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RM3 Web of Illusion (2e)
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/14/2013 06:55:24
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/14/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-web-of-illusion-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-edition/-


Web of Illusion is one of those odd Ravenloft adventures that neither fits the mood nor theme of the campaign setting, and actually works better if used as a generic mid-level adventure for PCs. This is not the fault of the adventure’s location, as Sri Raji is one of the more unique locations in all of 2e AD&D, and the Darklord of this domain is one of the more memorable in Ravenloft. Rather, the adventure simply eschews everything that makes Ravenloft, well, Ravenloft, and instead we are given a highly generic and somewhat dull experience that just doesn’t sit well with fans of the Dread Domain, and especially with those of Sri Raji itself.

One of the big problems is that the adventure lacks everything that makes Ravenloft so unique. There is no need for fear or horror checks because nothing about the adventure is scary, spooky, creepy or foreboding. It’s your general run of the mill, “Learn about a big bad guy, enter a dungeon and kill it,” affair. That’s hardly the type of thing one thinks of in regards to Ravenloft. Oerth or Toril based adventures, sure, but not the Dread Domain. Another problem is that there really isn’t a lot of story. The adventure is literally, “You’re magically in a new location. Here’s a magical artifact that can kill the evil being that rules this land. Have at it.” Sure you get a tiny bit of explanation from a few NPCs, but the adventure is so linear and dead set on rushing you into the dungeon crawl that you don’t really get a taste of the setting. This is funny, because the adventure includes a huge section from the Darklords supplement on the background and world design of Sri Raji. Seriously, why include over five pages of background information if your adventure turns this entire country into a one shot location that players will never be able to visit again?

Another thing wrong with the adventure is that it simply refuses to ever pull the trigger on the fact that Ravenloft is a pretty evil place where one constantly has to choose between the lesser of two evils. It turns the guilds of Sri Raji from a bevy of horrible choices that control the political intrigue of the country into a simple black hat and white hat side. Sure, the white hats are all Lawful Evil, but the characterization in the adventure makes them all closer to Lawful Neutral or Chaotic Good. That’s some bad design there. As well, if players drag their feet, the DM is encouraged to run a scene where their would-be allies claim to have infected the PCs with a weretiger strain of lycanthropy. However, the adventure balks at actually doing this, having it be a trick to make players go along with the adventure story. Not only is that kind of lame, but it’s Ravenloft people. Infect those PCs! Look at Dark of the Moon. Here players ARE infected with Lycanthrophy, and it really adds a layer of tension and fear to the adventure. Not with Web of Illusion though. God forbid you actually try to fit the theme or feel of the setting.

Finally, the adventure is just too disjointed for me. It feels like two different writers with two VERY different adventure writing styles each took half of the adventure and threw it together. The first half is a bunch of barely written scenes thrown together without any real order or continuity, and the DM is supposed to make sense of them. Then the second half of the adventure is written in a completely different style and is a very dry dungeon crawl that feels hastily inserted. Web of Illusion is just NOT a good Ravenloft adventure, and it’s kind of a middle finger to the entire campaign setting.

Now you would think after all that constructive criticism that I’d give this adventure a huge thumbs down. Actually, no. As I said at the beginning of the review, Web of Illusion is far from being a good Ravenloft adventure, but it works quite well as a generic hack and slash dungeon crawl. The actual dungeon crawl part of the adventure is really well done. In fact, in terms of explaining and showing how to properly use illusion magic, Web of Illusion is almost a must read for any DM or player who uses Illusionist specialists in the slightest. Showcase layered illusion and how to craft one on top of the other or make the dispelling of an illusion trigger a new and different one is simply genius, and it’s something 99.99% of players and DMs either overlook or never even think that deeply about. The illusions are the most dangerous aspect of the dungeon, and I think anyone who plays this will walk away with a newfound respect for that type of magic. The dungeon is tough but fair and the type of monster the Darklord turns out to be is always a fun one to deal with.

