RPGNow.com
Find Category
 Publisher Info













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Chthonic Codex
by Cenate P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/30/2017 11:10:46

It's a campaign setting! It's a bestiary! It's a whole new way to handle magic in your campaign setting! It's a low-calorie dessert topping! It's Chthonic Codex!

The DIY/manapunk aesthetic of Lamentations of the Flame Princess meets Potter-style wizard school shenanigans. The closest RPG supplement I can think of to the Codex is GURPS: Illuminati University, another book about students at a ridiculous university where hoary old traditions hold sway but limitless power and ineffable weirdness wait in the wings.

You get a couple of things suitable for plugging into any OSR-type campaign:

  1. About thirty new monsters, ranging from animated blobs of magical tar to origami golems to animated lecterns made from and powered by the corpses of dead apprentice wizards.
  2. Multiple new schools of wizardry, including the old standbys of "necromancer" and "fire wizard" but also some more interesting options like astrologers and artificers. Includes spells, research rules, etc.
  3. Pages upon pages of random charts to generate locations, quests, magic items, and the like.

If you're like me, and wanted to build a campaign world from scratch by bolting together a bunch of Weird OSR content that appealed to you, this is a must-get. The magic system is fantastic, the creatures are clever, and the general aesthetic of the thing is entertaining.

About the only real issue here is that the layout is kind of weird - bestiary up front, magic schools in the middle, everything else kind of shotgunned here and there.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Chthonic Codex
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Macchiato Monsters ZERO
by Troy H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/28/2017 11:32:21

This tight little OSR-indie game combines the spiciest bits of The Black Hack and The White Hack, and then throws in some flavoring of its own to create a delicious stew of low-prep, quick-to-learn, quick-to-run, caffeinated fantasy gaming.

The two bits I like best about MM is the risk die and the way characters are built.

The risk die comes to MM by way of TBH's usage die, but the scope of the risk die is expanded quite a bit in MM. At base, risk dice are used for things in the fiction that are expendable, brittle, dangerous to use, etc. You assign a die, anything from a d12 to a d4, to an object. When the object is used/tested in play, the risk die is rolled. On a result of 1-3, the die is replaced with the next smallest die in the d12 to d4 run.

The second thing I like best about Macchiato Monsters is the way characters are built. No classes or races, per se! Building a character is like buffet shopping from a list of possible stat upgrades, traits, and abilities. This leads to character concepts you will see nowhere else in fantasy gaming. I mean, "weird" for a D&D game is a gnome illusionist or a dwarven thief, right? Weird for MM might be a living construct that has modular parts and electrical spellcasting. Of course you can still play the old staples too, but the system really supports your creativity in this regard.

All in all this is great stuff. I know it's an evolving work, which is a good thing. Eric Nieudan is still in love with it and is adding things like creative map generators and other tools to it on a fairly regular basis.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Macchiato Monsters ZERO
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Marvels & Malisons
by Tore N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/22/2017 08:11:58

A collection of fun and creative magic, using the brilliant level-less magic rules in Wonder & Wickedness. Some of the magic schools are idiosyncratic, but is never silly.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Marvels & Malisons
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Macchiato Monsters ZERO
by Timothy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2017 23:13:19

Macchiato Monsters is a fun, lightweight system that captures the feel of classic D&D in just 34 pages -- and that includes the cover, OGL, worksheets, and 50 monsters! The classless system allows you to build a character that fits your concept, providing they live long enough, of course. Combat tends to be fast, and at low-levels it can be qutie deadly. If you're looking for an OSR game that welcomes players using their creativity rather than what's written on their character sheet, Macchiato Monsters is worth checking out.

While it's not the first game to use a risk die (roll a die of a certain size, if you roll a 1-3, the die size steps down the next time you use it), I believe it features the most extensive use of this type of die in any game I've come across. Personally, I like this mechanic as it provides for careful resource management without having to individually track every coin, crossbow bolt, and ration.

The spell system reminds me of Vance's Polysyllabic Verbalizations from 13th Age or the ritual system from that game. Players have a lot of leeway in what effects their spells will have. There's a risk to failing to successfully cast a spell, however. It's not quite as gonzo as Dungoen Crawl Classics' consequences, but it adds an element of risk/reward when casting spells.

