RPGNow.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
by Jason C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/17/2014 23:14:28
I'm still reading this fun and odd game. It's got a lot of inspirational material in it - I'm stoked and can't wait to run a game. I won't be using any of their setting until I get DOOM, but the game drips fun. So what if the die mechanic is really easy? I like it that way. There's no arcane charts littered all over to overly define anything. I really think the level of abstraction here hits my sweet spot.

Character creation is fun even if it makes some weird characters. That's the fun part! The randomness is cool in my book.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
by Sylvain B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/26/2014 07:52:54
This is a textbook example on how to write a new RPG edition; improving the game on every front while maintaining a high level of compatibility with the previous product line.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS: The Nemesis Crisis
by Chris H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2014 13:11:36
If you enjoy comics series along the lines of Marvel's "Secret Wars" or "Contest of Champions," DC's "Salvation Run," or BOOM!'s "Deathmatch," you should be able to have a blast with "The Nemesis Crisis." The storyline revisits some well-worn ground—cosmic being "kidnaps" metahumans for a sort of contest—but with enough distinctiveness in the cosmic antagonist's motivation to keep the story interesting. It's particularly notable that author and artist Dan Houser includes guidance for giving the adventure a tone appropriate to the Golden, Silver, Iron, or Modern Age in comics.

It's not quite right to call "The Nemesis Crisis" an "adventure" in the traditional sense. By design, it's really more of a framework for an adventure. Dan gives the GM a lot of information about the antagonist's and deuteragonist's motivations, which of course is absolutely critical. Beyond this, the meat of the plot information for GMs comes in the form of a timeline describing what happens if the player characters do nothing. Since the whole scenario stretches out over a week of in-game time, this is a good format. What it lacks is sufficient information for inexperienced or harried GMs to know how the deuteragonist will respond if the PCs do not remain idle, which of course they won't. As a GM with little prep time and, frankly, below-average improvisational skills, I would have appreciated an additional sentence or two for each entry in the timeline, something like "If foiled, [deuteragonist] will …" This isn't a damning weakness, but I'd call it a significant missed opportunity.

Production values vary depending on what you're looking at. Dan's artwork is, as always, evocative and entertaining. As a writer, Dan's strength is in conceptualizing stories, not in wordsmithing. The prose has a rushed quality to it. Grammatical errors, typos, and such are not infrequent. Some of this can be written off as a "conversational tone," but some can create annoyance or confusion. For example, the cosmic antagonist is called "Justicar," and while the name clearly derives from the English word "justiciar," it's not clear whether the spelling "Justicar" is an intentional variation or a mere misspelling. Also, for somebody so interested in justice, it's laughable that Justicar at one point refers to "not guilty" as a "sentence." There's also a disruptive column-wrap error in Derecha's stat block. But these things are all GM-facing, and only affect the aesthetic experience of reading the module, not the play experience at the table.

"The Nemesis Crisis" is envisioned as a "big crossover event," like DC's "Forever Evil" or Marvel's "Original Sin" (to cite two recent examples). To get this "big crossover event" feel, you'll need a very large selection of supervillains, and you may want to have your players adopt the rules of multiple superheroes, either in big teams where players run multiple characters at once, or in successive "meanwhile, elsewhere on the planetoid" scenes. Therefore, the "event" works best if you have easy access to Hero Pack 5 (the Hero Pack volume with the most substantial supervillain population) and/or the Villainomicon. By the way, "The Nemesis Crisis" is written with the original ICONS rules set in mind, but it's not hard to adjust on the fly to the Assembled Edition—in fact, I don't think you'll even notice the difference, except for the way qualities are written.

In sum, "The Nemesis Crisis" is an ambitious scenario that can easily bring the "big crossover event" feel to an ICONS gaming table. It's well worth the price, and worth the time to run, for what it pays you back in fun. It does, however, require an additional source of supervillains to be most effective.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS: The Nemesis Crisis
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
by Michael S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/02/2014 11:03:52
Steve Kenson and Dan Houser knock it out of the park once again with Icons: The Assembled Edition! The book is very well written. The art is fantastic. The truly awesome Icons system is even better with more options drawn from with out being too heavy. I love how all my Icons books are still useful with very little work. This new edition truly brings Icons to my gaming table like never before! Thank you guys! Great job!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
by Anthony P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/02/2014 10:03:02
A few years ago when I first picked up ICONS, I did it because I didn't have access to my copies of Mutants and Masterminds.
My friends and I wanted to run something supers related but none of us had our normal materials so I popped onto the internet and did a quick search for something that would let us get to playing quick.

I'd always liked the old school Marvel RPG as well as FUDGE/FATE and ICONS looked simple enough. I figured "Hey, why not".

We rolled up our characters, had a hilarious time trying to sort them out and come up with great names and origin stories. Our game was a little on the wild side, we played Super Powered Lawyers who used their abilities to handle all the different harassment, threats, bribes, and other problems that a single Mega Corp (also run by a powered being) used against our clients (Think Harvey Birdman Attorney At Law, but a whole lot less humor).

The game only lasted one session but that was all I needed to come to appreicate ICONS for what it was.

Assembled Edition did the same thing that the original did for me, I scrolled on through each page of the PDF and was brought back to that moment when I realized what a gem the ICONS Supers RPG is.

This version of the game includes a lot of changes, but they feel more like minor tweaks and additions than full on revisions some from other source books and adventures and others just bits that were adjusted in the new book. While I see what's different, I am definitely able to say at the end of the day "This is ICONS" without any reservation. The new Assembled Edition is different and familiar at the same time; of all the different games I play, it's those types of games which usually remain on my shelf (physical and digital) for the long haul.

One of the changes that I noticed right away was the dice mechanic, the D6-D6 method was replaced by a slightly more intuitive (Attribute+D6)-(Difficulty+D6) method of resolution. It still works the same for the most part but it feels just a little better in my opinion. Other changes include the villain character creation system, pyramid system (an extended test method) and powers being brought in line with the material from their Great Power source book.

The art of the book is great. I've always loved the art styles of Dan Houser (no not that one, the illustrator), his stuff immediately evokes instant memories of the various DC Animated shows I love so much, he blends that comic book with cartoon feel that I think works best for the ICONS products. The cover was the most obvious new piece and it manages to hit that spot in me that suddenly wants to start rolling up new characters right away.

ICONS Assembled Edition clocks in at 232 pages and is absolutely worth the low price of $15.00 for the PDF or $34.95 for the print edition; either version of the book deserves your attention.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition
by Chris H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/01/2014 11:23:22
Whether you’re a longtime ICONS fan or a new player/GM looking for a relatively rules-light yet richly textured superhero RPG, you’ll welcome ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition.

If you’re not familiar with ICONS but are considering a purchase, this book will give you everything you need to get started … except for some six-sided dice, an adventure and friends to play it with. Chapter 1, “The Basics,” starts off by describing ICONS scale, a system of ranking abilities, powers, difficulties, and so on using a scale of 1 to 10 with corresponding adjectives (think of the classic Marvel Super Heroes RPG). Almost everything in ICONS is measured using this scale. Chapter 1 also defines the six ability scores used for ICONS characters, and explains Determination, a kind of in-game currency that players can spend to gain advantages and GMs can award to cause trouble. Fighting, of course, involves the additional consideration of damage and healing, which are addressed here in chapter 1. Chapter 1 ends with a wonderful example of play that illustrates all the basic concepts.

Chapter 2, “Hero Creation,” obviously covers character creation, but also team creation. The default method of character creation in ICONS is random generation using a series of tables, but a point-buy option is also presented. Character creation is illustrated using the origin of Saguaro, the iconic (heh) cactus-man on the front cover.

Chapters 3 and 4 describe the standard powers and specialties presented in the game. ICONS takes the approach of boiling powers down to their basic essences or most common expressions, then allowing customizations through limits and extras. Specialties are learned skills, and only have a three-step scale (specialist, expert, and master).

Chapter 5 goes into more detail about how characters’ actions are mechanically resolved in ICONS. This straightforward chapter ends with another great example of play.

The book’s longest chapter is chapter 6, on “Game Mastering.” This chapter is chock full of great advice, ideas, and inspiration for ICONS GMs. It’s useful not only for new GMs but for experienced game masters as well, since it provides helpful overviews of comic book tropes, quick villian creation, and so on.

A selection of NPCs, both allies and adversaries, rounds out the book. Some readers have noticed that the superheroes presented here do not have starting Determination values listed, but that’s because they’re intended as NPCs, not as pregenerated player characters.

For those of you who already play ICONS and wonder if you should get the new edition, I’d say “yes.” There are a few significant rules changes that should make gameplay even easier than it was before. To highlight the three most important changes:

1. In the Assembled Edition, GMs now roll dice. The formula for task resolution has changed from relevant ability/power + 1d6 - 1d6 vs. target difficulty or opposing ability/power to 1d6 + relevant ability/power vs. 1d6 + target difficulty or opposing ability/power. The resulting probabilities remain the same as in classic ICONS, but the revised mechanic makes it easier to resolve villains’ actions without mentally inverting the scale.

2. In classic ICONS, characters had aspects, divided into qualities (generally advantageous) and challenges (generally disadvantageous). In the Assembled Edition, the advantageous/disadvantageous distinction is dissolved, and new characters have three qualities that could potentially serve in a variety of circumstances to yield advantage or trouble. This particular change is, in my view, the best rules change in the Assembled Edition. Additionally, the whole system is explained much better in the Assembled Edition than in the classic ICONS rulebook. The Assembled Edition even gives GMs and players a “formula” to use to show how qualities are used: “Because of (quality), I/you get (advantage/trouble).” Through the use of models like “Because I am The World’s Greatest Detective, I get improved effort on the Intellect test to figure out what happened here” or “As a Believer in All Things Good, I am taken aback by this horror and lose my panel this page” and the examples of play at the ends of chapters 1 (“The Basics”) and 5 (“Taking Action”), the use of qualities becomes much clearer to readers of the Assembled Edition.

3. Classic ICONS included some powers that “counted as two powers.” Those powers have been eliminted, revised, or folded into other powers in the Assembled Edition, so that there is no such bookkeeping. All powers “count as one power” for purposes of reckoning starting Determination and point-buy character builds.

Since the Assembled Edition differs only in these two major and a few other minor ways from classic ICONS, it’s very easy to use older adventures and supplements with the Assembled Edition. For the Villainomicon, I would suggest just ignoring the rules material up front in favor of what’s in the Assembled Edition, but most of the villains should work fine with just slight adjustments to terminology and maybe reconfiguring their qualities. A good bit of material from ICONS Team-Up appears in revised form in the Assembled Edition, but that book still retains value in its chapters on exotic environments, sidekicks, and—if you want to use them—vehicles and bases. In general, Great Power also retains its value, especially in “translating” various power concepts into mechanical terms. You can also still use the random power tables in Great Power for the sake of variety, and then build the character according to the power terminology in the Assembled Edition.

Production values for this book are very high. The Assembled Edition uses the same page templates as Great Power, so the pages have plenty of light colors and white space, making them very readable and aesthetically pleasing. The book is also full of wonderful new artwork by ICONic artist Dan Houser.

In short, I enthusiastically recommend ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying: The Assembled Edition. My only “complaint” is that the PDF as initially released did not include bookmarks (but I hope this will be fixed soon).

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/14/2014 03:31:47
http://www.teilzeithelden.de/2014/03/14/rezension-icons-supe-
rpowered-roleplaying/

Nominiert als Bestes Spiel, Bester Newcomer und Bestes Regelwerk 2011! So ein Rollenspiel muss doch der Überflieger sein. Im Falle eines Comic-Rollenspiels darf man das sogar wortwörtlich nehmen. Wir werfen einen Blick auf ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying vom bekannten Mutant & Masterminds-Macher Steve Kenson.


Die Spielwelt

ICONS ist ein reines Regelwerk, welches vordergründig auf eine Spielwelt verzichtet und stattdessen den Spielleiter dazu auffordert seine eigene Welt zu erschaffen. Im hinteren Teil werden aber eine Reihe von Helden und Bösewichten vorgestellt, welche mit Abenteuerideen versehen wurden. Gerade bei einer Superhelden-Comic-Umsetzung ist eine voll ausgearbeitete Spielwelt aber auch von eher geringerem Interesse, da man sich in der Regel darauf beschränken kann, sich auf eine zeitliche Epoche (z.B.: 60er Jahre, Gegenwart, Nahe Zukunft,…) festzulegen. Die beschriebenen Charaktere und Bösewichte sind eher humorvoll zu nehmen und lehnen sich nicht an bekannte Protagonisten von Marvel oder DC an.

Die Regeln

ICONS setzt auf Einfachheit, entsprechend werden lediglich W6 verwendet. Um einen gewissen Bereich des Wahrscheinlichen zu konstruieren, nutzt das System ein Plus-Minus-System, der zweite Würfel wird also vom ersten subtrahiert (genannt The Dice).
Wie in vielen Adaptionen von Fudge und FATE üblich, werden Werte benannt. Also anstatt Stärke 6 gegen eine Tür der Stärke 3, versuche ich mit beachtlicher Stärke eine durchschnittliche Tür einzurennen. Das funktioniert meistens ganz gut, aber ob nun „Fantastic“, „Amazing“ oder „Great“ besser ist, erschließt sich mit letzter Sicherheit wohl nur Muttersprachlern, so dass man schlussendlich doch wieder beim Ansagen von Zahlenwerten hängenbleibt.


Proben laufen in der Regel immer nach dem Schema Attribut + The Dice, dazu kommen Situations-Modifikationen. Übersteigt das Ergebnis die vom Spielleiter aufgestellte Schwierigkeit, gilt der Versuch als erfolgreich. Je nachdem, um wieviel die Probe gelungen ist, wird der Effekt ausgeschmückt.

Beispiel:
Firebug hat eine exzellente Intelligenz (5) und versucht eine beachtliche (6) Verschlüsselung zu knacken. Da er unter Druck steht, erhält er einen Malus von 1. Er würfelt 6 und 1. Ein Topergebnis! Damit hat er

Intelligenz(5) + Würfel 1(6) – Würfel 2(1) – Schwierigkeit(6) – Malus(1) = 3

Laut Liste ist eine 3 ein „Major Success“, was bedeutet, dass er die Verschlüsselung knackt und den Inhalt versteht. Mit 5 oder mehr hätte er sogar einen „secondary benefit“ erhalten, also vielleicht denjenigen rausbekommen, der hinter der Verschlüsselung steckt.

Man sieht, dass die dahinterliegende Mathematik nicht über die Maße schwer ist, aber man doch einiges hin und herrechnen muss. Das obere Beispiel zeigt aber auch, dass unter bestimmten Umständen ein „Massive Success“ gar nicht möglich ist, da es keine Möglichkeit gibt, dass Würfe explodieren und sich so zufällig ungewöhnlich hoch oder tief verhalten.

Erwähnenswert ist dabei, dass die Spielleitung selbst nie würfelt. Bei einer Attacke überwinden die Helden einen fixen Wert des Gegners und bei der Gegenwehr widersetzen sich die Helden einem fixen Angriffswert.

Charaktererschaffung

Charaktere werden in ICONS nicht klassisch erstellt, sondern erwürfelt. Und zwar in jeder Hinsicht. Zwar gibt es ein optionales Generierungssystem basierend auf Punkten, dieses ist aber weit weniger lustig und auch nur mäßig gut ausbalanciert.
Im ersten Schritt wird die Herkunft des Helden ermittelt, die kann alles zwischen „Trainierter Mensch“ bis zu „Überirdisch“ sein. Je nachdem was man würfelt, bekommt man später eine Mischung aus Vor- und Nachteilen. Optional kann man diesen Schritt auch überspringen.
Schritt Zwei umfasst das Ermitteln der sechs Attribute (Tapferkeit, Koordination, Kraft, Intelligenz, Bewusstsein, Willenskraft), dabei liegt der Durchschnitt bei 5, was schon gehobenen menschlichen Werten entspricht. Sollte man insgesamt keine 20 Punkte erhalten, darf man neu würfeln. Nach der Ermittlung können lediglich zwei Werte getauscht werden, um den Charakter etwas an die eigenen Vorstellungen anzupassen.
Es folgt das Auswürfeln der Powers oder Superfertigkeiten, diese umfassen gut 30 Seiten und decken damit so ziemlich alles ab, was man in Superhelden-Comics entdeckt haben könnte.
Das Fertigkeitssystem ist denkbar einfach und stellt lediglich die Talente dar, die der Held besonders gut beherrscht, also bei einer Anwendung einen kleinen Bonus erhält.

Als FATE-Derivat kennt ICONS natürlich auch Aspekte, diese werden Determination (Bestimmung) genannt. Dabei kann es sich um Beinamen („Die Menschliche Fackel“) oder Slogans („Ich bin Batman!“), aber eben auch eine Schwäche („Kryptonit“) handeln. Die Verwendung dieser Aspekte wird recht feingliedrig zerlegt und macht das Spiel leider etwas blätterintensiv. Das hätte man einfacher bzw. freier regeln können. An dieser Stelle greift auch das einzige Balancing des Systems ein: Je mehr Superfähigkeiten, desto weniger Determination-Punkte. Anders als ein FATE-Aspekt kann eine Determination aber nicht jederzeit genutzt werden, sondern nur, wenn man an etwas scheitert, würfelt oder ähnliches. Ergo: Es ist eher eine Reaktions- aber keine Aktionsmöglichkeit.

Insgesamt ist das Erstellungssystem wirklich ganz spaßig, wenn man sich darauf einlässt. Das Ganze hat aber zur Folge, dass es schwierig ist ein Team mit den typischen Archetypen (Tank, Healer, Brain, …) zu füllen, sondern man mehr improvisieren muss. Die Charaktere sind definitiv nur unzureichend ausbalanciert und so kann der naive Schwächling mit einer Fertigkeit schnell neben dem superfitten Megabrain mit fünf Supermächten stehen.
Dass man sehr viel würfelt (im Schnitt 20x) und hin und herblättern muss, ist nicht jedermanns Sache. Vor allem, wenn man in der Gruppe seine Charaktere erstellt, sollte man sich darauf beschränken seine Fertigkeit nur zu notieren und sich diese erst später im Detail durchzulesen.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht

ICONS spielt sich als Spielleitung leider etwas steril, denn diese würfelt nicht und hat auch keine Möglichkeit auf „Determination“ als Ressource der Bösewichte zurückzugreifen. Damit hat man kaum eine Möglichkeit in das Spielgeschehen einzugreifen. Spielführung verkommt so schnell zu Spielverwaltung. Und auch wenn man immer sagen kann, dass ja die Spieler ihren Charakter an die Wand gefahren haben, so kennt es doch fast jeder SL, dass man hier und da einfach mal Gnade vor Recht ergehen lässt und einen Würfelwurf absichtlich danebensetzt: ICONS bietet diese Möglichkeit nicht.
Auf der anderen Seite muss man sich recht gut vorbereiten, da ein Gegner oder Hindernis sehr schnell zu leicht oder zu schwer werden kann, wenn er nicht auf die Charaktere abgestimmt ist.
Darüber hinaus fällt gerade als SL schnell auf, dass ICONS mit sehr rudimentären Regeln daherkommt. Fahrzeuge oder die Herstellung von Gegenständen, die gerade in vielen Comics eine große Rolle spielen, muss man stattdessen improvisieren. Waffen oder Rüstungen als solche gibt es nicht, diese sind wenn dann ein Aspekt des Charakters.

Der Spielleiterteil als solcher bietet kaum etwas Neues, sondern befasst sich hauptsächlich mit den Grundprinzipien des Spielleitens. Für Anfänger sicherlich gut, für Fortgeschrittene bietet es aber zu wenig Informationen, die sich speziell auf das Genre beziehen.

Die Auflistung der Bösewichte ist gut gemacht und bietet eine Vielzahl an Abenteuerideen. Voll ausgearbeitete Szenarien gibt es dagegen nicht, lediglich die zwei Seiten „The Wages of Sin!“ bieten einen guten Ansatz, um loszuspielen. Der eine oder andere Bösewicht ist nett gemacht, würde beim Einsatz aber vielleicht eher zum Lächeln anregen, denn wie eine Bedrohung wirken.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht

Wenn man sich auf das Abenteuer der Charaktererstellung mal eingelassen hat, dann spielt sich ICONS erstaunlich flüssig. Das Regelsystem ist nicht unnötig kompliziert und schnell verinnerlicht.
Dass ICONS bestimmte Aspekte der Regeln umbenannt hat, gerade im Kampf, ist zwar der Comic-Adaption geschuldet, nimmt aber hier und da die Geschwindigkeit aus der Action, da nicht jeder sofort im Kopf hat, dass eine Aktion ein Bild und eine Runde eine Seite ist. Gerade in Zeiten, wo viele mit Comics doch eher Kino-Blockbuster verbinden, etwas antiquiert.
Das Regelsystem ist eingängig gemacht und die Würfelmechnik hat man schnell raus. Die Rechenarbeit lässt sich locker im Kopf machen. Da sich jeder Wert um +/- 5 verändern kann, ist man selbst mit extremen Werten nie hundertprozentig auf der sicheren Seite. Dennoch ist das Risiko intuitiv einschätzbar.
Etwas schade ist das Fehlen eines Erfahrungssystems. Das optionale Verbesserungssystem setzt lediglich darauf, dass ein Held unter bestimmten Umständen seine Basis-Determination in Powerstunts, Supermächte oder Ressourcen umwandeln kann. Da sich diese wiederum aus den schon vorhandenen Powers bestimmt (siehe Charakterentwicklung), führt diese bestenfalls dazu, dass im Laufe der Zeit alle Charaktere auf ein ähnliches Niveau gehoben werden. Wer aber mächtig beginnt, kann sich nicht weiterentwickeln. Als wirklichen Nachteil möchte ich dies aber nicht werten, da Charakterentwicklung in der Mehrzahl der bekannten Superhelden-Spiele keine große Rolle spielt.
Wie alle Spiele, die auf Aspekten basieren, um Vorteile zu erkaufen, leidet auch ICONS etwas unter einem bestimmten Problem: Man ist schnell versucht, jedes Hindernis so umzuinterpretieren, dass es durch die passenden Aspekte überwunden werden kann.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis

Derzeit ist ICONS für gerade mal 10 USD erhältlich. Dafür erhält man ein in sich stimmiges Regelwerk oder zu mindestens eine gute Regelbasis. Das Artwork kann mit vielen Fanwerken bekannter Systeme kaum mithalten, aber zu dem Preis ist das okay. Für die ursprünglichen 30 USD hätte ich hier deutlich mehr erwartet.
Wie schon das Schwesterprodukt „Mutants & Masterminds“ setzt ICONS auf die Strategie der Micro-Veröffentlichung. Das heißt, es erscheinen Unmengen an Erweiterungen von geringem Umfang (wenige Seiten) zu einem nicht all zu hohen Preis. In Summe kann dies aber sehr teuer werden, wenn man als Sammler alle Veröffentlichungen haben möchte. Leider gibt es auch bislang kaum interessante Bundles.

Erscheinungsbild

ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying wird ausschließlich als PDF ausgeliefert, enthalten sind sowohl eine schlanke, als auch eine hochauflösende Version, je nachdem, ob man das Werk am Monitor, im Druck oder gar auf dem Tablett/E-Book-Reader genießen möchte. Die 128 Seiten sind durchgehend farbig hinterlegt und enthalten eine Vielzahl an Superhelden-Illustrationen von Dan Hauser. Der Stil erinnert entfernt an den von Fate2Go, ist aber wesentlich schlichter gehalten. Die Schrift ist angenehm groß, das kostet auf der einen Seite Platz, ist dafür aber auch im doppelseitigen Broschürendruck noch gut zu lesen.

Auf dem E-Book-Reader (getestet: Sony PRS-T1 und Tolino) funktioniert die normale Version sehr schnell und bietet allen Komfort eines gut designten PDF, wie z.B. ein sehr detailliertes Inhaltsverzeichnis. Verlinkungen innerhalb des Textes gibt es leider nicht. Auch auf einen Index oder ein Glossar wurde verzichtet.

Insgesamt ist das Layout zweckmäßig, auch wenn die Illustrationen irgendwie etwas zu simpel daherkommen. Sie geben dem Werk einen leicht „billigen“ Anstrich.


Bonus/Downloadcontent

ICONS bietet neben dem Grundregelwerk noch eine ganze Reihe von Erweiterungen, die meistens Helden oder Bösewichte abhandeln. Dazu gibt es einige Abenteuer. Diese liegen preislich zwischen 5 und 8 USD für um die 20 Seiten Inhalt.
Wer mal einen Blick auf die Charaktererstellung werfen möchte, kann sich das kostenlose Hero Creation Quick-Sheet anschauen.
Mit der Erweiterung „Great Power“ liefert ICONS übrigens auch vollständige Conversion-Regeln für Fate Core von Evil Hat Productions.

Fazit

Um den Teaser aufzulösen: ICONS war in drei Kategorien der ENnie Awards 2011 nominiert, hat aber keine gewonnen, hier hat gleich zweimal Dresden Files dazwischengefunkt, was natürlich nichts über den persönlichen Spielspaß aussagt, den man mit ICONS haben kann. Aber kommen wir zum Fazit:
Noch nie lag ein Rezensionsexemplar so lange auf meinem Schreibtisch und warte darauf, abgearbeitet zu werden. Mehrfach versuchte ich mich daran, mich in das System einzuarbeiten, aber so richtet fesseln wollte es mich einfach nicht. ICONS ist kein schlechtes System, so ist das nicht, aber es vermag sich auch nicht positiv von den Mitbewerbern abzusetzen. Vielleicht waren die Erwartungen durch die enormen Vorschusslorbeeren etwas überzogen. Mich ganz persönlich konnte ICONS leider nicht überzeugen, da die Regeln von zu vielen anderen Systems gut abgedeckt werden und auf der anderen Seite kein interessantes Setting Lust aufs Spielen macht.

Generell kann ich ICONS Spielern empfehlen, die bereit sind eine Welt auf Nichts aufzubauen und sich dabei nicht davor scheuen, die doch teilweise wagen Regeln zu interpretieren. Klassischen Old-School-Spielern, die für jede Situation eine Regel benötigen, rate ich dagegen von ICONS dringend ab.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS: Gamemaster Screen
by Patrick R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/19/2014 15:38:07
I normally make my own GM screens because I can be sure to include all the information I need. I purchases this because it was a buck.

The 11-page GM screen is nicely laid out with a good 3-panel graphic for the players' side.

3 of the pages contain a character creation summary, which is nice to have in the packet, but not useful for a GM screen. Other handy tables like random events, sample vehicles, sample animals, NPCs, etc. are nice and you can pick-and-choose which to include on your GM screen. The Uses of Determination are welcome, but they should been put on the same page with the rest of the core rules.

I give it a low rating because it is missing a table for stuns, slams, and other combat effects. Meanwhile, it dedicates space for the dice probabilities, which is not nearly as useful or necessary.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS: Gamemaster Screen
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Character Folio
by Daniel O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/08/2014 08:45:43
A nice program for generating characters but I was disappointed that it is not updated with the rules in the Great Powers supplement.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Character Folio
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS: Cold War Conundrum
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/23/2013 11:08:19
High adventure in classic comic-book style, yet right up to date as regards plotline and gameplay.

Opening in media res, the characters are called to help with an accident to a prisoner transport convoy (super-powered convicts, of course), and the action just hots up from there on in. The background is clear, setting the scene nicely for the GM. This adventure is written as a sequel to the earlier Flight of the Nova-1 from the same publisher, but if you have not run it not to worry, it works as well as a stand-alone game. You can even reverse the order and run Flight of the Nova-1 later, notes are provided to show you how this can work.

Events are explained clearly, with a lot of detail about the sequence in which things ought to happen, the options available to the party - and to the opposition! - laid out just where you need them. This is particularly notable when a brawl occurs, but other opportunities are equally well signposted - the opportunity for the party heroes to get some airtime as TV reports home in on the accident, for example.

Once the initial challenge has been met, and the characters settled into their new base (yes, a philanthropist has provided one), the adventure proper begins with a trip to Russia to help guard nuclear warheads on their way to destruction. Alas, someone else has an eye on those WMDs and a dastardly plan to put into action...

Events flow thick and fast, with action and investigation playing their part as our heroes work to thwart that villainous plan. Support for the GM, especially during the rather tricky bits of the investigation, is good despite it being presented quite free-form with plenty of leads for the party to follow up, tasks which will take them all over the former Soviet Union and elsewhere as well.

The fittingly climatic battle takes place at a former 'Science City' once the jewel in the USSR's crown, and rounds off the adventure in a satisfying manner.

Good solid classic adventure well-presented, what more could you ask?

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS: Cold War Conundrum
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Character Folio
by Andrew G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/15/2013 06:53:36
I gave this one star. On a mac running OSX 10.8.5 it just reports that the app file is damaged and suggests I move it to the trash.
Also looking around (after the purchase) it seems that its not being worked on and may have Java incompatibilities.
The blurb has a selling point of full support but no-where in the documentation or on RPGNow is any indication on how to get that support.
It may have been a great idea at the time but I'd suggest this puppy be pulled from sale.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Character Folio
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying
by Yoav E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/07/2013 02:43:25
This game is great for silly, fun super heroic action, and presumably can be used for non-silly ones, though it'll require a bit of tinkering. It is rules-light, which is great for new players or for one-timers.
While being light, it still has some awesome mechanics (anything and everything dealing with Determination, really) - but some of them are very difficult to use while running a one-time, because they require either diverting attention or knowing the characters Challenges really well.

I am definitely pleased, and will use this for a few one timers and mini-campaigns.

Great fun was had.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS: Hero Pack 5
by Chad K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/02/2013 08:20:54
I really like Dan's Hero Packs. I even had him do a character for me in Hero Pack 4. ( Crimson Fist)
Hero Pack 5 is top notch. A cool mix of unique characters.
Art is great. Nice set up of descriptions, background & powers.
If id have one negative- it would be set up. For the teams, if goes hero/villain, hero/villain. Id rather have seen one team, then the other. But I understand that is how the hero spots were done, you bought a hero/villain slot.
Very small complaint for me. A top notch product. I have all the Hero Packs and will continue. Hopefully I can get in on the next one!! A must for any serious ICONS! fan.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS: Hero Pack 5
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS Character Folio
by Thierry H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2013 17:50:53
Sorry, I will give one star because it is just impossible to install it. I have read the ICF-manual.pdf (you have to search for it under Mac "file", which is not obvious when you are working on a pc), I work under windows 7, and this is supposed to be the V1.1.1 of Icons Character Folio. Unfortunately when you unzip the file ICF-v1.1.1 you don't really get the Icons_charcater_folio_installer.jar, or if you get it, when you double click on it opens one more zip file ?!? I don't know if it is normal, but the lack of information doesn't help at all. Personally this product is just a total waste of money, I am very disappointed. If I can give people a piece of advice, avoid this product by all means.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Character Folio
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

ICONS: Operation Shatterstone!
by Chris H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/04/2013 02:05:06
Operation: Shatterstone combines the “planetary disaster” and “alien invasion” motifs into a rollicking fun ICONS adventure. Author Dain Lybarger has populated this adventure with compelling situations, engaging NPCs, and interesting villains. Many possible plot elements and variations are included, so even novice ICONS GMs should be able to run the adventure pretty easily. The adventure would work fine as a one-shot, the beginning to a campaign, or an episode within a larger campaign. Dan Houser’s artwork lives up to the high standards he’s set in previous ICONS products. The layout mimics the layout of Great Power, but reverts to Helvetica Neue for body type, resulting in an overall less attractive presentation. Dozens of grammatical and typesetting errors and/or inconsistencies unfortunately mar the presentation. These issues aren’t significant enough to impede readers’ understanding, but they are noticeable. If DTRPG supported half stars, I’d add half a star to my rating.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS: Operation Shatterstone!
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 89 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG