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B24: Young Minds
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/20/2017 10:00:12

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 41 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC,1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 36 pages of content, so let\'s take a look!

This module, like Colin Stricklin\'s previous offerings in the series, takes place in the city of Hordenheim, which is...let\'s say, peculiar. If you have missed the excellent \"Death & Taxes\" and \"For Rent, Lease and Conquest\", I\'d strongly suggest getting them. The form a kind of unofficial trilogy and while they all are self-contained, their collective does paint a very interesting picture of the city.

All right, this being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

All right, still here? Great! So, Hordenheim has a bit of a different take on undead and monstrous humanoids and is pretty much a cosmopolitan city - and as such, it should come as no surprise that the place does have its own university, Leverinac Metropolitan University (LMU) - it is here that the module takes place, with the campus being depicted in a truly gorgeous full-color map, player-friendly version included with and without compass-needle and name, so if you just want to scavenge the map, no problem.

We begin this module in perhaps the funniest scene I\'ve seen in a module for quite some time. The adventurers are staffing a booth at a job fair, extolling the virtues of their chosen profession. I am not kidding. This can be absolutely hilarious for anyone who has ever had to staff a booth for a job fair...and the very concept is similarly just so funny to me. And it gets better. During the job-fair, dean Derthag Dwarfeater is introduced- Yes. He\'s an orc. Obviously. Oh, and PCs can witness a harpy pranking a minotaur and have I mentioned Professor Fugglestone, the zombie lord teacher? No, I am not making that up. Better yet, it is said zombie lord who...expires (???) permanently. The PCs are tasked with finding out how the zombie lord was destroyed.

Thing is, among Fugglestone\'s notes the PCs are handed a hand-out, an anatomic drawing of an intellect devourer, alongside several notes. You see, intellect devourers are described as hedonistic creatures, but require a host body to properly feel the respective sensations. The dean assumes such a creature to have infiltrated the campus, obviously underestimating the decomposition of a zombie host body sans animating forces/brain. The irony of an intellect devourer eating a zombie\'s brain...once again is exquisite. It will hence be the PC\'s goal to infiltrate the underclassmen and find sudden changes in personality etc. and root out the parasitic creature.

For the purpose of this, the PCs receive magical rings that revert them to age 17 (with minor stat-adjustments) - and the stakes are high, for, according to the notes, young may well hatch soon and replace the minds of some of Hordenheim\'s most brightest! The PCs receive specially prepared alchemical nasal swabs they can use to find the right persons...but ultimately, getting people to agree to that will not be too simple. After all, a panic should be damn well avoided!

While the rings are detect magic-proof, the intellect devourer can still detect other items - so investigating the creature will not be simple. The PCs will have to juggle their courses and investigative duties (schedule of courses, in this, the semester\'s last week, is not too busy). The schedule, just fyi, represents another cool handout.

The investigation itself is basically a fun sandbox - the respective areas do have their own read-aloud text, with a plethora of different pupils and instructors provided in a nice array of fluffy write-ups - from head librarian to bookish minotaurs and clumsy ogre, the array presented is nice. Rumors, both useful and patently false, circulate - and two factions, delinquents and honor students, will seek to recruit the PCs to their causes. The cool thing beyond that backdrop would be that three sample suspects, in detail, with different evidence and encounters, are depicted: The arrogant hall monitor, the elderly, mean-spirited janitor (who is also a mite) and the ettin-coach all have their own challenges and interactions and can lead organically to one another - when played at a con, you can just run one; otherwise, putting them in an organic sequence is very easy - and the different factions have different goals associated with the respective suspects.

Beyond all of that, the timer\'s ticking and a barroom brawl with a chimera ( student at Trots Tech), a grand game of the local football-stand-in Hurly and an overachiever summoning hellhounds and fiendish dire lions at the same time...so yeah, beyond events and free-form investigation, much like a good Persona-game, you\'ll have such events to juggle. The intellect devourer, once unmasked, may well try to panic and escape, trying to save its brood - but the witlings have hatched...and promptly consume their parent and make off to the ceiling looking for prey. Fulfilled faction objectives during the module will help the PCs establish their standing - the more respected they are, the more help they\'ll receive...and they\'ll need all the help they can get to prevent a full-blown body-snatcher scenario! The module ends, thus, hopefully with a graduation...and hey, when they unmask, the PCs may actually have gained a proper cohort!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no grievous glitches. Layout adheres to AAW Games\' two-column full-color standard and the pdf sports several nice full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and the cartography and handouts are high quality and neat.

Colin Stricklin\'s third Hordenheim module is absolutely phenomenal and proofs that he knows what he is doing. One or two can be happy coincidences; three? Not so much. This module is one of the most hilarious and bonkers modules I\'ve read in quite a while. It is rewarding, imaginative and has some many moments that made me smile, so many cool and creative ideas, it simply is a joy to read. It also can be a pretty amazing module to run for older kids that are not fazed by intellect devourers as a concept; ages 8+ should work well for all but the most sensitive of kids. That being said, adults will absolutely adore all the cool jabs at the education systems, high-school/college/university-stereotypes, etc. - this module is funny on so many levels and provides a thoroughly evocative change of pace.

Absolutely amazing. Seriously, get this module and get the first two as well, while you\'re at it! My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval and the module, courtesy of its unique premise and creative execution. If you need a good laugh and a delightfully irreverent and unconventional module, this one delivers! The premise could carry a whole mega-adventure!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
B24: Young Minds
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Mini-Dungeon #043: Thelamos
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/16/2017 07:47:26

An Endzeitgeist.com review This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM. Oh, and the series now comes in an archive that also contains...drumroll a .tif-version of the map! Yeah, that\'s pretty amazing

Since this product line\'s goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

The complex herein would best be situated under a major settlement, where the existence and new occupancy of such a place would make most sense. By means of a winding staircase, the PCs can enter a place that, ultimately, is woefully disgusting - so pervasive is the stench, that from the get-go, we have a chance to be sickened....and yes, there are traps, for this place is the new base of the Sons of Arratoi, a notorious band of thieves - which, coincidentally, also consists of wererats! Exploring the complex is btw. less of a cakewalk than you\'d assume - while it is very much possible that capable PCs can catch the perpetrators unaware and asleep, they will need to be good: Beyond traps and a rat swarm, dungeon hazards and the like, a well-hidden true treasury, accompanied by a \"proper\" boss can be found.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf. The .tif version included here, which you can easily cut up and hand out to the players as they progress is a huge bonus. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos! If you\'re using hyperlinks, you should be aware that, strangely, in this one they don\'t seem to be working.

Jonathan Ely\'s Thelamos is a generally challenging, fun little sidetrek. The obstacles are diverse enough to render it an interesting sidetrek and the pdf employs challenging terrain, fun foes and a reward for particularly diligent PCs. It is, as a whole, a nice, easily inserted and challenging module for anyone looking for a somewhat icky little sub-dungeon. Barring serious complaints, this receives a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded up due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #043: Thelamos
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Mini-Dungeon #042: The Dreamer's Shrine
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/16/2017 07:45:57

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM. Oh, and the series now comes in an archive that also contains...drumroll a .tif-version of the map! Yeah, that\'s pretty amazing

Since this product line\'s goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

Hidden away under a place of learning, the cultist hideout was crafted from a previously used tomb and has since been used in different ways and expanded. The complex presented makes sense from an game-world internal point of view: Perceptive PCs can e.g. find a way to not sumble into traps and the like, making the complex feel sensible as something that is frequented by the living. Beyond having the chance to find a ghost who demands that evil be evicted from his resting place, these rooms now basically contain the shrine evicted to Cthulhu, including doom prophets. Their magical equipment does receive proper names (nice touch!) and a cursed array of gibberish may put the sanity of PCs foolish enough to read it in peril...

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf. The .tif version included here, which you can easily cut up and hand out to the players as they progress is a huge bonus. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Jonathan Ely\'s \"Shrine of the Dreamer\" is a perfect example for a sensible, unpretentious mini-dungeon. The structure of the place makes sense; the module offers a bit of combat, a bit of exploration, a chance for social interaction, rewards being smart, etc. - there\'s not much more you could ask for. Easily inserted (and adapted to other evil deities, should you require that or prefer another evil deity), this very much is a neat example for a useful and consistent sidetrek. My final verdict will be 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #042: The Dreamer's Shrine
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Snow White – Digital Art & Map Pack
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/13/2017 04:28:05

An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, I usually don\'t cover packages like this, but here, I consider it to be justified. This art & map pack consists of an archive containing no less than 1.2 GBs of high-res .tif files.

Upon unpacking the archive, you\'ll be presented with 3 general folders - one containing Snow White Artwork, one that features the cartography and one for the puzzles.

Let me elaborate: Inside the artwork folder, you\'ll find sub-folders for flora, fauna, items, locations and NPCs - including three variations of Catsle Morsain in fall, winter and summer, the stunning rendition of the water fall of Pondy Falls, the plants and weird animals of the haunted forest (including the smoking worm and the minitaur - not a typo, btw.) or the desktop-worthy rendition of a certain character\'s kidnapping.

Now Snow-White, in case you do not yet own this gem (Why not? Seriously, it is one super-amazing, unconventional and awesome mega-module!!), does feature some of the best cartography you\'re bound to see in either the 3.X or PFRPG-era - Tommi Salama delivers not only amazing top-down maps, we also get isometric maps of the complexes, from humble cabins to castle Morsain to dungeon-levels. And yes, the player-friendly iterations do not have the annoying keys or big secret door \"S\"-markers. Once again, all maps are presented in high-res .tifs, with two exceptions - the GM\'s maps of Morsain with the numbered key are presented as pdfs - and yes, one actually does feature the district map as well.

Finally, the module excelled by not only engaging the hands, but also the mind - there are a couple of simple, but fun puzzles within the pages of the module and if you want the representation of the graphics of both puzzles and solutions, you\'ll find these in the respective folder, depicted as .jpgs.

How much do you get? Well, over 100 files. Let that sink in. Yes, this book is a gorgeous beauty - and if you\'re looking for a way to drive that home via playing it online or want the art and maps for VTT purposes...well, this ought to do the trick. Now it should be noted that this is not required to run the module in the traditional manner...but those of us who\'re using a lot of tech to game will certainly appreciate this pack. It does what it says on the tin and delivers some truly amazing art and cartography. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Snow White – Digital Art & Map Pack
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Winter's Roar: Vikmordere Bestiary
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/12/2017 04:39:55

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This bestiary, spawned as a stretch-goal to the \"Into the Wintery Gale\" mega-adventure, clocks in 62 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 57 pages of content, so let\'s take a look!

Sooo, I\'ve seen A LOT of bestiaries in my years of roleplaying. If you\'ve been following my reviews, you\'ll by now know that the one thing I bemoan most about the current editions of the game would be that the respective creatures don\'t have as much room to shine and be developed as they once had. Well, this bestiary does something interesting in that regard - each creature contained herein is depicted in a two-page spread - this means that, if you get the print copy, you can fold the stats to your side and show the artwork, contained on a hand-out-friendly second page to the players. That is a HUGE deal. Particularly when you consider that Mates Laurentiu\'s art for this book is frankly AMAZING. See that front cover? All those critters? Every artwork within these pages is of that quality. Yes, this is a beautiful book.

Which brings me to the second challenge this faces - I mentioned the lack of space current bestiary-formatting allows for creatures; the sheer size of statblocks means that there is not that much room to develop the flavor of a given adversary, which renders the fluff-writing an exercise in concise writing that is not an easy feat to accomplish. Speaking of statblocks -after more than 5 bestiaries and a vast array of other monster handbooks, it\'s hard to make creatures stand out. We all remember the point in 3.X when slapping a loosely-draconic theme on critters was en vogue...that reminded me of the time when comic books had monkey on the cover. I digress.

I know I\'m rambling, this is going somewhere. Bear with me. So, from a formal point of view, the creatures herein range from CR 7 to CR 16, spanning the reach of the levels the associated mega-adventure deals with. A crucial difference in comparison to similar Norse-themed bestiaries, however, would be that it is crafted to adhere, in style and theme, to the mythology woven for the people of the Vikmordere (hence the title) - in case you are not familiar with this culture, picture them as a thoroughly amazing cultural blend of Vikings and Norse culture with Native Americans. It may sound odd, but it works really well and puts a fresh thematic spin on the subject matter, one that maintains the feeling of being a clear love-letter to both. This is, in some cases, represented by the very nomenclature employed.

Take e.g. the undead revenant-like critter called Aptrgangr, two variants of which are provided (and YES, each of the them has its own statblock and its own full-color art): Lake aptrgangrs not only curse and befoul the bodies of water they\'re in, they may also release a snake from their bodies, constrict foes...but the interesting component here, to me, would be how they establish relevance: Sure, the fluff text talks about their effect and mythology, which is nice and dandy - but the snake provides a visual cue, a plot-device, if you will and a strong visual metaphor; the befouling of water represents a built-in narrative angle for the GM to use and the rest of the build retains combat-relevance. The land-version of the aptrgangr is more straight-forward, though the dark blades, quick coup-de-graces and familiars they gain ultimately mean that they may be fared more in direct combat - but, by virtue of familiar choices, they also retain a sense of foreboding, of omens, if you will. Oh, and rejuvenation.

Woe to any settlement that attracts one of the dread brunnmigi, grotesque fey that lair in wells, who use mimicry to lure their prey in and then drown the unfortunates, spoiling water with sadistic glee. In an age without ready access to running water, one of these predators can easily depopulate a whole thorp if not put in its place! Into these mythological and very real feeling anxieties are realities of the game skillfully woven in - take the elderfey, as an example: This being once was a druid, but one whose unabashed love of life ultimately corrupted him; not ready to accept the cycle of life and death, these beings are tied to a specific tree (which spells doom for them if it is destroyed) - and in order to retain the balance of life and death, they can implant trees in victims, having them grow in a rapid and disturbing pace from those that are unfortunate enough to cross their paths. You know that I like my fey dark and creepy - this one positively qualifies as nightmare fodder as far as I\'m concerned...and I mean that as a complement. It feels like it could have been drawn from mythology.

Or let me talk about the Fafnir dragons - hunted as abominations by their kind, these beings are shapechanging beasts, regal and lethal and have elevated greed and paranoia to a form of art. surrounded by an aura of avarice and capable of teleporting held items to their hoard, these beings are rightfully loathed...but there is more to them. Those that drink the blood of a fafnir may undergo the change into one themselves, somewhat akin to a lycanthrope: As such, they do have a hybrid shape, artfully depicted by Mates Laurentiu. Oh, know what\'s worse? They don\'t breed true. Instead, their unions result in the birth of lindworms, another new creature: Think of these as lethal, serpentine predators with 6 clawed legs that are nigh unerring hunters - not even nondetection will save you from these hunters!

