RPGNow.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 
     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
 Follow Your Favorites!
NotificationsLog in or create an account and you can choose to get email notices whenever your favorite publishers or topics get new items!

 What's New?
Star Fleet Battles: Module T 2012 Tournament Rulebook
Star Fleet Battles: Module T 2012 Tournament Rulebook
$12.00









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
by Levi A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/08/2014 13:10:51
The classic DnD campaign setting, in a handy digital package. I've been waiting for some time for this set to come back into print, so a review of the contents of the books wouldn't be objective at all. Sure, Spelljammer has some rough edges, and in some places is downright wonky, but the sheer audacity of it is what made it so great. With that said, this review is going to focus on the digitization thereof.

The book scans are very clear, appear to quite high resolution (I didn't check the DPI), and are miles better than another one I'm aware of. The box set is split into two books, and all the extra materials are appended to the end of the first book. This is less than ideal (I'd have preferred a third document), but is not any real hardship. (Although, they'd have probably fit better as part of the Lorebook of the Void, seeing as that's the DM book.) They are formatted at the same page size as the book, so I don't know if they where scanned at a higher resolution or not (for the ship cards and tokens, it probably doesn't matter, but being able to print large format versions of the maps would be nice).

There doesn't appear to be a scan of the box itself. What's a box set with no box? Incomplete, that's what. While it's a minor bobble, as many won't miss it and few will make use of it, it still cost this review about 3/4 of a star. While some manipulation with PDF hacking tools can split the books into as many parts as a savvy user requires (or combine them into one), one can't (easily) replace missing content.

I haven't printed any of the contents, so I can't specifically say how it'd go, but everything I've seen indicates it should be high quality.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
by Craig S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2014 13:53:24
This is one awesome book at an awesome price you can't even get close to this price for the hard back. Buy it while you can.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
by Alexander L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2014 08:48:51
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/03/07/tabletop-review-spellja-
mmer-adventures-in-space-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-ed-
ition/

Wow. I can’t express how happy I am to have the Spelljammer: Adventures in Space boxed set once again available to the public. Sure it’s in PDF form instead of in a fun box, but you can’t lose the maps and ship handouts with a digital copy like twelve year old me did with the physical version. Spelljammer is just such a fun and fantastic idea and along with Planescape and Ravenloft, it remains one of my three big campaign settings for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons and is a big part of why 2e is my favorite version of D&D.

Spelljammer somehow manages to change everything you know about D&D while still holding true to the mechanics and core ideas of the game. Through it, you can have a wonderful blend of sci-fi filtered through a high fantasy lens along with the ability to travel from say Oerth to Krynn and then on to Toril. It’s really a wonderful idea and in fact, one started by Gary Gygax himself with Expedition to the Barrier Peaks. After all this earlier OD&D adventure had characters entering a sci-fi location with strange aliens and technological marvels a plenty. What Spelljammer did was simply flesh out the sci-fi aspects of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons while still making them work with wizardry and iron age combat. Spelljammer is the setting where Beholders and Mind Flayers were given complete ecologies, histories and homeworld. It’s the setting where the tinker gnomes of Dragonlance were given a serious look. It’s where Lizardmen were first treated as a playable PC race. It’s the setting that gave us Giffs, Neogi, my beloved Rastipedes and of course GIANT SPACE HAMSTERS. I could go on for hours about everything that makes Spelljammer so entertaining, but suffice to say, the fact that you are getting the full boxed set for only $9.99 makes this not only a must buy, but perhaps the biggest bargain on DNDclassics.com

Spelljammer: Adventures in Space gives you two core books. You get The Concordance of Arcane Space and Lorebook of the Void. The original physical boxed set also came with eleven handouts and four maps. These are now included with The Concordance of Arcane Space‘s PDF. Everything looks as crisp, clear and colorful as with the original print copies and it’s easy to read all of these on either computers or e-readers like a Kindle Fire. Now, the maps and handouts are only the size of a regular page now that they are in PDF form, but that’s a minor kibble at best.

The book you should read first is The Concordance of Arcane Space as it gives you the introduction to Spelljammer. Here you get an overview of the setting and what to expect from it. This is where terms like Wildspace, Phlogiston Spheres and other Spelljammer specific jargon gets explained for the very first time. Even if you never play a Spelljammer campaign, the explanation for everything is just so fascinating, fun and imaginative, that you’ll enjoy reading it. I can’t believe how fresh this feels even twenty five years later. Rules for air quality, gravity, temperature and time are all things that you’ll find in The Concordance of Arcane Space – mechanics you’d never need or even think of for other campaign settings.

Although most of the playable new races are found in The Complete Spacefarer’s Handbook, you will find rules for Lizardmen PCs here. You’ll also find some very important rules for playing a Cleric in Spelljammer and how it can be quite hard to gain spells outside of you God’s sphere of influence. Conjuring and Summoning spells also take on different characteristics. Fire however may have the biggest impediment. This means a lot of common spells and especially healing magic take on a new twist, causing players to think different about what kind of a character to make and the tactics they will use.

Of course, what would Spelljammer be without rules for how to buy and/or build your own ship? That’s all in here too. Of course, building a ship is extremely expensive and you have to maintain a crew to boot. This means Spelljammer is an excellent way for long running characters to use that hard gained loot that is just sitting around somewhere. You’ll also find rules for ship on ship combat, saving throws for all sorts of potential hull materials, crew based morale checks and interplanetary travel.

The last thing we’ll look at in The Concordance of Arcane Space is “The Rock of Brawl,” which gives DMs and players alike their first playable Spelljammer location, complete with story seeds, a cast of memorable characters. There is a lot of great stuff here and the map still looks great. The map does have one minor problem with it though. In coverting it from an oversized map from the boxed set into a standard PDF page, the words “The Lesser Market” and “Dungeon” are warped and blurry. There’s also a red dotted line going through the entire map towards the top. A minor quibble, but one purists might grumble over.

Now let’s talk The Lorebook of the Void. This second book in the “boxed” set is also a lot of fun. The first chapter in the book gives DMs a lot of ideas and suggestions for running a campaign in space as well as one that flitters between worlds. You are also given a glossary of terms and a fun ideas on making alien versions of common D&D creatures. One great example is the Beholder bartender who has a Detect Lie eye instead of the Death Ray one. This lets it be an effective bartender and patrons don’t have to worry about being killed instantly. They do have to worry about disintegration or petrification if they don’t pay their tab however…

Chapter Two is all about Spelljammer vessels. You’re given a whole host of crafts along with their stats. These are common spacefaring vessels and should help DMs running a Spelljammer campaign immensely. The Gnomish Sidewheeler and Neogi Mindspider are amongst my favorites. Chapter Three is entitled “Spacefarers” and it talks about the culture of various D&D races in space. You get a really nice look at all the PC and NPC races common to the game, regardless of setting and how alien versions might be different from established worlds. Goblins, Ogres, Giants, Centaur, Dragons and even Undead have their own listings here. Of note are the entries for Mind Flayers and Beholder, as this is the book and setting that really defined both as a species instead of just creepy looking antagonists. Lycanthropes too have a long and highly detailed section in this chapter – for obvious reasons. The chapter then ends with Monstrous Compendium entries for a lot of creatures, all of which are tremendously entertaining and worth using. Chapter Four is “Known Spheres” and it talks about the core D&D worlds: Krynn, Toril and Oerth, along with important planets or moons within their sphere. That, my friends, is the entire book.

So yes, you’re getting all this plus maps and handouts for under ten bucks. It’s a terrific deal and one any D&D fan can make great use of. Even if you don’t play Second Edition AD&D, the ideas, mechanics and creatures presented here can be applied to any version of the game with a little effort and the end result will be well worth it. Out of everything on DNDclassics.com so far, this is by far my favorite offering (so far) and with a little luck, it will be yours too. Now, let’s see those Ravenloft and Planescape boxed sets on the site as well, am I right?

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod
by Marc T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/05/2014 07:41:21
Not only is this fun to play with your kids, I was actually able to give it to my children and they ran their own games with it. It really is a fantastic product. I only wish WoTC would make more of these!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
by Edward K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/27/2014 13:13:11
Originally posted on www.throatpunchgames.com, a new idea everyday!
Product-Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast
Producer-Wizards of the Coast
Price-~$18 (PDF)
System-DnD Next
TL;DR- Not bad, but the worst of the three Sundering Modules. 80%

Basics-Time to go back to the Sword Coast. Problems are brewing around Daggerford with goblin attacks, orc raids, and gnolls stalking the country side. The heroes arrive outside of Daggerford as the Duke has barred all non-citizens from entering the town. Can the heroes save the town and the people stuck outside from the horrors brewing in the Sword Coast? A DnD Next adventure for character level two to level four.

Story: This module doesn't seem to have as involved a story as the other two Sundering modules. It kind of feels like a holding pattern as the players get to find some interesting information, but the players will have to wait till next module to use it. You get to be a hero, but not completely the one you want to be. 4/5

Mechanics: This module uses new DnD Next mechanics, so that is fun and give more insight into the progress of DnD Next as rule system. I really missed the random encounter tables and other stuff that gave the last DnD encounters season it's amazing flare though. 4.5/5

Execution: This adventure come is in one source book, and I think that hurts the adventure. The players will not see it, but as a GM I felt things were too cluttered with important information being mixed with bits of encounters. I also miss the custom GM screen. I know I would have to print one out, since this product is a PDF. But, I missed those little extra bits. The random encounters really made the world come alive in the last season. I can do that as a GM, but now I need to do extra work! Furthermore, I felt like the story needed a diagram to really help me to organize my thoughts regarding the plot. I feel the story is a bit mixed up and won't help all the GMs across the world coordinate their efforts well. Also for $18, I felt like I didn't get enough. For $30 I got a printed option with the GM screen. What I got was nice, legible, and a fun play experience, but this should have been much cheaper for a PDF product. 3.5/5

Summary: I don't hate this adventure. I've been the roughest to this Sundering adventure path, but I don't hate it. This adventure has the unfortunate luck of coming out after the previous one, WHICH WAS AMAZING! This one feel like it's in a holding pattern for the next adventure. These facts make all the flaws that much more visible. I would have liked two books, a PDF of a printable GM screen, and some help keeping pace of the adventures, so all the encounters GMs can coordinate better. However, this one isn't bad, but I hope the next one lets the players get past level 4! 80%

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Dragons of Eberron (3.5)
by Kristian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/26/2014 18:32:52
The content of the book is fine. I have an original hardcopy. But the PDF doesn't display in Adobe Reader for Android (version 11.1.3). I believe this is related to the fact that it was generated using distiller. This isn't the first PDF in the Eberron line that has had rendering issues either. I'm sorely disappointed.

If Wizards of the Coast is reading this, which I doubt they are because they never responded to my review on Faiths of Eberron, I'd be willing to generate new PDFs using a current version of InDesign for them if they don't have the time or resources to do it themselves.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Dragons of Eberron (3.5)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Player's Secrets of Tuarhievel (2e)
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/24/2014 06:42:17
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/02/24/tabletop-review-birthri-
ght-players-secrets-of-tuarhieveln-advanced-dungeons-dragons-
-second-edition/

f there’s one thing you can say about Second Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons with absolutely certainty, it is that this was the golden age for campaign settings. Dragonlance, Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Ravenloft, Spelljammer, Planescape and more came from this period, after all. The piece we are reviewing today, Player’s Secrets of Tuarhievel, is from Birthright, an underappreciated gem of a setting in its day whose print versions can be quite costly these days. Please note that, in order to actually use this book, you’ll need a copy of the Birthright Campaign Setting. Otherwise, there will be a lot of references to specific events and characters that will make no sense, as the book assumes you have not only read the books for the campaign setting, but are intimately acquainted with them.

Birthright is very different from regular AD&D 2E in that there is no alignment and that player characters are divinely infused rulers of regions where the focus is more on political intrigue than dungeon crawling hack and slash. It’s a very different experience from the usual AD&D 2e game, with concepts such as regency, provinces, holdings, War Magic (and the associated War Cards) and domain turns being routine vernacular for the setting mechanics. Again, if none of this sounds familiar to you, you really need to hold off on purchasing this or any other Birthright supplements until you have picked up the core campaign setting.

Player’s Secrets of Tuarhieveln covers a specific region of the continent of Cerilia. Tuarhieveln is the sole region still belonging to and controlled by the elves. These elves are not necessarily shining nobility, however. They have enslaved Kobolds and goblins for thousands of years, and have a long history of both xenophobia and racism. Now, in the modern times of the campaign setting, the great nation of Tuarhieveln is perhaps ready to tear itself apart, for a “lowly” human sits upon the Thorn Throne, a living symbol of regency within Tuarhieveln, and it decides who will rule. Obviously, a nation of elves who view their race as superior to all others doesn’t take too kindly to a human being chosen as their ruler, or that the Thorn Throne accepted her. However, the twist is that this human, a ranger named Savane, was the chosen lover of the elven prince Fhileraene, the previous ruler of the realm. Before being forced to be a prisoner of The Gorgon (The Big Bad of the campaign setting), he passed his divine powers to Savane so that they took could be passed to the female child she will soon give birth to. I should point out that, if you are unfamiliar with Birthright, you will have no idea who The Gorgon is or what is so special about him, as the book makes no attempts to explain him. As well, the book’s talk of “passing blood” and the like will come off as a weird way of skirting around things like sex and pregnancy. This is not actually the case, but it’s very easy to read this into the text if you don’t know the particular phrases specific to Birthright

The contents of Player’s Secrets of Tuarhieveln are geared towards helping you understand the political turmoil within the domain so that your character, who would be an elven noble ruling one of the many provinces of the domain, can take actions supporting his or her side. Do you side with the human regent, the missing prince and the Thorn Throne, or do you see to ensure an elf, perhaps even yourself, becomes ruler of Tuarhieveln? Again, alignment doesn’t really come into play with Birthright, so pick the side that sounds the most fun for you. By the time you are done reading Player’s Secrets of Tuarhieveln, you will be familiar with the history of the domain, previous rulers, some of the most important moments from the domain’s past and a list of movers and shakers within Tuarhieveln. Most important is the look at how elves play the political game compared to humans, and how vastly different the two view/broach the topic. It’s also worth noting that the politics section also discusses how erroneously both humans and elves view each other’s games of intrigue. You’ll also find maps, story seeds and interesting bits about why there are no clerics, nor any form of organized religion, with Tuarhieveln. It’s notable how truly unique Tuarhieveln comes across, even in a game as unusual as Birthright.

What’s here is great for Birthright fans, but again, the book is pretty useless without the campaign setting. Much of the intent and purpose is lost to readers unless they have the knowledge of how different Birthright is from your normal AD&D 2e game. Some gamers might balk at the $4.99 price tag, considering the original physical copy was only $7.99, but honestly, Birthright pieces are quite expensive, so $4.99 for this supplement is actually a VERY good deal. At the time of writing this, there are NO copies on Ebay, and other entries in the Player’s Secrets line go for about ten to twenty-five dollars. Again though, you NEED to make the $9.99 investment in the campaign setting if you’re even remotely interested in picking this up. Still, you’ll then get digital copies of this book and the core campaign for about the same cost as a physical supplement for Birthright. That’s a pretty awesome deal. If Birthright sounds interesting, but this particular domain isn’t of interest to you, there are many other ones to choose from. Currently, Wizards of the Coast has put three other “Player’s Secret” books on DrivethruRPG.com and DNDclassics.com. Feel free to choose from Ariya, Halskapa, or Medoere if Tuarhieveln isn’t your thing. I do wish the book was a little more newcomer friendly to people who aren’t well versed in all things Birthright, but longtime fans of the campaign setting will enjoy getting a hold of this one.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Player's Secrets of Tuarhievel (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
GAZ1 The Grand Duchy of Karameikos (Basic)
by Thierry S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/23/2014 12:18:19
A fabulous game material unavailable for a long time : Mystara is a great setting for a medfan campaign and this good pdf scans, with maps, for GAZ1, 2 and 3 allow to rediscover this coherent, varied and interesting books nowadays. I'm eager for GAZ5 to 15 availability, and an update for a GAZ4 scan including maps, which are missing according to other reviews...

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
GAZ1 The Grand Duchy of Karameikos (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Player's Secrets of Tuarhievel (2e)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/18/2014 11:35:03
Fancy governing an elven realm? If playing in the Birthright setting, you get the chance with Tuarhievel. The situation, of course, is not straightforward. Currently, there's a human - yes, HUMAN - regent acting on behalf of the yet-unborn heir to the throne. If she has to flee, you may end up running the place, or as an elf noble you might be an advisor or be in charge of one of the provences. Of course, if you want to play a more regular game, Tuarhievel becomes a very interesting place to visit with some intense intrigue going on at the highest level, all of course with an elven twist.

The overview is penned in character by Savane, the Prince's Consort and mother of the unborn heir. She is understandably well clued up about the political situation and explains it well. And a muddled story it is, with the Prince missing in defence of the realm - he's gone to negotiate a peace-treaty with a Gorgon - having asked Savane to rule until his return or the child's coming of age; and many elves quite unhappy about a human acting as regent. Added to this, the seat of power, the Thorn Throne, is an intelligent artefact with a habit of making it very clear whom it deems worthy to sit there!

The history and geography of the realm is detailed, along with the various provinces, flora and fauna and so on. Elven politics and culture are also covered, as well as religion, the military and art and entertainment - a matter of great importance to the elven mind.

Several notable NPCs are described along with their stat blocks, and then there are notes on the holdings that accrue to whoever is the regent. There's a selection of rumours, which could easily be expanded to campaigns never mind adventures, and finally some suggestions as to what strategies might be employed by Birthright players in partiticular in furtherance of the good of the realm.

There are a few maps, although the one of the full realm appears to be missing half while the plan of the area where the Thorn Throne is gets duplicated. Other than that, it's a fascinating realm and could easily prove a good site for a long-running elven intrigue game in its own right.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Player's Secrets of Tuarhievel (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
by John P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/17/2014 19:31:55
SPOILERS AHEAD!

THE GOOD:

Most of this review focuses on the things I didn't like, because this adventure has a lot of aspects that frustrate me. That said, those problems are mainly with the presentation. The content itself, for what it is, is really awesome. There are five fully detailed adventure locations, each with their own unique feel and intertwining threads between them. There's even a little intrigue in town. The maps are beautiful (though they could be much more useful, see below). The PCs always have a choice of what they want to do, and even the dungeons are refreshingly non-linear (compared to Keep on the Shadowfell, which was basically a straight line with the boss battle at the end). There's plenty of good old-fashioned dungeon exploration, with plenty of weird shrines, secret doors behind secret doors, checkerboad floor puzzles, etc. Good stuff. I haven't seen how the combat shakes out, but it looks like a good mix of easy and difficult fights.


THE BAD:

#1. My biggest problem is that the descriptions are too verbose. It would just be much easier if the information was presented in a clearer, more concise way. For example, here is a room description:

"The tents of the Fanged Moon tribe shelter the fifteen orc warriors that live in the castle. Normally, five rest in the tents, five idle in area 10, one is on sentry duty in area 9, two keep watch in area 12, and two patrol the curtain wall (areas 3 and 5).
Development: If the orcs come under attack here, orcs dispersed to other areas join the battle in 1d4 rounds (roll for each group). The ogre in area 4 joins the fight in a similar amount of time. Sezibul joins combat from area 16 in 3 rounds."

They really expect me to make four separate d4 rolls and write down which is which at the start of the combat (when I'm already busy rolling initiative for the orcs and listening to initiative rolls from the players)? Why not roll each round to see which group shows up? Actually, why even make it random? It's not like the party is going to have this encounter multiple times. It would be much more convenient if it was written like this:

"There are fifteen orc warriors in the castle. Normally, five are resting in the tents, and the others are in the areas listed below. If combat starts here, orcs from the other areas join the fight on subsequent rounds:
Round 1: Two orcs (area 12).
Round 2: Two orcs (areas 3 and 5).
Round 3: Sezibul (area 16), one orc (area 9).
Round 4: Ogre (area 4), five orcs (area 10)."

The prose style makes it a hassle to run on-the-fly, and I had to reread the adventures multiple times before I understood how to run them. Almost every published adventure has this problem, and it's really annoying.

#2. The adventure seems awfully complex, with lots of moving parts. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it seems like a poor choice for Encounters, as it makes the adventure harder to run.

#3. Why does it start at level 2? Who starts a campaign at level 2? Again, seems like a poor choice for Encounters, since 1st level characters are supposed to be a simple starting point for beginners (which is presumably the target audience for Encounters). If I was going to start at level 1, I'd flesh out the goblin encounter before getting to Daggerford, and have that get the players to level 2. I wonder if the adventure was originally written like that and changed at the last minute.

#4. As I said, there's a little intrigue in town. But beyond that, Daggerford itself is just a map and a bunch of boring descriptions of boring businesses and the boring people who run them. I don't know why they wasted so many pages detailing the town itself; there's nothing interesting about it. It would really help if there were tables with useful mechanical details (info about the guards and the militia, the kind of equipment available, classes and levels of NPCs, etc.). As is, there's nothing in that section that would actually help me run a game. That's 5 pages wasted. WotC needs to stop paying adventure authors per word.

#5. The adventure says you should use the wilderness exploration rules, but doesn't let you do so. The overland maps don't have hex grids (so what am I supposed to do, use a ruler?). There are no random encounter tables. Actually, both those things would be really useful even if they don't assume we're using the exploration rules (and it would have taken fewer pages than all those boring paragraphs about people in town).

#6. There are a few smaller problems that everyone already knows about. The monsters don't have XP values. The puzzle on page 53 relies on showing the image to the players, but the image itself shows the solution. The region map has a location marked on it that the PCs aren't supposed to know about. These errors aren't dealbreakers, but they do make me wish they'd put in the extra effort.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Player's Secrets of Medoere (2e)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/15/2014 10:54:10
In playing a full-blown Birthright campaign, each player is ruler of a domain... and of course, if you are in charge of a place you need to know all about it. This product is aimed at a player taking on the role of the regent of Medoere, a small but potent theocracy. However, it is an interesting place, and could be incorporated into a more regular campaign as an interesting place to visit (or to come from). While the book supposes that you are playing the regent, and the in character flavour text supports this, there are plenty of notes to facilitate the use of the information herein in other ways if preferred.

It opens with a briefing from the Grand Curate (or Prime Minister) to a newly-appointed Celestial Archpriest, as the regent of Medoere is known. This paints a vivid picture of the realm and the people in it, as well as discussing current relationships with neighbouring domains. If you are playing Birthright, these are likely to change swiftly as play progresses.

Next comes a historial account of the domain. Until about a century ago, the three provinces that make up Medoere were part of Diemed, one of the neighbouring domains. Then a war of independence led by one Daen Roesome led to the formation of the domain named after him, and left these three provinces a bit on their own. However, a priest by the name of Brun Szareh received a divine revelation in which the deity Ruornil imparted much information and directed him to bring people and cultivation to the land, although despite his requests Szareh was not allowed to establish the domain, that task being left for others who followed him.

The history is followed by details of geography, climate, topography and even flora and fauna of the land. Each province is described, with major settlements, places of worhip and other sites of interest being detailed. This section ends with the family tree of the ruling Enlien dynasty (complete with space to insert your character's name!) and details of religious foundations and other holdings.

Next comes a look at the society of Medoere. As well as noble titles and social structure, you will find information about the law, money and the ordinary people of the realm. This rounds off with a discussion of 'game demographics' showing how the population stacks up in game mechanical terms, and a selection of notable NPCs. A section on religious and legal matters follows, then on to rumours, plots and secrets that can be gathered by inquisitive visitors or used as sources for ongoing plots. Finally there is a page of strategy and advice, particularly aimed at Birthright players.

There are several maps and plans to enjoy as well. Even if you're not playing Birthright, this could prove a fascinating place to visit in the course of your adventures.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Player's Secrets of Medoere (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
GAZ1 The Grand Duchy of Karameikos (Basic)
by Timothy S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/14/2014 12:04:41
Good scan! Properly formatted pages in landscape where necessary.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
GAZ1 The Grand Duchy of Karameikos (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod
by Michael A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/10/2014 11:02:27
After reading the scenario I felt sorry for the monsters. This adventure scenario does not seem "heroic". The rules and art are good and this might be usable with a rewrite of the situation the characters are placed in.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
by Geoff G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/09/2014 09:29:01
This adventure is part of the Encounters series and is designed to be played for a couple of hours a week in a game store. I bought this for personal use with my gaming group and am going to review it from that perspective. I have DMed a couple of sessions for my group, and have read through the whole adventure, but we have not finished it.

The adventure comes with a description of Daggerford, and five "dungeon areas", including (low resoultion) maps and a bestiary. Overall I would estimate that the adventure could be finished in 20-25 hours worth of play time.

Good Things:
- The adventure is laid out in such a way to encourage player choice. It describes the town, the principal characters, and for each area it provides a room by room description of the creatures and traps present. Players can largely decide the order in which they want to visit the areas, and there are a number of different ways to traverse each dungeon.
- The adventure comes with a very good description of Daggerford, including businesses, a detailed map, and descriptions of the major NPCs. You could easily integrate Daggerford into your own campaign.

Gotchas:
- The levels are assigned a predetermined points in the story and xp values for monsters is not provided, so you don't have an option to use xp based leveling. This is fine if you usually assign levels this way, and its probably a good fit for Encounters, but some DM's may not like it.
- The adventure ends with many things unresolved. This is good for encounters because you want people to come back for the next adventure. However, many people buying adventures expect all of the major plot threads to be resolved by the end of the adventure, and that's not the case here.

Overall, I think its a good Encounters adventure. The more similar your group is to an encounters group (meeting 2-4 hours biweekly, a possibly rotating cast, etc...) the better this adventure will fit. The adventure may not satisfy a very dedicated group, or a DM who buys adventures to chop them up and use them in their own campaign.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
FR3 Empires of the Sands (1e)
by Gareth T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/07/2014 12:19:16
Knowing little about the Forgotten Realms before running a campaign, I was unprepared for running desert adventures when my campaign led to the desert it was very helpful to have some idea about background for towns and atmosphere to fall back on. This product did not disappoint -- with flavourful examples of shrines, or individuals it made adding in the background easy so I could concentrate on the story.

The examples of local sayings and attitudes was a neat touch. Keeping the monster details light was also good - if I wanted monsters I would buy a bestiary.

A good source book for the DM not that au-fait with the Realms

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
FR3 Empires of the Sands (1e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Displaying 16 to 30 (of 1348 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
 Cart
0 items
 Publisher Info
Wizards of the Coast
Wizards of the Coast
Publisher Average Rating

See All Reviews
Publisher Homepage
Other products (424)
 Hottest Titles

GAZ5 The Elves of Alfheim (Basic)

01.GAZ5 The Elves of Alfheim (Basic)
02.GA2 Swamplight (2e)
03.I11 Needle (1e)
04.D&D Basic Set Rulebook (B/X ed.) (Basic)
05.Ghosts of Dragonspear Castle (D&D Next)
06.D&D Expert Set Rulebook (B/X ed.) (Basic)
07.D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
08.GAZ1 The Grand Duchy of Karameikos (Basic)
09.Dreams of the Red Wizards: Scourge of the Sword Coast (D&D Next)
10.Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
11.Oriental Adventures (1e)
12.From the Ashes (2e)
13.GAZ2 The Emirates of Ylaruam (Basic)
14.GAZ3 The Principalities of Glantri (Basic)
15.B2 The Keep on the Borderlands (Basic)
 
See All
 Gift Certificates
Get Your Favorite Gamers What They REALLY Want...
$10 Gift Certificate
Powered by DrivethruRPG