RPGNow.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse
 Publisher Info









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Fat Goblin Travel Guide To Horrible Horrors & Macabre Monsters
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/15/2013 07:22:55
Complete with a beautiful fat goblin in hiking gear on the cover, this book contains nearly fifty of the most horrible and depraved monsters you've ever wished not to meet when out for a stroll.

Each monster comes with full-colour illustration, complete stat block and comprehensive notes to aid you in situating it appropriately and running it in combat... most are not the sort to consider a chat over a drink with passing adventurers. Even the sentient ones tend to the ferocious and hostile and as for the rest - well, the Bone Gorger is just after your bones, for example, and is none too particular whether you are alive or not when it gets to eat them.

There are some innovative constructs here, too, like Clockwork Children and the Arc Hound. There's a sad tale behind Clockwork Children. They were created originally to ease the grief of those who lost children to accident or disease - but some abandoned them once they had come to terms with their loss.

Clockwork Dead, on the other hand, are an horrific combination of corpse and construct, moving jerkily around and created by the collaboration of necromancers and artificers to serve various ends, none of them particularly pleasant.

Many of the monsters herein are well suited to 'jump-shock' horror, surprising unwary travellers and proving themselves to be just as unpleasant as they look at first glance. Yet watch out for that nice young lady in the tavern - she might be a Masked Ghoul, poised to resume her normal form and feast upon you rather than with you.

Conveniently, most are contained on a single page, so you can print out just the monsters you need.

An excellent collection, and you can never have too many monsters, after all!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fat Goblin Travel Guide To Horrible Horrors & Macabre Monsters
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Fat Goblin Travel Guide To Horrible Horrors & Macabre Monsters
by Joshua G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/15/2013 05:59:14
I am associated with Adventureaweek.com, were I operate as the main PDF monkey. My reviews are written with a desire to remain unbiased as many of the designers, writers, artists and publishers are considered friends to me. Having said that I am first and foremost a reviewer, and in respect to these people and their product I intend to evaluate this product honestly and fairly.

Fat Goblin Travel Guide to Horrible Horrors & Macabre Monsters.....wow that is a serious mouthful of a title. 52 pages, in full bleeding color populated with 47 entries from the minds of Jason Stoffa and Rick Hersey, all crafted to life with the art stylings of Mr. Hershey. Format follows the standard format for creature statblocks from Pathfinder, with the creatures kept to a single page per creature. Personally, I love the idea of single page creature entries, as if I want to print out a few critters for a session they tend to look far more cleaner when they are not sharing half of a page with something else.

The range of creatures here are quite varied, with some things in this collection that will easily make a playgroup work for their lives, with others leaving them scratching their heads wondering if perhaps you have lost your mind, lol....but we'll get to those soon enough. The majority of what you will see here is new art in this collection, with a few pieces that have appeared in other products Rick was involved in one way or another. There are a few pieces here from the Creaturedaily collection, and I am thrilled to see them come to light for all of those who might have missed these creatures the first time through. There are a few editing hiccups, the Table of Contents lists 48 creatures when there are in fact 47 (Stonework Guardian was separated into two words and listed on two different lines), and the bookmarks could possibly use a polishing (spacing, capitalizing and several two word names split into separate bookmarks). So, all of that out of the way, shall we take a look at some of these critters? It is the reason we are here, right?

The Artican will start us off, a variant giant with some seriously unique abilities that allow it to transform into a living snowstorm. How freaking cool is that. Their skins are branded with rune shaped coverings that give them not only great resistance to heat, but leave them conducting cold as well. Am loving this giant variant, a great design paired with an awesome piece of art that I can guarantee will be finding themselves at my table to menace my players. The Blighted Creature is a great template for giving a GM an instant variation to what their group might be used to facing. Created by exposure to those spaces we all know not to dwell for long, the blighted creature comes with a d10 random table for quick and easy creation of the new version of the base creature, with an art piece that is freaking great, although shows the creature with an apparent breath weapon, or perhaps ate really strong chili for lunch, lol...either way, a great and easy to apply template.

Clockwork Children, all that needs to be said here. Creepy, very very creepy. Druboar answer that question for us, If human stock gave us the minotaur, what would orc stock give us? Not going to lie, I'm digging it. Offering essentially another creature to take the place of the standard minotaur in an encounter that will present you with something perhaps your players haven't already fought a thousand times before, not to mention that its new tactics and ecology give more options for how to utilize it in the encounter. Oh, and for the record, Rick? Get to work on getting miniatures freaking licensed, seriously, this thing needs to be available as a miniature.

HagWasp Swarm just might be my favorite addition to the creatures presented here. A swarm of lethal wasps that can bring the pain with their Nightmare Fever poison, these freaking winged killers bring something far more dangerous to the game, Hag Servant. Able to be used as a familiar by a coven of hags, this freaking swarm takes on an entirely new level of dangerous, very quickly. Didn't I mention that these are on my top list? There is just so much win here for an evil GM to devastate for fun....ah, the screams and lamentations....sweet music to the ears......ah, sorry, didn't realize you are still here...ahem..so, moving on...

The Imperial Cannon reminds me a lot of the canon golem, albeit far more refined to its shape, and purpose. A very cool idea, both in design and visual presentation (OK, seriously, will someone out there with some sculpting skill (or knows someone working with one of these smaller mini companies) get a hold of Rick and do some talking about licensing some of these into minis, please!!). Mousling, remember I mentioned a few that might leave people scratching their heads. So, an anthropomorphic mouse, standing at around 4 to 4 1/2 feet in height, with the ability to take advantage of their capacity to share space with others of their race. OK, at face value it would be real easy to look over these creatures, but when you slow down and look at them, and what you can go with them, suddenly they are not so cute and funny looking, they take on an entirely different light and threat.