So a thumb’s down as a Ravenloft experience, but a thumbs up if you look at Web of Illusion as a generic hack and slash one shot, akin to what you’d find for say, Dungeon Crawl Classics. The two ratings balance each other out, and I give this a thumbs in the middle. I can’t recommend it if you’re specifically looking to run something Ravenloft for the Halloween season. You don’t have a lot of options to choose from over at DNDClassics right now, but there are definitely better ones than Web of Illusion for showcasing the Dread Domain. As a general adventure, five bucks for a sixty-seven page adventure is a really good deal nowadays, and there’s that great showcasing of how to properly use illusion magic, so it may be worth picking this up, depending on what you are looking for. In the end, Web of Illusion proves the old adage about whether or not to buy a Ravenloft adventure: if the adventure has you killing a Darklord, you probably shouldn’t buy it.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
RM3 Web of Illusion (2e)
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T1-4 Temple of Elemental Evil (1e)
by Brandon B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/11/2013 13:53:15
One of the most fun, challenging and imaginative Greyhawk adventures ever designed. If ToEE is not the greatest Greyhawk module, it is easily one of the very best and is a must for any Greyhawk campaign.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T1-4 Temple of Elemental Evil (1e)
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Dark of the Moon (2e)
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/11/2013 06:37:57
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/11/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-dark-of-the-moon-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-edition-
/

As I’ve said in the past, a good rule of thumb for whether or not a Ravenloft adventure is worth buying or not is whether the plot ends with you trying to kill the Darklord of a domain. If it does, put it down and look elsewhere. Of course, there are always exceptions to this rule. Ship of Terror is one. Bane of the Shadowborn is another. Thankfully, Dark of the Moon is another, even though you’ll be killing one of the more interesting Darklords in the game. The reason this adventure is able to get past the horrible idea of killing a Darklord (which should be all but impossible and trivializes what being a Darklord means as well as the entire campaign setting as a whole) is because you’re given a slow burn up to the inevitable climax. In essence, Dark of the Moon is more a mini campaign where trying to kill the Darklord only comes after a long series of grueling events where PCs will be tested not only by a horde of unwavering lycanthropes, but by the very elements themselves. Much of my time with Dark of the Moon both past and present reminded me of the old Wilderness Survival Guide from First Edition. For many gamers, Dark of the Moon will be the first adventure where they actually have to keep track of inclement weather damage, frostbite, hypothermia and starvation. For some, Dark at the Moon may be too intense for the gamer that just wants a standard hack and slash dungeon crawl. For others, the fact their players will have to deal with so many variables will be a new, exciting and interesting challenge. After all, weather is an enemy that you simply can’t defeat.

Dark of the Moon is designed for four to six players between 5th and 8th level. The adventure is pretty intense and more likely than not, members of the party will die from exposure to harsh temperatures or being eaten by werewolves. Do not underestimate how lethal this adventure is as it’s very reminiscent of some old Gygaxian penned adventures in terms of how easy it is for a PC to meet their final fate here. I’ve found that a Druid has the best chance of survival, followed by a Ranger or a Cleric. Indeed, a Druid may be indispensable to the party surviving both the weather and the werewolves in this adventure. The old AD&D adage about Mages being the best character the higher level characters get is thrown completely out the window here as for much of the adventure, Magic-Users will not have access to their spell components. So that extremely low Hit Point total combined with no magic just paints a massive bullseye on any Wizard PC that takes part in this adventure.

Dark of the Moon takes place in the domain of Vorostokov, which is an analogue for Siberia. Players will be brought to the domain by the mists of Ravenloft, ensuring that they will be ill prepared for a climate of endless frigid winter. Votostokov has little in the way of food as animals that are game animals are elusive and the weather is much too cold for the growing of crops. Villages are sparsely populated and it can take weeks of travel before you find one. As such, players are in a bind. After all, would you want to be wearing full plate mail in below zero weather? That has got to be painful. With the heroes realizing they are pretty unprepared for the weather (unless again, you have a druid or magic items like a ring of warmth), cold based damage is about to set in. So Players will be completely out of their element, both literally and figuratively lost in a land that they have never been in and freezing their collective asses off.

Which of course is when the hordes of werewolves show up. Much of Dark of the Moon is fighting and running from werewolves. If the players have magic, silver or blessed weapons, there will be more fighting than running but if the opposite is true, Pass Without Trace becomes the absolutely best spell in the game for the duration of this adventure. The werewolves in Vorostokov are very different from those players will have encountered before. Instead of your standard werewolves or loup-garou, the lycanthropes in Dark of the Moonare skinwalkers or Loup Du Noir, which actually doesn’t mean skinwalkers or skin changers in French. Discovering the differences between these creatures and your standard werewolves, is a big part of what will help characters to survive, especially as the way to kill the Darklord is extremely convoluted and may take multiple play sessions based on the rolls and wits of the players. There’s also the additional problem that at least on PC WILL be infected with lycanthropy, if not all of them. In Ravenloft you have a 2% chance per point of damage taken of developing lycanthropy – 3% if it is by the Darklord. Considering the sheer amount of combat and that for this adventure you roll after each hit and the percentage is cumulative, you’re going to have a werewolf or entire group of werewolf PCs. The good news is that being a werewolf will help them to survive the freezing weather, give them some nice damage prevention bonuses and help them to regenerate. The bad news is that it basically lets the Darklord of the domain mentally control them at will. A cruel DM will force infected players to find a cure for their lycanthropy after the adventure, but in Ravenloft, that is an exceptionally hard task to accomplish. A kind DM will let the players be free of the disease once the Darklord is dead and that’s what I’d strongly suggest. Of course some player at some point will want to stay a werewolf, but that’s a whole other problem you’ll have to deal with if and when it comes up.

Another interesting aspect of the adventure is how alignments blue here. You’ll find Chaotic Evil Rangers, a good aligned werewolf, and that your best bet for killing the Darklord is by allying with three evil aligned NPCs – two witches and a ghost. More than likely, there will be a few Powers Check rolls made by your players in this adventure. This is actually typical of a Ravenloft as you’ll find strange bedfellows as players must decide between the lesser of two evils. Truthfully though, the three allies you’ll need to make in this adventure aren’t evil in terms of how they are written, but Second Edition was pretty strict with classifying specific “races” (for lack of a better word) as a specific alignment with no room to budge. It’s odd the adventure does this with these three while making huge steps outside the usual alignment with the aforementioned good werewolf and evil ranger who still has access to all his class disciplines.

All in all, Dark of the Moon is one of the better “Kill the Darklord!” adventures for Ravenloft, mainly because while being the climax of the mission at hand, there is so much more going on, that it is only the focal point until the very end. Dark of the Moon will last you several playsessions and while it’s not a top tier Ravenloft adventure, so to speak, it’s still a pretty enjoyable one. You could do a lot worse for a five buck adventure, especially since this one will last you multiple playsessions and really test you as both a player and a Dungeon Master. I definitely recommend this, but with the caveat that you and your players really have to be willing character death or a permanent change into a evil werebeasty.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dark of the Moon (2e)
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Howls in the Night (2e)
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/11/2013 06:36:58
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/11/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-howls-in-the-night-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-editi-
on/

It’s October and what better time for DNDCLassics.com to FINALLY start re-releasing some more Ravenloft adventures than in the month of Halloween. Until now, DNDClassics.com had only sported subpar releases like The Created, the badly written, Children of the Night pieces and the wonderful Monstrous Compendiums for the setting. This month however, we’ve seen four Ravenloft adventures released so far, which is great to see. Today we’ll be looking at Howls in the Night is not only one of the best Ravenloft adventures, but one of the best second edition adventures regardless of campaign setting. It’s extremely versatile and can be adapted to just about any campaign world (except Planescape). Best of all. Howls in the Night offers four different ways for the GM to run the adventure (One for each possible main antagonist) which gives the adventure an amazing amount of replay value, a fact that is all the more amazing when you remember that most adventures written in this time period (regardless of system) were extremely linear and inflexible.

Howls in the Night takes us to the domain of Mordent. It’s an analogue for Scotland and you’ll recognize that almost immediately. From the lush rolling meadows to the dark ominous moors where much of the adventure takes place, the DM should feel more than free to use their best (worst?) Scottish accent to give the NPCs of Mordent some personality. It’s a great setting and one made all the better by the fact the Darklord of the domain never shows up in the adventure. You can generally tell whether a Ravenloft adventure is good or bad by whether or not the goal is to kill a Darklord or not. If it is, put it back and look for a different adventure.

Howls in the Night is a little bit The Hound of the Baskervillies, a little bit of the Black Shuck from British folklore and a lot of Ravenloft twists thrown in. The adventure is for four to six players between 3rd and 5th Level, meaning that the characters have some experience under their belts, but not enough that they can shrug off a pounding. Indeed, much of the adventure is running from or circumventing the almost limitless bog hounds at the disposal of one of the antagonists. As well, the core monster plaguing the town of Mordentshire can’t be defeated unless very specific circumstances are encountered, meaning that Howls in the Night plays a little more like a Call of Cthulhu adventure and far less of a hack and slash dungeon crawl.

I absolutely love the story here. You have a doomed force love affair, the effects of which still curse the village, the surrounding countryside and the principal players a century after it occurred. You have a wonderful curse, as odd as that phrasing may sound, which breathes a lot of life into the adventure, makes it exceptionally spooky and also highlights how well Ravenloft used the concept of curses, especially curses made during one’s death throws. I always found the whole “Bestow/Remove” curse spells from D&D to be implemented horribly and both PCs and DMs would use the spell without any style or forethought. Ravenloft is the one exception to that and a curse made here is extremely hard to get rid of and generally has long ranging dramatic results.

As the principal protagonists in this adventures, Players are hired to exterminate the ever growing problem of what appears to be extremely aggressive wild dogs. Just as the moors slowly extend their reach every year, so too do does this pack of wild canines grow ever bolder and closer to the town of Mordentshire. Of course, players will instantly assume that the dogs aren’t actually dogs. They’re right, but not in the way they think and the end result generally has overconfident players who were relying on player knowledge rather than character knowledge, getting freaked out and humbled by their actual foe. It’s wonderful as a DM to see how players handle their first encounter with the bog hounds and the slow realization that nothing in Ravenloft is ever straightforward.

Besides dealing with the hounds, Howls in the Night has several other nasty surprises for the players. At least one character will probably having to roll for their lives against quicksand. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a playthrough of this adventure where one character meets their end at the hands of a mundane natural occurrence. It’s wonderful as it keeps players really invested in where they are placing their feet and their immediate surroundings. Players will really quickly learn to think on their feet (literally and figuratively) from this adventure. Most of all though, players will be brought into the conflict that occurs between the two main NPCs of this adventure. They are the root of the curse plaguing the village and much of the fun of the adventure comes from the players trying to decide who is wearing the black hat and who is wearing the white hat. Again, the adventure has four different playthrough possibilities, so you can design the adventure to where BOTH are evil or both are victims of the curse rather than deserved recipients. I tend to find the adventure is more fun for everyone involved when you have both NPCs either be truly evil dicks or good people caught up in a bad situation. Regardless, all of the four storylines are extremely fun to play through and no matter which one you choose, your PCs will talk about this adventure for a long time to come.

I can’t end this review without really plugging the artwork it contains. The cover for Howls in the Night by Paul Jaquays is especially spooky and sets the tone for things to come quite nicely. The interior artwork by Mark Nelson has me missing the days when I could regularly see his art in Vampire: The Masquerade, Ravenloft and Shadowrun publications. He also did a wonderful job with the Hellraiser comics back in the day. Both Wizards and Catalyst Game Labs need to hire him back for regular work ASAP! Nelson is one of my favorite RPG artists and it’s easy to see why after you’ve flipped through this adventure.

So yes, Howls in the Night is a truly brilliant adventure from beginning to end. It’s an extremely easy adventure for a DM to run, and it’s hard not to have fun with this. With a price tag of only four dollars, it’s practically begging you to buy it. Howls of the Night is one of my favorite adventures from 2nd Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons as it is creepy, boasts a wonderful cast of characters, a very intricate plot and it highlights just how well D&D works as a horror game instead of a hack and slash dungeon crawl experience. Seriously, pick this up today.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Howls in the Night (2e)
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B1 In Search of the Unknown (Basic)
by David S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/04/2013 12:29:55
Ran as an intro 3.5 not much had to be added. Just some save DCs ect... Took me three week days to read and prep but still not much time each day.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
B1 In Search of the Unknown (Basic)
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B4 The Lost City (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 16:27:20
Another great Moldvay module. This one is so strange, but so much fun. I remember playing this one in 8th grade and honestly I had a blast. It wasn't though till many years later while running it for my own kids did I see it's Pulp fiction roots. Plenty of great influences can be seen in this from Robert E. Howard to Lovecraft to Clark Ashton Smith.

To me this one was always on the edge of that B/X divide. Sure it was a B series module, but it could have easily been one of the X series.
Unlike some adventures I played or ran in the 80s I went back to this one appreciated it more now then I did then.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
B4 The Lost City (Basic)
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X2 Castle Amber (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 16:20:57
This adventure had always been something of a Holy Grail for me. I was a huge fan of Tom Moldvay, I had heard this adventure took place in Glantri and it was full of horror elements. As time went on and I still never found a copy I began to hear more; that it was a crazy dungeon full of crazier NPCs. That it is was more of a thinking module and not a hack and slash one and finally it was heavily influenced by Clark Ashton Smith, whom I always felt was superior to Lovecraft in many respects.

I did finally get a copy, paid a lot for it and I also got a copy here.
The module lives up to the hype. It is not a particularly easy module to run and you better spend a lot of time with it. But for me at that time (the mid 90s when I finally got a copy) it became a great addition to my growing Ravenloft collection. It was not officially part of Ravenloft mind you, but so much of it feels the same that is would have been a crime not to bring them together.

This is one of the last of the truly classic modules.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
X2 Castle Amber (Basic)
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B1 In Search of the Unknown (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 14:36:45
This is my "go to" adventure anytime I want to start up a new group or game. It's a ritual for me, roll up characters and run them through the halls of the lost Castle of Quasqueton. I still have my copy that I bought all those years ago and it was also one of the first PDFs I purchased from WotC. I never really expanded on Roghan the Fearless or Zelligar the Unknown save that they were long dead and their Castle was now overrun with monsters.
It is one of those adventures I can run with zero prep time and each time I learn something new or remember something I forgot.
This module is simple, easy to use and can adapted to any campaign world and even any game.
It is a perfect module for the Basic game.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
B1 In Search of the Unknown (Basic)
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X1 The Isle of Dread (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 14:23:23
Maybe second only to B2 and B1 in terms of numbers of players, but The Ilse of Dread lasts as one of the best Basic-era adventures out there. In today's frame of mind the adventure is equal parts Pirates of the Caribean, King Kong and Jurassic Park. It is a heady cauldron of tropes, ideas and just plain crazy fun. It was included in the original Expert set and it still had expanded maps and more creatures. I never understood why the creatures where not just in the main book, but it did make the module special.
What was so nice about X1 over B2 is you had the feel it was more integrated into the Expert rules; it felt like a logical extension.
I ran it again recently with 20+ years between the last time I had ran it and it felt like a very different adventure. There is a lot of untapped potential here. Enough for several adventures.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
X1 The Isle of Dread (Basic)
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B2 The Keep on the Borderlands (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 13:49:04
I once read that more people have played through the Keep on the Borderlands more than any other adventure. Of that I am sure. I have run scores of new players through it myself including a new generation of gamers.

The module hardly needs an introduction and it really is almost immune to review. Who cares that the Caves of Chaos look like some sort of Monster Condo where all these different creatures live together until those meddling humans show up from the Keep.

Going to the Caves is rite of passage. It is the hallmark of a real honest to Pelor adventurer.
If you don't have it you can't really call yourself a D&D player.

Just remember, "Bree-Yark" means "I surrender" in goblin. Yell it out really loud.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
B2 The Keep on the Borderlands (Basic)
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B3 Palace of the Silver Princess (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 13:41:21
Another classic. B3 has had a storied history, but the module we all actually played has a special place in many gamer's hearts.
For starters it is a Basic module, and lot of material in it is aimed at new DMs working on their craft. While the programmed text of rooms 1 to 6 might look quaint by today's standards, there is a lot of good things here.
For starters the basic premise of the module is a fun one. An Evil artifact, an innocent princess, a dashing rogue on a white dragon. Lots of the cliches of fantasy gaming, but all are played earnestly and not a hint of irony is here.

The module itself is not without issues as mentioned. The map of the castle is enough to drive a sane mapper crazy and some of the NPCs (like the green elf "Protectors") are annoying. But all that fades when you discover the Eye of Arik and destroy it.
I recently re-ran this one for my kids using the D&D 3.5 edition rules. Worked great.
http://timbrannan.blogspot.com/2010/07/return-to-palace--
of-silver-princess.html

If you are new to the Basic D&D game (B/X flavor) then this is a great adventure to get.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
B3 Palace of the Silver Princess (Basic)
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CM2 Death's Ride (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/01/2013 12:54:10
Death's Ride is one of a few adventures I have had the privilege to both play and to run. While overtly for the D&D Basic rules, Companion set, it can be run (and we did) under AD&D. Though some of the special features were lost I think.

The Barony of Two Lakes Vale gave us ample room to move about and try different things, but the it was the NPCs that captured my attentions the most. Ulslime, Wazor and Korbundar lived on in my games for many more years with both Ulsime and Korbundar even threatening my players in the 3rd Ed. game. One, and I am not sure if he was an NPC in the game or one my DM made up, went on to torture my characters for many more adventures after this.

The Death Portal was an interesting bit of necromantic trickery to get the players something to focus on and the new monsters were a lot of fun (the Death Leech nearly took out my characters back in the 80s.)

Calling it a "High level dungeon crawl" is fair, but it leaves out a lot of what made this particular adventure so much fun.
I still have my original copy of this and it holds up well.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CM2 Death's Ride (Basic)
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Q1 Queen of the Demonweb Pits (1e)
by Darin S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/13/2013 11:11:30
Rated this at three stars.

5 stars for the module itself and for DTRPG for hosting it! Can't thank you all enough for this. This module is very creative and deep. Lots of fun to be had for both players and DMs.

1 star for the scan though. It is very muddy and there appears to be a lot of page bleed through.

Averages out to 3 stars for the full rating.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Q1 Queen of the Demonweb Pits (1e)
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X2 Castle Amber (Basic)
by Darin S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/06/2013 13:40:44
I loved this adventure when it first came out. It ranks high on most surveys on peoples favorites and I agree with those assessments. The eclectic cast of characters is a highpoint for me. Other than the map issue (mentioned in other reviews) the scan is very nicely done. The monster on the cover gave me the shivers back in the day. "OMG! It's using a tree for a club! Run!"

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
X2 Castle Amber (Basic)
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HHQ4 Cleric's Challenge (2e)
by Chris M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/06/2013 12:21:23
This is an interesting adventure, I was disappointed with the way the "solo" aspect of this was handled. I was hoping I would have an adventure that was balanced for a single player , not a group adventure written for the DM (me) to have to play the missing aspect of the group out.( could have done this with basically any adventure).
some of the Magic items available within an adventure geared for a player of this level is a bit over power in my opinion.(easily corrected as I will just remove these items or replace, +3 weapons just shouldn't end up in the hands of a level 2-4 player). those things mentioned I am looking forward to running this adventure with my player, it has a cool story and should prove to be fun.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
HHQ4 Cleric's Challenge (2e)
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