RPGNow.com
Browse Categories
 Publisher Info













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Alien Breeds
by Neal H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/20/2018 20:41:34

The xenomorph is a well-known and terrifying monster. However, because of its fame, most players will be familiar with the creature and it's capabilities and few weaknesse. Alien Breed gives a GM lots of variations on the xenomorph and will remind players why they are scared of the dark.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Alien Breeds
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Alien Breeds
by Shawn F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/18/2018 22:11:39

If you play Cepheus Engine or Mongoose Traveller and you want to surprise your players with a certain iconic alien lifeform, this is the supplement to get. The book details a variety of "evoled" xenomorphs, that is, they have new features that make them a little different then the stock aliens. This includes some which breathe fire, other which create spores, or others which are puppeteers. Each one has a full explanation of their lifecycle and the game stats you need to terorrize your unsuspecting adventurers. It also includes a small 40-50 person mining colony which is being terorrized by the aliens. It has full maps and stats for the colony and colonists. I highly recommend it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Alien Breeds
by Chris H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2018 09:41:59

Zozer Games' HOSTILE is an RPG that wears it's influences proudly on it's sleeve, and it's beautifully crafted for the job. It's also phenomenally good value for money. ALIEN BREEDS continues the trend, and addresses the only criticism that I have of HOSTILE - that it needed more monsters. The array of lifeforms presented are both familiar enough that players will enjoy the nostalgia, and unfamiliar enough that they'll present a genuine challenge. The colony setting included is invaluable, a resource that the GM will be able to use over and over in a variety of HOSTILE adventures. Impressive work from Paul Elliott, yet again.

Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Zaibatsu
by Mark J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/12/2018 05:10:26

I'm part of an experienced RPG group in Kazakhstan. I love the setting for this, and the game mechanic is easy and straight-forward. I enjoy crunchy games, too, but we used Zaibatsu for a 4-hour one-shot. By strategically selecting portions of the book to print, I was able to put together materials that the players could use to make their characters and play without prior knowledge of the game. PC generation took about 20 minutes. The game went great! I used the beginning mission included in the book. The players, as usual for our group, managed to completely avoid the direction they were supposed to go. But, with some ad hoc additions to the game, things went fine. I followed the designer's suggestion of keeping combat frequent and deadly. I also added new NPC's on-the-fly (I introduced the Makita assassin as a "femme fatale," and put her and her team earlier in the game, then had them have a shoot-out with the PC's for the climax). But, again, this was easy to do given the easy game mechanic. The players loved the setting and the fast-pace of the game!

Keep in mind that the game's modified Cepheus engine was easier for me than for some gamers in that I was already familiar with Traveller. The book has a few typos, but I'll address one of these on the discussion thread.

We're planning to use Zaibatsu for a local con on Saturday.

I do recommend this game!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Zaibatsu
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Hostile
by Daud V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/08/2018 04:34:22

This book provides an incredibly rich setting for human exploration of star systems relatively close to Earth made possible by massive corporations searching for profits and raw materials while consuming the hardworking lives of countless technicians, explorers, and agents. Although outerspace is mostly void, HOSTILE describes a universe filled with heavy machinery, grease, and blood. It intentionally offers a retro (1980s) SF vison, but players and GM interested in an updated (but equally dark) vision could add certain technologies (e.g. widespread wireless access) according to their preferences.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hostile
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

1970s 2D6 RETRO RULES
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/24/2018 09:53:21

Having long been a fan of the original Traveller RPG, I was intrigued enough to download this supplement for the Cepheus Engine rules and I have to say I’m glad I did.

This short pdf provides a slightly altered task resolution system, but the majority of the page count is taken up with an overhaul of the combat system. This greatly simplifies the Cepheus Engine rules and tries (and succeeds) at recreating the very free-form nature of original Traveller combat. Its also great to see a version of Andy Slack’s excellent vehicle combat rules included here (originally published in White Dwarf in the 1980s).

Although these rules are probably not to everyone’s taste, if you’re a fan of those original ‘little black books’ and want to give your Cepheus Engine games that OSR feel, the 1970s 2d6 Retro Rules are well worth a look.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
1970s 2D6 RETRO RULES
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Zaibatsu
by Shawn F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2018 12:26:48

Komban-wa, ronin. If you are a hardwired street samurai, if your eyes are always bathed in neon reflected from rain-slicked streets, if your skeleton is laced with titanium, or if you dream of electric sheep, this game is for you. Zaibatsu is a complete cyberpunk game based on the Cepheus Engine. The characters all work for a multinational conglomerate (nicknamed ‘zaibatsu’). As such, the character creation process is a bit different than usual for a Traveller setting -- characters have "concepts," not careers (street samurai, organ legger, maverick cop, ninja, etc.). Each concept comes with one skill and one piece of equipment. You get a few extra skills for a high Edu stat. The employer pays for retrogenics, cyberware or genetic alterations, which are detailed in the book. Finally, you start with a handgun and a radio headset and 4,000 yen. The standard PC here is a young, fresh out of training hired-gun or technician, solving problems for their employer.

The book includes a stripped down version of Cepheus Engine, meaning personal and vehicular combat is included, but ships and ship design are not. The focus is on street combat, with androids, robots, and vehicular combat getting a good treatment. These rank as Tiny, Small or Large and as Softskin, Light Armor or Heavy Armor. Three figures are given for a variety of vehicles; Armor Points, Disable Value, and Destruction Value. Armor points are subtracted from the damage of an attack. The damage is then inflicted on the vehicle (and added to previous damage suffered by it). When this total reaches the Disable or Destruction Value then the referee describes the consequences. There's stats for heavy weapons in the book, and the combat's go fast and lethal. It's very free-form, but also easy to use and fun. If things go bad, the PCs can be

The setting is in the Japan of 2100, a timeline much the same as the one outlined in Zozer's other game, Hostile. However, whereas Hostile deals mostly with the frontier worlds, Zaibatsu is about life in flashy, high-tech world of Japan. There are lots of details on the technology of the classic cyberpunk era, on money, and places to eat and shop. The author has created a setting that feels fast and claustrophobic, and though it focuses on Japan, the description works just as well for Los Angelos, say. Sa the book says, "take the broad brushstrokes that Gibson used to create that dystopian Japanese setting and create a living, vibrant world, detailed, immersive, exciting, dangerous, fashionable and also seedy" This a world without cellphones, using old school tech as it was envisioned in the 1970s and 1980s -- vidphones, no wireless computing, and instead of an internet, you have a datanetwork and cyberspace. And yes, the game includes rules for cyberdecks and playing in cyberspace, hacking, and so forth. The book includes descriptions of all the major zaibatsu and the yakuza.

If you are looking for something that is fast, easy to use, and captures the essence of the 80's cyberpunk books and films, this is it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Zaibatsu
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

The Ladder
by Matthew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/16/2018 11:19:02

Admission of bias from the jump: I provided suggestions on the superheroes section back in 2003 and am credited in the book.

I have been a long-time fan of this game. Super simple, requires no prep, and is all resolved on a single d6. With this system I've written a Final Fantasy, Minecraft, Fallout, Harry Potter, and even a stand-alone space genre for my kids. I'd love to see a 'fan setting' page set up somewhere for people to populate with character 'sheets' and suggested skill lists per genre.

For free this is a great rules-lite system. My only issue is I prefer games with dice pools, but that's easily worked around.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Ladder
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Hostile
by Shawn F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/11/2018 23:53:28

If you want a gritty and edgy setting that feels dangerous and grungy from the first page, this book is the LV-426 you've been looking for.

This is a retro-80's setting, ala Aliens or Bladerunner -- no smartphones and no nanotechnology, heavy on the industrial grunge, corporate oppression, and conniving criminal syndicates. It really feels like the classic sci-fi of that era, and includes extensive world and organizationl information. You've got colonial marines, military contractors, miners, work-a-day joes fit for the moons of Jupiter, and yes, androids as PCs. (The series 110 are the heavy combat chassis, indeed.) The technology of the setting is fully fleshed out, including plenty of guns, armor, vehicles (from Aliens exoskeleton loaders and APCs to Bladerunner-style hovercars), and a ship design system for large and small craft that has a lot of setting appropriate flavor and details (Nostromo-style tugs, USCM dropships, one-man lifepods).

The game covers a description of the major players in the universe, and has plenty of maps to describe the world. You can drop your PCs right into it and just start playing. I liked the effort at creating company names and logos. It's very handy for waving your hand around as a GM and giving the impression of a deep background. However, Hostile is generic enough and familiar enough that honestly, you don't need to say much more than "you are a commerical shipping crew in hibernation when you are awakened because of a distress signal." And then watch your players fall apart. They know what's coming. And fortunately for the GM, there's a section of horror pacing and for creating exomorphs.

Note, that if you have Zaibatsu, the Japanese cyberpunk game by Zozer, then you'll see that Hostile plugs into that setting seamlessly. Whereas Zaibatsu is focused on cyberpunk Japan, Hostile is more industrial sci-fi, and seems more comfortable on the far away frontier. The two games share a common timeline. Rules-wise the two fit together nicely.

I have enjoyed re-connecting with Classic Traveller/Mongoose Traveller over the last few months through the Cepheus Engine. This product is a nice addition to those games, and provides a lot of bang for the buck.

The one con to the whole thing is no bookmarks for the pdf. For a 307 page book, that's a real pain. I did have some problems reading a few pages of the pdf in my chosen viewer, Sumatra, but it reads fine in Adobe.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hostile
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

The Universal World Profile
by Anthony F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/27/2018 13:07:21

Amazing wealth of information, and like all of the work tied to SOLO and their other publications, this is just a fantastic resource. Paul offers usable concise and inspiring insights into both how the UWP is often portrayed, and in expanding it to make worlds, and the situations and encounters, colorful, usable, and above all memorable. I cannot give this one enough praise.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Universal World Profile
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Pioneer Class Station
by Anthony F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/27/2018 13:02:29

I was so very delighted by this supplement, and it will be seeing a Lot of use in my Traveller campaign, and make a great handy reference and locale for my writing projects as well. Lovely flavor, detailed maps, concise and consistent information across the board. I will be looking into more of these guys work. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pioneer Class Station
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
It's wonderful to hear those remarks! Thank you.
Pioneer Class Station
by MR C D T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/19/2018 13:23:29

An excellent product. I love the overall flavour and background detail of the Hostile RPG and I envisage this station design will also get a bit of use in my Traveller campaign too. The adventure that comes with it is also very good; full of tension and putting the players into a dangerous situation from the outset before turning up the scare factor!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hostile
by Omer J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/16/2017 03:56:02

Admit it - you watched Alien(s), Outland, Blade Runner, and many other 1970's and early-1980's sci-fi films. You loved them. You've always wanted to run role-playing games in their settings. There was once a relatively obscure Aliens RPG published in 1991. Classic Traveller also comes quite close to Alien(s). However, none of them captures the spirit of these "retro-industrial" hard-line 1970's universe as brilliantly as HOSTILE does.

The entire thing oozes atmosphere. It is clear that the author knows the milieu like the back of his hand and has analyzed it, dissecting it to its most basic elements: a focus on work and working-class heroes; industrialization and an "industrial" look and feel; danger lurking in the many corners of space; anthropocentric milieu; retro-futurism; and a hearty dose of cynicism. It provides a list of several movies inspiring HOSTILE games, from Alien to Elysium.

Also, it lists Red Dwarf as inspiration! And also mentions it again as a source of adventure inspiration! BONUS POINTS!

HOSTILE comes in the form of five PDF files:

  • 1970's-style Classic Traveller-inspired rules. These are almost exclusively combat rules, which supplement the many rules included in HOSTILE. However, ship combat is still absent.
  • A PDF with 15 floor plans of various "space colony" locations, from Aliens-style colonial corridors to a warehouse.
  • An in-universe starship-trade "Magazine" showcasing the "Hercules"-class tug, which is, in a nutshell, the Nostromo (of Alien fame) with its serial numbers filed off.
  • A HOSTILE-specific character sheet, in the shape of an in-universe PERSONNEL Form.
  • The HOSTILE book itself.