I'm amazed by how much content is packed into this book. It offers these little rules that are only a paragraph or two in length and cover a broad spectrum of scenarios that come up in a typical fantasy game. Morale, mass combat, random encounters, NPC reactions, chases, wilderness travel, retreating from combat, determining the weather, hirelings, sanity, stamina, and other subsystems are all provided in a consice manner. Often, the rule can be written with few words thanks to the nearly universal use of the risk die.

Even when I run other systems, I like to use Macchiao Monsters as a quick reference for how to handle situations. For example, I wanted to provide a unique magic item to a player recently, and assigned the item a risk die, rather than a set number of charges. Watching him weigh wether or not each use is worthwhile adds an interesting strategic twist that wouldn't be there if charges were simply be deducted from a total.

In a sense, this book is like a minuscule Rule Cyclopedia. It covers a broad range of situations in a small package.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Macchiato Monsters ZERO
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Macchiato Monsters ZERO
by Ali B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2017 19:00:39

(Disclaimer: I had the chance to do some playtests for the game and my name appears in the special thanks section.)

As many others tabletop gamers, I have a long history of love and hate with D&D. When OSR became a thing, I got really excited at the prospect of unearthing old modules and play the way our ancestors did.

But despite all the different rulesets available, I found myself still looking for the perfect fit for my tastes and GMing style.

Then came Eric Nieudan and his new game Macchiato Monsters. See, Eric is a smart guy and talented Game Designer: with his game, he managed to hand pick some of the best mechanics that came out of the DIY D&D scene these last few years, added some of his own, and blended them in a way that makes sense.

  • The game is expressive, thanks to its classless and Trait-based character creation system and freeform magic.

  • It's easy to manage, thanks to the "Risk Die" mechanic. Basically, the author took the "Usage Die" from The Black Hack, and applied it to almost every variable values of the game: Consummables, Armor Ratings, Money,...

  • It's fast paced, thanks to the player-facing, roll-under resolution system.

  • The game is easy to GM, thanks to the Advantage mechanic (à la The Black Hack/D&D5), and the Risk Die to handle states changes (weather, chaos, morale, troups, sanity...)

  • And the game supports Lazy/No-Prep or Sandbox GMing style thanks to all the tools provided. Random tables, drop tables, procedural hex-map generator, encounters, factions, plots, treasures... The game comes with batteries included : everything needed to play on-the-go, or to populate the map between sessions is there.

Of course nothing is perfect in this world, and the game comes with a few flaws : risk dice can be somtimes hard to track when you are using too many of them in your game. Also this ZERO version, despite being fully playable, is still a preview : some parts are still rough or missing, and some tables deserve a few more words to explain how to use them IMHO.

But fear not: there's already more than enough content for you to play with for months. And the author provides regular updates everytime he finishes a new part.

For the price of a cup of coffee (at least in Paris!), you definitely should treat yourself and purchase this game!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Macchiato Monsters ZERO
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/11/2017 03:28:26

(Re-posted from https://oliof.blogspot.de/2017/06/quick-review-macchiato-monsters-zero.html)

Macchiato Monsters ZERO is a hack of hacks (Black Hack and White Hack, neither of which I know myself). It has some nice mechanics that a both tight and loose, comfortable in a word. The game is complete, has some nice mechanics (I like the death-spirally/doom-clocky risk dice, and the roll all the dice fast equipment generation method). I guess some people will take umbrage with the single-die-roll-combat resolution (players roll and do damage on success/take damage on failure), but I guess that is more about how that feels ... Dungeon World players might feel right at home.

The recently added Extra Shots has a number of referee facing tools that uses the resource die mechanic to have semi-dynamic encounter / event tables: The worse the circumstances, the lower the die size, the worse the result. It's nice that in the current work-in-progress the extra shots each fit one page.

There are also some in-progress die drop tables which are another bunch of tools for quick off-the-cuff prep in the macchiato-fantasy, which is described as "borderlands style" (i.e. exploration of dangerous mostly unknown area, plus safe havens/points of light to return back to).

The map generator deserves extra mention because it is not purely random but somewhat procedural. This promises somewhat more natural looking maps.

Macchiato Monsters is probably the system I will use for short-notice games (at conventions or similar). I am also seriously considering mashing it up with Wonder&Wickedness for a Principalities of Glantri vs. The Grand Schools of the Hypogea spinoff of my current campaign; i.e. Make Total Destroy with Nuclear Powered Lich Mages discovering Hypogean Mana Tar ...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mageblade! Zero
by Tore N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/08/2017 13:57:01

A brilliant and light-weight fantasy rpg. While it owes something to THE fantasy rpg, it has flavor and interesting rules-choices, and does not feel like 'yet another OSR game'. Mageblade is pleasantly terse, and works well as a rules-reference, without being dry or bland. For me Mageblade strikes a balance between hardcore let-the-dice-fall-as-they-may old school gaming, and giving meaningfull and fun choices during character generation.

The game is built so that it complements Lost Pages' two brilliant magic sourcebooks (Wonder & Wickedness and Marvels & Malisons) but does not requre them. As I own these two (and recommend them as well) I see that as a plus.

(And I'd put that Joson Sholtis cover on my wall if I could).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mageblade! Zero
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Wonder & Wickedness
by Kevin W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/23/2016 09:07:00

This is right in my wheel house: simplifying spells (I can't memorize hundreds of spells) while simultaneously making them more flavorful and more versatile.

I immediately ported them into my new OSR campaign. I love it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wonder & Wickedness
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Chthonic Codex
by Tore N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2016 15:23:05

The Chthonic Codex is a cornucopia of creativity. Too often magic in rpgs is presented in a very pragmatic and bland way, but in this book every spell has flavor and adventure hooks for magic-users of all stripes. A vast and vibrant setting is indicated, without limiting or locking things in place. I would suggest that you read it cover to cover, with a notebook close by, as you are likely to come up with a wealth of uses for the ideas within. Greco's writing style is compelling and strong. It is colorful, without being too florid or verbose. The organization is not terribly intuitive though, and reading the Codex feels a little like reading a wizard's grimoire, I view that as a positive, but you may want a few bookmarks if you want to reference it at the gaming table.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Chthonic Codex
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Chthonic Codex
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2016 06:41:19

An excellent source of strange creatures, weird spells, useful subclasses of magic-user and bizzare setting components.

You can read an indepth review on my blog: http://d-infinity.net/blog/derek-holland/review-chthonic-codex



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Odditional materials
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/23/2016 21:57:37

Great resource for ItO. Worth the ridiculously reasonable price of admission for Sean Smith's Cyber London hack alone.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Odditional materials
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Into the Odd
by Christopher T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/16/2015 22:00:51

This review is based on a single play as the GM. I bought the PDF, read it and immediately set up a game and ran it, which is probably the fastest purchase to play for an RPG I've ever had. The game rules are simple, but effective. Saves go against a stat, either Str, Dex or Will. Combat is rolling for damage only. This leaves lots of room for adjudication of odd situations on the fly without flipping through a book. Character creation is fast and interesting with only 4 stats and a matrix for equipment based on them. I'd love to see more matrices of stats to equipment as that is brilliant since you skip the horrible and long step where people buy all their crap during most of your first session for the ZZzzzz. We were off and playing within 15 minutes and the game runs at a good clip. I finished an entire adventure with about 6 encounters in just over 2 hours. Definitely a system to check out and try if you are interested in OSR as it's a boiled down D20 at it's core, and frankly, if you want to get into story stuff without all the annoying and confusing system crap in say Dungeon World or FATE, this will do it. Will make a very easy pick up game for nights drunk when you, as the hapless GM, get forced to run something as well!

Overall it is as if Lamentations of the Flame Princess and Numenera had a child.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Into the Odd
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Into the Odd
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/28/2015 03:24:11
http://www.teilzeithelden.de

Ein Old-School-Rollenspiel auf 48 Seiten? Into the Odd bietet Material zum Gleich-Losspielen: Alle Regeln auf einer Seite, Zufalls- und Generierungstabellen, eine Spielwelt voller Absurditäten, ein Magiesystem basierend auf Gegenständen. Was es taugt, was es anders macht, wo es hakt – hier ist unsere Rezension zu diesem Indie-Kleinod.

OSR-Spotlight: Into the Odd

Bevor die Bücher einzelner Systeme ganze Schrankwände füllen konnten, fand man oft alles, was man zum Spielen brauchte, in einem oder mehreren dünnen Heftchen. Die Beschreibung der Spielwelt ließ das Meiste offen und es war den SL überlassen, den Faden weiterzuspinnen. Into the Odd ist es ein solches Spiel. Wie schlägt sich ein so liebevoll gestalteter Dinosaurierklon in der rollenspielerischen Postmoderne? Die Spielwelt

Die vorgegebene Spielwelt von Into the Odd konzentriert sich auf die Gegend um eine Metropolis namens Bastion. In dieser Stadt konzentriert sich zunehmend das zivilisierte Leben, während Ruinen, verlassene Städte und entvölkerte Landstriche die Umgebung darstellen. Bastion selbst bietet einen Mix aus Steampunk, Fantasy und rein bizarren Elementen.

Dem Spiel beigefügt sind eine Beispielsiedlung namens Hopesend Port, ein Hexcrawl der Umgebung und der erste Dungeon, die Iron Coral. Beschrieben ist also nicht die Umgebung von Bastion, sondern eine Gegend nördlich hiervon am Polarmeer. Das wahre Highlight sind dabei die ausgeflippten Zufallbegegnungstabellen und Hexbeschreibungen, die dem Setting sein Flair verleihen. So trifft man beständig auf Kulte und Merkwürdigkeiten rund um die Star Men, die Leute entführen und durch die Luft fliegen. Auch ansonsten verstecken sich hier eine Dosis abgedrehten Humors und einige Popkulturreferenzen.

Den stärksten Eindruck von der Welt gewinnt man durch die beigefügten Tabellen, auch im Anhang. Vieles ist nicht lange beschrieben, sondern gleich in verwertbare Tabellen verpackt worden. Insgesamt wird das implizite Versprechen des Buchtitels eingehalten: Diese Welt ist merkwürdig und abstrus. Sie will nicht zwingend Sinn ergeben, sondern unterhalten.

Die Regeln

Into the Odd verwendet Altbekanntes leicht anders, um ein besonders schlankes und meiner Meinung nach durchaus elegantes Regelwerk zu erschaffen:

Es gibt nur drei Attribute: Strength, Dexterity und Willpower. Jeder Waffe ist ein Schadenswürfel zugeordnet, von W4 bis W12. Jeder Charakter hat ein paar Trefferpunkte.

Tatsächlich gibt es aber nur zwei Proben: die Rettungs- und Schadenswürfe.

Rettungswürfe stellen das Grundgerüst des Spiels dar. Würfelt man mit einem W20 nicht mehr als den Attributswert, wurde die Probe bestanden. 1 ist immer ein Erfolg, 20 immer ein Fehlschlag. Die Bezeichnung „Saving Throw“ ist hierbei historisch zu sehen, denn ähnlich wie die Saving Rolls in Tunnels & Trolls sind diese Rettungswürfe allgemein einsetzbare Proben. Im Gegensatz zu D&D und dessen Varianten gibt es keine separaten Werte für Rettungswürfe – die drei Attribute genügen für alle Proben.

Ebenso im Gegensatz zu D&D gibt es keinen typischen W20-Angriffswurf. Man würfelt seinen Schadenswürfel (durch die Waffe vorgegeben), zieht den Rüstungsschutz (Armour) des Gegners ab und der Rest verbleibt als Schaden. Eine typische Rüstung reduziert den Schaden um 1 Punkt, bei Monstern liegt dieser Schutz höher. Die meisten Attacken gegen leicht gepanzerte Gegner bewirken also direkt Schaden. Wird der Angriff in irgendeiner Weise behindert, sinkt der Schaden auf W4. Wird er durch einen Umstand begünstigt, steigt er auf W12.

Jetzt kommt der Clou: Trefferpunkte fangen zwar Schaden ab, aber das Absinken auf 0 ist noch nicht der Tod oder die Ohnmacht. Stattdessen nimmt man Stärkeschaden. Man muss dann auf den niedrigeren Stärkewert einen Rettungswurf ablegen. Schlägt dieser fehl, hat man kritischen Schaden erlitten. Fällt der Stärkewert auf 0, ist man tot. Das System simuliert also mit einfachsten Mitteln zunehmenden Wundschaden.

Eine kurze Rast von ein paar Minuten stellt alle Trefferpunkte wieder her, eine lange Rast von einer Woche alle verlorenen Attributspunkte. Die Trefferpunkte sind somit ein kleines Polster an Sicherheit, das den Charakter vor Schlimmerem schützt. Mit den Attributspunkten muss man hingegen gut haushalten, da sonst auch die lebensrettenden Proben scheitern.

Ansonsten gilt: Eine Runde (Turn) erlaubt eine Aktion. Deren Ausgang kann über die oben genannten Würfe abgewickelt werden.

Arcana

Spart sich Into the Odd schon den W20-Angriffswurf, so verlässt es die Welt der d20-Spiele endgültig mit seinem gegenstandsbasierten Magiesystem. Das Spiel dreht sich um die Suche nach besonders mächtigen magisch-technologischen Artefakten, den Arcana. Man kann ein Arcanum je nach seiner Beschreibung direkt anwenden, oder versuchen, es mit einem Willpower-Save zu einer ungewöhnlichen Anwendung heranzuziehen.

Das Spiel kommt hierbei mit drei Seiten Beispiel-Arcana von dreierlei Stufen an Mächtigkeit. Diese reichen von einer Art Portal-Gun (Space Folder) bis zur Wetterkontrollmaschine (Weather Altar). Viele Effekte sind vage beschrieben und erlauben es den Spielern, kreative Einsatzmöglichkeiten zu finden. Nicht alle sind durch Spielwerte definiert.

[box]“PHASE KEY: Phase through a wall or floor with any objects you are carrying.“

„GAVEL OF THE UNBREAKABLE SEAL: One door, window, etc. is sealed until you open it.“

„INFERNO DEVICE: Cause a source of fire to explode, causing D10 Damage to all within 20FT.“

„SPIRIT CHAIN: Swap bodies with another that you are touching. They can resist with a WIL SAVE. Retain WIL scores only.“[/box]

Bereits im Einstiegsabenteuer fand der Hitzestrahl (Heat Ray) reichlich Anwendung. Sobald Arcana im Spiel sind, erweitern sich die Handlungsmöglichkeiten der Spieler stark.

Der Rest

Das war es im Großen und Ganzen bereits mit den Regeln – interessant wird das Spiel durch die Ausrüstungsliste, die Vielzahl der Arkana und die ebenso merkwürdigen wie gefährlichen Kräfte der Monster.

Eine Besonderheit sticht noch hervor: Es gibt Regeln für das Spiel mit großen Gruppen, den Companies. Wie rekrutiert man, wie kämpft man untereinander, was kann man sich Schönes für sein neues Miniimperium kaufen – all das ist beschrieben. Wer also in seiner Sandkiste selbst zum Gestalter werden will, kann das über diesen Mechanismus tun und zum Krieg gegen ganze Kultisten-Organisationen ausziehen. Das Ganze ist zu kurz, um als voll ausgearbeitet zu gelten, aber man kann damit arbeiten. Charaktererschaffung

Ein normaler SC wird mit 3W6 für die Attribute erwürfelt. Hierbei darf man Werte gegeneinander austauschen. Zusätzlich erhält man 1W6 Trefferpunkte. Man ermittelt dann das höchste Attribut. Die Ausrüstung bestimmt sich aus einer Tabelle. Man sucht sich die Zeile mit dem passenden höchsten Attributwert und die Spalte mit den eigenen Trefferpunkten, schon kennt man sein Startequipment. Besonders niedrige Werte werden in der Tabelle eher durch die Ausrüstung und Sonderfertigkeiten ausgeglichen, besonders hohe durch leichte Nachteile.

Zusätzlich gibt es noch zwei weitere Arten an SC: Companions werden wie normale SC ausgewürfelt, haben aber nur ein 1 Trefferpunkt und ein Schwert. Damit kann eine Gruppe vergrößert werden, die nur wenige Spieler hat. Hirelings sind da je nach Situation schon besser, wollen aber Geld für ihre Dienste sehen.

Zu guter Letzt der Stufenanstieg: Pro erreichter Stufe erhält man W6 zusätzliche Trefferpunkte und darf für jedes Attribut mit W20 würfeln. Übertrifft man den Attributwert, steigt er permanent um 1 Punkt. Das Erreichen neuer Stufen bestimmt sich darüber, wie viele Expeditionen man bereits überlebt hat. Auf späteren Stufen bildet man zusätzlich einen Lehrling aus.

Auch hier ist das System sehr leichtgewichtig, reicht aber völlig aus.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht

Das Spiel ist sehr einfach abzuwickeln. Man beschreibt, beantwortet Fragen, weist auf Konsequenzen einer Entscheidung hin und verlangt Proben. Es sind kaum Regeln zu verwalten, daher verschiebt sich der Fokus klar auf das Problemlösen. Der kurze Abschnitt für das Spielleiten ist völlig hinreichend und angenehm zu lesen.

Man kann sich der vielen Tabellen im Buch bedienen, ebenso gibt es einen vorgefertigten Einstieg sowie einen Hexcrawl. Danach bleibt es einem aber weitestgehend selbst überlassen, eine volle Sandbox hinzustellen. Man sollte sich dringend Drittmaterial zum Thema suchen. Der Spaß im Spiel entsteht vorrangig durch Absonderlichkeiten (Tricks), Fallen und ungewöhnliche Schätze. Gerade durch die Arcana-Liste erhält man hier eine entscheidende Hilfe, ansonsten wird man sich viel ausdenken oder aus Modulen von Old-School-Spielen zusammenklauen müssen.

Der Fokus liegt aber nicht so sehr auf dem Monsterverkloppen, sondern auf der Schatzsuche, der geschickten Spielanlage. Es gibt keine echte Belohnung für das Monstererschlagen, ja, nicht mal eine Motivation hierfür, da sie eigentlich nur im Weg sind. Daher muss der Fokus beim Abenteuerdesign auch darauf liegen, das Rätselhafte zu generieren.

Das ganze Spiel scheint auf das Generieren einer Sandbox ausgelegt zu sein, eine wirklich vollständige Anleitung oder Unterstützung dies zu tun fehlt jedoch – keine Checkliste, keine Generatoren, keine ungefähre Beschreibung des Prozesses. (Wer sich hier alleingelassen fühlt, sollte vielleicht mal bei Kevin Crawfords Sine Nomine Games reinschauen.)

Es gibt einen Stall Beispielmonster. Hierbei fällt besonders positiv auf, dass jeder Kreatur im Spiel eine Motivation (Drive) beigegeben ist. Diese ist in nur einem Satz beschrieben, erleichtert aber das Ausspielen ungemein. Schätze und die Generierung neuer Arcana haben ein eigenes Kapitel. Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht

Es gibt hier nicht viel zu sagen: Das Wichtigste kommt nicht vom eigenen Charakterbogen, sondern ist das Interagieren mit dem SL. Verzögerungen und Lärm werden zumeist mit Zufallsbegegnungen bestraft. Eine Mischung aus Vorsicht und Eile ist geboten, und man muss selbst entscheiden, wann sich ein Raubzug gelohnt hat, und wann die Verluste zu groß werden.

OSR-typisch sind Figuren schnell ausgewürfelt, und mit etwas Pech fast genauso schnell verstorben.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis

Into the Odd ist ein vollständiges Spiel, mit dem man gleich losspielen kann. Für ein Werk unter 100 Seiten ist der Preis jedenfalls nicht untypisch. Man darf halt kein durchdesigntes Produkt erwarten, das wäre bei einem Indie auch zu viel verlangt.

Spielbericht

Bei Into the Odd dachte ich mir, dass sich dem Spiel am einfachsten auf den Zahn fühlen lässt, indem man es spielt. Also haben wir einen abwaschbaren Bodenplan ausgepackt und das beigefügte Beispielabenteuer The Iron Coral gespielt.

Da das nicht unser erster Ausflug in die Old-School-Ecke war, gingen Generierung und Einstieg flott von der Hand. Auch die Abwicklung der Regeln war ohne echte Lernkurve zu bewältigen, es geht ja immer nur ums Beschreiben, das Stellen gezielter Fragen und das Abwickeln der Würfe. Daher spielte es sich auch nicht anders, als wenn wir wieder Basic/Expert D&D gespielt hätten, nur mit noch weniger Regeln (und ohne Bedarf für Hausregeln). So weit, so gut.

Der Text am Einband des Buches verspricht Folgendes: „This is a fast, simple game, to challenge your wits rather than your understanding of complex rules.“ Das ist für das Buch selbst durchwegs richtig, nicht aber für das Einstiegsabenteuer! Zum größten Teil ist The Iron Coral ein nicht besonders kreativer Dungeon. Das steht leider völlig im Widerspruch zum dreiseitigen Spielbeispiel. Dort geht’s in einem einzigen, clever designten Raum völlig ab!

Nichts von dieser Genialität findet sich im Beispielabenteuer: Herausforderungen beschränken sich auf einige, wenige Räume. Für ein Old-School-Abenteuer ist es zwar okay, wenn es keine größeren, raumübergreifenden Zusammenhänge gibt, aber hier ist einfach zu wenig los. Mehrere Räume sind lediglich zur Spielerverwirrung da und kosten nur Zeit. Die Schatzkammern kann man erst betreten, wenn man mit den Türen das Richtige anstellt. Leider gibt es keinen echten Zusammenhang zwischen dem, was die Tür öffnet und irgendeiner Art von Hinweis. Die Spieler haben denn auch einfach eine der beiden Türen mit Hilfe eines Arcanums demoliert. Generell waren die meisten Räume schlicht uninteressant und zogen das Ganze nur in die Länge, wodurch das Abenteuer auch mehr Zufallsbegegnungen generierte.

Auch bei der Spielvorbereitung hatte ich gemischte Gefühle. Einerseits mag ich kurze, knackige Beschreibungen, damit ich schnell vorbereiten kann. Das hier dargebotene Format bietet für den Flavortext aber nur Schlagworte. Das war dann doch sehr karg. Ich habe denn auch zweimal über die wortkarge Beschreibung aller Räume drübergelesen, bis ich gemerkt habe, dass hier wirklich nicht mehr geboten ist. In Summe hat mich so meine Erwartungshaltung beim Lesen mehr Zeit gekostet, als ich benötigt hätte, wenn der Dungeon etwas stärker ausformuliert gewesen wäre.

Es verblieb der Eindruck, dass das Spiel selbst für Old-School-Abenteuer völlig ausreichend ist, und dass der Blick schnell von den Regeln hin zum Problemlösen geht. Das ist gut, das ist richtig, das macht mir Spaß. Als wuchtigen Einstieg hätte ich mir nur einen smarteren Dungeon gewünscht, wo die Spieler hinterher nach mehr verlangen. Als jemand, der gerne Dungeon Crawl Classics leitet, bin ich vielleicht inzwischen beim Dungeondesign etwas verwöhnt. In Nebin Pendlebrook's Perilous Pantry oder den Modulen von Goodman Games haben Spieler mit Beobachtungs- und Kombinationsgabe immer etwas zu entdecken, und das hätte ich mir hier auch gewünscht. Erscheinungsbild

Im Großen und Ganzen ist das Buch hinreichend gut gestaltet. Die Tabellen sind gut lesbar, der Schriftsatz hat einen Hauch von Nostalgie, zumal auch Großschrift anstatt Fettdruck verwendet wird. Es gibt wenige Illustrationen, die meisten in Schwarz-Weiß oder Grautönen. Bei einigen fragt man sich, was abgebildet sein soll, aber das Buch macht einen guten, wenn auch einfachen Eindruck.

Die Beschreibungen für den enthaltenen Dungeon und den umgebenden Hexcrawl sind eher unübersichtlich und nicht wirklich ansehnlich formatiert. Zum Beispiel wurde eine Minidungeon-Beschreibung in den ansonsten recht kurz gehaltenen Hexcrawl hineingepfercht. Aber ganz ehrlich: Ich habe im OSR-Umfeld, gerade in Bezug auf Wildnisbeschreibungen, schon Schlimmeres gesehen.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Wer nach mehr Spielmaterial sucht, sollte sich dieses Oddpendium ansehen.

Fazit

Into the Odd ist ein starker Indie mit einem hohen Nostalgiefaktor. Das Spiel beweist auch immer wieder Humor. Man kann damit schnell losspielen und Spaß haben. Es bietet dennoch das Potenzial, eine Gruppe für Wochen oder Monate zu unterhalten.

Während das Buch vieles bietet, bleibt es am SL hängen, die Gruppe auf Dauer mit Kniffeleien zu bespaßen. Zwar gibt es ein paar Tabellen, um merkwürdige Orte, Kreaturen und Gefahren zu generieren. Aber schon das Einstiegsabenteuer ist nicht besonders prickelnd und die Spieler werden schnell nach mehr verlangen. Die etwas chaotische Natur der Arcana erweitert die Möglichkeiten der Spieler stetig, so dass auf Dauer Herausforderungen nicht leicht zu planen sind.

Wer Into the Odd auf Dauer viel abgewinnen will, sollte sich mit Büchern wie Grimtooth's Traps oder Tricks, Empty Rooms & Basic Trap Design bewaffnen, um die Spieler weiterhin zu fordern.

Insgesamt gefällt mir Into the Odd gut, ich werde es wieder spielen, und man kann damit ohne großen Aufwand jederzeit einen Oneshot anbieten. Es bietet Old-School-Spiel in Reinkultur und funktioniert als Spiel trotz und gerade aufgrund seiner Einfachheit hervorragend.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Into the Odd
by Harald W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/06/2015 14:51:48

This 48 pager is the closest to a steampunk game I would think captures the idea of rottenness and oppression of industrialization without demonizing technology itself — all the bad things come from what people do and want, and not the implements they use.

The first half or so of the book is rules: Character generation and equipment (2 pages), another page of rules for saves (all kinds of checks), a tiny but tight combat system, half a page about advancement, one page about companies and war, and three pages of sample arcana, weird magical or magitechnical or technomagical items that people hunt after; an example for play that conveys the style and themes that the game supports, and a couple pages devoted to the game master, including general advice, sample monsters, traps and hazards. The official world description fills one page, but we get 10 pages of a sample location, a region, and a small settlement which illustrate more of what the game is about — matter-of-factly, without being preachy.

The last third of the book is filled by the aptly-named Oddpendium, a collection of tables that allow you to quickly generate Into-the-Odd content but also serves as a condensed way to show more setting details, without getting overly verbose.

In terms of Old-School games, I consider Into The Odd somewhat of an outlier as it's pretty much setting infused with rules. I'd have a hard time saying what I'd use from this book in other games —no wait, that's a lie: The arcana are pretty nice and could spruce up about any game, unless you shy away from ray guns or black hole generators or portal guns. The rules, sparse as they are, seem to be a tight fit for the kind of setting or at least the kind of adventures the setting of Into The Odd seems to beget.

I could kind-of see Into The Odd to be used as an alternate future setting/game on top of your average fantasy game. It's close enough to be a parallel universe that you could get to through any of the many portals of the Kefitzah Haderech (also a Lost Pages product), because it's weird enough to find something lost from another world, or to hide in there because you probably won't stick out much.

Also, Into The Odd has good ongoing support by Chris on his blog (http://soogagames.blogspot.co.uk/)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wonder & Wickedness
by Harald W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/06/2015 14:50:04

This book is, at it's core, a collection of articles from the author's blog (http://www.necropraxis.com/). It's an alternate magic system for classic fantasy games.

At it's heart lies the idea of level less magic, as demonstrate in a writeup of 84 spells in seven spell schools. In addition you will finde rules about learning magic, magical sigils required for and/or caused by spellcasting, magical duels and fumbles, as well as a small collection of magic items. You can take either of these elements and add them to your own favorite system, or use Wonder&Wickedness wholesale to replace / add one.

I like the idea of magical sigils a lot; and while the spell schools are described as optional their use is recommended; not only because of the rules for spell specialists, but because the spells are listed according to their schools.

The spells themselves require some interpretation, which allows their use in different kinds of campaigns. Spell duration, range and area effects are only given in rough approximations, which allows their use without resorting to map and ruler; if you do like map and ruler there is enough guidance to come up with some clear numbers.

While the spells are clearly inspired by the classic set of D&D like spells, they deviate far enough that they hold their surprises for people that intimately know the old spells. The differences are less subtle than, say, Lamentations of The Flame Princess' spells.

The layout is simple and legible, I had no problem using the PDF on a 7" tablet. There are a few illustrations which are related to the content close by.

I recommend this book for all who like D&D like rules and haven eye open for new expressions of old concepts.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wonder & Wickedness
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 18 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG