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Servants of Shadow: Five Necromancy-themed Races (PFRPG)
by Dannie R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/13/2014 16:28:19
I really find this product unique and usable for both DM/GM's and PC's. Starting immediately, I would like to see my players using much of the info and see at least one class played at my table. I am very impressed by the writing. It is well thought out. The art work is amazing and the layout is well done!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Servants of Shadow: Five Necromancy-themed Races (PFRPG)
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Grave Undertakings: The Tomb of Caragthax [Revised]
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/13/2014 08:40:57
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This revised edition of TPK Games first module clocks in at 43 pages of content, one page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 40 pages of content - quite a bunch, so let's take a look, shall we?



So this is it - the revised version of the one pdf TPK Games had put out I didn't like - now mind you, the first iteration of this module had an awesome boss battle in a dread cairn - multiple phases etc. - cool, yes. But that was about it. Fast forward to NOW.



Want to know what's changed? Well. Everything. No, seriously. Let's start with the maps - superb, line-drawn b/w-maps -all originals. While we don't get key-less versions to hand out to the players, the maps are sufficiently large to print out. Additionally, the pdf comes with quite an array of seamlessly fitting, glorious b/w-artworks, again, original - so from the get-go, vastly improved production values! It should also be noted, that like the creatures in other recent offerings by TPK Games, you'll see next to no boring standard adversaries - whether with unique options, class levels added to monsters or the like - just about every foe herein has some interesting peculiarities that should drive home the fact that the PCs aren't up against a harmless module...not that this one would punch any punches, even in the first encounter we have...



Wait. Sorry, forgot - from here on reign the SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

All right, still here? Well, I mentioned the cairn the PCs find - via one of several hooks, or a combination thereof, the PCs enter the cairn - and are in for a nasty surprise - crypt thing teleport to ghoul cells. Here's to hoping your fragile casters are up for the task. This sets the scene - as does the advanced, grisly legless ghast that makes for one of the most shocking adversaries I've seen in quite a while. Faint stomachs need not apply! (And yes, said adversary has no less than 3 simple templates applied!)



This was essentially when the original module ended - Caragthax showed up, deadly battle ensued, that's it. And yes, Caragthax is next on the to-kill list - but something happens - the floor collapses and the PCs plunge down through the collapsing floor into the second level of the module. At page 19 of 43.



Yeah, I wasn't kidding when I said the module has been revised! The unholy reliquary hidden by the cairn is now the PC's trap - and in order to escape, they not only have to brave the deadly adversaries within, they also have to contend with the weird effects of the dungeon. These deserve special mentioning: Sleeping is impeded, summoned creatures turn hostile and evil...and worst of all, magical healing is corrupted, potentially dishing out negative levels. Now since my players usually yawn at dungeons as written, this amount of lethality is EXACTLY what gets me DAMN STOKED! It also drives home how nasty the place is and makes it feel wondrous - in a rather delightfully twisted way... Just imagine you cleric realizing his/her healing here makes the flesh of his allies pallid...undead-like. Yeah. Priceless.



Better yet - Dossenuses, doom-laden riddles and prophecies of the reaver reborn set the stage to prepare your PCs for their A-game - which they better bring. There's e.g. a room, where the door slams shut - and vanishes from the inside, CEASING TO EXIST. Yes, potentially, PCs can be entombed for an eternity, undying (due to the sustaining quality of the dungeon)... Hope they've got their mining-equipment or similar tricks up their sleeves. Unforgiving? Yes, but a good dungeon ought to be about using both brains and brawns, the former being more important than the latter. Oh, and PCs drinking from a fountain could see the water turn into an elemental INSIDE THEM. Yeah. OUCH! Mummified gremlins? Yes. What about complex multi-round traps? Hag rangers? Broken Souls? An improved swarm of IRON ROT GRUBS? A smart little riddle that penalizes wrong decisions? Living Walls? The option to recreate a holy blade sworn to defeat Caragthax? An undead belching beheaded skull? Deadly haunts? This dungeon does EVERYTHING RIGHT - including a deadly showdown with the returned and turned unique demon Caragthax!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch - I didn't notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly 2-column b/w-standard and the artworks are thematically-fitting and awesome. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and both artworks and maps complete an overall A regarding production values, with unobtrusive hyperlinks being the cherry on top.



Well, Brian Berg, PJ Harn and Tom Phillips took one great encounter and made one of the best dungeons crawls I've read in quite a while out of it - breathing dread atmosphere, this module is not only glorious regarding the mood, but has something unique going for every room, every encounter. There's always something unique, something lethal and mechanically interesting around the next corner. Sure, social skill specialists may not have their field day here, but that does not detract from this gloriously difficult dungeon crawl - this now truly deserves being called HARD. This is one of the few modules I could run as is and not have to upgrade everything. So if your players are looking for a challenge (or if you want FGG-level difficulty) or if you want to show off how truly disturbing and dark a dungeon crawl can be, while having a true blast, this is the way to go.



Let me say that loud and clear - the revised edition of this Grave Undertaking deserves its name, is simply awesome and its content makes this an actual steal at the price-point. If you have at least some soft spot for balls to the wall horror, for deadly dungeons, then this is a must-buy purchase. The team of TPK Games deserves my highest accolades for this revised module, which, I hope, will be the standard for all their things to come - 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Grave Undertakings: The Tomb of Caragthax [Revised]
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The Bleeding Hollow Deluxe Adventure
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/08/2014 04:42:03
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This mega-adventure clocks in at 133 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 page ToC, 2 pages backer list, 2/3rds of a page SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 125 1/3 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We kick off this massive module with a foreword by Frank Mentzer and an intro of TPK Games' Brian Berg - novice-DMs: Read these! Why? Because if your players are used to level-appropriate challenges, CRs they always can defeat etc. - then this is a change of pace. This module is old-school and a sandbox, meaning the PCs will encounter foes they'd better pass by - and also meaning that there's no easy plot-train to jump on. As a sandbox, this module endeavors to be modular and player action driven, so make sure your players know what they're getting into. Now before I get into the module's plot, I want to address two more things: Difficulty and structure.



TPK Games isn't exactly know for cakewalk modules and this one is no different - if your players don't fight smart, take care of their resources and if they think they can charge into any encounter without thinking, they will die. Still, difficulty is below the at times downright brutal classics Frog God Games provides -this is no Rappan Athuk-level meatgrinder. In fact, it is actually easier than the "Reaping Stone" - if you make sure that your players are at least moderately capable regarding stealth.



This has a reason that becomes evident soon - first of all, in the level of detail offered regarding the two settlements herein, the town of Westden Falls and the ailing mining town Bertram's End. The towns come with copious details, often offering a b/w-picture per NPC - yes, shopkeepers, landlords etc. - quite a lot of illustrations there. More relevant for the type of DM who isn't used to improvising stats for townsfolk (or their dialogue) - both are provided. Especially the read-aloud texts for likely questions asked of the respective NPCs should help DMs that tend to experience problems with the thespian tasks of DMing. It should also be noted that the villages come with village statblocks and neat b/w-maps (though player-friendly maps of the two, sans numbers etc., would have been nice...). Furthermore, the adventure comes with quite a few quests - these can be considered mini-quests for the fulfillment of one of the adventure hooks, for completing optional goals etc. - personally, I tend to structure my adventures like this, so nothing new for me, but most AP-players coming fresh to a sandbox will probably enjoy having these explained in detail as well.



Now, while this *is* a sandbox in the true sense, the module still has a plot and a progression, which hence comes with milestones (levels) that make it easy for the DM to judge whether the PCs are ready for (read: Have a chance to survive) the challenges ahead. What's also rather nice (and something I've been doing as well) - the module offers tangible benefits for eating good food and drinking certain beverages, rewarding players for the arduous task of food tracking - why? Because this module, in part, is a wilderness scenario, including a table of weather by the day, temperatures etc. - the later in °F AND °C, btw. - awesome! For once I don't have to on-the-fly change °F to °C - great service for all customers there.



Now the PC's adventure starts off upon arriving in the town of Westden Falls (whose NPCs, as mentioned, are extremely detailed and offer quite some material for further adventures/sub-plots) via one of several VERY detailed hooks, which btw. all potentially can work together.



Since from here on out, I'll be going into the details and challenges of the plot, I'd like to ask potential players to skip to the conclusion NOW - from here on reign the SPOILERS!



Only DMs left? Good! Sooner or later, the PCs will have to leave the comfortable safety of Westden Falls behind - whether to find missing spice merchants, missing elves, re-open trade-routes by killing off a bunch of harpies or escort a seamstress to a scheduled wedding. Unfortunately for the PCs, weather turns sour...extremely sour. In fact, weather has been foul for some time, but a winter-style cold snap in the middle of summer is impending and the PCs will have to track not only supplies and stand up to terrible storms, they will also have to cross a terribly fragile bridge and finally, hopefully reach a ruined church at the half-way point between the two settlements. Said dilapidated church by now is not only a dangerous environment, it's also the base of the harpies that have been plaguing the area, offering chances for the PCs to vanquish these foes. Beyond that, the church also hides the lab of the missing spice merchants, which in truth were merchants of poison and death.



Beyond the church, the forests hide a massacre of elves - which introduce a further meta-plot element: The wood elves, who sold their lives 15 to 1 against gnolls and ogres and worse, were the caretakers of the magical seed of the Arsae Laidir, their powerful tree of life, which stands at the center of their enclaves. Upon overpopulation, wood elves go out with a seed in an exodus to start a new enclave....only this time, the exodus has been stopped dead in its tracks. The seed is missing and via speak with dead or similar means, the PCs may find out about it - and it spells bad news indeed. The seed is tabula rasa when it germinates and can be forced to gestate - by creating special circumstances of blood and death, the seed could be tainted with terrible consequences.



If the Werewolf-ogre barbarian crashing through trees wasn't enough implication - Bertram's End has fallen. The village is now a truly grim reminder of the dread consequences of failure on the side of adventurers, with the mining town being wholly overrun by gnolls of the Bloodfang tribe. It should be noted that both their wolves and the gnolls themselves are variants - the gnolls more often than not lupine creatures with their unique tricks. (And if you want more variants, Krenshar-style or even two-headed gnolls are part of the appendix of the module, where some great variants are provided.)



Beyond that, the mining town by now is the place of dreadful atrocities committed daily against the remaining populace - and it is here, stealth becomes relevant. While nothing keeps PCs from starting guerrilla warfare, a group of PCs trying to take the village by unsubtle force will suffer. Thankfully, the module includes patrolling routes etc. - and beyond saving the groups of villagers (or administering euthanasia - there are shades of grey-decisions here), the PCs can also find another subplot: The town's founder is known nowadays under an alias, having faked his death back in the day and the insane alchemist has indeed made his mine a dangerous place to traverse - whether to escape the town, escort NPCs outside or just to finally end the mad alchemist's experiments, there's a dangerous dungeon here. Things get even more complicated by a honey-tongued accomplice of the alchemist, ready to try to bribe the gnolls with the last, polymorphed survivor of the elves remaining... (It's a bit of a pity said elf gets no stats, but oh well...)



The clock's ticking, though -every day, a child is sacrificed to the seed in order to corrupt it and to truly vanquish the evil, the PCs not only have to get rid of the dread gnolls besieging the city, but also interrupt the ritual conducted by the vile druidic lycanthrope mastermind behind the woes that have befallen the area. The ritual itself and stopping it turns out to be a truly tough final battle in the titular bleeding hollow, with the ritual's properties offering some rather unique effects that make the combat against Jirak Thoole a memorable final encounter. It should also be noted that some (though by far not all) encounters come with scaling advice +/-1 level.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, but not always perfect - I noticed a couple of minor glitches, though not enough to truly hamper the overall experience. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly two-column, full-color standard and the pdf comes with nice original pieces of b/w-artwork. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and the hardcover is solidly crafted. The b/w-maps are glorious, but the absence of player-friendly maps makes for a minor detriment. Especially the mine's levels could have used hand-out style maps, since they are VERY small in the pdf/book. So map-wise, in spite of the quality, some minus-points here.



Brian Berg, PJ Harn, Rick Cox and Bernie McCormick's Bleeding Hollow is per se a great dark fantasy sandbox and a surprisingly beginner-DM friendly one - while not as easy to run as more linear modules, the detail each statblock provides (often explaining each ability), the copious sidebars and extensive, well-written read-aloud prose, make this sandbox surprisingly easy to run - which wasn't what I was expecting, to be honest. The Bleeding Hollow turns out to be a challenging, dark adventure, yes, but also one that is relatively easy to run. Now branding-wise, I have *somewhat* of a problem with this being labeled "wilderness" or "survival" - after the journey, the survival aspect becomes more of a background theme, but I won't complain about that - while generally, I would have preferred a second journey section to the finale, I won't hold that against the book. In fact, this sandbox makes for a great introduction of moderately experienced DMs to old-school style gaming and its peculiarities and is defiantly dark in tone - all in all, a fun sandbox with a believable villain and iconic areas. If I had to voice gripes, it would be that "The Reaping Stone" spoiled me regarding epic boss fights (a multi-phase final fight would have been nice) and, more importantly that the maps are problematic - whether in the dead-tree version or in the pdf, printing them out in their at times VERY small depictions, cutting them out etc. just doesn't make for a comfortable use, requiring you to essentially redraft them, if you want to hand them out. Having these as hand-outs would have made the module so much easier to use...



Still, the overall module is great, deadly, fun, atmospheric and easy to run - hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform and this nice introduction to old-school sandbox gaming. Just make sure to take some time to get the maps done...

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Bleeding Hollow Deluxe Adventure
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Feats Reforged: Vol. II, The Advanced Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/06/2014 02:54:42
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second of TPK Games' books on redesigns of feats that scale with the level is 39 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page editorial, leaving us with 36 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



This time, we get the feats reforged-treatment for all feats in the APG. So how do they scale? Most feats get their first upgrade at 7th level, the second at 14th, but that can in no way be claimed for all of them - one upgrade at 17th level (for feats that require 10th level), 13th and 20th level-upgrades...see the reasoning? Essentially, the feats upgrade in increments of 7 levels after the earliest level you could take the feat, which seems like a prudent guideline. Additional Traits, for example, nets you +1 trait at the respective increments, though you have to choose it from a category you don't already have a trait in.



Usually, the feats have relatively straight progressions, like additional +1s, less penalty with Bloody Assault etc., but not all adhere to this formula - take the bodyguard feat - its first enhancement reduces the AC you have to hit to 8 (making it kind-of automatic sooner for non full BAB-classes like the monk) and the second upgrade increases AC granted to +3.



Special mention deserve usually rather useless feats à la cosmopolitan - their upgrade nets them a bonus to linguistics and later +1 language and even a 1/day reroll and makes them a much more valid, if not 100% optimal choice. Crossbow Mastery nets you an initiative bonus and an attack in the surprise round at -5 with crossbows, which also makes imho for some rather cool ideas regarding upgrades of a feat that in its base benefit is rather static. But, you know, I wouldn't be me if I found nothing to complain about now, wouldn't I? The good news here is - the following complaint is with the base feat, NOT exclusively with the reforged one - Deepsight has a prereq of Darkvision 60 ft. and extends it to 120 ft. - which is per se cool. However, there are beings with darkvision 90 ft. that, as written, can't take the feat. And yes, that's a blunder n Paizo's part, not on the side of TPK Games, who stayed true to the base feat, but I still would have loved to see the Plus added that fixed the prereqs. That being said, ultranitpicks like this one of course will not influence the final verdict.



Disruptive Spell is also interesting, using a particular rule that is near and dear to my heart - degrees of failure. The disruptive effect lasts longer if the target botches the save by 5 or more. Which is definitely a plus. A downside, on the other hand, would be that broken feats that have inherited their non-scaling issues, missing the chance to be fixed.. Take Dreadful Carnage. Whenever you reduce an enemy below 0 HP, you get an AoE-demoralize as a free action. Fails the bag of kitten tests - carry around bag of kittens = unlimited demoralize AoEs. All right, at level 11 perhaps not the best strategy, but still, probably not how the feat was intended in either incarnation.



The Extra-feats take an interesting approach - instead of tying the benefit-upgrades to fixed levels, they net you a second discovery, hex etc. 10 levels after taking the feat. Where I can potentially see issues with certain builds would be the fast drinker-feat - at 7th level, it reduces the action required to imbibe alcohol down to a free action, thus opening the swift action slot. While MOST builds won't benefit too strongly from this, some classes out there put quite a value on the swift action, so not 100% comfortable here. What's damn awesome would be Groundling - taking a relatively lame base premise, its upgrades allow you to talk to earth elementals and all creatures with the earth-subtype. Quite cool! Also nice - the additional effects of improved stonecunning that allow for the bonus to be added to perception-checks to determine surprise and even initiative while underground or surrounded by stone, making the feat in this iteration not suck. Kudos!



Now while most of the upgrades make sense, there also once in a while is an effect that just is broken - personally, I won't ever allow the light step upgrade at 7th level near my table - it extends the ignoring of difficult terrain to unnatural environments, which becomes problematic once one recalls the amount of effects, spells and items that can create unnatural difficult terrain. Not a big fan. What do like is that some of the teamwork feats herein, at their highest level, allow you to treat all adjacent allies as if they have this feat. Makes sense and works...and is probably closer to what Teamwork-feats set out to do than the regular iterations.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting...this time around are actually very good -almost excellent. The only minor glitches I stumbled over, were some missed italicizations, nothing grievous. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and also hyperlinked.



Brian Berg has taken the APG and turned the feats into scaling ones - and they work. Where issues present themselves, they are few and far between and often are based on Paizo botching that particular source-feat. Overall, I'm positively surprised to note that this installment of Feats Reforged works imho even better than the first, salvaging some feat-choices that in the original iteration were rather...let's say bad. That being said, one gripe with the series so far hasn't been remedied and that would be that feat-rich creatures and characters simply benefit more from these reforged feats, thus slightly altering the balance. While the resulting power-creep is marginal at best, some concise advice for DMs to handle it would have been much appreciated. Still, if you don't mind the rather conservative benefits added to the feats, this is a great buy. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Feats Reforged: Vol. II, The Advanced Feats
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The Cleric Reforged (PFRPG)
by nick e. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/21/2014 22:18:43
Cleric is the first reforged pdf I have read, and I have to say, it is awesome. What makes a cleric unique? Channel. Yet, very few good options exist for this basically bland heal-bot action. Cleric Reforged takes channel and turned the amp up to 11. Varies abilities, scaling more than just the dice rolled, and feats galore to make channel, what can be the core of the class, worth being the core of the class. I am 100% implementing all the channel rules within for my home game. If that isn't enough for you, numerous other abilities like domains and such get a tweak or two, with side bars that I think are very helpful, especially for those of us that haven't been playing since the 80's. Amazing product here.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Cleric Reforged (PFRPG)
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The Cleric Reforged (PFRPG)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/21/2014 17:18:17
I finally got my hands on this! Gotta say TPK does it again! They took in my opinion the best class and made it better. I'd say it's worth it's weight in gold but it doesn't weigh that much.. So for 4 bucks this is a steal. Take the right feats and you turn channel energy into a knock back that lights everyone on fire. The Cleric Reforged does all of this and more and it does it in a balanced (and why didn't I think of that) way.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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The Cleric Reforged (PFRPG)
by Darius S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 19:36:54
I've played every class in Dungeons & Dragons since 1st Edition, nearly all of those in Pathfinder. The cleric is one of the most underrated classes in most parties. Either seen as a heal bot or the party's undead smiter. Rarely is the class of cleric chosen by a player because they truly want to role-play a representative of divine power. Rarely chosen because they bring more to the table outside of heals and smites.

Enter TPK games Cleric Reforged! Want new ways to spice up your class? Reasons to play a cleric? Take a close look, this supplement can put the fun back into playing one. I'm excited to give it a shot in the next Pathfinder game I play!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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Rawr! - Volume 2: Flame & Wrath
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/31/2014 04:35:09
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of TPK Games monster-series is 65 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 61 pages of content - quite a bunch, so let's take a look, shall we?



We kick off this book with an introduction by Tom Phillips before diving head first into the chapter by Richard Hunt -all about monster psychology, this chapter should especially prove helpful for less experienced DMs, providing sound advice on considering a monster's disposition when crafting encounters - is it happy? Cowardly? Angry? Perhaps it suffers from one form or another of madness - from MPD to schizophrenia and a wide list of phobias, we get quite some nice advice, though for ideas on phobias I'd also wish to point DMs out there to Call of Cthulhu or Trail of Cthulhu for inspiration in spades. All in all, a useful, nice chapter for beginner-DMs with neat advice, though not a chapter that will wow jaded DM-veterans...



What instead should prove to be useful for just about every DM would be chapter 2 - essentially, herein we get optional rules for dragons: First of which would be dragon barding -and yes, I always considered it stupid that this idea wasn't more common in most worlds - dragons may be arrogant, but they're not stupid, so additional armor makes sense...especially at larger sizes, when dex gets less and less useful/reduced. These bardings come with tables denoting their cost, min amount of humanoids minions needed to put on and yes, also the time frame that is required to don the armor - all by size. Now barding does influence flight - heavy barding makes it impossible, whereas medium barding drops maneuverability by 1 point and halves flight speed. This might come as a surprise, but the solution for medium barding here actually contradicts obscure rules on flight in PFRPG - creatures may not fly with medium or heavy load - and by conjecture, with medium armors; For ME, this is an issue.



That being said, they're DRAGONS - if any creature deserves an exception to the rule, it's them, so I'll stop nitpicking...this particular rule-set. Also rather neat would be an alternate rule that allows dragons to embed treasure in their scales for increased armor bonus as well as a handy table that includes options for dragons dropping huge options on small puny earthbound adversaries - neat! What about the aberrant pigmentation dragon template, which allows you to color-swap dragon scales for nasty surprises? Yeah, rather awesome, especially considering the fact that I always loathed the fact that they're color-coded for dragon slayer's convenience... Nasty!



Chapter 3 sees Brian Berg collaborating with Mike Welham for first an array of new draconic feats - fancy some hooked talons on the wings that net the improved grab special quality? What about a roar that is not only terrifying, but also deals (lethal or nonlethal)sonic damage? Ball-shaped breath weapons? Using the breath weapon to further shield the majestic reptile? VERY nasty would be draconic savagery - even when missing with claw or bite, the target still takes str-mod damage - and we all know that's usually not a dragon's dump-stat - great to represent them slowly chewing apart even the best buffed/armored of dragon slayers... Cold-based breath weapon users may freeze the wings of foes and with a feat, a dragon may count all 1s of a breath weapon as 2s. Vastly improved tail attacks and hitting foes with it while retreating also become options thanks to the feats herein - now where I'm not sold would be Killing Roar: While I can get behind a dragon's scream killing a target, the insta-death feels a bit anachronistic: I would have preferred vast amount of damage in line with most death-effect-spells. Then again...these are dragons. If anything can scream and make foes drop dead from that, it would be dragons... We also get 7 new traits for dragons - universally solid and especially the trait that lets them use embedded weapons as armor spikes is nice. It should be noted, though, that if you're looking for meta-breath feats à la Draconomicon, you won't find any here - the breath weapon feats herein primarily modify the limited breaths of half-breeds and those with bloodlines, offering e.g. additional uses per day (which full-blown dragons don't require). So a bit of a missed chance here.



Now before we delve into further crunchy bits, we get one full-page piece of artwork that is simple gorgeous - Dusan Kostic would be reposible for the majestic spread unless I'm mistaken - just wanted to give kudos where kudos are due.



Now chapter 4 introduces us to draconic bloodlines. No. Not the ones sorcerors get. Rather, the concept is handled via feats for dragons; Major Bloodline feats may only be taken at first level/HD and net you elemental resistance 2 for the dragon's respective element as well as +2 to diplomacy and intimidate against your draconic bloodline's dragons. Additionally, you get +1 to one skill and said skill as a class skill - again, the skill is determined by the color of your ancestor's scales. Unless I've miscounted, a total of 86 feats are thus unlocked - these increase e.g. bite damage with +2d6 acid, grant spell-like abilities to e.g. speak with animals, insect plague, create food or water, fog cloud or locate objects to find gems.



Now as a peculiarity, several of these actually have synergy effect that improve them when combined with the right major draconic bloodline - aforementioned fog can e.g. be made into a cold-based variant of acid fog that coats floors with grease-like effects. While many of these feats have cool unique effects like this, not all do, though. Spouting draconic wings should be particularly interesting for half-breeds and sand-based gusts of wind that have a chance to blind foes could become full-fledged sandstorms. Walking on clouds, auras of slowness -all cool. Less nice: While you can get a draconic tail for attack purposes, and while it attacks at -5, making the mechanical intent clear, it does not explicitly declare the tail as a secondary natural weapon - a slight hick-up in wording here.

Of course, breath weapons may also be further improved/gained and elemental auras are also part of the deal - though I wished these scaled with age category, if applicable. All in all, I really like all these options, since they make dragons more versatile, more diverse, and add some oomph to them. Now whether you like this or not, the respective feats and their prerequisites are based on both bloodlines and HD, making it easy for you to add these feats to monsters for all types of half-breeds - at the same time, though, the reduction of these down to feats mean that they don't scale well with dragons, for whom feats are a rather scarce good - templates would have helped there. Also: The respective auras, as awesome as they are, could require some age category-scaling - otherwise a wyrmling's aura is the same as a great wyrm's - and that feels wrong to me. It's ultimately a nitpicky gripe, but one that I feel prospective DMs should be aware of. To me, this decision/oversight is particularly paradox since TPK Games is currently releasing pdfs on scaling feats with their "Feats Reforged"-series.



If you instead want to go for a less pronounced draconic lineage, there also are minor draconic bloodline traits that net resistance 1 to the appropriate bloodlines's element and +1 to diplomacy and intimidate when interacting with the dragons in question. These traits can also qualify you for at least an array of aforementioned feats. Unfortunately, the pdf fails to specify to which category of traits these are supposed to belong, though I assume racial - it's the only one that makes sense. Now if you'd rather go template, next we're introduced to templates - minor and major templates, for each draconic bloodline at CR +1/+2 respectively. As a nice bonus, each bloodline comes with one sample creature to which one of the two templates (and partially additional ones!) have been applied.



The pdf concludes with 5 new creatures: First would be the wingless, almost serpentine Antboga at CR 17 not only has an aura of destructive gravitational field and a force-damage dealing breath weapon, it also has a gaze attack that may increase your load (which might send fliers tumbling from the sky...). Second would be the Lyukana at CR 12 - with fever-inducing gaze and caustic sweat another cool adversary. The CR 12 Mound Worm can regenerate when managing to frighten foes with its terror-inducing bite and it also is rather poisonous. The CR 10 Ursaor, a bear-like being with a red/green-scaled head may be a cool apex predator and yes, it makes for a cool imagery, but it could have used some signature attack beyond its lethal bite. Still, nice critter. Finally, the CR 2 Winged Viper can be taken as a familiar via improved familiar.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good - while I noticed some minor glitches, non too grievous or significant obstructed my understanding of the content herein. Layout adheres to a 1-column b/w-standard - apart for the purpose of statblocks NOT my preferred standard - to me, 1-column files always look a bit cluttered. Also layout-wise a complaint - there are instances where the name of one feat is on one page, the feat's text on the next. Not a fan of those, but again, this is me nitpicking. The pdf comes fully and extensively bookmarked and hyperlinked with the good kind of unobtrusive hyperlinks - those I tried always sent me off to the right location on d20pfsrd, so kudos for the work!

The artwork ranges from phenomenal original to ok stock - no complaints here either - apart from one: I'm usually not a stickler for art, but new monsters usually benefit greatly from good artwork - I wish we had gotten art for the new creatures.



Brian Berg, Richard Hunt, James Olchak, Tom Phillips and Mike Welham have created a neat supplement...though one that suffers from a bit of an identity crisis. I'm honestly not sure whether this is supposed to be for DMs, players or both - and hence how to rate it. Why? Because I'm a firm supporter of the "F*** Balance, it's a DRAGON! It CAN do that!"-school of DMs: My dragons have minions, custom abilities and fight with ever single dirty trick in my considerable book of nasty DM-tricks. My players have learned that taking on a dragon amounts to suicide more often than not sans army...and possibly even with one. Now for that, this toolbox, let me phrase that precisely and explicitly, is AWESOME.



Unfortunately, as a reviewer I have to take other campaigns into account - and to an extent the same holds true there. If you for example play in such a high-powered game that your DM allowed you to play a dragon, then this makes for a superb toolbox to increase your arsenal, though admittedly additional daily-use feats for breath weapons won't inspire any dragon...they already have thos infinite times per day. Now where I'm seeing problems is with less high-powered campaigns featuring dragons - e.g. via RGG's Dragon Rider-class. In such a context, the content herein may prove to be unbalancing and should be carefully scrutinized by the DM before allowing it in the game - perhaps on a case by case basis.

How to rate this, then?

...

As a mean DM's toolbox - superb; For high-powered games: Nice. For more conservative games...potentially problematic. Is this pdf perfect? No, but it honors the TPK in TPK Games - and in the end, I'll rate it as a monster-book/DM-Kit - one that could require age-category scaling for auras and has some rough edges, but still is a VERY nasty kit. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 by a margin.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Rawr! - Volume 2: Flame & Wrath
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Servants of Shadow: Five Necromancy-themed Races (PFRPG)
by Jason L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/18/2014 15:04:32
Personally, I don't much like undead races. I wouldn't play one. I tell you this because despite that, I still really liked this book.

First, we have the Mortiss, undead creatures escaped from the afterlife to get a second chance among mortals. Basically a sentient zombie, with all the ripe smells that accompny such a character you'll be sure to be a real treat during mealtimes. There's a genuinely awesome magus archetype for the race and a mortiss paragon prestige class. Next up is the Forsworn, so called because they've given up their mortal soul in return for immortality. It's an acquired template instead of an actual race and I can certainly see a necromancer in your game seeking the rites to be able to do this to themselves. They have a witch archetype (a watered down 3.5 warlock), a paragon prestige class, and some really neat racial feats that allow you to graft bones onto undead as armor among other things. Third in the book and definitely the most gross is the Maghra. Once upon a time they were just jerks. Then they ate a bunch of ghouls and became undead jerks that eat people. If you've ever want to get a bonus for eating your fallen enemies, I have a solution for you. Also the phone number for a mental health professional. They have a racial paragon PrC and a bunch of feats to augment the bonuses you get for eating someone. Not content to just eat the flesh, you can also use feats to get a bonus for eating the skin or the bones. Because at that point, why not? Moving on, the Deathless are quite interesting. Another applied template, sometimes a god of death or necromancy needs some boots on the ground to take some petty vengeance or hunt down escaped souls. A sidebar suggests the template as a way to bring a fallen PC back to the party. If you want to do this, be aware that this template has a +2 level adjustment so you might need to break it down into two levels of abilities that they can get as though multiclassing or dropping two levels of their previous class. Deathless also have a racial paragon PrC and some racial feats. Finally, the nephandim are gnome-like little stewards of the underworld with control over hellfire and significant bonuses to necromantic spellcasting. They have a cleric archetype and, like the rest, a racial paragon PrC.

The book is liberally spotted with new necromancy spells, there's a new template for bonescriven undead, and a profile for Nergal, TPK's god of the dead.

A number of these races have really fascinating moral dilemmas built in for players to explore and TPK helpfully points them out. What does a person do when they're undead but yearn for life? Consumed with unnatural urges that must be controlled to fit into society among the living? These races lack the glitz and glamour of vampires. With the exception of the forsworn, it would be difficult to pass yourself off as normal playing one of these races. While that can create some problems at the table, I think it's outweighed by how this might turn even the most mundane conversations in interesting directions.

As a GM, if you have players interested in these races be sure to have a conversation about expectations. Undead have a lot of immunities. While they're probably going to be harder to heal for a traditional cleric, they're also going to shrug off most spells that require fort saves and a number of conditions. It's not impossible to do. I have a player right now who's doing it just fine. It just really needs open lines of communication so that everything works out for everyone at the table.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Servants of Shadow: Five Necromancy-themed Races (PFRPG)
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The Ultimate Gladiator
by Jason L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/21/2014 13:54:06
When Brian Berg told me that he was making a Gladiator class inspired by Spartacus: Blood and Sand I made a sound indistinguishable from that of a 13-year old girl at a One Direction concert. Lets dig in.

Just slightly more that 36 pages of content here. The basics of the Gladiator only takes up two of those pages. Eighteen (EIGHTEEN!) pages follow with talents to customize your Gladiator. They are divided into three tiers that you unlock as you progress. Each tier is loaded with great stuff to tailor your Gladiator to what you want to do. Interestingly, many of them are markedly similar to the abilities of various archetypes. This was a really great idea as it allows you to borrow from your favorite fighter archetype to get the weapon style you want working for you. Other talents help with skills, performance in the arena, maneuvers, mobility etc. A final page for this part has favored class bonuses for nearly two dozen races.

Eight pages of archetypes follow featuring thirteen specialties. Some of these are remarkably cool like the blind Adabata.

There are four pages of feats including a whole passel of achievement feats that you can gain in the ring. I think these will be really great for feeling the progress you've made in your area bouts. I also really like the feats inspired by real gladiatorial styles like hoplomachus and retiarius. The book wraps up with a bit more that two pages of traits.

I'm really happy with the way this book came out. the talents for two weapon fighting made me yearn to watch some of the fight scenes from Blood and Sand. The various talents, archetypes, and feats that involve animals were an excellent inclusion allowing for some not very PETA-friendly arena fights that will evoke the lions from Gladiator (and also maybe that nightmare I have with the whale in it).

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Ultimate Gladiator
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The Ultimate Gladiator
by Erik F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/16/2014 07:15:55
By Jupiter's, aww you know the rest.

This is one of my favorite classes in the history of d20. Seriously, if you like 300 and want to Spartan kick fools into the depths of the abyss you can! If Spartacus Blood & Sand had you saying, "Why can't I be this kind of badass?!" No questions, the rules are there.

Top this all off you are charismatic (role play bonus) and intelligent to boot!

Don't believe me come watch my review. Oh, and there is beer!

http://refreshandreload.com/

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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The Reaping Stone Deluxe Adventure
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/15/2014 04:55:55
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive mega-adventure clocks in at 206 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of ToC, 1 page advertisement and 2/3 of a page SRD, which leaves one with a massive 201 1/3 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.



All right, still here? Set in the metropolis of Maerh Varza (which comes detailed in a short appendix and with a full statblock), the PCs begin this module in a tavern of all places - and are dumped right into the action, as deadly adversaries enter the tavern and drop a vial - one, as it turns out, of many simultaneous strikes throughout the city, the contents spread a deadly magical plague that resists curing - the Reaping Sickness. Where did this come from? Well, once upon a time a good king got rid of a deadly cult of fertility and disease worshipping the dread queen of rot Maramaga - his men slew the cult's members and all associates. Alas, they also slew the family and friends of one of the most powerful cultists (hey, evil cultists can have families as well, right?), who then turned towards an excessive plan for blood, death and vengeance.



Following the cultist's trail through wererat-infested sewers (whether to find a cure due to being infected or to prevent a plague zombie apocalypse...), the PCs will find the operation place, from where the simultaneous strikes were -launched: The burnt-out remnants of a haunted orphanage, burdened by dread tragedies of crimes past (including great terrain hazards and haunts) not only conceal some cultists, the PCs will also have a chance to lay the dread spirits of the place to rest and even save one particularly foolhardy child from certain demise/madness. From here on, the PCs will also encounter the first of the numerous skeletal champions spellcaster from a sisterhood of undead skeletal spellcasters aligned with Maramaga's cult. Conveniently, the cultists have a map including a safe house noted down - at least for me, that hits a pet-peeve - any villain with an Int of >8 does not get such papers in my campaigns...



While the other plague strikes could be explored by the PCs, the module more or less linearly leads them to aforementioned safe-house, a mortuary now under the control of the cult - via magic etc., the explicit details are rather well explained, which also brings me to a point I will further elaborate in the conclusion - this is very concisely written. The mortuary, including crematorium etc. once again drips details galore and from the hints gleaned here, the lead brings the PCs to essentially a desecrated paladin-come-saint's shrine, which doubles as a final resting place for the dread remains of the undead that spawned from the paladin's betrayers. Fighting through the undead-ridden catacombs, the PCs dive into the underdark, where they explore a gigantic cavern (including ruined, cursed dwarven ruins and a tower ablaze in hellfire) and fight or negotiate with a deadly dwarven dullahan to finally reach the ultimate stronghold of Maramaga's cult.



The final dungeon is complex and sports not only deadly cultists, undead and vampires, it also delivers two deadly artifacts and perhaps the hardest climax I've seen in just about every commercial module - for once, the final battle would not require me amping up the challenge - this is a finale your players will remember for years to come, as multiple phase encounters, with magical terrain and deadly adversaries conspire to push even well-crafted PCs to the limit - at least if a DM has enforced them not being able to easily retreat throughout the module.



Among the appendices, we get all new monsters, a short write-up of Maramaga etc. It should also be noted that the module contains information to scale the encounters down to work for less than 6 players - nice!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, but by far not perfect - room's headers tend to miss apostrophes when requiring them and I noticed multiple instances of line breaks in the middle of sentences and similar minor glitches. The bookmarks are okay, though nested bookmarks for the respective areas would have made navigation more comfortable. My print copy has an issue with the second half of the book, with white paper near the binding and the text closer to the borders - something seems to have gone wrong on the printer's end, at least with my copy. This won't influence my verdict, though, since I can't ascertain whether this is a unique problem or extends to all copies. The cartography by Richard A. Hunt per se is AWESOME, though the maps of smaller locations (at least in my copy) tend to be slightly pixelated in both print and pdf, with the grids partially being superimposed on the walls instead of being below them - the big maps are high-res and do not have this issue, though. Artwork is generally solid, original b/w-artwork. One final complaint regarding the maps - in almost all examples when the pdf mentions that a foe is on a specific locale on the map - don't bother looking for the "x" or similar letter - they have been mostly forgotten - a rather unpleasant detriment.



Soooo, this module is very linear and does not kick off particularly enticing - a tavern, followed up by a sewer-level does not blow Endzeitgeist away.... Nor does the very linear storyline and structure allow for much deviations or excitement, essentially putting crawl back to back with crawl - this is a slugfest if there was one - however, that derogatory moniker does NOT fit "The Reaping Stone".



Why? Tom Phillips. The author *GETS* horror and dark fantasy and what makes it tick - each trap, each of the numerous haunts and treasures, from hidden caches to buried corpses - all has a meaning, a story to be unearthed, rewarding exploration and curious players with multiple tidbits that make experiencing the challenges herein actually very fulfilling - the logical, often very tragic storylines herein border on grimdark and paint a vision of bleak desperation against truly abominable foes. Speaking of which - another bonus herein is that this module is HARD. TPK Games is not known for easy modules, and inexperienced players will have their severed, undead, plague-ridden buttocks handed to them - apart from the handicap of the plague (which your PCs WILL contract in one of the numerous chances throughout the module), we get smart foes that, while adhering to certain themes (which enforce an identity via e.g. the skeletal champion sisterhood), offer enough diversity to keep things interesting. The respective dungeons/locales are creepy, spooky and will challenge and creep out your players - when moaning sundered ones, silver-tongued sociopaths and headless dwarven lords attack, your players will be challenged indeed.

My favorites among the adversaries would be the multi-phase battles - for once, we get multi-phase fights, e.g. preceded by haunts or traps; Particularly the boss battles, with unique terrain, multiple phases and often downright BRUTAL challenges are simply glorious to behold and made me chuckle my most sadistic DM-grin - also thanks to most NPCs actually feeling very organic and coming with at least short background stories. This also extends to the monsters - thanks to various mutations, variations and the like of established creatures, the fights have a lot cool, small tidbits to offer -and no, they don't stop at old, obese dire rats or 3-tentacled otyugh-mutants... So combat-wise, this is GLORIOUS. The vast plethora of small stories, the atmosphere of the respective locales is excellent as well.



But the module also has its weaknesses: The one puzzle of the book is rather simple - but hey, one easy puzzle is better than none. My other issue would be pacing and meta-storyline. So we have an outbreak of a zombie-plague in a metropolis - an incurable zombie-plague, nonetheless! AWESOME!! But the module does next to nothing with it - when compared to e.g. "Seven Days to the Grave" or Necromancer Games' 3.X plague-saga "Shades of Gray" (stop giggling - that was before a fanfic turned phenomena gave BDSM a bad name...) better moments, the sense of urgency is somewhat lost as PCs hurry from superbly crafted creepy vignette to vignette. There is next to no investigation, almost no chance to meaningfully use diplomacy (though more often than in several crawls I've read) and the threat to the city remains an opaque one - don't expect your players to experience mounting unrest, chaos, quarantine or the like in the city. No looters, no doom-speakers...and hence, the terror of the plague loses some of its gravitas.

Essentially, the PCs have a clear task and no timeline adds urgency to the plot. In fact, one of my issues is that, if you enjoy non-instantaneous level-up, this won't work: Your PCs are assumed to level as they go - which wouldn't be too bad, but in the combination with the lack of consequences for dawdling, that takes away from the threat of the adversaries and their vile plan- their plague-gambit essentially waits for the PCs to stop it. Maybe it's just me, but I was thinking that a sense of constant urgency, with consequences for each retreat, each resting, could have made this module a truly nailbiting, legendary experience.



So how to rate this? Oh boy, this is HARD - one the one hand I absolutely LOVE each and every locale herein - they're creepy, dark, logical and made me grin all the time - and then they're over, suddenly, the meta-plot's flimsy premise ripped me right out of it and towards the next location - where the whole game repeats itself. The pieces of fabric are among the most beautiful you'll see, but the yarn that holds them together is frayed at best. Add to that the issues with the cartography and the slightly less expansive bookmarks than what the module would have warranted and you have a module that is more of a mixed bag than I would have liked. "The Reaping Stone" has some truly awesome, grim moments and iconic locales, but the meta-plot requires serious work on the side of the DM to keep from showing its weakness and thus ending the sense of urgency the players hopefully feel. In the end, my final verdict hence has to clock in at 3.5 stars, though I'll round up to 4 for the purpose of this platform - just be aware of the rough edges in the production value department and the fact that the meta-plot needs serious work by the DM to produce the sense of gravitas it deserves and make the transitions from location to location more compelling.


Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Reaping Stone Deluxe Adventure
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Grave Undertakings: The Tomb of Caragthax [Revised]
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/01/2014 12:34:59
I never saw the original version of The Tomb of Caragthax, but apparently it was one of Total Party Kill Games's very first adventures and by all accounts deadly enough to be worthy of the company name! Now its back, revised to accommodate both advances in the Pathfinder RPG and the improved capabilities of its publisher... starting with the magnificent cover art that almost reaches of the page to grab at you, and almost doubled in size.

The backstory presents a picture that would surely scare even the bravest adventurer, and deterr them from entering the cairn the discovery of whose entrance is the starting point of the adventure, did they but know it. Keep this to yourself! Three 'hooks' are provided to sucker them in. Whichever one you use, they will soon find themselves at a small circle of stones, in the centre of which is a sinkhole, through which they can see some steps leading down into darkness...

And the fun begins! Each location, event or encounter is well-resourced with 'read aloud' text, appropriate stat blocks and tactical notes to accommodate just about any character reaction. That said, the nature of the adventure's opening event means that you will need to be on your toes and well-prepared to deal with what is to follow. Without giving too much away, the party gets split up and you will have to manage individual characters as they strive to regroup with their fellow adventurers.

There is a nice touch in that when they have managed to do so and cleaned out the crypt they suddenly discover that it is by no means over and there is an even more fateful foe to fight (and a whole other complex to explore). It is suggested that adventurers should be at 5th level when you begin this adventure, and that they be allowed to level up to 6th for the second part... suffice to say they'll need it.

If you relish truly deadly dungeons and are not afraid of inflicting a Total Party Kill (it's quite possible here), this is an excellent example. You might prefer to run it as a one-off with characters created for the occasion, though.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Grave Undertakings: The Tomb of Caragthax [Revised]
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Rawr! - Volume 2: Flame & Wrath
by Jason L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/28/2014 11:27:10
This is an excellent supplement for GMs and players alike. Nearly 60 pages of content with some great art (the phenomenal cover included) there a lot here for everyone.

The first seven pages feature some really great advice for adding more personality to your monsters to make encounters more interesting. I think there's some good stuff here. As GMs, we often forget that every intelligent creature, not just the big bad guys, that the players face has lived their life and had experiences and has a personality. It's all too easy to just make them just boring slogs. Giving monsters occasional phobias or other forms of madness, angry or even happy (to have their dinner delivered) adds spice to your encounters.

Next we have some dragon specific goodies like rules for draconic barding, embedding treasure in their scales, and a few pages of feats. I really liked the rules for embedding treasure in scales, especially the mechanic that calls for it to drop off bit by bit while the dragon flies leaving a trail. What a great hook. If any of my players are reading this, follow the trail of gold and gems. Nothing bad will happen to you. I promise.

Lastly, come the bloodline feats. Until now, pretty much the only way to make your character born from draconic ancestry was to play a sorcerer. No longer. With Major Bloodline feats you can take at first level or traits that give you more limited access you can be part of a proud (or shameful) dragon lineage. Now you have access to a wealth of feats letting you grow wings or a tail, walk on clouds, get a breath weapon or spell-like abilities, or even more awesome stuff. There's a lot of potential for awesomeness here which always means potential for abuse so players and GMs should communicate about when is appropriate to introduce things like flight.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rawr! - Volume 2: Flame & Wrath
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Rawr! - Volume 2: Flame & Wrath
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/19/2014 20:05:24
Really who doesn't love dragons. This is a good book for us of the dragon loving "bloodline".

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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