After this introduction, there is a 9-page setting overview, out of which 3 pages are setting history, 3 are nation-state and corporate overview, and the rest is mostly art. I love this: short and to the point. History serves the setting. No need for long fluff here. Just the bare bones necessary to provide context to the rest of the book. Excellent game-design choice, in my humble opinion.

After that comes astrography. This is meaty - 54 pages, most of which describe worlds. As in Aliens and 2300AD, HOSTILE organizes space into "arms" of human expansion into the stars. This book focuses on the American Arm. It also divides space into "Zones" - i.e. Traveller-style Subsectors. The book includes six of these, in excellent blue-and-dark maps. Before the worlds, it overviews the standard Cepheus/Traveller world generation rules, with minor modifications. The book details 23 worlds, all "Core" worlds, and then mentions Frontier worlds in a passing, without details. This is a shame - Frontier colonies are a hotbed for adventure.

A major point of divergence from standard Cepheus/Traveller is that of tech levels. HOSTILE combines TL15 in computers, robotics, and ship drives with TL10 in everything else. It also totally lacks cybernetics - remember, this is Blade Runner, not Johnny Mnemonic. Other than a short table on p.38, the book does not mention tech levels. As in Aliens, colonies have similar technology to that of the Core.

After this come the actual setting details - those of the "Big Seven" mega-corporations, the obligatory spacefaring USMC, the United States Space Command (refreshingly a development of the Air Force rather than the navy), starlines, NGOs, mercenaries ("Primate Military Contractors" - PMCs - HOSTILE uses the real-world contemporary term), non-profits, and criminals. Ah, and Antarctica Traffic Control! It also has the equivalent of Bladerunner Replicants, that is renegade psychopathic clones which authorities are trying to hunt down.

As in most third-party Traveller and Cepheus settings, such as Clement Sector and These Stars Are Ours!, HOSTILE has a sizable character generation chapter. This follows standard Cepheus Engine rules, though with 15 new careers such as Corporate Exec (the replacement of a Noble), Marshal (frontier lawman), and Roughneck (space miner). There is also an option to play Alien(s)-style androids. They have several limitations, such as Asimov's rules they are programmed to follow and limited skills, but still - playing an android is cool!

Perfect Classic Traveller/Cepheus Engine "character sheet" if there ever was one! Just add equipment on the back and start chasing star outlaws!

Similar to Outer Veil, HOSTILE provides equipment, complete with in-world brand names. Expect Pulse Rifles and an AK-equivalent. The equipment chapter also discusses technology as a whole in this setting. This is straight 1970's-mid-1980's sci-fi. No cellular phone, no flat or touch screens, no nanotechnology. Video-Phones rule the day, as well as data cards and minidiscs. A great addition is in-universe "medicinal" names for the otherwise dry Traveller drug names; you will find ACE Inhibitor and Dexamphetamine here, not Slow Drug and Combat Drug. There are all sorts of equipment, as well as guns and vehicles. There are no gravitic vehicles in HOSTILE, so vehicles are restricted to pretty realistic ones, from cars to tilt-rotors. This chapter is very long, and has its fair share of "Gun Pr0n".

Oh, and the Referee/GM is called here... The "Manager"!

The next chapter details styles of play and the general milieu, with adventure hooks aplenty. The three recommended play styles are Work - that is, playing corporate troubleshooters solving all sorts of nasty frontier problems; Fight, where the PMCs and the said obligatory space USMC come in; and Explore, which is boldly going where no man has gone before and probably getting eaten by a xenobeast as well. HOSTILE then gives many tips about how to run and describe an Aliens-style setting. This includes visual and auditory ques, as well as the main themes of the game. There is also an excellent discussion of horror gaming, with tips to the budding horror Referee ("Manager"). Including Xenomorphs. And Hyperspace anomalies! HOSTILE mentions Red Dwarf in the latter, which, again, is wonderful. I love that series!

There are also stats for various dangerous xenomorphs, including, as you expect, a Reticulan Parasite, i.e. an Alien (in TSAO!, of course, a "Reticulan Parasite" has another meaning :-) ) and a creature inspired by the one from John Carpenter's The Thing. The next section discusses environmental hazards, including radiation and a realistic depiction of vacuum exposure. Everything is well-detailed and clear: from extreme temperatures to poisonous atmospheres. I think that this chapter will be perfectly useful in other settings as well, as it is, in my opinion, superior to the discussion of these subjects in Mongoose Traveller or the 2D6 Sci-Fi SRD. The only downside is that the chapter only lists the amount of rads a given radiation source causes, but does not list their effects on the human body; this sends the player to browse the Cepheus Engine.

There are belting rules, along with some new equipment, which is very well thought out. The mining rules themselves remind me of Outer Veil - these are OGL, of course, and this pleases me very much.

The next big chunk of HOSTILE is starship construction. This is a major point of divergence from the Cepheus Core. HOSTILE ships are big; as big as those of old Classic Traveller Book 5: High Guard. Up to a million tons! However, maneuver drives are plasma reaction drives. Hyperspace engines require no fuel, but M-Drives require fuel similar to that of a Cepheus Core J-Drive. Thus, you can use ship designs from other 2D6 OGL-compatible products in HOSTILE, including their deck plans, with minimal adjustments.

This is "not"-Alien(s) so while in Hyperspace transit, everyone must hibernate in Hypersleep or suffer horrid effects. Ships still have staterooms for in-system flight, though, and Hypersleep seems much safer than vanilla Traveller Low Berths. There are also shipboard medical facility rules (possibly) inspired by my Outer Veil, but sadly no hydroponics, which would be, in my opinion, highly appropriate to this setting. Finally, the chapter clarifies the Cepheus/2D6 SRD missile rules, which is a boon.

The book provides several ship designs, from tugs and refineries (ahem, Nostromo) to Naval patrol ships - similar to cruisers in MGT terms, I think. There are no deck plans, but there are beautiful renders of some of these ships.

Finally, there are adventure seeds - they are short, but there is a large number of them.

The book ends with some NPC stats - including a very well-known crew with its serial numbers (and names) filed off - and a filled character sheet example.

The bottom line is that this is a wonderful product. I think that, far more than a setting book, it is a genre toolbox. If you want a gritty, Alienesque near-Terra, near-future setting, this is the book for you. If you want to build your own near-Terra, near-future setting - this book would also be of immense value to you.

Highly recommended!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hostile
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Solo
by Jens G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/08/2017 14:52:46

Looks great, it has already been put to good use for background events in my regular campaign. I'm looking forward to start using it myself, for my own solo adventiring.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Solo
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

1970s 2D6 RETRO RULES
by alistair l. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/10/2017 20:51:46

If you're a fan of the original 2d6 game this was based on, this provides a good return to the simplicity of those days of the 1970s. Nice to see a variant that bolts on to a current rule set rather than yet another different stand alone rules set that unnecessarily re-invents the wheel. I'll be using it, and the advantage is that if there is anything I think I need to add back in, thats pretty simple. But the baseline provided I think will allow for good quick simple game flow. Mostly. My only reservation is the simultaneous combat rules. My experience is that all the rules in various rpgs for simultaneous combat that I've used in the past require a moment or two in the combat where everyone writes down what they're doing, or at least commits to an action in their head. And that slows things down for me and my typical playgroups. I don't see any explanation in the text for implementing the simultaneous nature of combat, and I think an example and a bit more explanation here would add clarity. And especially, an explanation on how it'll speed things up. I personally find a simple initiative system to work fine for defining an order of declaration then reaction, and I think something similar could have been provided as an alternative option - even if only a suggestion to let people know that its ok to tweak things. Aside from that, I like it. And I think I'll like the twist that has melee going before fire combat. The explanation, and the things it allows that mimic your favourite TV/film combats, are nice. I can always change it if I don't like it. The elegance and straightforwardness of the rest of it certainly make it worth while in my opinion. The quibbles are why its 4/5 not 5/5.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
1970s 2D6 RETRO RULES
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 47 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG