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Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by Neil P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/01/2016 22:14:39

Actuall old school is not my thing to play, but I still enjoy a good read. And this is one. Full of imagination, thrills, and a few good laughs as well (gives ol' Disney a what for). I don't expect much for free, but this is the quality of a major for sale product. The production is darn good as well. If you are running an old school game get this fer sure!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
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Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by Bob P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/09/2016 19:38:31

This is AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I would have happily paid $30-40 for this free product. I have been waiting for this for YEARS!! and it was worth the wait!!!!!!!!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/22/2016 14:04:41

Incredibly comprehensive. It has more petty gods thanyouwill everuse. A must have!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by Torsten O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2016 19:20:34

This has everything I had been hoping to add to the game I'm running. Gorguos art and layouts. The writing has been consistantly clever and evocative. I'm a fan.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by patrick m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/03/2016 20:57:11

A fun way to look at some interesting lesser gods. With the AD&D feel it filled with me with nistoligia



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
PA1 Vault of the Faceless Giants
by T. L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/06/2016 11:02:49

PA1 Vault of the Faceless Giants review


Billed as an old school adventure module from New Big Dragon, by Richard J. LeBlanc, Jr.


First off, I love the old school modules and by 'old school' I mean early 1980s TSR modules. Vault of the Faceless Giants does a good job of looking old school. The two-colunm layout, the boxed text, stat blocks, maps, etc; reading the module really made me feel like I was reading an early 80s TSR production. It is black & white throughout, with the exception of the monochrome colour cover. I found the artwork, though not abundant, to be pleasing. It accents and breaks up the text nicely. In my opinion, the production quality is very professional.


A few disclaimers: I read the PDF version, I got the PDF when it was offered for free recently on DriveThruRPG and I have not played the module.


Vault of the Faceless Giants is labelled as PA1, the first part of the PA-series. This series is meant to highlight (and make use of) Old School Adventures™ Accessory PX1: Basic Psionics Handbook, also from New Big Dragon. It is necessary to have the Psionics Handbook to get the most out of the module (especially if you want to run it out-of-the-box). Otherwise a bit of extra work is require by the DM, but I don't consider the Psionics Handbook essential. Another thing to note is that any Psionic characters in the party might dominate play, or at least grab more of the spotlight.


Also, as the first module in the PA series, it is an introductory adventure meant for level 1 characters. With a little work by the DM it could be used for higher levels. As well, it appears to be the only module currently available in the series. Modules PA2 and PA3 are mentioned in the text, but they do not appear to be available anywere. I assume they are future releases (this being written in January of 2016). It doesn't matter much, because Vault of the Faceless Giants can easily be run as a stand-alone adventure (although see mini-dungeon, below).


Back on the topic of potential work for the DM, and things that may prevent out-of-the-box play: the setting of the module is very strongly south/southeast-asian. This includes heavy use of mysticism from those cultures (e.g. chakras, meditation, etc.) If this does not fit into your personal setting, you might have some work to do. For example, I don't think this would run well in northern Middle-Earth or a Viking setting. It also makes use of planar cosmology, which may cause trouble in someone's personal world. Nothing here is something that a good DM could not work around, but just to note that is a potential for extra work to make it fit your own campaign.


Finally (yes, finally!), what is the Vault of the Faceless Giants? It is a dungeon crawl, through what I consider a medium-sized dungeon (~50 rooms). I guess it would take a session or two to complete, but thay would all depend on how you play. The dungeon is meant to be realistic, in the sense that it is not a funhouse dungeon. Although effort has been made to include lots of unique and interesting rooms & encounters, it might seem like players are fighing slight variations on the same enemies over-and-over. This is a typical limitation of realism/naturalism, not the Vault itself. (Note: I like funhouse dungeons).


The module is actually a 'two-in-one', because in addition to the main dungeon there is also a mini-dungeon. The mini-dungeon is meant to act as a transition to the next adventure in the series (PA2). Since PA2 is currently not available, this may make the extra mini-dungeon a little less useful. In any case, I am sure a good DM could make some use of of it.


Finaly, a set of pre-generated characters and a bestiary of new monsters is included at the back. Always a welcome sight.


Overall, I found it an enjoyable read (I can only assume it would be more enjoyable to play). I will definitely be looking out for the next releases in the series, and other similar New Dragon old school products as well.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
PA1 Vault of the Faceless Giants
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PA1 Vault of the Faceless Giants
by Lora A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/21/2015 07:27:33

This was a great adventure to run, but the lack of a wandering monster table for the dungeon itself left it feeling kind of empty. (That's why I gave it 4 stars instead of 5. I would have done 4.5 if it was possible.) I ran it without the psionic element because I didn't have the supplement, but doing so took nothing away from the adventure. The battle at the bell went too easily, largely because of a lucky die-roll on the thief's first shot, but I still would have beefed it up a bit (and I will when I run it again!)


As a first-level adventure it was wonderful not to have to deal with the typical "fight the goblins/rescue the unicorn" simplistic plots that many beginning modules feel like. In fact, there's a lot of material for development for later adventures. It left my players wondering, "Was this the only temple?". "Are there other planar rifts that need closing?", "Will that thing be coming back for us?"


Overall, a great adventure. I am glad to add it to my library!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
PX1 Basic Psionics Handbook
by Rachael S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/11/2015 12:41:47

I really enjoyed reading this book.
I like the Chakra system. To use this with 1st edition games would be very easy. I plan to use the wild talent portion of this rules system for the old system. I do like the character classes as listed for rare monk/mystic type NPCs. I don't see having a PC with that kind of skills. The only change I plan on making for my 1st ed is to use the 1st ed rules for att/def modes and psionic strength points and this wild talent system for what Chakra you have access to and what abilities you get.


The list of powers/abilities is quite well thought out and tied quite nicely to each Chakra. The only suggestion I would make is to have a few crossover devotions as there is more than one way to get to the same effect.


I also like to couple of rules;


1) Psionic are twice as strong as Magic.


2) Psionic defenses will all ties


EX: use of magic telepathy by spell or device can be stoped by psionic telepathy of half level. Spell like ESP level 2 can be blocked by psionic level 1 telepathy or even mindblank defense.


All in all I highly recommend this for any DM who has psionics in his/her campaign.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
PX1 Basic Psionics Handbook
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PX2 Extra: Planar Primer
by Eric F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/06/2015 09:37:30

Have you ever wanted to take your basic or OD&D parties onto the planes but in the AD&D 1st edition Dungeon Master's Guide only the 'high level' parties got to play there? Need to throw your PC's into the deep end of the multi verse? Well wonder no more because New Big Dragon Games Unlimited Old School Adventures™ has a brand new pdf with everything to jump start your PC's into the deep dimensional morass that is the multiverse. The Planar Primer is seven pages of stripped down easy access nastiness waiting for your PC's to stumble into the astral and beyond.
So Richard LeBlanc Jr has stripped everything down to a usable format for Labyrinth Lord or B/X and made it an easy access for DM who don't have the time to deal with the issues of conversion, reference, and all of the little details that make planar and dimensional travel a headache everything here is boiled down into an easy to use format. Basically this is planar travel without tears and its pretty nifty. The break down is easy to understand and there are some old favorites for magic items even. The planar travel isn't the nightmare its been in the past and the author explains everything out like stereo instructions step by step from set up to plug & play making this a very easy to understand book on the planes. There's a bit of everything laid out in easy understand and plain English. Its pretty much all there for the DM to pick, choose, and use as they see fit.
Everything is laid bare in this book from the basics of plane physics and its effects on magic, to thumbnail sketches of the planes themselves, a quick overview of magick on the planes, a smattering of magic items and diagrams outlining the planes, the ways magic effects them and your PC.
The nice thing about this book is the fact that there's no real emphasis on how to use this pdf, you could easily tack this onto a Mutant Future session as easily as a regular game of B/X Dungeons and Dragons or mix it up. The fact that its free makes this an even more enticing little gaming morsel. There is a ton that can be done with this little pdf, such as grafting onto other campaigns and getting much expanded other dimensional multiverse. The nice thing is the simplicity and functionality of the piece, it makes adventure crafting quite nice in a simple way when a DM doesn't have to reach for the Manual of The Planes. For a short seven pages of old school retroclone fun, this is a damn little useful book. Four out of five, I kinda wish there might have been a bit more of this book but it is free!
Eric Fabiaschi
Swords and Stitchery blog
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other old school systems supported?
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andstitchery.blogspot.com/



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
PX2 Extra: Planar Primer
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PX1 Basic Psionics Handbook
by Edward H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/04/2015 16:11:08

It might sound like faint praise to say that this product is "as good as it can be all things considered", but in the context of designing a OSR psionics system, that's actually a compliment. Anyone attempting to integrate old-school psionics (one of the most notoriously fiddly bits of AD&D) into the streamlined minimalist B/X model of play is really attempting to square a circle. This product executes some parts of that project commendably well, and even the parts where it doesn't succeed still manages to be interesting and worthy of study. I've been waiting a long time for its release, and even planned certain elements of my campaign around its anticipated release.


The editing is high quality; I found a table that listed "min meight" instead of "min height" (weight?) on page 13, but no other issues. The illustrations have a retro minimalist feel and do a good job of invoking the theme of psychic warfare. There's high-quality index and a separate set of tables at the end that could be clipped and integrated into an existing GM screen.


To give potential purchasers some idea of what they're buying, this product ("the Basic Psionics Handbook", henceforth PX1) needs some short description. The major selling point of PX1 is that it reconstructs the original vision for a dedicated psionicist class (the "Mystic") based on communication with its creator, Steve Marsh. The first publication of a D&D psionics system (in the Eldritch Wizardry supplement) essentially decided to disassemble Marsh's class for its spare parts, reconstructing it into the "wild psionics" system that passed over into 1st Edition AD&D. The PX1 psionicist isn't a perfect reconstruction of that lost class, but it's as close as we're probably ever going to see. In particular, it also restores some of the original cultural flavor of the class abilities, which were clearly inspired by the various siddhi of Hindu mythology.


The basic mechanical modification to the old AD&D system is that all abilities (disciplines and attack modes) now require a saving throw vs paralysis. The number of psionic strength points has been scaled down for mathematical simplicity, and the various defense modes now provide modifiers to both the saving throw and to the damage/duration of the attack effects. This effectively reduces the huge combat matrix tables in 1st Edition down to a single 5x5 attack-defense table, and also lets the mystic play a little more like a standard caster class that piggybacks on existing attributes and saving throw statistics. The tedious requirement to track hourly regeneration is mercifully replaced by a full-restore of points by a single night-rest, as with other BX/LL casters.


But there's plenty of other useful stuff in here too. There's a reorganization and balancing of the various disciplines into thematic categories similar to later psionics systems, but with an eye toward keeping a short list that highlights some of the early "classic" powers. There's a convenient collection of some of the iconic 1st Edition psionic monsters, with slight modifications to fit with new mechanics and avoid copyright infringement. And for purists who want to retain the old "wild psionics" approach, there's a short appendix outlining a way to assign random talents to other classes.


If there's a weakness to PX1, it's in the implementation of attack and defense modes. On the one hand, it does preserve most of the cosmetic aspects of the old system, retaining all the names as well as the idea of cross-referencing them on a grid to determine the results of mental dueling. But the cross-pollination between 1st and 2nd edition ideas leaves the interactions feeling more muddled. Instead of just having damage modifications (1e) or having saving throw modifiers (2e), there's now a combination of both, a redundancy that suggests overly dissociated mechanics. In particular, this leaves the "high" defense modes (Intellect Fortress and Tower of Iron Will) seeming generic, with no particular strengths or weaknesses -- in contrast to the 1e grid where Id Insinuation can strongly counter those area-defense modes, making them dangerous to overuse.


Another oddity that probably reflects vestigial elements of abandoned mechanics is that Psychic Crush (now simplified to a direct damage ability) is still priced higher than all other attack modes. This is something that made more sense back in 1e, where it could cause instant death. But in PX1 it's hard to see any good reason to use Psychic Crush over Psionic Blast, an area attack that also inflicts a devastating multi-round stun despite being cheaper. It's like a magic system where Fireball is a 3rd level spell, but Magic Missile is 4th level.


But probably the biggest problem is that the system maintains a museum-curator's fidelity toward one of the peculiar aspects of the 1e system: the tendency of weak psionic ability to actually be a curse rather than a blessing. The developer acknowledges this after the presentation of the new Monk class, a martial artist with some limited psionic empowerment. Once this class's tiny pool of psionic strength points is depleted, it takes hit-point damage from every psionic attack. Yet even worse is the fate of wildcard psionics users, who could see their pools depleted by a single attack -- because they'll only gain enough PSP to cast their lone wildcard ability. This is actually more punitive than in 1st Edition, which at least gave wildcard users a deeper buff of attack/defense points based on their latent "psychic potential". (Well, assuming you did well on that percentile roll...) With a GM who has any tendency to throw psychic monsters at you (i.e., any GM using this product), you absolutely DON'T want to be psionically awakened as a wildcard!


It's worth comparing PX1 to the much simpler (two-page) psionics rules created for LL by Procter and Curtis in Realms of Crawling Chaos. The latter makes no pretense of having any purpose other than giving alien abilities to a few Lovecraftian monsters, but it actually does a better job of carrying forward some of the most fearsome thematic aspects of AD&D psionics. For example, it keeps Psychic Crush as the "psychic version of death spell", it allows Id Insinuation to retain its mind control function, it allows for the long-term coma effect from Mind Blast and feeblemind effect from Ego Whip, and so forth -- all despite drastically simplified mechanics. This sits better with me. I think that the theme of psionic effects being uniquely unnatural (flavor-rich character-wrecking stuff on par with level draining) is even more important from a thematic standpoint than retaining a table-based implementation as psychic arm-wrestling. PX1 has a more mundane and less horrific idea of what psionics should be -- a design preference which might be to the liking of some, but not to others.


There are also a few questions that could have been anticipated and answered a little more directly in the text: Does being hit by a spell or physical attack break the concentration required to activate an ability? What is the "psionic level" of a wildcard user? How are new disciplines and modes learned/selected during character creation or when leveling up?


One final minor complaint is that the rules frequently reference use of the Astral and Ethereal planes, which aren't explained in much detail and may or may not fit easily into the cosmology of a particular campaign world. This is another legacy dating back to the original Eldritch Wizardry version, which packaged psionics together with some new astral/ethereal monsters.


But there's no reason not to buy this product, since it's easy enough to just use the parts you like and ignore the parts you don't. Just be aware that you're purchasing only a conservative revision of one of the more problematic sections of the rules-as-written AD&D experience. I suspect that I'll use the classes and monster stat-blocks on a regular basis; I'm more likely to either write my own system for psionic combat, or to just ignore this section entirely. I'm certainly interested in purchasing a future PX2, perhaps a "Manual of the Planes" with some discussion of astral/ethereal encounters or some alternative visions of how psionics could work differently in other worlds.


(It should be noted that this is a "first impressions" review, and some opinions might shift after playtesting.)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
PX1 Basic Psionics Handbook
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PX1 Basic Psionics Handbook
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/03/2015 12:54:55

I love Basic-era gaming. Basic/Expert D&D was the first D&D I ever played. Even when I had moved on to Advanced D&D, it still had a strong Basic feel to it. So I was very, very pleased to hear about +Richard LeBlanc's new psionics book, Basic Psionics Handbook.
If you have been reading his blog, Save vs Dragon, a lot of what is in the book won't be a surprise, but it is all great stuff. Even then there are things in the book that are still a treat and a surprise.


The book itself is 58 pages (PDF), full-color cover and black/white interior.

The book covers two basic (and Basic) classes, the Mystic and the Monk. Both use the new psionic system presented in the book. The system bears looking at and really is a treat.


Overview. This covers the basics including how psionics is not magic and how attributes are used. It's a page of rules that slot in nicely with the normal Basic rules. The basics of psychic power including Psionic Level and Psionic Strenght Points (PSP) are introduced.


Mystics are next. Mystics in this case are more molded on the Eastern philosophy of mystics, not the clerical sub-class-like mystics I have detailed in the past. Though through the lens of Western thought. That's fine this is not a religious analysis, this is a game book. This class helps builds the psionic system used in this book based on the seven chakras. Chakras divide the psionic powers into broad groups; something like the schools of magic for spells. As the mystic progresses in level, they open up more and more chakras.
Each chakra has seven Major Sciences and twelve Minor Devotions, similar to the old AD&D rules (but not exactly the same, so read carefully). This gives us 72 devotions and 42 sciences. That's quite a lot really.
As the mystic progresses they also earn more PSPs and more attack and defense modes. They are the heavy hitters of the psionic game.


Monks are the next class. Monks really are more of psionic using class in my mind and to have them here next to the mystic is a nice treat for a change. Everything you expect from the monk is here. Unarmed attacks, no need for armor and lots of fun psionic based combat powers. The monk does not have the psionic power the mystic does, but that is fine it is not supposed to. It does have a some neat powers from the mystic's list. One can easily see a monastery where both mystics and monks train together, one more mental and the other more physical. The monk has plenty of customization options in terms of choice of powers. In truth it is a very elegant system that shows it's strength with the mystic and it's flexibility with the example of the monk.

This is very likely my favorite monk class.


Psionic Disciplines detail all the powers of the chakras. It is a good bulk of the book as to be expected. There are not as many psionic powers as you might see spells in other books, but this is a feature, not a bug. Powers can be used many times as long as the psychic still has PSP. Also many do more things as the character goes up in level.


Psionic Combat is next and deals with the five attack modes and five defense modes of psychic combat. The ten powers are detailed and an attack vs. defense matrix is also provided. The combat is simple and much improved over it's ancestors.


The next large section details all the Psionic Monsters. Some of these are right out of the SRD but others are new. Personally I am rather happy to see a Psychic Vampire. Though it is not listed, I assume that these creatures are also undead and are turned as if they were vampires.


Appendix A deals with something we abused the hell out of, Wild Psionics. At two pages it is the simplest set of rules I have seen for this sort of thing. Also it looks like something that could be ported into ANY version of D&D including and especially D&D 5.


Get out your crystals, Appendix B details Psionic Items. Again, short, sweet and to the point.


Appendix C: Psionics and Magic is a must read chapter for anyone wanting to use both in their games.


Appendix D: Phrenic Creatures turns normal creatures into psionic ones.


Appendix E covers Conversions for Monsters from LeBlanc's own CC1: Creature Compendium.
Appendix F details how to convert any monster into a psionic one.


We end with a a couple pages of collected tables and the OGL.


Bottom line here is this is a great book. Everything you need to play psionic characters and add psionics to your game. Personally I am going to use this to beef up The Secret Machines of the Star Spawn which I also picked up today.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CX1 Extra: Gnomes
by Eric F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/15/2015 16:25:18

Richard J. LeBlanc, Jr. has turned out some damn fine quality retroclone system's material and I became familiar with his work on Petty Gods and his damn fine Creature Compendium. Now he's released his free eight page preview of gnomish goodness titled CX1 Extra Gnomes perfect for both BX,OD&D, and Labyrinth Lord based games. This is an eight page PC based supplement perfect for back introducing in your old school campaigns includes: deep gnomes, forest gnomes, rock gnomes and tinker gnomes, as well as 3 pages of supporting spell descriptions. This is according to the RPGNow description.
This is eight pages of race as class with a gnomish flare to the product, there racial abilities and little touches that give these gnomes a bit more of a distinct touch to each one. The powers and abilities reflect the mythology and legends that surround their type. There is a nice balance and flare for each.
For example the Svirfneblin (deep gnomes) can appraise gems, have the ability to determine sloping passages, figure out stone works and has several abilities usable once per day including rendering creature blind if they fail their saving throw, the ability to cast an illusionary disguise around themselves, and blur. Then there is the Forest gnome described as stewards of nature who possess druid-like magical abilities, but are also versed in the underground skills common to most gnomes. Mature forest gnomes often find themselves in the role of woodland sages. The rock gnome is one of my favorites and features many of the common abilities seen in AD&D 1st and 2nd edition. Rock gnomes are the most common type of gnome, easily distinguished from other types of gnomes by the size of their noses. They are miners, fighters and illusionists.The final type offered by the CX1 Extra Gnomes is the Tinker Gnome; 'Tinker gnomes are experts in a variety of mechanical devices. They are focused and purposeful, and they revel in their personal accomplishments, often congratulating themselves for a job well done. Tinker gnomes, like rock gnomes, are slightly larger than halflings' Tinker gnomes play fast and loose with many of the second edition conventions of mechanical objects, systems and weird contraptions associated with gnomes. The release of CX1 Character Class Codex is coming soon and this free download serves to wet the appetite of the OSR public. Is it worth the download for your OD&D, BX, Labryth Lord, Swords and Wizardry, etc. retrclone games? In a word yes!
Eric Fabiaschi
Sword and Stitchery blog



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CX1 Extra: Gnomes
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CX1 Extra: Gnomes
by Timothy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/13/2015 18:44:11

If this is any indication of how CX1 Character Class Codex will turn out, I anticipate a great sourcebook for B/X D&D and Labyrinth Lord. This 8-page sample offers details for playing four race-as-class sub-races of gnomes: the deep gnome, forest gnome, rock gnome, and tinker gnome. The special abilities for each sub-race do a nice job of capturing the lore around the various types of gnomes. I particularly liked the 3 pages of forest gnome spells.


One small question I have is about deep gnome balance -- they are able to permanently blind or deafen one target per day (if the target fails a saving throw). This feels like it could be abused, and is powerful for an ability available from level 1. I've never heard of svirfneblin having this ability, but I'm no expert, so perhaps this was an iconic ability in earlier editions.


I look forward to the release of CX1 Character Class Codex, and hope it enriches many OSR games.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by Richard K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/10/2015 12:16:26

Highly creative and humorous in a snarky way, but ultimately unusable for what I was planning. The gods I wanted to portray in my campaign would be ones from Earth history, including as many of the "petty," or household gods we still know about. I didn't get past the "B" gods before I lost interest, since I felt like I was reading a compendium of someone's demonstration that they have far too much time on their hands. Maybe somebody who is trying to make a campaign filled with dark humor could find this list useful.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
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Petty Gods: Revised & Expanded Edition
by Corey W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/08/2015 20:23:19

I thought it was going to be more planned out and useful. It uses the words "petty gods" in the wrong way. When used in the past, it referred to gods warring over petty rivalries at the expense of men. Thus, I thought I would find a lot of good antagonists and bosses, but found little in that regard. It's a book of humor to entertain yourself on a monday night, not a useful role-playing supplement.


The book includes the mostly useless demi-gods, servitors, cults, magic items, scrolls and spells.


There are things there of use, but several themes are repeated and many of those "petty" (or rather, "pitiful") gods and other individuals and items would be best served as a simple list of gods and other stuff with unstatted single paragraph descriptions, like a glossary. I'd be far more interested in one or more mythologies demonstrating the petty rivalries of lesser gods, common or previous unheard of, that earn them the name, rather than a loose assortment of demigods most of whom are absolutely meaningless to game play. I was hoping for some bosses, but barely 1 in 10 are worth any use. The listed magic items should be related to the gods shown, but most are just simple useless magic items that don't really belong in a book about gods.


As the Preface indicated, they were rather enamored with the name, just as I was, (It's a great name,) but had absolutely no plan in its execution. (A great name is meaningless if you are not inspired to a great plan.) Like the box, Reflecting on Unknown Gods, indicates, its not very exciting.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
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