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Star Trader
by Glen P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/27/2014 05:02:02
Found this recommended on the Traveller Facebook group. Excellent value for money. A campaign framework with real solo play! Provides an excellent system for generating encounters and even crew problems on trading missions as well as a really good framework for playing a merchant captain. Highly recommended

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trader
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Star Trader
by Geoff O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/28/2014 06:37:08
I had picked up Trader a while back, just because the system interested me. Unfortunately, it wasn't capturing the interest of those who I typically game with (my family and friends). So there I was, holding an a amazing system in my hand and nothing to do with it. I searched for a satisfactory way to solo this system, and it kept falling apart as being to bogged down or to fluffy. Then I saw a review of this book and was intrigued. I haven't been this happy with a purchase in a long time. The book reads like a guy wrote down his most successful attempt to achieve what I was looking for, and it works great! I've been happily running my crew around the Regina sub-sector for about a week now. Thanks for the effort, and for publishing what obviously could have stayed your own secret homebrew jewel.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trader
by Thad H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/24/2013 14:44:34
This is a great addition to a great game!
Get Star Trader if you've ever wanted to play a merchants based game of Traveller... by your self.
Heck! I bet it will even work well to play with a small group! (I'll have to try that...)

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trader
by Jacob R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/07/2013 10:52:17
This product delivers what it says. You get a good framework for running solo adventures with Traveller. There is one enormous error: the starship maintenance fee is way too high. According to the core rules, it should be multiplied by 0.001.

I want there to be expansions; I'd like to see naval and scout books.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Publisher Reply:
Thanks for the review Jacob, and for the errata ... I noticed it says 1/12 and also 0.1% in my rulebook, I've corrected the text. Thanks again. I am working on a Solo Explorer game in the same spirit, it's a tough proposition however, and there have to be certain assumptions straight off the bat.
Star Trader
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/25/2013 11:18:27
Traveller is a strange game. Its fans get as much pleasure from rolling up characters, creating equipment and designing planets as they do from actually playing... and this work is a touch of genius combining the solitary approach with actually PLAYING Traveller rather than merely messing about with the system (and yes, I have spent many an hour tinkering with characters and planets... never been that good on gear).

The basis, the core of this sub-game is trading. Now, the rules have - from the beginning of the game - accommodated the concept of interstellar trade and the mechanics of this have been developed to a high degree. Many a full-blown Traveller game revolves about a bunch of merchant spacers and the adventures they get up to... but for other folks the idea of being a merchant is not why they get their dice out, so if this is your pleasure you may not find a group with which to play. So, mess around with the trading system on your own, or go play Traveller but doing something else that suits the rest of the party?

Or pick up this book, which blends trading and all the other stuff that makes Traveller fun into a workable solo game. It is more than coping with the vissitudes of interstellar trade, more than a bookkeeping exercise in paying the running costs of your spaceship, although it incorporates these things at its heart. You can develop the crew with whom you travel, or even choose not to have a ship but book passage for yourself and your trade goods. You can even engage in space combat if you want to (or have it forced upon you).

You will need to take account of your route and the planets that lie along it... and you can have adventures on them too. Even selling your goods and stocking up with your next cargo can get exciting. Oh, and events can happen in space too.

To accommodate all this, there is a wealth of tables to roll on and advice to heed. Keep notes as you go and you will find out how exciting it can all be. It's also a good way of getting your head around the system preparatory to running it, and have fun whilst you're learning.

