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Idyll, Romantic Fantasy
by Joshua H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/17/2013 21:03:33
Idyll could work for one-shot games, but (despite being advertised as a "romantic fantasy" rpg) it doesn't add any innovative mechanics or advice. On the other hand, the sample adventures would probably be fun to play out (with any system, really). The sample adventures might even serve as helpful examples (to newer GMs) of how to structure a good mini-adventure.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Idyll, Romantic Fantasy
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Legends of Steel: Broadsword Ed.
by Ralf W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/09/2009 04:20:48
I haven't used the BroadSword / 1PG system, so I can't actually comment on the rules section.
I bought this, because I was looking for a Sword & Sorcery setting. Don't expect a setting where everything is described down to the last detail. The world is described in broad strokes, but very evocatively. Almost every sentence contains a plot hook. This fits nicely with my idea of S&S: The story is mainly driven by the characters and not necessarily a world-spanning plot of an evil mastermind as in Heroic Fantasy.
The same with the map: Sometimes when I look at a map for a setting, I must admit, that it is done skilfully, but it doesn't actually appeal to me. Here, when I looked at the map, something clicked and I wanted to play in the setting.

If you like the cover, you'll like the rest of it :)

Pro:
- evocative setting
- great cover
- evocative map

Con:
- interior illustrations could be better
- layout could be better (can't say why)

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legends of Steel: Broadsword Ed.
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Hero Force Giant Size Super Special
by Francis G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/05/2008 03:12:06
Hero Force is a nice compact superhero game that you can just pick up for an evening and have fun with. For a ridiculously silly price, you get you do get a complete superhero role-playing game. But naturally, for a game this cheap and fun it can be a little rough around the edges and naturally does not allow you to create every superhero imaginable.

But that is where the Giant Size Super Special supplement comes in. For an even more ridiculous price you get bigger package containing a wealth of material. Included within the 30 odd pages are more superhero character types to fill in the missing blanks from Hero Force, expanded notes on the original types, more super powers and some optional rules as well. This alone is worth the asking price as suddenly you have so much more flexibility when you design your characters, but the GSSS does not stop there.

In addition, this supplement provides you with a campaign setting - Victory City. Located wherever you want it to be, Victory City provides you with a place to locate the action. The City is divided into five boroughs and each of which are described along with notable personalities, heroes and villains, complete with statistics. Each borough is different enough in style and substance that it seems impossible not to be able to fit an adventure of some sort somewhere in the City!

Rounding out the supplement are five more adventures written in the normal Hero Force style and set within Victory City, each of which is enough for a good evenings play.

If you are a fan of Hero Force, then the Giant Size Super Special is a must. For a cheaper price you get so much that will truly expand your super game!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hero Force Giant Size Super Special
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The World of Broadsword
by Andrew P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/29/2008 10:09:07
I got a free copy of World of Broadsword for winning a contest, and I must say it was a very nice prize.

If you're playing Broadsword, then the bestiary is a very nice expansion that provides lots of adversaries for your games.

If you're playing some other fantasy rpg, then this is still a great product for your game. The campaign world provided has just the right level of detail for my taste-lots of plot hooks on every page, but not so much detail that it takes forever to read or impairs the GM's ability to customize the world in his own way.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The World of Broadsword
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The World of Broadsword
by Olman F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/23/2008 19:25:39
Well I finally got down to printing this out and reading it properly and I am really impressed! There are three sections, some new rules and monsters, an overview of the world of Broadsword and an adventure. I had already read the adventure in draft form and really enjoyed it. It captures really well the feel of an old Savage Sword of Conan, with a nice range of locations and great characters.

But it's the world of broadsword that I found really inspiring! The map itself is no thing of beauty, deliberately done in an old-school hex style. But it's all there and easy to read. The text is basically a brief description of each city, with Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. They are very brief, a page each, but that is enough. You've got every kind of adventuring city (the desert kingdom, the city under military rule. the slave city, the dark sorcerous city) and each description really gives tons of awesome adventuring hooks. Inspiring stuff like:

"Because of Hogar's remote location, their weapons and are armor are rare in most of the world. For the few hardy souls who make the journey, braving the mountains, bandits, hill tribes and other perils, the profits from even a modest sized caravan of such weapons can allow a man to retire in comfort."

I mean that's a mini-campaign right there! Just reading that package immediately triggered a whole narrative in my mind, ending with a shattered caravan at the unreachable bottom of a mountain crevasse and heroes just grateful to be still alive, laughing bitterly to themselves at the twisted humour of their gods.

What's more, as each city is described, their relations to each other are also laid out and slowly you see a very complex and twisted state of politics, one that is rife with espionage, manipulation and outright war. The goal of creating a world that you can plop adventurers into anywhere and have stuff to do has definitely been achieved here. This could be used for any high fantasy campaign.

Really good stuff overall. It actually makes me want to run a campaign of this nature and I'm someone who is done with high fantasy. I'm going to go paste this into rpgnow.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The World of Broadsword
by Simon Y. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/04/2008 21:44:42
The World of Broadsword includes a section on new advantages, a bestiary, an overview of the major cities and features, and a new adventure. Compared to the original Broadsword, the writing is more sober, factual, and informative. Not as campy, but it still retains that sword and sorcery feel.

The advantages are fully in the spirit of the cinematic sword swingers, there are six new ones for your players to chew upon. I personally would have liked a few more, perhaps by cutting a picture or two from the bestiary section they could have squeezed some more in. That leads us to the Bestiary. It's not inspired but you do get all the stereotypical monsters, animals, and creatures that one is expected to encounter, along with a blurb on their special abilities if necessary. One thing that I have a love hate relationship with in it is that what it tells you is essentially, how hard it hits, and how hard it is to kill. On the one hand it means that if your PCs want to interact beyond "I see it....I SMASH IT IN DA HEAD!" you'll have to make up those extra stats. On the other hand, if your players are going for the whole barbarian ethos; chain mail bikini wearing, over-sized musclebound, or swearing by Crom, then 9 times out of 10 it is going to be "I see it....I SMASH IT IN DA HEAD!" There's some black and white art here for the various monsters(though animals and common enemies such as skeletons don't rate having an illustration, and I don't blame them for that decision, everyone should know what those look like without needing it sketched out) with varying levels of quality, but it gets the job done. Anyways, it's a pretty necessary and well done portion if you're going to be playing Broadsword with the 1pg rules(will definitely cut down on prep time), but nothing spectacular.

On to the world section. Now this is where the product really shines. Each major city gets an overview, and then a SWOT analysis(strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats). As a GM, one of the things that has always bothered me is where to draw the line on how much the PC's should know as 'common knowledge' versus what they need to ask around for. Give them too little, and all they do is head to the tavern to wait for something to happen, too much and there's no incentive for them to ask around. This covers that nicely, the overview gives enough that you won't have befuddled PC's wandering around aimlessly if you let them have that much info, and the SWOT gives you plenty of things to tell them about if only they dig a little bit deeper. Not to mention that it essentially gives you 4 or 5 plot hooks for every city. Heck, even if you just hold up the map, close your eyes, and point, you'll have half a dozen adventures that you can delve into at the nearest city. The location section is a little bit sparser, but still gives plenty of mysteries and adventures that your PC's can stick their noses into. Though personally there are some locations that I would have preferred to be treated almost like the cities in their descriptions(e.g. The Moors of the Witch-Queen? The Tribes of the Sikkar Plains? I could definitely see a page worth of info on each). There's also a small section on the gods, which is nice, but personally if I were to GM a game in the Broadsword world, I'd just as soon drop in a pantheon that has a little more detail than what's given.

The River Pirates of the Belsa is the new adventure. And I have to say that Mejia really knows the tropes, we have all the ingredients to put this firmly in the sword and sorcery genre. The witchy woman with her leopard right out of a Frazetta painting, the dashing rogue, trials by fire, treachery and backstabbing, and to top it all off, an ALLIGATOR PIT! Campy and cheesy, perhaps, but does it set the tone of the adventure nicely? You bet. The other thing that I especially liked about it was that there was a section devoted to the major characters that the PCs would be interacting with, I thought it a nice touch and something that I wouldn't mind for other RPGs to adopt(since many just give you a stat block and make you infer their motives by their actions).

At this price it's essentially beer and chips money purchase. And even if you're not interested in the core Broadsword game, you can use this setting. Just drop in your favored system and viola, instant game world. Forgive me, but I think the best analogy is that it's like cooking semi-homemade. With the World of Broadsword you're getting the bare bones(well, actually you get bones and major organs) of a setting that you can fill in without having to search out the relevant passage. You don't have to devote hours and hours trying to draw out and create your own world, or else spend a bundle of cash to buy a setting book(which you'll then need hours to read through), in order to have a coherent and consistent world for your players to explore. And I think that's a very valuable thing, gamers are looking for ways to keep the time needed to have fun low, we've got busy lives and being able to run a pick-up game with a few friends on 10 minutes or so of prep time is great.

The key here, is recognizing what you're getting and what you expect from it. Don't expect a work of art or minutiae filled tome of knowledge, do expect a pre-made world with enough detail in the SWOT analysis of the major players to let you jump in headfirst and not have to overly worry about inconsistency. Which is something that I think both GM's and players will appreciate highly. All in all, if you need a world, and don't want to spend the big bucks or long prep time, maybe it's a one shot game or you just don't have the free hours, then the World of Broadsword is the way to go.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The World of Broadsword
by Garry W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/29/2008 18:02:42
I still can't believe how good this product is! Simple and to the point with no complex rules to bog it down (as per the 1PG standard), yet still giving a complete and highly satisfactory campaign setting for the Broadsword game or any other sword & sorcery rules set that you'd care to use. The art is nice, the feel for the genre is great, and the dedication to the late Lana Clarkson (patron goddess of 80's S&S films) was a nice touch.

Well, I'm off to trample my foes before me and hear the lamentations of their women.


Doc

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hero Force Giant Size Super Special
by Brendan F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/13/2008 11:48:59
In my review of Hero Force I accuse it (rightly to my mind) of not fulfilling its potential and of being written as a second stringer product. In some ways the GSSS goes toward alleviating that. it answers a few rules queries, it adds a lot of in-genre options and seems to help the game. Not enough... Sadly. Not to pull it out of the mentality HF seems to be written under, where heroes are disposable and their actions pretty meaningless in all but a little gratification for the players. But anyway, the GSSS is a good product that helps a lot. For the meager pennies involved here, if you bought HF and saw any promise, try this.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hero Force Giant Size Super Special
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Daisho Adventure Pack #1
by David R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/08/2008 00:03:31
A few interesting scenarios for Daisho 1PG. Nothing outstanding, but a good option for a few nights of casual gaming.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Daisho Adventure Pack #1
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Idyll, Romantic Fantasy
by jeff m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/08/2007 00:00:00
Are you ready for a roleplaying challenge? I mean some serious role-playing? In ?Idyll?, Heyoka Studios newest addition to the 1PG system from Deep7, Players enter the world of Romantic Fantasy. Idyll pays homage to the writings of authors Mercedes Lackey, Tanith Lee, and others.

This is a very well defined genre of fiction with a very loyal fan base. But to be honest at first glance I wasn?t too sure how it would play out with a table of gamers. However, the more I considered it, the more possibilities I saw. Romantic Fantasy has all the requirements of your standard meat and potatoes fantasy adventure- the struggle of good versus evil, rousing combat, evil villains, deadly traps and perils, the supernatural- with the addition of a story line more substantive than: ?We go to Ork mountain to loot the Warlocks tower.? In Romantic Fantasy the characters are driven by more than material desires, they are driven by passions both good and bad. Revenge and betrayal can play just as central a theme as true love.

There are two requirements that must be fulfilled for idyll to work for you.
The first and foremost requirement of playing in this genre is that you have to buy into the idea of heroic romance. And there is nothing weak or emasculating about romance. Heroes throughout history have done the impossible in the name of love. Men have crossed seas, led armies and toppled empires for the love of a woman.
The second requirement is that when playing a game of romantic fantasy, you must be mature about it. While a little goofing off is a healthy part of any gaming experience, when dealing with Romantic Fantasy the giggling and off-color comments should be kept under control. The payoff is the opportunity for a real intense roleplaying experience.

The game makes good use of the 1PG rules system. There are rules for magic, advice on setting the mood, sex, and love. Plenty of hack n slash equipment; swords, daggers, pistols and muskets, as well as poisons, garrotes and nooses. Skills include: seduction, oratory, shooting, and spell-casting. Included with the 1PG sheet and refereeing material are six individual adventures, each one ideal for an evenings play.

Now remember, this is a 1PG game. Which means that everything in it is dealt with very briefly- roll some stats, get some skills, grab a sword and a brace of pistols, name the character and start playing! And by the way, this is a great way to introduce gaming to a spouse or significant other who may enjoy Romantic Fantasy but never made the leap to roleplaying, not only that but with a little tweaking and imagination Faerie tale adventures for young children could easily be created using Idyll. Adventures like Sleeping beauty or even modern faerie tales like Shrek would be perfect for this fast playing system.

My only minor quibble with Idyll is the absence of any skills or background for the Rogue/ Bandit type character. Skills like climbing, thievery, acrobatics, etc. would have been very true to the genre. But as I said earlier this is a 1PG game and there is only so much you can fit on a page.


QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Idyll, Romantic Fantasy
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Idyll, Romantic Fantasy
by Garry W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/01/2007 00:00:00
It's been a long time since we've seen a new product from the 1PG line, but it was well worth the wait. I'm now looking forward to the next release!


LIKED: As always, the 1PG line gives you a simple, fast, and fun game where you don't have to worry about Standard vs. Quick Action, Attacks of Opportunity, reams of feats and skills, etc. Idyll makes a good pitch at playing in the socially oriented fantasy realms of Mercedes Lackey, Tanith Lee, and their ilk. While all of the 1PG games are fun, this one in particular is a keeper for those who like role-play as much as if not more so than combat and nuke spells.

DISLIKED: While this isn't one of my all time 1PG favorites, there really wasn't anything that I could point to and say "bad Idyll; baaaaad Idyll!" You get what they advertise: a fast and simple game where you can just enjoy playing a character without worrying about books full of complex rules.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Unusual Inns
by Chris G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/19/2007 00:00:00

Inns can serve as a great place for characters to rest in between adventures or can become an adventure for a well prepared DM. Necromancer has a book of Inns that I like very much and it was not until seeing Unusual Inns that I find a book almost as good. I am a fan of using Inns and having places characters can hear about and seek out. Or just to serve as a resting place that the characters do not expect so much more from.

Unusual Inns is a PDF by Heyoka Games. It is written by Rogan Hamby and it is his writing that really makes the product. That is because there are no game mechanics in this. It is designed to be used in a fantasy setting but it does not assume one is going to use it for D&D. It does not fit perfectly really anywhere so a little tweaking will be needed but one can easily use this with GURPS, Hero Fantasy, Palladium Fantasy, Burning Wheel, Warhammer, Blue Rose, or perhaps even D&D. It is of course not limited to just those games either. The PDF is well written and has a good lay out. It is also nicely book marked.

There are five Inns described here all written up as if part of a newsletter from a royal exploration society. There are no maps of the inns and just some basic names of the inn keepers and possible a few other important people. The focus is on the feel of the inn and some kind of quirky thing that is going on with it. The report about each Inn actually can make a handy prop to give the players. Each one sets up a possible adventure seed for the PCs to investigate. It is more exploration and discovery of what is going on then dealing with the latest evil thing to kill. Though in one or two of these a great big evil thing might be found. The book though does offer answers in a DM section. I really liked this part as it seems to be a new trend to set things up in a gaming book but never explain them.

The book does build on many myths and ideas from our own world. For instance one of the inns deals with the fey and the Seelie and Unseelie courts. Another one uses Egyptian gods like Bast. There is also one that could possible deal with angels. These type of things could easily be changed to help fit the setting.

The book does a nice job of presenting unusual inns but more it does it in an unusual way. It does have a nice writing style about it and even though it does not give menus or a layout like usual inns might get; this book presents the mystery and interesting bits of the Inn. The more mundane parts of the inns is something simpler for a DM to create on their own.


LIKED: Creative and well written

DISLIKED: parts might be a little too specific for easy use

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Unusual Inns
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Class Distinctions: The Magus
by Derek K. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/06/2006 00:00:00
?Class Distinctions: The Magus?, written by Rogan R. Hamby, presents a playable, 20-level core class for use in your Dungeons & Dragons game. This is only an eight-page supplement (three of which are devoted to the outside cover, the inside cover, and the Open Game License), so writer Hamby and editor James Stubbs (who also handled the layout for this supplement) waste no time before diving into this new arcane caster class.

The first page is devoted to describing just what a magus is in terms of the role the class would have in the Dungeons & Dragons game. The writing is sparse yet efficient, and after reading just this one page, readers and players will have a good grasp as to who or what a magus is. The core classes from the Player?s Handbook and even the Expanded Psionics Handbook are mentioned here, and the magus? viewpoints on each of these classes is made quite clear.

The next few pages contain the magus? ?crunch.? The magus is perhaps most like the wizard ? same hit die, both carry spellbooks, etc. ? but as players explore this material further, the unique differences are made evident. In addition to a spellbook, the magus also carries a research tome. The research tome serves as a sort of journal for the magus, but can also be used with the magus? spellcasting. Like a wizard, a magus can learn a spell through research, and when using their research tome in this fashion, they are able to forego a certain amount of spellcasting material components (the amount of which increases as the magus gains levels).

Another feature of the magus and his or her relationship with the research tome is that he or she constantly has general idea as to where the tome is, and at 12th level, the magus can ?scry? the research tome at will.

A magus memorizes spells by embedding the arcane knowledge into their mind. The required amount of memory, measured in units called rotes, increase depending on the level of the spell cast (a magus can cast spells from the sorcerer/wizard spell list). A 0-level spell requires one rote, but to determine the number of rotes required for a higher level spell, multiply the spell level by three. The level progression table for the magus shows how many rotes a magus has available per level, and the rules for how to determine bonus rotes (?A magus gains a bonus number of rotes equal to their Intelligence modifier times the highest level of spell she can cast each time she gains the ability to cast a new level of spell.?) are easy to understand.

At higher levels, the magus can add another spellcaster?s spell list to their own, but it?s not easy. The research must be undertaken personally; a magus cannot simply take spells from the cleric?s or druid?s spell list from another magus? spell book or research tome. There is also the possibility of the magus developing a phobia if the magus isn?t careful.

There is a new spell ? ?recall rote? ? included in this supplement, as well as a few new feats and a new magic item ? the ring of the magi (which functions similarly to a ring of wizardry).

?Class Distinctions: The Magus? is a solid supplement, and packs a fully-playable class into its few pages. Everything from the statistics players will need to play this class to material that will help players and Dungeon Masters incorporate this new class into their existing games is included (with even a sample magus NPC included). The fact that this supplement also recognizes psionics as part of the game is a definite plus.

There is only one noticeable grammatical error, but beyond this simple omission of a space between two different words, this is a solidly built supplement that as a reviewer I enjoyed reading and as a player, I look forward to playing!


LIKED: I really enjoyed this supplement. The magus is a character class that isn't meant to replace an existing arcane caster (but certainly could), and allows enough flexibility that it can be easily inserted into an existing game or campaign. The writing is efficient, and the layout is spot on. As a fan of psionics, that the psionic classes are mentioned thrilled me even more. The "look" of this supplement is just as good as the material itself; even the cover design immediately speaks to what readers and players will find within this supplement. "Class Distinctions: The Magus" is affordably priced, and highly recommended.

DISLIKED: There is just one grammatical error that I noticed, but beyond this, I found this product to be completely enjoyable and usable.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Class Distinctions: The Magus
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The Book of Curses
by Donald H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2006 00:00:00
Definately puts some "oomph" in a curse. Not something you can use on every little thing, but if your party needs a little zest in the adventure, this can be a challenging twist to say the least. It's a really interesting read.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Book of Curses
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The Book of Curses
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/20/2006 00:00:00
The Book of Curses is a product by Heyoka Studios. The book contains twenty curses, in the form of spells, along with variant templates for both vampires and lycanthropes.

The book is 65 pages long, with one page each for the cover, introduction, legalese/disclaimers, OGL, and ads. That leaves 60 pages of pure product. The book itself is just over 1.5 megabytes. The artwork, with the exception of the cover, is totally black and white. The interior art is sporadic, though each page is bordered with a rather chilling image of a statue of a woman.

The Book of Curses treats its curses as magical spells, making each curse something that can be cast on one?s enemies. The introduction explains that while treated as spells, the DM should manipulate them as necessary so they?re never twisted by players based solely on mechanics.

The curses are divided into two sections, arcane and divine. Each section contains ten curses of various types, each with roughly a page-and-a-half detailing their history as well as their effect, and how to lift them. Note that all of the curses here are insidiously clever and intricate, such as the Out of Time curse, which causes the cursed recipient to not only mis-recall information, but to think the cause of it is that their spirit was shunted through time. It even puts a faint aura of magic around the cursed victim so that they?ll think that. This causes the victim to take penalties to Intelligence-related checks, as well as have a chance to forget spells, facts, etc.

The magical curses take up the lion?s share of the book, at roughly sixteen pages each. The sections on lycanthropy and vampirism are shorter, but no less thrilling.

The section on lycanthropes is actually specific to just werewolves, but it gives much more information regarding infection, transformation, being cured, PC werewolves, and more. The mechanics of this show the werewolf as being like a prestige class, but treating each level of it like a template, allowing for progressions of the curse, or different breeds of werewolf.

The section on vampires using a series of templates, instead of just one. Three are presented, the Risen, the Elder, and the Ancient One. These templates are stacked on a character as the vampire grows in age. Three vampire prestige classes, the Undying Lord, the Sybarist, and the Sin Eater, are then presented; each a different take on how a vampire can conduct themselves are rising from the grave.

The product is peppered with sidebars, providing useful tidbits of information. Some discuss using existing templates in a campaign alongside the new ones presented here. Others mention characters introduced in this work as also being in other Heyoka products, and more.

Altogether, the Book of Curses presents a set of ways to vex your characters that are chillingly subtle but no less deadly for it. The contents of this book can, when used properly, serve as the impetus of many adventures, and have a flavor so strong that your players will likely be able to taste it when it?s used against them. While it may be a curse on your PCs, the Book of Curses is a blessing to any GM.



LIKED: The curses presented here were both evocative and colorful, providing in-depth and complex ways to torment characters. The new variants of lycanthropy and vampirism present intruiging new takes on classic monsters.

DISLIKED: This book is largely filled with things that can be used against your PCs, rather than for them. Non-spellcasting PCs won't be able to use the majority of this work, particularly if they (or the GM) isn't keen to have them become a vampire or werewolf. Even spellcasting characters should be wary of using the curses presented herein. This can be a limit on the usefulness of the product.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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