriker verlieren die Verfügung über einen Zauber, wenn sie Patzer würfeln. (Normalerweise ist eine gewürfelte 1 ein echter Patzer.) Und jedes Mal, wenn sie bei der Zauberprobe zumindest versagen, steigt die Wahrscheinlichkeit für einen Patzer. Fallen sie mit Patzern bei der Gottheit in Ungnade, heißt es: Buße tun.

Zauberer trifft es sogar schlimmer. Bei einer vergeigten Probe droht der Verlust des Zaubers für den Tag, manchmal schlägt die Magie aber zusätzlich auf ihn oder die Gruppe zurück (Misfire). Und bei mächtigen Zaubern droht sogar dauerhafte Schädigung (Corruption). Wer keine Lust auf dauerhaft entstellende Warzen oder die Abreise in den siebten Kreis der Hölle hat, der lässt von mächtiger Schwarzmagie lieber die Finger.

Zaubernde Klassen wie Magier, Kleriker und Elfen sind also sehr mächtig, unterliegen aber auch wirkungsvollen Einschränkungen. Die Götter sind launisch und die Magie will gebändigt sein. Gerade bei Klerikern ist der Spielleiter dazu angehalten, zu überprüfen, ob das gespielte Verhalten zu den Anliegen der Gottheit passt.

Bei metaphysischen Angriffen muss der Spell Check gegen 10 + 2 * Stufe des Zaubers gelingen. Zusätzlich steigen die Effekte von Zaubersprüchen oft mit höheren Ergebnissen.

Beispiel:

Der gleiche Magier der Stufe 5 darf übrigens auch einen Zauber als zweite Attacke hinterher schleudern – und beginnt mit W14 + 5 als Basiswurf. Er wählt den Zauber Scorching Ray und muss eine 14 erreichen, weil der Spruch Zauber-Stufe 2 hat.

Das Risiko ist nicht besonders groß, weil der Zauber selbst bei 12 und 13 laut Beschreibung zwar fehlschlägt, aber sich nicht verbraucht. Bei 2 bis 11 ist der Zauber laut Tabelle für den Tag nicht mehr verfügbar. Ein Ergebnis, das mit weniger als 50% Wahrscheinlichkeit eintritt (schon eine 7 als Wurf wäre ja eine 7 + 5 = 12). Ein Misfire oder eine Corruption ist sogar nur mit einer echten 1 als Patzer möglich, da ein Ergebnis von 1 in dieser Situation anders gar nicht zu erreichen ist. (Eine 1 beim Wurf bleibt aber ein echter Patzer.)

Eine weitere Abwandlung ist die Mercurial Magic. Für jeden Zauberbegabten manifestiert sich die Magie anders. Für jeden gelernten Spruch wird mit einem W100 geworfen und die Zauberwirkung dauerhaft mit dem Ergebnis aus der Tabelle modifiziert. Dadurch ergeben sich oft mächtige Nebeneffekte. Auch durch hohe Würfelwürfe gibt es ja Seiteneffekte. Nimmt man beides zusammen, gibt es sehr viele Variationen der Ursprungszauber, die besonders beim nächsten Spiel mit neuen Charakteren wieder eine ganz neue Vielfalt ins Spiel bringen.

Von den insgesamt 480 Seiten entfallen allein 173 auf Zauber. Ein Zauber kann ein bis zwei Seiten einnehmen wegen der umfangreichen Tabellen. Charaktererschaffung Ein zentrales Spielelement ist „der Trichter“ (the funnel). Damit beschreibt DCC den Prozess der Charaktererschaffung. Jeder Spieler erwürfelt 2-4 Charaktere auf Level 0. Das sind Bauern, Handwerker oder Alchemisten. Sie haben sehr wenige Lebenspunkte (1W4), und werden zufällig mit Attributswerten (3W6 für jedes Attribut) ausgestattet. Auch der Beruf und der Glücksmodifikator werden per Tabelle erwürfelt.

Mit einer entsprechend großen Truppe zieht man dann ins erste Dungeon ein. Ja, ein echtes erstes Abenteuer mit ausgearbeitetem Verließ, Tempel oder sonstiger Kulisse. Diese Ansammlung von Wagemutigen versucht nun, sich einen Schatz anzueignen. Oder fiese Kultisten zu erledigen. Dabei werden zwangsweise einige davon ableben.

Genauso, wie sich ein Trichter verengt, verkleinert sich die Auswahl möglicher Charaktere. Die Auswahl des finalen Charakters für weitere Abenteuer ist dadurch teilweise zufällig und wird teilweise erspielt. Sobald man zehn Erfahrungspunkte in einem Abenteuer gesammelt hat und/oder das erste Abenteuer beendet hat, wählt man eine der verfügbaren Klassen. (Nur den nicht-menschlichen Rassen ist der Weg bereits vorgezeichnet. Erwürfelt man einen Zwerg bei der „Berufswahl“, so bleibt er ein Zwerg auf Stufe 1.)

Dies teilt das Spiel konzeptuell in zwei Abschnitte. Während des Trichters kommt es zur eigentlichen Charakterwahl. Die Charaktere zeichnet noch nicht viel aus, und sie können noch nicht nichts Besonderes. Ein paar Boni durch die Attribute sind die einzigen Unterschiede. Nach dem Aufstieg auf Stufe 1 gibt es plötzlich massive Unterschiede durch die einzelnen Klassen und Rassen.

Der Autor glaubt so, dem Powergaming einen Riegel vorschieben zu können. Dafür soll die Zufallskomponente sorgen. Gleichzeitig soll das Prinzip des Trichters eine Bindung zwischen dem erwürfelten Charakter und dem Spieler herstellen. Schließlich hat man dieses zarte Pflänzchen ja durch sein erstes Abenteuer geschleust.

Ein Charakterbogen fehlt im Grundregelwerk. Aber es gibt sie zum Download (s.u.).

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht

Die Herausforderung an den Spielleiter ist klar: Bis zum zweiten Abenteuer muss er praktisch alle Regeln intus haben. Das ist beherrschbar, aber doch genauso viel Arbeit wie für alle anderen Spieler zusammen. Mitspieler, die hier aktiv mithelfen und -lesen, sind sicher hilfreich, den Überblick zu bewahren.

Der Spielleiter wird sicher nicht umhin kommen, seinen Spielern Teile des Regelwerks zu kopieren oder auszudrucken. Zumindest die Kurzbeschreibung der Charakterklassen sollte am Spieltisch separat vorhanden sein. Die Beschreibungen bekannter Sprüche sollten zumindest im Buch angemerkt sein. Da so viel im Spiel über Tabellen gehandhabt wird, sind ein paar Lesezeichen von Haus aus hilfreich.

Reichlich Material zum Bespielen gibt es sicherlich über das Grundregelwerk hinaus (s.u.). Allein Goodman Games selbst hat z.Z. 74 Abenteuermodule im Angebot (Klick).

Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht

Das erste Abenteuer ist für Spieler sicherlich sehr einfach. Da die Charaktere der Stufe 0 keinerlei Sonderfertigkeiten haben, werden die Basisregeln eingeübt, ohne viel wissen zu müssen. Die grundlegenden Spielmechaniken gehen so ins Blut.

Im zweiten Abenteuer hat man im Allgemeinen Stufe 1 erreicht. Dafür sollte man sich das Wissen über die eigene Charakterklasse aneignen. Für Magier ist die Lernkurve sicherlich steiler, aber selbst da bleibt es beherrschbar – man kennt ja nur einige wenige Zauber am Anfang. Nach dem zweiten Abenteuer greift man jenseits der Tabellen eher selten zum Buch.

Vom Gefühl her würde ich sagen, dass jedem Spieler eine gewisse Individualisierung geboten wird. Wirklich auf ihre Kosten kommen natürlich die Magier – jedes Mal anders durch die Unberechenbarkeit magischer Effekte. Zwar hat jede Klasse ihre Stärken, aber so wirr und trickreich wie ein Magier ist keine andere. Sie haben wahrscheinlich die kürzesten und interessantesten Leben... und der Spieler die meiste Mühe, den Überblick zu bewahren . Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis

480 Seiten sind schon ganz ordentlich. Ein großer Teil davon sind aber einfach nur Tabellen oder umfangreiche Illustrationen. Die Tabellen sind liebevoll gestaltet – z.B. passt jeder Patzer zum jeweiligen Zauber. Die Illustrationen stellen oft jedoch keinen echten Mehrwert dar.

Fazit

Auch wenn DCC nicht das minimalste Regelwerk hat, bleibt es überschaubar. Tabellen erzeugen oft komplexe und immer wieder interessante Ergebnisse ohne eine ebenso komplexe Spielmechanik zu erfordern. Ob man es mag, nach den meisten Würfen in eine Tabelle zu schauen, sei mal dahingestellt. Mit ein paar kopierten Auszügen für die Spieler geht das sicher fix von der Hand.

Insgesamt wirkt DCC gut spielbar. Nicht so simpel, dass es nicht fordern würde. Nicht so komplex, dass es überfordern würde. Die halb-willkürliche Charaktererstellung inklusive später Berufswahl ist definitiv Geschmackssache. Mit wenigen Ausnahmen dominiert das Würfelglück das Spielgeschehen.

Ein Spiel, dem man mal eine Chance geben sollte. Vielleicht wächst einem ein grässlich mutierter Magier einfach ans Herz.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Charakterbögen gibt es zum Herunterladen (Klick). Sie sind eher einfach gestrickt. Unsere Bewertung

Erscheinungsbild 3/5 Viele Illustrationen, wenn auch nicht unbedingt gute. Gut zu lesen. Spielwelt Keine. Fließt in die Wertung nicht ein. Regeln 3,5/5 Nicht immer innovativ, aber dem Thema angemessen. Charaktererschaffung 3/5 Eine Mischung aus Willkür der Würfel und Spielerentscheidung. Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht 3,5/5 Zu Beginn ist es schwierig, die Übersicht zu bewahren. Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht 4/5 Als Spieler wird man graduell ins System eingeführt. Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis 4/5 25 Seiten pro USD beim PDF. Gesamt 3,5/5



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 121 to 135 (of 503 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DriveThruRPG