If you\'ve been following northern mythology in its various iterations throughout different editions of the game, you may have noticed that, at one point, the lupine threats in the frigid North have become less pronounced; the Fenris (no, not the oomphteenth build of the original Fenris wolf - these are a whole species) should change that. Black as night, Huge and lethal, these supreme predators can smash you to the ground...and woe to any prone before them - with but a twist of their head, they may tear off limbs of such unfortunates! Frost wisps, harsh, but lawful aberrations in service of winter despise flames - beautiful and alien, mortals to them are magma-blooded devils, which adds a unique spin to any encounter with them. What about a snake-like predator that quite literally is the incarnation of frostbite, with an aura that renders items brittle and hypothermia-inducing cold damage? The visual metaphor, once again, is so obvious I don\'t think I have to explain it.

The horned glacial bear would be another magical beast of ice and snow - and it is, in spite of what I feared at one point, unique - not simply a variant of a bear-like winter-wolf, it can cause avalanches and emit devastating roars. There would also be the høyonde (translates literally to \"high/tall/very\" and \"bad folks/things\"), the spawn of traitorous Vikmordere who consorted with giants, these would be scions of death that not only may channel the forces of entropy (read: negative energy), they also have a nasty death aura that hampers the forces of life. The hidden ones, the huldufólk, also have their representation here - in touch with the very earth and rocks, these fey may animate rocks and sing a bolstering song to the very earth itself...but this connection goes both ways and stone may be used to slay them...

Even what should arguably be lame herein...somehow ends up not being that. Take the icy vigil: A medium construct of a frozen warrior. Stifle your yawns, ladies and gentlemen - they not only generate spawn from the slain, they may employ simulacra, wield equipment of ice and reform after destruction...oh, and put away that staff of fireballs - magic immunity. Disregarding the well-crafted prose, the mechanics of this adversary set it apart as not yet another boring guardian critter. The margygur would be aquatic fey that can sense the currents of destiny and fate like the currents that surround them (cue in Ayreon\'s River of Time) and as such, they may share their prophetic visions with others, making for a cool quest-reward/social interaction...or a deadly foe, should they decide that the PCs will bring doom...

Now the aforementioned vigil would be cool; the treasure golem style Nibelung would be a more straight-forward construct (with cost to create etc., just fyi) - and yes, feeding it treasure will make it grow in potency. You know, I think pretty much all capable dragons in may game have just added a new layer of defenses to their lairs....that aside, the nomenclature-choice is smart here as well, evoking obvious mythological connotations. Now, as is wont to happen, not every creature\'s statblock in a bestiary of this length is necessarily a stroke of genius. The overseer would be one example where that is the case.

Think of these guys as huge oak trees, with 5 dryad-shapes bound within the branches - for these beings are created when 5 dryads bond with one tree: All lose their sentience and become subsumed in the overseer\'s body, its personality wholly independent from the animated fey. This may sound weird, but in spite of the conservative statblock, this is one of my favorite creatures in quite a while - its very existence poses several unique conundrums to ponder: Were the dryads tricked? What threat caused them to undertake this drastic measure? The more interesting aspect, however, pertains the nature of free will: Unwilling to give up its existence, the overseer is understandably opposed to the freedom of its constituent dryads. Then again, they do have a right to reclaim their freedom, a right towards an individual existence, in spite of the fact of their status as \"parents\" of the creature.

The very existence of the overseer is inextricably-linked to the question of free will, it represents an escalation of the phenomenon of parentage as an experience that can deprive one of one\'s self and thus serves as a creature-made warning to retain one\'s sense of self - after all, that does benefit, at least in real life and a case less pronounced, the offspring. Similarly, its existence could be read as a rousing call towards those that continue to leech off their parents to assume an own identity, separate from the parts that constitute it. Of course, you may just shrug and think of it as a \"cool creature with an awesome artwork\" - but that\'s why I adore it. Its straightforward visual metaphor is one that can break abusive and unhealthy relationships by virtue of its impact and puts the creature, at least in my mind, into the rarefied regions where gaming can actually leave people as better persons.

Moving on to less intellectualizing adversaries, the pesta, a horrid monstrous hag armed with a rake, is pretty much a living incarnation of disease, plowing the fields for the reaper - once again, the choice of weapon, while seemingly innocuous, ties in with the visual metaphors we all have consumed, time and again and expands them - by virtue of their arms, they are literally the ones preparing the reaping, much like disease precedes death. If all of that sounded to grim, let me introduce the ratatosk - small fey that love riddles and look a bit like extremely fluffy and cute squirrels with two tails, beings of continuous renewal and destruction...and they\'re good guys. Their artwork is also so cute that I\'d seriously gift one as a plushy to my significant other.

In case you have been disappointed by the potency of sea serpents, the serpent of the depth should change that: At CR 15, these 8-eyed, horned killers not only are majestic - they control the very currents and those caught in their grasp can look forward to being flayed by their lethal, spiky coils. Speaking of disappointment - you know that I\'m pretty much enamored with Norse mythology, so take my word for it when I\'m saying that this book has the better representation of Sleipnir in it: With fire that burns past immunities and the ability to safeguard souls as well as a whopping 100 ft. movement rate, it is an appropriately powerful steed. Snow screechers may look like somewhat fey yeti at first glance...but only at first glance. Beyond the eponymous screech, they can alternate cold or fire damage and generate unsettling sounds, making them perfect ambush predators stalking the camp grounds.

We return to obvious mythological frames of reference with the stag of the whitewood - an alseid-like (think centaur with deer instead of horse-half) and a stag\'s head evoke so many tropes from our real world myths, I do not even know where to start: From the white stag to the alseid-ish angle to the hunter, there is a myriad of connotations and implications to add to these...and that from a guy who usually does not like this type. The tundra troll would be more interesting from a mechanical point of view, with fragile, shoddy shields and armor allowing for some nice tactics against theses beings.

Unique: The vaettir, life-draining undead icy corpses have a draining aura and go into a kind of hibernation sans food - but they also generate haunts! Another undead would be the vereri stalker - who casts his spells via the focus of a severed head! (Yep, you do NOT want to be coup-de-grace\'d by these folks...)...oh, and with a hair or similar part, they can and will track you! They, like 3 other critters here, are one of the few creatures whose art does not get the full-page treatment. While we\'re on the topic - what about a frost-themed banshee-like undead spirit with access to hexes?

If you\'ve noticed an absence of amorphous, strange threats - what about the aquatic vatndökk, a slime whose very touch suppresses magic...and who doubles as a magic-dead zone? Yeah...and they may capsize vessels. Considering the frigid climate, these things will put the fear back into the high-level adventurers...and they represent one of the most delightfully deadly adversaries herein. Then, there would be the winter wyrm and winter wyrmling - both represent basically ice worms. Yeah, I know - there are quite a few of those out there already - but bear with me, their respective builds are actually nice, with pit creation, hibernation and fantastic artworks.

The final creature herein can partially be seen on the cover - the wintertide jabberwock, with its one line- and one cross-shaped pupil that can only be slain be severing both of its heads. With eye-rays, head-regeneration and a fear of vorpal weapons (understandable!), the creature represents a great high note to end the book.

Conclusion:

Editing is top-notch on both a formal and rules-language level - in the instances where I took apart a statblock, I noticed no serious hiccups. Formatting-wise, some very minor aesthetic hiccups can be found - there are instances where the first paragraph of the flavor text is formatted like a statblock ability....hey, come on, I\'m trying to find something to complain about, all right? Layout adheres to an absolutely gorgeous two-column full-color standard with borders that employ graphic elements coded as Norse. The artwork by Mates Laurentiu is absolutely stunning and makes this one of the most beautiful bestiaries I have seen any 3pp put out. Each of these critters could, quality-wise, be found in a Paizo/WotC-book - the artwork alone is worth getting this...and yes, I\'d advise in favor of the softcover: The fact that you can show the one-page monster-illustrations sans spoiling the statblocks to players means that you\'ll spare time and effort printing the art as handouts. The fact that they all have one style adds a great unified visual identity to this book. Oh, and yes, the book comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Justin Andrew Mason and developer Stephen Rowe are both names that I associate with quality; in this instance, however, they delivered something that exceeded my expectations. You see, I get to see a metric ton of monsters. I\'m spoiled beyond belief by Legendary Games\' mythic monsters and bestiaries and my expectations at this point are VERY hard to meet. This book surpassed them by the sheer value of consistency. There is something I consider great (not \"good\", not \"very good\", \"great!\") in every single critter within this book.

Let me elaborate: When we boil it down, monster-design is both an art and a craft: You can string together numbers and components like feats; no problem. The artistry is when it comes together, when you add those unique abilities and give the mathematical construct its own sense of identity, its own story. In the best of cases, though, it does not end there. Take Kobold Press - the Midgard-setting they made is pretty much defined by the mythological resonance it evokes. I do not use the excellent setting lightly as a frame of reference.

We, as human beings, have a rich tapestry of myths that are, if you believe anthropology, to a significant part extensions of our conditio humana, our shared experiences. It is thus that you can find parallels between different cultures and their animism, religion and myths - they serve to illustrate facts, concepts and experiences - often in an anthropomorphized form. These tales continue to evolve with our lives; much like the changed experience of the industrial revolution gave rise to fresh incarnations of horror, much like Web 2.0.\'s slender man and similar creepypastas, we are defined by our mythweaving, by the incarnations of truths and symbols we inherited, by the complex constructs that generate a shared frame of reference to communicate.

One way to excel at monster design lies in mastering mechanics and artfully making the unique; another, less often seen, lies in tapping into this shared frame of reference, into the mythological sphere, and employing the powerful resonance it evokes within us all. There is a reason for that: It\'s hard. You see, the very first thing we usually do when running games is to take that frame of reference and apply it. Thus, straight adaptions feel old, stale, been there, done that to us. The genius of this humble bestiary lies in tapping into the shared frame of reference, the cultural resonance shared, and employing it in a creative and new manner that makes it a cohesive, unique entity.

A cynic may accuse me of over-intellectualizing in this review; my response would be that me actually pausing and analyzing to this extent is not something I do lightly or by accident; one creature that manages this feat is a happy accident; two are a tendency - a whole book full of them, however, is intentional, deliberate craftsmanship and artistry. This book represents one of the best bestiaries I have read in quite a while and its creatures will make plenty of appearances in my games. This is a steal, an exercise in excellent, unpretentious (in spite of my analysis - this is very much a bestiary, not a lecture in academia!) design - and oh boy do I love it to bits. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval and this is furthermore a candidate for my Top Ten of 2016. Get this!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Winter's Roar: Vikmordere Bestiary
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Mini-Dungeon #041: Feischkammer
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/11/2017 08:05:41

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM. Oh, and the series now comes in an archive that also contains...drumroll a .tif-version of the map! Yeah, that\'s pretty amazing

Since this product line\'s goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

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..

.

Still here?

All right!

So, for all non-Germans out there: \"Fleischkammer\" translates, literally, to Fleshchamber. Does not bode well, now, does it? The complex works best, logic-wise, near a sufficient accumulation of raw material, read: victims, for it is the home of one thoroughly nasty man named Hakkar Wolkennen, also lovingly known by his soubriquet \"Soulflayer\". The mad wizard is obsessed with the creation of, you guessed it, flesh golems and thus, one of the first obstacles will be for the PCs to dismantle to entry doors to the proper complex, for a flesh golem is holding them barred. The complex itself is sensible and features some nasty traps to further deal with the PCs if the golems and the evil wizard do not suffice. As a minor complaint, the latter is not hyperlinked and making a wizard of this level on the fly can be a bit of a challenge. The complex does reward the PCs appropriately for braving its challenges, though.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf. The .tif version included here, which you can easily cut up and hand out to the players as they progress is a huge bonus. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Jonathan Ely\'s Fleischkammer is a generally well-crafted module that, much like the primary antagonists herein, can be summed up as brawn over brains; the nature of the opposition does mean that magic-users won\'t have much to do herein, which is perhaps the one weakness of an otherwise nice mini-dungeon. Having something for these guys to do in the respective combats would have been helpful. That being said, apart from these minor complaints, one can still consider this to be a nice module, particularly to \"reward\" the group\'s melee-characters. As such, this sidetrek receives a final verdict of 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #041: Feischkammer
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Mini-Dungeon #040: The Kabandha's Request
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/11/2017 08:03:05

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM. Oh, and the series now comes in an archive that also contains...drumroll a .tif-version of the map! Yeah, that\'s pretty amazing

Since this product line\'s goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

In the middle of the wilderness, the PCs come upon a kabandha - badly wounded, he relays the tale of his tribe being subject to the attack of an evil cyclops and his retinue of ogres. Thus, it falls to the PCs to find the home of the reclusive kabandhas and stop the desecration of this place. From a vine-tangled circle of standing stone on the surface, the PCs will have to open heavy portals towards the small complex and deal with the adversaries within, while gaining some nice insights into kabandha culture: A marut hero depicted, a hall devoted to truth-finding and the eggs (and future) of these beings can be found within - provided the PCs survive the ogres and the deadly cyclops, that is.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf. The .tif version included here, which you can easily cut up and hand out to the players as they progress is a huge bonus. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Jonathan Ely\'s exploration of this complex takes a cool, often-neglected critter and adds a bit of cultural dimension to it; for that, I do like the pdf. Similarly, the flavor of the complex is nice and clever PCs can employ the stone circle outside to level the playing field a bit. At the same time, the module does not have that much going on for it beyond the flavorful tidbits and combat - no social skills, no traps or the like. This does not make the module bad, mind you...but compared to other mini-dungeons, it does render it more straight-forward and less versatile. My final verdict will hence clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #040: The Kabandha's Request
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Mini-Dungeon #039: We All Start Somewhere
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/11/2017 07:59:08

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM. Oh, and the series now comes in an archive that also contains...drumroll a .tif-version of the map! Yeah, that\'s pretty amazing

Since this product line\'s goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

Let\'s face it - if most of us were to embark upon the life of an adventurer, we\'d not look for Rappan Athuk, the Darkest Dungeon or a similar hell-hole to start off our career. We\'d start looking for something that feels like we can actually survive it, right? Well, the complex near Raakayras is exactly one such place - relatively peaceful, yet manageable...and other adventurers will probably have taken care of all those really nasty threats...right?

Well, things aren\'t always as they seem: The complex depicted still sports some nasty traps and is the result of an aftermath of the deeds of a particularly nasty wererat, who poisoned wyrmling eggs contained in protective vats of acid...well, all but one, who since then proceeded to eliminate said scoundrel as well as the most dire of threats from the vicinity. Relaxing in an acid bath, slaying the remaining wyrmling will be a challenging endeavor...and actually one that may destabilize the region, beginning the campaign already with an emphasis on consequences I tend to enjoy.

Trap and hazard-wise, modifications of effects and unique obstacles are pretty damn cool, though one instance of the word \"damage\" missing constitutes a minor hiccup...or something that got left behind due to word-count-restrictions.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf. The .tif version included here, which you can easily cut up and hand out to the players as they progress is a huge bonus. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Stephen Yeardley\'s introductory complex presented here is challenging and the final boss can be downright brutal...but then again, it can also be a great kickstart of a new campaign, already featuring the potential for Diplomacy, for reaping what one has sown and for a contextualization of the mini-dungeon within one\'s preferred campaign world. Considering the limitations of the series, that is pretty impressive.

Overall, this represents a fun first module to throw at players in a new campaign and thus receives 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #039: We All Start Somewhere
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Into the Wintery Gale: Wrath of the Jotunn
by Jacob B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/11/2017 01:07:23

AAW Games brings us a new adventure with Into the Wintery gale: Wrath of the Jotunn. This adventure was written by Justin Andrew Mason and features a campaign based on classic Norse mythology. For fans of tv shows like Vikings and The Last Kingdom, this adventure will provide ample opportunities to get one\'s Viking on!

The art by Jason Rainville, Mates Laurentiu, and Tommi Salama is utterly breathtaking!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Into the Wintery Gale: Wrath of the Jotunn
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BASIC04: A Miraculous Time
by Dean J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/23/2016 13:17:43

A really Fun yultide adventure. I normally create my own but ran out of time and bought this in desperation. IT was REALLY good and my group thoughly loved it. Aprently this was the highlight of CHristmas! Pair it with mince pies, mulled wine and a good soundtrack. Haunting woodland music, dripping creepy cave music and "It's the most wonderfull time of the year" for the finallale



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
BASIC04: A Miraculous Time
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Mini-Dungeon #038: The Spinner's Hole
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/07/2016 09:16:19

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM. Oh, and the series now comes in an archive that also contains...drumroll a .tif-version of the map! Yeah, that's pretty amazing!

Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

There is a little village called "Spinner's Folly" - and it may be aptly named, for they have an...interesting local tradition: Thrice a year, nature-affine adventurers are invited to a local dungeon, the selfsame one depicted herein, and given an interesting task: Enter the dungeon known as the eponymous spinner's hole...and subdue the giant spiders therein. You see, the local economy is relying completely on the giant spider silk, so killing them as per the usual adventurer modus operandi just won't do. This also means that this level 1 adventure would make for an interesting "man/womanhood rite" type of introduction to the adventuring life.

Within the dungeon, remnants of animal sacrifice, spider swarms and poison darts can be found and sheets of webbing as well as secret doors contain sections of the dungeon, providing some serious challenge.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf. The .tif version included here, which you can easily cut up and hand out to the players as they progress is a huge bonus. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Jonathan Ely's "Spinner's Hole" is perhaps the most concise of his mini-dungeons that I've analyzed so far: On paper, it may not sound like much; the traps, for example, with their exclusive emphasis on poisoned darts, could be more diverse. In play, however, the module actually works really well. I used it as part of playtesting and the unique entry vector of the scenario with the emphasis on the odd, local economy/custom, alongside with the challenge of dealing with swarms at level 1 made this a fascinating module that turned out to be more fun than its very focused theme would lead you to believe. It is hence that I award this 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #038: The Spinner's Hole
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Mini-Dungeon #037: The Unreachable Terror
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/07/2016 09:11:27

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM.

Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

All right, this mini-dungeon presumes that one PC is subject to some sort of divine quest: A remote and almost unknown shrine of the deity, situated on an island where the eponymously named village of Unreach is found, has been subjected to an unpleasant curse: The island looks like a horseshoe bent almost to closure, with steep cliffs everywhere but on the Southern side, where a shore can be found. The aforementioned village is also known as the edge of the world and the settlement comes with full settlement stats, including fluff-depictions of notable PCs and a box that contains investigation clues to be unearthed. The trail of said clues identifies the plague affecting the village as demon fever and points towards the doing of hags...and indeed, the PCs will have to deal with night hags here...but even after winning, they will not have prevailed; astute PCs will note the bloated corpse of a villager they have probably talked to - said villager would be the final hag, who has infiltrated the village - dealing with her final concludes the curse, with the night hag heartstones providing a means to deal with the plague.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Justin Andrew Mason's "The Unreachable Terror" pushes the envelope of the format in a great way; any halfway decent GM can extend this module with more clues, roleplaying, random encounters etc. to a full-blown adventure situated on an evocative island. While the module is slightly harder to include in a campaign than usual (you need a remote island - no problem in nautical environments, though!), it is also significantly more rewarding than most. In fact, if e.g. your convention-GM fails to show up, this makes for a flavorful, interesting module you can run on the fly. If you're good at roleplaying, you can easily get a whole day's worth of gaming out of this mini-dungeon. Alternatively, you can use this as a kind of backdrop for its nice map/village as well. Nice attention to detail: The settlement's impoverished condition is removed upon the PCs being successful in this adventure. While slightly more skill uses for clues than just Diplomacy would have been the icing on the cake, I found myself really enjoying this mini-dungeon, mainly for the nice level of dressing it manages to cram into its small array of allotted text. Concisely written and flavorful, this is well worth a final verdict of 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #037: The Unreachable Terror
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Mini-Dungeon #036: The Scrag Queen's Sanctuary
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/06/2016 09:05:46

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM.

Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

A couple of years ago, this little druidic stronghold has been overrun by a horde of trolls - no in ruins, the subterranean parts of the complex still remain - and actually manage to provide a concise exploration experience: From molds to strange, magical rooms to track the movement of the stars - the flavor of an old magical complex is captured well, with the traps and objects complementing the flavor. Beyond the rank and file trolls, however, it is the boss that deserves special mention, being the eponymous scrag queen...and a black half-dragon, to boot! Attacking from a pool of putrid water and with an actually effective flight plan, taking care of the BBEG of this mini-dungeon is trickier than one would expect...as she escapes in another pool, which is connected to a secret part of the dungeon! Knowledge skills, just fyi, help filling the blanks the PCs may potentially have and yes, the terrain actually is relevant in this one. As a minor complaint electronic users of this file should be aware of: One critter is not hyperlinked; it's a common enough one, though.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players. It should be noted that here, I have seen the artwork before in another context, but to make up for that, the map's more beautiful and detailed than usual, which is actually a plus for me.

Jonathan Ely's venture to the scrag queen's sanctuary is a fun, inexpensive sidetrek that sports atmosphere, a challenging boss and thematically fitting obstacles. A statue erected for a traitorous druid may even raise some follow-up questions, if you so desire. Anyhow, this module stands and falls with the boss; don't get me wrong, the rest is nice, but the villain here is the most intriguing component and makes for an nice, fun challenge with some neat tactics. The mini-dungeon can be inserted without much hassle into a given context, just fyi. How to rate this, then? Well...I'd kinda be inclined to settle on a final score of 4.5 stars and round down...but ultimately, particularly considering the limited space available, what has been crammed into these 2 pages is pretty impressive and well worth of rounding up.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #036: The Scrag Queen's Sanctuary
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Mini-Dungeon #035: The Queen's Estuary
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/06/2016 09:04:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM.

Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

It's a marvelous day in the forest; the birds are chirping and all's well...whether by accident or intentionally looking for it ( an adventurer vanished in these parts...), the PCs will notice a branch in the path...and if they investigate, they'll meet a nasty pit trap...and see a campfire burning outside a simple hut, right next to a gorgeous pond....though that one's inhabited by a water elemental. Nearby, there's a stone statue...of the queen of a local swarm of none-too-calm sprites. Why? Well, a hag has turned the queen of the sprites to stone and now, the sprites want the PCs to undo the harm. Of course, they may have already done that, if they ran into the hag before, for she offers them food that nauseates the PCs: No save. No designation as a poison-effect...not a big fan here.

If, however, they attack the sprites, they'll have a harder time getting to the treasure they offer...for that is guarded by liveoak'd bushes that may mutate into a treant when attacked by the foolhardy.

On a minor formal complaint, the pearl reward offered as an aspect of the module does not have a value or precise stats linked.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, but not as tight as usual; I noticed minor formatting hiccups here and there. Oddly, the pdf does not sport the Series' usual bolding for skill checks and the usual italicization for magic effects. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

It should also be noted that the pdf offers some nice read-aloud text for GMs less adept at improvising text. Rachel Ventura's "Queen's Estuary" is a solid on-the-road sidetrek. It is somewhat unspectacular, but thematically concise and thus can be considered to be a solid, if not perfect addition to the series. The villain, usually a creature known from subterfuge, somewhat is restricted by the limited space available, making the villain frankly less effective than usual for the creature. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded down.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #035: The Queen's Estuary
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Mini-Dungeon #034: Mysteries of the Endless Maze
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/06/2016 09:02:26

An Endzeitgeist.com review This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked and thus, absent from the pdf, with only deviations from the statblocks being noted for the GM.

Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right!

This is a ready to use portal-maze, but one with a twist: Upon entering one of the segments, you roll 1d4; on a 1, the segment's challenge is a riddle; #2 is a trap (4 of which are presented), #3 is a random monster (6 of which are available) and if a riddle is solved, the PCs can get one of 4 prizes. The riddles presented are brief, but not the lame old classics you will have seen before...unless you're really, really into riddles. If a segment of the maze has been completed, its portals activate. Critters defeated carry keystones and ultimately, these can be used to access the vault, where the nasty boss of the complex is awaiting alongside the sizable treasure. As a minor complaint, only the defeat of monsters will actually net keystones, which could have been handled slightly more flexibly.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players. The pdf does sport one nice piece of original full-color art - kudos!

Justin Andrew Mason's Mysteries of the Endless Maze is an amazing little puzzle-dungeon; it is not one of the annoying mazes that just frustrates players and has a smooth, nice progression rate, at least in my game it had. That being said, one minor nitpick is that you should carefully read how the dungeon works; due to the limited word-count available, its precise functions require a slight bit more observation on part of the GM. Not that it's opaque, mind you. The dungeon also has a nice replay value and whether as a maze in Sigil, as a sub-level, as the BBEG effing with the players - the complex has a ton of uses and can be inserted literally at any time and any place. All in all, a well-crafted mini-dungeon worth of a final verdict of 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #034: Mysteries of the Endless Maze
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