Um. I think this will be the last review today... I'm off Travelling!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Attack Squadron: Roswell
by Dale R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/19/2013 23:57:17
While I did not have Mongoose Traveller prior to getting Attack Squadron: Roswell, I have a long time interest in UFOs, ever since reading Edward Ruppelt's book, The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects, as a kid. The game looked quite interesting, and after contacting the author for more information, I purchased the game, and found if extremely interesting. Sufficiently so that I purchased Mongoose Traveller in order to fully understand how to use the game. I like the events tables for developing a character, as it gives him far more background than simply die rolls. In addition, it includes the XF-85 Goblin, an aircraft-borne jet fighter, the concept of which I have always found fascinating. The game does a very good job developing a basis for the UFOs, and catching the flavor of the period. It has a wide range of scenarios to give ideas for possible game sessions, which also provide ideas for other scenarios. The Traveller skill table has been very well adapted to reflect the period. Overall, I rate the game 5 Stars.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Attack Squadron: Roswell
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Attack Squadron: Roswell
by Mysterious B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/10/2013 16:58:31
Paul Elliott and Zozer Games, redefine Traveller not as dreary and uninspiring Space Opera heuristic but a heuristic for all types of Science Fiction games. In this case, Zozer Games, with Attack Squadron Roswell returns to the same wonderful mix of Hard and Soft by using Traveller to explore the genre of Alien Invasion films of the 1950s. For this provides an excellent skeleton building upon great Traveller products of the past like the flawed COACC but does not quite reach the global scope that Traveller demands. One should certainly buy this product, if they are looking to expand one’s own Traveller universe either in the direction suggested by the ATU or as I said, with modification, the OTU. For as I read the supplement, images of how to incorporate these concepts into my TNE game floated past. Certainly, a few good campaigns can be set in the 1950s, as Atomic Age Cthulhu or the author’s own GURPS Atomic Age shows the time period is a rich era for role playing…and the sheer profusion of films novels highlighting this pulpish yet hard science fiction makes it perfect for Traveller players who crave the mixture of hard and soft. Thus, I wholeheartedly recommend this product.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Attack Squadron: Roswell
by Ian B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/17/2013 09:18:51
Awesome setting book. Each Zozer Games product seems to focus on one "gimmick," which in this case is air-to-air combat. Well done and very inspirational. Looking forward to running this one!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Publisher Reply:
Your comments are really appreciated Ian, I hope you get some great sessions out of it! ~ Paul E/Zozer Games
Great Starship Names
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/16/2013 11:05:59
A neat resource for finding names for starships, especially when one turns up unexpectedly and the name is needed suddenly. Not that it won't be useful when characters are seeking to name their own ships, it is an area at which a lot of us struggle and I'm sure your characters, like mine, have served aboard some very strangely-named vessels. (I still remember the Hognose...)

There are several tables from which to choose. A couple of 'traditional' names for military starships, and another if you prefer 'epic' names. A couple more for commercial vessels and then its the turn of privately-owned ships, be they merchants (ethically challenged or otherwise) or wealthy travellers. Use d66 to get a random name or just read down the list and pick one which appeals.

A handy work to tuck away against the need for a name in a hurry.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Great Starship Names
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The Ladder
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/31/2013 08:50:25
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/01/31/tabletop-review-the-lad-
der/

Let’s say you’ve never played Dungeons & Dragons before. In this hypothetical, you’ve joined a friend’s campaign due to that friend talking incessantly about how awesome it is. You have no idea how to play, but you want your character to climb a wall. You’re asked to make a “climb check”. This requires rolling a twenty sided die, something you’ve likely never seen before because you’re used to playing board games like Monopoly and Life. You take the result here, add in your climb score, which is created by adding your strength bonus and ranks in that skill. The strength bonus, of course, is determined by taking your strength score, subtracting ten, dividing by two, and then rounding down. That number isn’t right yet. You still have to subtract points because your character is wearing armor, which weighs him down.

My point is that pen and paper games can seem like high end calculus to a beginner, and for any given action, there’s usually a good deal of math involved. The dice can seem alien, as can the list of skills and seemingly random numbers attached to them. Something as simple as climbing a wall has a whole lot that goes into it. For experienced players, such math is second nature, and is done almost instantaneously. For a beginner, it might just seem overly complicated.

The Ladder is a game that aims to simply pen and paper rules to the point where a beginning player can quickly feel right at home. Key to this goal is the fact that only six sided dice are used, and rolls don’t involve adding or subtracting any sort of modifier. Skills are relegated to a simple ladder system that uses words like “good”, “poor”, and “expert” to define character’s abilities. This is a noble goal, to be sure. Let’s see how it pans out.

When you create a character using the rules of The Ladder, you have a pretty easy task. You select six “assets” that you want your character to have. These should relate to the them of the campaign as described by your Gamesmaster. So, you’re in modern times, good assets to have might be “driving” or “computer skills”. Of these six assets, you can choose to become an expert in two of them. The other four you’re considered “good” at. Next up to create a few character flaws that add to your character’s personality. Maybe your character is scared of heights. Maybe he’s got asthma. After that, the rest is even simpler, and amounts to nothing more than creating some background information, such as defining features, and home location. You could easily create a character in a minute or two.

At the heart of the game is the ladder system itself. For each skill, you have a rating on the ladder. The idea is that if you’re good at something, you’ll succeed at related tasks most of the time. So if you’re good at driving, chances are you’ll make that turn without a problem. The kicker is that you do still roll a die. On a roll of two through five, nothing happens. Your outcome stays the same as it would have been without the die roll. On a roll of a one or six, however, things start to get interesting. These numbers represent the chance that any person may at some point exceed or fail to meet their normal skill level. For example, even a master martial artist can miss a kick, and a novice baseball player can still hit a home run. Rolling a six moves your attempt up the ladder, while rolling a one moves you down the ladder. Rolling either prompts a second roll. So, if you roll a six, you’ve exceeded your expectations, and get to roll again. Another six means you do even better. You keep going until you don’t roll a six. This sets up the chance, although unlikely, that you can can pull off something amazing.

The ladder system is definitely interesting. For most actions, it has a nice feeling to it. You have a pretty good idea of how you’ll perform on any given task, yet there’s always a chance that something can go wrong/right. Also in play is the “wonky ladder” system where some outside influence can affect the likelihood of your place on the ladder being changed. For example, let’s say you want to perform a running jump. The trouble is that you’re on a patch of ice. This results in a bad wonky ladder, and when you go to make your jump roll, you’ll go down a ladder on a roll of a one AND a two. This gives the system some flexibility when dealing with extraordinary circumstances.

It’s when there’s conflict that one starts to see some serious flaws in the system. Logically, it makes sense that someone ranked good at something should almost always defeat someone ranked poorly at the same task. However, when it comes to this game, it can often feel like your roll means nothing. If you’re down more than a rung, you have to hope your opponent rolls multiple ones in a roll, or that you roll multiple sixes in a row just to avoid an abysmal outcome. In combat, things get even more redundant. Winning a roll awards the victor points. A certain number of points is needed to win. This means that even if the lesser player has a miraculous roll, they’ll still likely lose because they can’t possibly meet that total number of points before their superior opponent. It takes some of the chance and fun out of conflict, and makes things more of a foregone conclusion. It may be logical, but it’s not as much fun.

Advancement in the game comes via “plot points” that are awarded by the GM. These can be cashed in to improve an existing skill, add a skill, or used to bump yourself up a ladder in times of need. The GM is encouraged to stem too much growth, however, as one shouldn’t be an expert in too many fields. It’s definitely interesting to watch a character grow, and this system can easily be used to create a very specific build.

This game attempts to make things simpler, and for the most part it manages. It can get a bit over complicated when it comes to degrees of injury and how that affects your ladder scores, but the system is still one that can be used to ease a beginner into the world of pen and paper games. I can’t say it’s better than it’s more complicated brethren, but it does offer some appeal to those looking for a rules-light adventure.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The Ladder
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43AD - Roleplaying in Roman Britain
by Asen G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/30/2012 04:18:22
A really in-depth treatment of the setting. Personally, I like picking the combat effects after rolling, the way armour work, the system for advancement, the simple way the game handles the importance of advantages, how magic is powered... and did I mention the work that went in the setting?
It's a splendid game indeed.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
43AD - Roleplaying in Roman Britain
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Warband
by Asen G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/30/2012 04:14:21
A really in-depth treatment of British tribes at the time. Since they're part and parcel of 43 A.D., this supplement can help a GM (or rather, a Referee) that wants to run a Roman miliitary campaign set in these times, and be sure they're getting the NPCs "just right".
Or you can just raid your enemies and steal their cattle!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warband
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Orbital
by Gerald M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/26/2012 21:36:22
This is amazing work. The detail, concepts and technology absolutely bring a real hard science campaign to reality!!!!I have been playing Traveller since I was 13 and never thought of the concept of a realist approach like this setting. THUMBS UP ALL THE WAY!!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Orbital
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Horizon Survey Craft
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/26/2012 08:30:59
If you are using Zozer Games's Orbital low-tech setting - or just have a need for a relatively primitive exploration/survey craft for use in-system - this is a nice, well-presented one to have to hand.

The product begins with some explanatory notes giving the rationale for the design's development within the Orbital setting, and this is followed by the description of a 'walk through' which brings the vessel to life in one's mind's eye as if one was watching a TV documentary about it. Given the low-tech level, by Traveller standards, of this craft, it is easy to visualise and indeed could almost be built today. It's certainly easy to imagine.

The actual deckplans, produced in standard Traveller style, show clearly how the whole thing hangs together and presents the craft ready for play.

The product rounds off with several variant forms - for anything from a small attack craft to a cargo ship or a rescue vehicle - and gives an example crew. These are fully-developed NPCs, so if you decide that your characters are going to encounter one of these craft rather than be running it, the crew is ready-made for you.

As already mentioned, this low-tech design is customised for the Orbital setting. If you are not using it, you might still find a use for this... perhaps if your characters encounter a system that has only developed to this level of technology, or if it is a poor system that doesn't have the resources to use more sophisticated craft in-system.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Horizon Survey Craft
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Orbital
by Mysterious B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/21/2012 12:53:29
Unquestionably, somebody in need of wanting to introduce more pragmatism and grit into their Traveller game would be wise to pick this book up. And, those like me, whose goal of the reaching for the stars not as just destination points but fully realized places replete with cultures and different ways of doing things yet grounded in the sensibilities that these new worlds will carry the problems of the old into them, will certainly welcome the addition of this book into their Traveller collection. Those wanting to dream about the easy life in the Stars should go back to playing Star Wars/Star Trek versions of Traveller. Zozer Games, I hope will return to this milieu, and create more supplements and adventures for it – and thus hopefully inspire the Grand Old Game itself.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Orbital
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