Going to end this with the Wing Worm. A tiny flying critter that tend to travel in groups of 100-1000, and eat anything in their path. Their bite comes along with an acid that plays havoc on the best defenses, along with a bore and infest ability. A tiny cloud of fyying worms with the capacity to devastate an entire community if not dealt with properly. Just another reminder to your players that they are not the end all be all, and there are still things in the universe waiting to eat them lol.

So, one page for an ad for another line carried by Fat Goblin Games and the OGL and we're out of pages. So, wrapping it up.....the minor issues with the editing are all fixable, which is always a good thing. The creatures lend themselves to feeling like things a GM will want to use, and the design is solid to support the concepts. The art is visually inspiring or making one want to use the creatures. Yeah, am having a real hard time coming up with anything to really complain or whine about here, lol....perhaps the fact that I want a miniature or two made? The fact here is that this is exactly what you want to see in a bestiary, and am impressed with what the Fat Goblin Games guys have produced, this is an excellent collection of creatures. A solid 5 star rating, and well worth the price of admission folks. And guys, get this into print, I want it on my shelf.

edit- all corrections required to handle the TOC and the bookmarks wre handled within minutes of the Fat Goblin crew having it brought to their attention. This is the mark of people who care, and are willing to fix things. Thanks Rick!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
[PFRPG] Behind the Monsters: Omnibus
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/09/2013 06:36:56
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive pdf is 76 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 72 pages of content, so let's take a look at this massive tome, shall we?



Now if you're not familiar with Tricky Owlbear's Behind the Monster-series from the 3.X days of old, here's the idea of the series: Know those bestiary entries? Remember from the days of old the information on habitat, society, history etc. and later, the ecology-articles? Well, behind the monsters essentially takes a look at monsters and provides extensive background information on them, supplemented by crunch for variants and interesting options. Beyond that, we also get information on lore-DCs for the respective critter as well as some tactical advice for dealing with the respective critter, provided in a way that the entry can be shown/read to players. If you're not familiar with the series as of yet, here's the news - this one is essentially a compilation of old material, fully updated for PFRPG - so let's take a look, shall we?



Owlbears, what other creature could be possible for Tricky Owlbear Publishing, would be the first in the compilation. We all know about the "A Wizard did it"-background of this notorious creature - here, we actually get a detailed background story that explains the reason WHY Owls and Bears have been chosen - providing a coherent and sensible reason for the creation of these beings in the first place. Kudos for that, but where the entry shines more is with cool peculiarities like owlbears being bad in reacting to being flanked - DMs are encouraged to penalize flanked owlbears with concise, easy to use rules - which is AWESOME and something done not nearly enough in regular monster-design. It's peculiarities like this that make creatures more distinct. The creator used control collars to keep the reins on these ferocious beasts and so we also get the entry for these items - which is cool, though these, like ALL items in this book, lack the information on how much they weigh - an annoying blemish, especially since the items usually are rather intriguing. Also rather cool - owlbear-tokens as a semi-magical low-level item of respect for primitive cultures is provided herein - a cool little item, though the aura should probably read "faint", not "feint". ;) We also get the full statblock for the transmutation-disrupting...Bearwols! (at CR 2, btw.!)



The second creature covered herein would be the Xorn - here, we get no origin-myth, but rather a tale of how these weird beings may have come to the material plane as a result of a conflict between drow and duergar, bribed to participate with mithril - which is a bit of a weak point of this particular myth: The legend assumes that there is no mithril on the Elemental Plane of Earth, which is something that some supplements and modules contradict. Still, a nice yarn. On the crunchy side, we get rules that allow player characters to find tell-tale signs of xorn hiding within the rocks. Following the cool trend from the owlbear-entry, we also get an optional weakness for DMs to include in their game, this time all about exploiting the xorn's senses and overloading them, making them more susceptible to specific attacks by forcing them to roll saves twice - and again, I love those ideas that reward the PC's legwork since it very much mirrors how I tend to reward smart players. Beyond that, we also get a nasty Xeran at CR 7, which would be a magma-based xorn with a truly nasty temper and a magma-line breath weapon as well as the Shadowstone Cloak made from the hide of an elder xorn, which not only comes with nice benefits, it also includes information on how costs are affected if the xorn hide is provided - neat!



While we're at the weirder creatures of our hobby - what about the Bulette? Well, in this legend, the creature was the result of the madness of a wanna-be-conqueror archmage aquatic elf seeking to raze the surface world to the ground - upon his defeat and subsequent imprisonment, the mad mage created these creatures...perhaps in a designed environment created by the elves of old to capitalize on his massive arcane prowess. If so, stranger beings still might lurk out there to exact vengeance in the name of their mad creator. Among the cool character advantages, a glitch seems to have swallowed at least a part of a sentence with the second paragraph beginning "spellcaster and a roving bullette." - that's it. Which is a pity, for the ideas for tactical combat (plat growth to enlarge hindering roots, for example) are quite cool. Unfortunately, one of teh tactical options makes no sense, though - feather fall is supposed to help against their tremorsense, negating the vibrations and allowing travelers to cross their territory - unfortunately, that would extend to all creatures with tremorsense, something clearly not intended by the spell's description or the relatively powerful tremorsense ability, especially when feather step would fit the fluff much better Among the new pieces of crunch, we get a new level 3 spell (which should probably be on the magus/inquisitor-list as well) that nest you burrow speed, tremorsense and a bonus to attack when attacking from below the earth - a bit powerful for level 3. We also get the CR 3 Maglette Swarm variant creature, land-piranhas. Rather cool!



Barghests are the fourth creatures covered and are reimagined as the offspring of goblins created by the exiled, soul-stealing sword-wielding god Karg-Thaal: The instruments of his revenge versus the keepers, barghests have spread across the planes. In line with the countermeasures, this time casting gentle repose on characters makes barghests incur a morale penalty upon failing a will-save when attacking protected foes - rather cool! As a further weakness, barghests that have feasted on powerful adversaries may be sent back to the home of their vile master upon being hit by magical fire -interesting, also as a storytelling device/to save doomed groups that have already lost one of their own to the creature. Worse, said rift may result in invasions from teh dread god's realm...VERY COOL. Necklaces made from barghest fangs (which can grant minor bonuses and temporary hit points...) and a new feat are the crunchy bits provided - the feat allowing first level characters to draw upon angelic heritages, shifting to outsider type with minor deflection bonuses once per day. Okay, I guess, but rather weak - redesigning this as a feat/trait-combo, with the feat being more useful (minus the 1/day restriction), would have probably been prudent.



With the next entry, we go full out - what could have been just a lame joke-entry turns out to be rather well-crafted: The CR 5 Terror Turkey. Yes, Terror Turkey. And yes, it has deadly quills, a sonic gobble, matings eason rage, a clumsy flyby...what a damn fine critter! While I'm not a big fan of the quills (which require a perception check and then a ref-save to avoid), the creature again comes with cool weaknesses...oh, and 3 recipes. Roasted Terror Turkey, Terror Turkey soup and sandwiches! While we don't have Thanksgiving in Germany, I nevertheless tried the roasted Terror Turkey recipe by substituting its more mundane lesser brethren recently - and it was rather delicious! Kudos for a cool entry that also provides rules on using the bird's quills for crafting darts!



And next up...are skeletons. Yeah. How can they be exciting? Well, we get a tale of woe and love, o harsh punishment and a divine mandate that create the first of these beings, a deadly, immortal, mad creature, doomed for all eternity. Unfortunately, the tactical character advantage options have been subjected to sloppiness of a rather sad degree - first of all, the rules refer to undead immunity to critical hits and center on options to ignore that by attacking structural weaknesses - cool per se, but undead no longer are immune to crits in PFRPG. The second option refers to turning undead, which has been reduced to a feat not that many clerics I know use and ignores completely the channel energy ability. Weak. We also get an oil that temporarily makes piercing and slashing weapons deal bludgeoning damage and we get a new quality for skeletons - flesh-stealing, which may use the skeleton in question and leave a purple scar on the target. Not sure whether this quality is worth the CR +2 and d10-table to roll regions of where the flesh is stolen since the regions have no unique benefits.



Gargoyles get a rather cool background-story that can be blended with other creation-myths of the race - as an instrument of punishment, rods linked to an artifact that may transform beings into gargoyles, the result of a terrible justice system. The combat between a thieves' guild and the creators of said artifact damaged the awakened item...what has since befallen it, well, that's mostly up to the DM. Beyond the regular gargoyle, we get two variants for clan gargoyles and good-aligned noble gargoyles. Unfortunately, the non-lethal damage dealing subduing ray of the noble gargoyles lacks a range. Clan gargoyles look like they're made from earth and gain some earth-related abilities. On the tactics-side, gargoyles may be distracted by cries of pain (e.g. by good actors) -a and spellcasters may tear asunder their transmutation-spells via spellcraft to hold gargoyles in place - exceedingly cool! Also nice - we get a fully mapped sample lair and a new alchemical item, gargoyle blood, which allows you to temporarily get DR 1/magic.



The tale of Gothos Sund could have been a tale of the grand era of weird fiction - a hunter who learned to destroy new creatures, ropers, and inadvertently was transported to their home realm. Instigating a slave-revolt against the overlord ropers, the man also freed the ropers from their chthonic deity, the Great Maw, who may still be out there, looking for the ropers - thus explaining the relative xenophobia and isolationalism of the species - they're hiding! Among the crunchy bits, we get an alternate statblock for ancient ropers as in the tales - slightly less powerful than their regular versions, but studded with a fortification-like ability and superior mental faculties. Unfortunately, the alternate statblock uses wrong mechanics to simulate the drawing of creatures - no combat maneuvers or the like instead of just using the regular rules. We also get a variant option for ranger's favored enemy ability, allowing to specialize in killing one particular type of creature - not sure whether that's a good idea, though, unless your campaign has a very monotonous opposition. We also get 6 variants (5 at CR +2, 1 at CR +1) for ropers that specialize in crushing (using some antiquated rules-language, but workable), ones with icy breath, fast hunters, mind-controllers, ropers that can temporarily petrify foes and ropers than can unleash deadly waves of psychic energy - nice variety there! We also get 3 items - roper poison, roper whips and a roper's skin as a cloak - unfortunately, only the last gets a price and a harvest/craft-DC and none get a weight.



Vegepygmies, spawned from weird russet mold in caverns beneath the barrier peaks, in corridors of metal of a fallen star, have since spread throughout the lands and while the origin story here may be interesting and a nice read, it somewhat pales to the tactics/modifications provided - vegepygmy sap may be used to delay the onset of slime/ooze/mold damage, vegepygmies exposed to sunlight slowly turn berserk and finally, old colonies can create artifact-like russet mold bombs, infecting whole swaths of land. Oh, and old colonies of these threats may spontaneously develop giant, deadly guardians - almost 30-feet-tall Vegegyants, which, at CR 6 are very dangerous for their CR with force blasts, nets emitted from palms and a significant amounts of hp. I LOVE this creature, though its statblock lacks a perception-score in the sense-line, instead only offering +X. Since the skills list the +14 bonus, I'll let that slip though - functionality is not impeded. All in all, one of my favorite chapters herein.



The final creatures covered would be the Dark Folk, i.e. Dark Creepers and Dark Stalkers. The story here is once again aptly-written and presented, weaving a yarn that resonates quite nicely with the theme of light/dark and the fear of degeneration is competently portrayed - if you're interested in it, though, you'll have to read this pdf yourself. Unfortunately, the tactics-section once again features a cool idea improperly executed -as a cool idea, strong magic auras can be used to distract Dark folk. Unfortunately, magic aura i8s considered an example - but the spell does not allow the suggested increase in aura-strength, just a cloaking/modification of the aura. This is especially puzzling since the other tactic, inciting faux death throes via positive energy, makes proper use of channel energy and the rules, offering one superb, cool tactic. Also rather cool - specific attacks may make Dark Slayers turn temporarily undead - complete with positive energy vulnerability. Also on the crunch-side, we get the CR 5 Dark Keepers, guardians of the blood grails and we also get information on the libraries and hidden caches of the dark folk as well as a new item, the Staff of Warding. All in all, one enjoyable chapter.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are by no means bad - in fact, most of the time, they're really good, making the often rather significant glitches stand out even more, especially since they sometimes impede the usefulness of the crunch. A good rules-editor would have helped a lot here. Layout adheres to a one-column b/w-standard with a black pillar on a side. The letters are big enough to enable you to print out 4 pages of this pdf on a regular page of DinA4-paper, which is nice and the reason I don't complain about the 1-column standard. The b/w-artworks in the book are ok, though don't expect to be wowed. The pdf comes extensively bookmarked with nested bookmarks.



Bret Boyd, K. Axel Carlsson, Michael Ferguson , Chuck Cuthbert and Stefen Styrsky have delivered a nice supplement - beyond the intriguing legends, the crowning achievement here should be the exploitable weaknesses and peculiarities that make fighting these beings so much more distinct that I really love. These are simply awesome when they work (which they do most of the time) and overall, I'd wish that more monster-designers would introduce options like this. This also makes me yearn quite a bit for MORE. I want to see more of these supplements - theme-wise, this is a 5-star+seal of approval pdf... one that also exhibits quite a few problems. From 3.5isms to spells not working as the tactics describe to the glitches here and there, we have quite an array of accumulating issues that drag down what could have been a superb offering. I did my best to give you an overview of potential problems that can be found herein, but still encourage you to take a look at this if you even remotely like ecology-articles or how Paizo's redesigns of classic monsters add to their lore and provide more details on them if you can look past the issues. In spite of really loving the plethora of ideas herein, I can't go as high as I'd like on this one -with the flaws, the best I can do, is rate this collection 3 stars and hope for more careful updates in the future - or new pdfs taking the cool concept into PFRPG-territory.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
[PFRPG] Behind the Monsters: Omnibus
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Feats of Monstrosity
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/09/2013 06:31:22
An Endzeitgeist.com review

As always with pdfs of the "More Feats"-series, we get 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD and 1 page content, so let's take a look at these feats that are intended for characters that have acquired monstrous abilities!



-Awesome Strike: Requiring Str 25, 1/round use Awesome Blow as part of your full attack. OUCH!



-Daunting Damage Resistance: Demoralize foes as an immediate action when taking no damage due to DR.



-Deny Channeling: +2 to saves if saving successfully versus channel effects; cumulative versus said source in 24 hours; Also nets you the same amount as bonus to intimidate.



-Flyby Snatch: Combine snatch with flyby attack -awesome for the huge creatures that are required to use this feat.



-Gruesome Gaze: Creatures adjacent to you may not avert their eyes from your gaze attack. OUCH!



-Hazardous Hover: Creatures caught in your hover's cloud of debris are dazzled sans save.



-Rancorous Resistance: When hit by energy against which you have resistance, you get charged by it, adding 1d6 to your natural/unarmed/touch attacks for one round.



-Regenerative Clutch: At CMB -10, disarm foes that hit you as an immediate action by having your regeneration grow over the weapon.



-Undying Rage: Gain morale bonuses granted by rage and channel resistance +2, even though you're undead. Become staggered upon the end of the rage. Would be okay, had Kobold Press' Advanced Races #2: Darakhul not provided a vastly superior take on undead raging via a feat.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I didn't notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Art's 2-column no-frills standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none.

Daron Woodson has created some feats that allow for truly dastardly tactics to drive the fear back into the players...however, prerequisite-wise, these feats see me troubled: The prerequisites could have used some additional racial caveats - as provided, I can see player characters qualifying for several of them and for player feats, honestly, these are too strong. A [monster]-descriptor or something like that would have helped there. The feats herein offer great options for DMs, but should remain out of the hands of players - and that's about all I can say about this collection; Offering iconic options for nasty adversaries, this pdf clocks in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform due to the low price, the 5 only missed by a margin due to the uninspired undead rage feat and the relatively weak deny channeling.

Endzeitgeist out

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Monstrosity
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
[PFRPG] Pug's Bazaar: Tent #2
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/24/2013 11:34:46
With all the style of a market huckster, Pug presents his latest 'adventurer-must-haves' to (he hopes) an eager public.

Each item presented is described in Pug's inimitable patter as well as having the necessary game mechanical information, plot hooks for using that item and quite often an illustration as well. Pug has a few spells on sale as well, presented in the same manner.

Items include marionette meathook gloves, which are fingerless gloves with steel talons attached. They act as a +1 cestus normally, but come into their own in the unfortunate event of the wearer being swallowed alive! Not only do they protect the victim from the effects of being swallowed whole, they give him a chance of clawing his way out and even of mentally dominating the creature that swallowed him. An absolute must if you think you will feature on someone's menu.

Then there's the amplifying wand widget, that you slip over the end of a wand and activate by means of various buttons to cause various metamagic effects to influence whatever spell your wand puts out.

The rest are in similar vein, they sound enticing but... there's always something. How often do you get swallowed whole? Do you really need to alter your wand spells (that is, provided the thing doesn't cause a misfire...)?

A fun little selection.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
[PFRPG] Pug's Bazaar: Tent #2
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Call to Arms: Axes & Picks
by Jason R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/18/2013 13:14:30
This is an amazing piece of artistry and insight, highly recommend.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Call to Arms: Axes & Picks
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
[PFRPG] Hargroth's Fieldtrip
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/17/2013 02:39:22
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module for apprentice-level characters is 29 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial,1 page SRD, leaving us with 26 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.



Still here? All right, since this pdf uses the apprentice-level rules for 0-level characters by Tricky Owlbear Publishing, the PCs unsurprisingly haven't seen much action - in fact, none - until one fateful day, the local dwarven woodcutter and huntsman Hargroth wants to take them on a fieldtrip from their idyllic, remote village of Wood's Edge. The basic village comes with a full statblock and quite detailed pieces of information on all notable NPCs of the town - nice amount of detail there!



Now Hargroth has promised the PCs he'd take them to the Crystal Falls - and on the way there, they'll be glad the old dwarven ranger takes some healing potions along on the way - after all, the very first encounter already pits the PCs versus 2 wolves. While with Hargroth, the PCs probably won't get lost in the woods, there still is a random encounter table and information should the PCs run off on their own. Beyond the addition of capability, the inclusion of Hargroth is smart since it allows the DM to actually guide the PCs through the module without being too imposing as an out-game entity.



In order to reach the falls, though, the PCs will have to follow Hargroth into the caves, where they'll arrive at day 3 of their trip into the wild: There, a carcass of a kobold and a sudden attack is enough to break the old dwarf, who confesses, amidst sobbing, how he is a fraud and only survived his only adventure by hiding in the healing crystal falls while his brethren were slaughtered. It gets worse, though - beyond a viper nest, Hargroth actually breaks through a wooden plank and falls to his (almost) demise - severely wounded, the PCs have to stabilize the old dwarf and actually carry him to the healing falls - the thing is, the area is now home to a couple of kobolds. Beyond these menaces, they'll have to answer a riddle (with a nice visual hand-out representation) and then finally manage to heal the old dwarf. When a ghostly knight appears and Hargroth takes up the mantle of guardian of the healing falls, becoming a spectral, immortal guardian - and providing some starting equipment for the character's careers as future adventurers, ending with a bitter-sweet note.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are ok, though I did notice a couple of typos while reading teh module. Layout adheres to a beautiful, parchment-style two-column standard, but unfortunately does not provide a more printer-friendly alternative. The handouts provided would have been nice on a collated page in the end. Cartography is serviceable and does its job, though no player-friendly maps are provided. More significantly, the pdf comes with a baffling lack of bookmarks that make navigating the pdf a tad bit more complex than it ought to be. Artworks are mostly fitting stock - no complaints here.



Marc Radle knows how to write modules - and he keeps it down-to-earth and personal for this one - which serves in its advantage. I get that one can't weave epic yarns at this level and by keeping things personal, tragic even, a compelling narrative can be told.

That can be said on the positive side. On the downside, the 0-level approach also requires a certain amount of guidance to prevent the deaths of the fragile PCs and while Hargroth helps in that regard, the module still is rather linear. The one crucial flaw the module has beyond that is, though, that the characters at one point need to carry a significant burden, the exact weight of which is absent- and especially with new characters/inexperienced players, that is a problem. DCs to get this burden up an obstacle, carry it around etc. would have greatly helped here. It is due to the accumulated issues like the lack of bookmarks and this rather crucial hole that make me settle for a final verdict of 3 stars - a solid offering, though not a perfect one.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
[PFRPG] Hargroth's Fieldtrip
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Bestiarum Vocabulum: Nagas & Magics
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/11/2013 10:30:53
Nagas are a particularly fascinating lot, intelligent and devious, ideal for those who like convoluted plots (whether as a GM or as a player with an unusual character), this work provides lots of added detail to anyone who finds use for naga in their game.

The introduction discusses some of the versatility displayed by nagas and explains the three main types: guardian, spirit and water nagas. There's a novel suggestion for their venom, that each naga has TWO separate venoms. One is stored in sacs attached to the fangs and is delivered by a bite attack; the other is derived from their bile, finds its way into the saliva and is delivered via a spit attack. Add in a whole slew of new naga species to go with the main three, and you get a dizzying slew of venom effects - a poisoner's dream, can he but catch and 'milk' a naga of its venom.

Next comes a listing of naga species, starting with the 'evil' ones. Best used as monsters, these tend to a pretty mindless pursuit of whatever they crave: the golden naga amasses treasure, the pit naga likes lots of slaves and so on. Neatly, their specific venoms are linked to their desires - a golden naga's bite venom turns the target into gold, for example. Slime naga and ruins naga are even more basic beasties, and best avoided.

Then the neutral naga species are explored. The eerily beautiful lock naga, all shimmering silver scales, guards interdimensional portals and planar gates, charging a toll for passage, that is if they will let you through at all. There's also one called a master alchemist - its venom is extremely useful if you are an alchemist as you can use it as a basis for virtually any potion or other subject you care to name.... and many of them have got wise to this, making a comfortable living out of selling their spit! Royal nagas likewise are content to earn their keep as advisors to monarchs, sharing their wisdom... and are very religious, being devoted to a deity. Their bite venom can convert victims into devotees... There are quite a few other naga species with different areas of interest such as the jade naga which hunts undead and the jet one that goes after demons.

This naga bestiary is followed by a list of spells. Most naga have some spellcasting ability. Most of the spells could probably be learned by other casters could they but find a teacher (or a book) but some really only work if you are a naga. There are also some magic items, constrained by the fact that naga do not have hands and so are quite limited in which items they can wield effectively. There are some interesting caps, torcs and ioun stones here, though, as well as some other oddments. Good treasure trove material if nothing else.

Nice selection of material about an interesting but rarely featured race.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Bestiarum Vocabulum: Nagas & Magics
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Feats of Rage
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/05/2013 12:06:01
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf is 3 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 1 page of content for 11 new rage-themed feats, so what do we get?



-Anarchic Aura: +2 to saves versus lawful spells and gain a chaotic aura.



-Chaotic Combatant: As a swift action, interrupt the teamwork feat benefits of all creatures in melee range as long as you connect with at least one attack. How awesome is this one? Quite cool idea!



-Deathless Rager: When having 0 HP or less, enter rages without expending rounds of rage.



-Enduring Rage: When receiving damage while raging, subtract the amount of rage-numbers you have left from the damage received. Nice one!



-Gruesome Finish: Improves Gory Finish to inflict the sickened instead of the shaken condition. Just wished the feat's text would not use the word "demoralize", which makes this slightly ambiguous, though not to a problematic extent.



-Pitiless Brutality: Activate Raging Brutality by expending only 2 rounds of rage.



-Prophetic Rage: When casting percentile-based divination while raging, gain a bonus to the d% equal to your charisma score. A bit specific for my tastes.



-Quick Hurler: Apply Catch Off-Guard to thrown improvised weapons.



-Sundering Stroke: +2 to sundering as long as your weapon is harder than the object you attempt to sunder.



-Unpredictable Rage: As long as you're raging, aid another does not work against you.



-Wrath of Righteousness: Allows you to become a paladin and maintain barbarian powers. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. The limitation never made sense to me.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Art's two-column no-frills standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



This is what rage-themed supplements should look like. Opening up a couple of "Improved" venues to improve "savage" unpredictable fighting styles, we also find feats herein that simply are elegant and awesome - in fact, while not everyone of them are pure awesomeness, the amount of good and even superb feats severely outclass the two ones I'd consider filler. Taking the more than fair price into account, I'll settle for a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Rage
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Amazing Races: Kitsune!
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/30/2013 04:08:34
An Endzeitgeist.com review of the revised edition

This installment of the Amazing Races-series is 4 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 2 pages of content, so let's check out these options for the Kitsune!



We kick off with two new feats for the Kitsune:

-Kitsune Chakra: Via the expenditure of spell-level ki, you may use racially granted/magical tail-feat granted spell-like ability without expending it. Powerful one - and without the racially exclusive component, I'd start complaining right now. Since it's restricted to Kitsune, I won't complain here.



-Shapechanger's Reveal: This one allows you to revert to your true form by foregoing the first attack of your full attack and make bluff AND intimidate check versus every opponent within 30 ft. for a combined feint/demoralization-effect. Those aware of the Kitsune's shapechanging capability get +4 to sense motive/have their intimidate DC increased by +4. A powerful ability - and one I can only see work on a given foe once in every 24 hours. Apart from that caveat missing (introducing it for perhaps +30 ft range?), this feat's limit make it workable, if not superb.



We also get two new traits - one that nets you +2 to bluff to deceive humans and nets you bluff as a class skill. The second trait is useful when hiding in a crowd via stealth, you may make a sense motive check versus DC 10 to count as if the aid another action was executed by the crowd to aid you.



We also get 4 new alternate racial traits - Blazing traits allows you to replace magical talent with produce flames as a spell-like ability HD+cha-mod times. Alternatively, Kitsune may replace agile with +1 to Bluff and Intimidate as well as always learning +1 language per linguistics rank. The latter is imho bad - languages should not be that easy to acquire. Graceful Attacks nets you weapon finesse in exchange for natural weapons.

Finally, Kitsune may replace Kitsune magic with a ki pool of 1 point + 1 for every 4 level the Kitsune has. The Kitsune may spend ki to get DR 5/cold iron until the end of the turn. I wouldn't harp on this, but since the pool stacks with ki pools from other sources, it becomes an issue: The Kitsune may use cha instead of wis to determine ki AND there's another issue the pdf fails to specify: The ki pool gained via this racial trait can usually be used exclusively for the DR-granting purposes - so far, so good. None of the regular uses are possible - but what about Ki-based feats that require the expenditure of ki? I assume they can be taken, but I'm not sure. All in all, gaining a powerful (especially at lower levels) ability that far surpasses Kitsune magic in power makes for a problematic piece of content and one I wouldn't allow in my home game.



The pdf also provides us with a racial archetype, the White-Furred Oracle (WFO in this review). These Oracles later their bonus spells from their mysteries with an expanded selection of spells representing the Nine Mysteries. An interesting and mythologically sound decision is to replace the oracle's star gem -when not HOLDING this gem, these Kitsune must make concentration checks to properly cast the respective spells, spell-like abilities or supernatural abilities - with the latter getting information for the DC of their concentration-check. And now, in the revised edition, the star gem gets proper stats and makes for perhaps one of the coolest restrictive balancing-mechanisms I've seen in quite a while.



The oracle also gets 1/2 level + cha-mod ki points. Said points stack with other ki pools, but only apply attribute modifiers once. As long as there's one ki point remaining, concentration checks are 5 (!!!) easier for the oracle and additionally, ki can be used to increase the DC of spells by +1, increase speed by +20 feet for a round. They may also spend ki to cast mystery spells by expending spell level ki without expending said spell. This ability, in the pdf's first iteration victim of an unpleasantly worded sentence now has been rephrased - two thumbs up!



At 5th level, WFO may take rogue talents or ninja tricks that require a ki pool or any combat feat that requires ki in lieu of a revelation. The archetype gets a native outsider capstone.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top.-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Art's two-column no-frills standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Author Alexander Augunas (of Pact Magic Unbound-fame) is a big fan of Kitsune - and it shows. For the better in the fact that the crunch is tied to mythologies and offers iconic options. The options contained herein while on the upper segment of the power-scale, now come with appropriately flavored information and streamlined options that got rid of prior ambiguities. The flavor is superb, as are the ideas of the crunch, but the price the archetype (or alternate racial traits) extol is not always perfectly on par with the benefits they grant. The revised version is superior in every way - and thus gets 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Amazing Races: Kitsune!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Feats of Flight
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/26/2013 03:14:18
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf is 3 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 1 page of content with 10 feats themed around flying, so what do we get?



-Aerial Acrobatics: Use fly instead of acrobatics with regards to moving in/out of occupied/threatened squares. Also improves evasion if you have it.



-Aerial Marksmanship: Ignore prone bonuses to AC when at least 30 feet above your foes.



-Eagle Eye: Triples the range-increment by which your perception-checks are penalized when doing aerial scouting.



-Flight of the Bumblebee: When airborne, you may use fly instead of bluff to feint.



-Just out of reach: Gain 5 foot elevation as an immediate action.



-Looming Ascent: When using the flight hex, you may combine that with the cackle hey and a bonus to intimidate. Neat!



-Skybound: +4 to saves versus altitude sickness and fatigue and on fly-checks for skill checks made to fly upward.



-Swooping Save: Reroll ref-saves 1/round when airborne, but at the cost of 30 ft. height - potential for crash landing here. Awesome one!



-Vicious Dive: End charging to a lower elevation with two natural attacks (instead of one) - not usable with manufactured weapons. Makes sense and is one of the feats that make you think: Why didn't someone do this before?



-Wingbeat Warrior: Use the Wingover-feat to turn up to 90 degrees during a charge - awesome!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Art's two-column no-frills standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Sometimes Daron Woodson just gets it terribly, extremely...RIGHT. Aerial combat has not seen much support - and this pdf provides feats that make your flying adversaries awesome, so much cooler. From dual-claw dives to iconic dog-fight maneuver, this feat-collection should be considered a must-have for anyone interested in taking the combat to the skies. And the rules-language is concise indeed - all killer, no filler, no issues: Final verdict? 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Flight
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Amazing Races: Vanara!
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/20/2013 03:23:36
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, by now you know the drill - 4 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with two pages of content for the Vanara, so let's take a look!



Contrary to what the intro-box would make you believe, this pdf starts with 5 new feats for the Vanara-race, not the Kitsune - though these also have their installment in the series.

So what are the feats?

-Ki Cloud: Spend 2 ki to generate a fluffy cloud that nets you a perfect maneuverability and flying speed equal to base movement for 1 hour - and yes, strong winds can dissipate it, as does any action that would break invisibility - like attacking. VERY cool and iconic, if a bit strong - but sometimes coolness trumps all!



-Greater Ki Cloud: The cloud doesn't dissipate upon attacking, withstands winds better and lasts longer.



-Prehensile Toes: Hold object with your feet - but not move except to climb or attack. Neat!



-Vanara Flip: As a swift action, flip around and transfer items from hands to feet or vice versa. Cool!



-Vanara Feint: When doing a Vanara Flip, feint as a free action - Neat!



We also get two new character traits - one that makes you count as having a running start when jumping from climbing a vertical surface and one that allows you to wield branches as quarterstaffs sans penalty.



We also get two new alternate racial traits - Dexterous Tail replacing nimble and allowing a Vanara to cast a spell while grappling on a successful concentration check, whereas Serene Striker allows the Vanara to use wis instead of str/dex with their AoOs, also in exchange for the nimble trait.



The issue's racial archetype is the Agile Arcanist, a magus archetype with diminished spellcatsing, but in turn the archetype gets canny defense, may substitute arcane pool points for ki points with regards to taking feats and using them as well as evasion etc. - elegant design that may utilize a lot of existing material in interesting ways - I like it!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting, apart from the mentioned introductory guffaw, are top-notch -I didn't notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Arts 2-column no-frills standard and the pdf comes without bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



I don't like the Vanara-race one bit - and here I am telling you: This is steeped in lore, iconic and all-killer, no filler: Each and every feat feels properly and uniquely tied to the race, the traits/alternate racial traits rock and the archetype is concise, innovative and versatile while allowing you to create a character truly different that captures well what magical Vanara duelists should be about. Racial supplements have a hard standing with me, but this one succeeds in each and every way with bravura - and hence is worth full 5 stars plus seal of approval - Daron Woodson has done an extraordinary job here!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Amazing Races: Vanara!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
CLASSifieds: Shaman of Humanity (Druid Archetype)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/07/2013 10:42:24
Typically, a Druid is a nature-lover and often comes over as a bit of an eco-warrior environmentalist... "Where every prospect pleases, and only man is vile" - well, the Shaman of Humanity is a bit different. This druidical philosophy holds that humans are just as much a part of nature as everything else, and goes beyond this to try and impart a bit of humanity to other creatures, creating formidable allies.

This archetypeis quite a bit different from a regular druid build, but the differences are spelled out clearly. One interesting feature is the ability to transform an animal companion into a human-like form - this is discussed purely in terms of its combat potential although I can imagine quite a few other uses for such a transformation in day-to-day life. This does not only work on companion animals, it can be applied to summoned ones as well provided the decision to do so is made as the summoning is cast.

The Shaman of Humanity can also become protector to a settlement, guarding them against nature's denizens - a neat reversal of normal druidic activities, protecting nature against enroaching humanoids!

A couple of new feats are provided as well as full progression charts and information to enable development right up to 20th level.

An interesting and thought-provoking concept, and one well-suited to the adventuring life.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
CLASSifieds: Shaman of Humanity (Druid Archetype)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Feats of Battle
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/03/2013 03:47:44
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf is 3 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 1 page of content with 10 battle-centric feats, so what do we get?



-Deadly Opportunist: When hitting foes with an AoO, you may forgo any number of remaining AoOs to get 2 points of additional damage per foregone attack, three when using light weapons.



-Defensive Aid: Gain +2 to AC when using aid another to help allies.



-Defensive Battler: Increase the aid another DC to protect versus your attack by your BAB. That one's a bit too specific for my tastes.



-False Strike: As a full-round action, make an attack versus a foe. You deal normal damage versus that foe when you hit - if you miss, though, you count as having helped an ally within range with aid another to increase atk or AC versus the target of your attack. Nothing to complain here!



-Improved Takedown: When using takedown to grapple foes at the end of your charge, you pin successfully hit foes automatically. Iconic!



-Opportune Aid: +2 to atk and damage with AoOs until the start of your next turn when successfully using aid another.



-Shield Mount: As a swift action, share your shield bonus with your mount, but at the cost of twice the armor check penalty. Awesome one!



-Strategic Defenses: As a full-round action, grant all allies holding readied actions within 30 ft. of you +2 to dodge AC until the start of your next turn Cool one, though I would have preferred its range to scale .



-Takedown: When charging and successfully tripping (or otherwise knocking prone) foes hit by your charge, you can initiate a grapple with said target as a free action. Nice!



-Tireless Tenacity: 1/minute, ignore fatigue (or reduce exhausted to fatigued) for 1 round at the cost of 1d6 nonlethal damage. I really like this one - it should imho be codified as a default option for characters.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Art's two-column no-frills standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.





Per se I like feats expanding options for aiding others - but many herein are a tad bit too specific for my tastes and feel a bit like they're on the weak side. However, there also are the takedown-feats, the cool "shield mount"-feat and the damn cool "Tireless Tenacity"-feat. All in all, a solid collection of feats for a fair price that has some neat gems and while not universally hitting home, it still is a worthy purchase at a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Battle
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
More Faeries!
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/29/2013 05:47:30
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Abandoned Arts' More Monster-series is 8 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



Not wasting any space, we kick off with the CR 2 Asrais, benevolent fey at home both in the air and in the water, who, depending on whether in contact with earth or water, may pass traceless through terrain or turn greater invisible. Rather cool: When flying by, the hypnotic hum of an asrai's wings may fascinate foes or send them into a deep slumber.



The CR 1 frostjacks benefit constantly from slipstream and icewalking as well as with a breath weapon they may alternatively use to create items (or weapons) from ice or to cover the area around them in ice - rather cool, versatile uses of breath weapons. Nice!



CR 1/2 Grogochs look essentially like whiskered, smelly fey bums who make for excellent housekeepers (via e.g. Improved Familiar) - if you can bear their terrible stench aura. Special mention deserve the whiskers - they net the fey +8 initiative - but only as long as there's no too powerful breeze blowing. Haven't seen that caveat before - neat! Also rather cool - the fey come with a severe antipathy towards all things divine.



At CR 2, the butterfly-winged, voluptuous Leanhuan are tricky things - they charm enemies, then task them with impossible tasks as per geas/quest - but only if they succeed in convincing the target. On a failed attempt, the Leanhaun has to serve the crafty individual as muse for a year as a muse - with significant benefits, especially for craftsmen... Oh, and when they succumb to the wiles of the truly powerful, these fey may change alignments and become truly loyal servants of said master - these Leanhuan are essentially a variant with some significant oomph added for CR+2.



The CR 1 Sheoque come not only with a nice rhyme, but are also guardians of the fey's sacred places - as such, they may hallow areas - to the point where the undergrowth actually attacks intruders! Neat!



The final page provides a list of the fey herein by CR, combat and skill role and also reprints the slipstream and vanish spells for your convenience.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to Abandoned Arts' no-frills two-column standard and the artworks by Katie Brandley and Carlos Torreblanca are originals and their b/w-awesomeness is not something you'd normally expect to see at this price-point. The pdf has no bookmarks, but doesn't necessarily need one at this length.



Author Daron Woodson has once again created a collection of well-crafted monsters for your perusal, all with their respective signature attacks - but in contrast to the installment on Gremlins, this one feels a tad bit weaker. Only marginally so, though, and thus I feel justified in rating this neat collection of monsters 5 stars - no complaints and a definite recommendation.


Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
More Faeries!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Displaying 31 to 45 (of 335 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG