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Orbis Mundi 2
by Ted M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/11/2017 20:20:28

love this book. so many ideas to make my world gritty and real. fun to read great facts and most of all really great to let a game master add flavor and realsim to your medieval world!!! FANTASTIC!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Orbis Mundi 2
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Orbis Mundi 2
by Geoffrey S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/30/2017 07:41:32

A very complete and helpful product which delivers its promise : to give its reader insights into European medieval life. Useful for everyone wishing to have an medieval historical RPG or a more precise medfan one.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Farm, Forge and Steam
by Jason S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/29/2017 21:23:45

Crop yield statistics for ancient times (up to the fall of the Roman Empire) and into the early Dark Ages are very low, far lower than that given by period sources. Also, this work assumes the beneficial nature of monastic intitutions, and while there is some evidence they were beneficial there is also evidence that their activities actually set agriculture yields back millinia by destroying beneficial strains through breading worse-yielding strains with superior survival charactertics. Also ignored is the serious regression in technology experienced in Europe during and after the fall of Rome, this includes the loss of many farm technologies and methods. All of these contributed to the low-yield agriculture experienced during the late Dark Ages and Early Medieval.

Also inaccurately represented is the nature and frequency of famine. Famine in some regions was very rare, in others more frequent. Decades might pass between famines, and centuries between very bad famines. Many famines were caused by military conflict and deliberate destruction of crops, rather than natural causes. Technology, such as wells and aqeducts, mitigated natural causes but conflict could, and did, destroy these as well. Without proper mechanics for famine its impossible to represent real cultures with these rules. The stability created by the great empires (Rome specifically, but others as well, such as Egyptian) substantially reduced the rate famine (less military confict in prime ahricultural areas). The fractured political landscape of the late Dark and early Medieval periods was a significant factor in the rate of famine and disease.



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[1 of 5 Stars!]
Farm, Forge and Steam
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Creator Reply:
Yes, it is an old work, based on older material, some of which is now known to be wrong (but wasn't, or wasn't widely, known to be at the time the book was written) ... and some of which is still being picked over by competing schools of historical thought, some of which you provide as an alternative point of view ... given that the book covers all of recorded history (and before!) in such a short space there was, of course, some simplification. If anyone is interested in a more comprehensive treatment of a sub-set of the period covered in FF&S, specifically the Medieval Period (even more specifically the period from roughly AD 1000 to AD 1400), I would suggest looking at 'Orbis Mundi 2' which has been recently Kickstarted and is available from Phalanx Games Design on this site ... 470 odd pages to cover 400 years ... which is to be followed in the first half of 2018 by 'The Marketplace' which will look at the economics and actual prices of items in faux medieval RPGs and will probably run to another 128+ pages. OM2 looks at some of the issues you raise in detail and, while it (and I, obviously) disagree with some of the conclusions you have put forward, it makes note of key areas where there is ongoing debate ... and, for example, TM looks at Famine cycles for the period in much more detail then even OM2 (15-30 year cycles of 'bad' famines and 90-120 year cycles of *really* bad ones for the 11th-14th centuries, where the former were more likely regional or national and the latter multi-national or even Europe-wide) ... however, on my reading of things for the 11th-14th centuries famines, the bad ones, were mostly the result of climatic variation and unusual weather pattern variation. Yes, military action could make them worse, often much much worse, but it was rare for a multi-regional famine to be *just* a result of military action. In any case, I would recommend you have a look at OM2 ... if you email me or PM me through RPGNow I'll happily give you a voucher for $9.99 off the price of the PDF version!
Orbis Mundi 2
by Peter H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/26/2017 04:33:43

If you are keen on getting it right with any medieval setting for a role-playing game, or you want to inject a more historical and realistic edge to a fantasy, one this is quite simply the best book you can buy! Instead of having to use a great number of seperate and expensive books for reference this gives you eveything you would need in one place.

Orbis Mundi 2 is quite simply invaluable. I imagine writers would also find it very useful and if you just love history this is worth getting just to read. The book is a large one at around 450 pages and densely packed with information. The authors knowledge of the period is good as are his sources so this about as accurate as you can get. I have the softcover already but as I can see this book getting a lot of use I will probably also get a hardcover copy when one becomes available. It is not often I find a book worth getting two copies like that.



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
Orbis Mundi 2
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Farm, Forge and Steam
by Marja E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/22/2016 20:33:47

Food (and Metal) for Thought

In Farm, Force, and Steam, Phillip MacGregor emphasizes the continuous evolution of past pre-industrial societies, and the ecological and technological constraints on these societies, in order to show how they could affect hypothetical societies, especially fantasy ones. I would like to have seen more discussion of actual societies. While there's ongoing debate over Roman population, there something closer to consensus about late medieval and early modern population, town sizes, trade links, etc. I would also like to have seen notes on plausible town sizes and army sizes, since both are often exaggerated. I would also like to add that there were towns/cities, such as Cahokia, and civilization in the Mississippi plains before European contact.

If you're interested in the topic, I would suggest this book, and I would suggest looking at the works of Brian Fagan for a broad overview of anthropology, Marvin Harris if they are interested in another cultural materialist view, and perhaps either Walter Scheidel or Saskia Hin if they are interested in Roman population densities, population sizes, and life expectancies.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Farm, Forge and Steam
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Creator Reply:
Thanks for the kind words. I am currently working on an updated version of \'Orbis Mundi\', which covers the Medieval Period (14th-15th centuries) which will also incorporate material from FF&S and Displaced in an attempt to give a more rounded view of one particular period in one particular place (Western Europe, mainly) to deal with some of the constraints that existed on medieval level civilisations in the area ... depending on how that goes, I may (probably will) revisit, revise and expand FF&S with a similar intent (eventually ...)
Farm, Forge and Steam
by Garry S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/23/2015 08:55:18

The book is an excellent read on the historical relationship between food production, technical advancement, disease and societal change. It's goal is to introduce more realism into fantasy society designs. That's where it falls down in my opinion. We all know people who snarkily rip ideas to fix something apart, but when pressed for their "fix" get mumbles. That's the way the book reads. Based on its inherent logic, Elves and Dwarves can't exist as written in almost all FRPG's, not enough food production for the population. Ok, so how do we make those work? That's where the ideas dry up. Universal Empires aren't realistic in FRPGS's, as no Universal Empire was actually in stasis. From historical perspective, right on, but from an FRPG perspective, what would make it work? That's what I was hoping to see, not just a listing of why everyone else's idea sucked, but what are your ideas to make things work.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Of course Elves and Dwarves can work ... just not as most FRPGs describe them. Sylvan (Forest Dwelling) Elves are problematic, as are entirely aristocratic \'High\' Elves - Elvish civilisations would have to resemble human ones ... large areas to grow crops and large workforces set to growing those crops. If they have a \'higher\' level of civilisation than humans then they will have a better understanding of agriculture and get higher yields ... perhaps they understand composting, which western european societies didn\'t until quite late, and they probably have extensive irrigation works and the like. And there\'s be an Elvish peasant class (or Human peasants, perhaps, labouring away in the fields for their Elvish overlords). All in all they will too closely resemble classical western feudal societies nor classical fictional Elvish societies ... As for Dwarves, the same applies - entirely underground dwelling ones are unlikely in the extreme. So what? Dwarves as Miners, Stonemasons and Metalworkers *aren\'t\' ... so where are they likely to live, where Mines and Quarries often tend to be - in Hilly and Mountainous regions. They will resemble the Swiss or similar peoples, in Western European terms, or Tibetans, Nepalis the like in Asian terms. They will have valley floor or terraced hillsides where they grow their crops and will almost certainly herd sheep, cattle and goats on some sort of transhumance basis. Not at all like the ridiculous ideas most game backgrounds assume. Universal Empires. They simply cannot exist in the ways that most if not all RPGs write them up - but it really doesn\'t matter as RPGs rarely *actually* exist beyond the campaign period in which your PCs play. You just can\'t have thousand year (or multi-thousand year) \'Ages\' or \'Eras\' (or whatever) where things remain at unchanged Feudal levels of Technology forever. You get something like the Romans ... 753 BC through to 1453 AD, but to refer to the whole period as the \'Roman Empire\' is simply wrong, you have Bronze Age Kings developing into Iron Age Republic expanding throughout the Mediterranean and self destructing into a disguised Military Dictatorship (the Principate) and then developing into an Imperial Autocratic State (the Dominate) and then several more stages until the Medieval semi-Feudal late East Roman state that the Ottomans destroyed. Technology did not remain static any more than society did ... stirrups, horseshoes, windmills (vertical and horizontal), overshot and undershot waterwheels, cheaper iron and steel smelting making plate armour possible and requiring new weapons capable of smashing through it, crossbows changed and matured, gunpowder is developed and lots more. That\'s over 2000 years, not the many thousand year ages that seem de rigeur in many RPGs (civilisation is only 5500-6000 years old, going back to first recognisable/readable writing systems ... and there isn\'t a single \'Universal Empire\' in the whole period, and no unchanging thousand year \'Ages\', either) ... pre-modern societies aren\'t any more static than modern ones, it is just their distance from us in time and a lack of knowledge about their *details* (simply not covered in the general survey works that most history courses use to teach about them) that make them *seem* to be unchanging, not to mention a bad (but understandable) habit of the writers of such survey works to concentrate on \'snapshots\', sometimes from one short time period within a civilisation\'s much longer existence, sometimes several snapshots of different aspects of the civilisation from several widely spread periods and pass them off as if they are representative of the whole in all ways. That would be like taking snapshots of what society and technology was like during 1914-19 Europe and placing them in a survey text on the Cold War and implying that they represent society as it was in the 1970s and 1980s and methods of warfare that would have been used in any major conflict ... which is obviously ridiculous! All this is actually there in the historical or economic record. As the intro said, FF&S is a *meta* product and points out the limitations of the then extant (when written) and succeeding products ... and presumes that the readers are smart and motivated enough to consider the issues and design their own solutions to the issues raised. If you wish to see a snapshot of a real late medieval world on the verge of the Renaissance and how it worked, then you could have a look at \'Orbis Mundi\' and if you want some ideas as to how to create a more detailed pre-modern society with some actual numbers to crunch through, the you can look at \'Displaced\' ... both these books supplement FF&S and were logical developments from it as FF&S was the second oldest PGD product. Still, FF&S is overdue for an update and rewrite and, when I get around to it, it will include material from the books mentioned as well as another decade\'s research and will probably make more specific (if not excessively detailed) suggestions for workable nonhuman fantasy societies as well as ways to make realistic historical backgrounds for people who do not have the time or (understandably!) the desire do it completely unaided ... but it won\'t simply do the whole job, and has never been intended as more than a *meta* product, and the rewrite won\'t do it either. That won\'t be for at least another year (probably more) as I am working on a major project to be Kickstarted later in 2015 ... a six or seven book update/rewrite of the first part (pre-Armageddon, loosely) of \'Road to Armageddon\' and that will be followed (in 2016+) with a multi-book update/rewrite of the second part (post-Armageddon, loosely). NB: The second part of Road to Armageddon will include a Fantasy background with societies that have to deal with exactly the issues raised in FF&S, and which have *a* set of solutions for those issues ... and that will allow campaigning in an entirely \'fantasy\' world without \'modern\' technology or characters from the 21st century ... but one that isn\'t simply (*I* think, rightly or wrongly) isn\'t simply a cloned version of feudal Europe (or Asia) with tacked on fantasy races that make no sense. So your issues are understood, and there are existing products that help address them, and forthcoming products that hopefully do more. Sadly, as a one man operation, even if now retired, all the writing, layout, mapmaking, art buying and everything else has to be done by that one person, so it won\'t be instant. If you would like to have a look at \'Displaced\', which may be a partial solution to your issues, email me at aspqrz@tpg.com.au and I will arrange a coupon for a free copy so you can see if it does ... that\'s the best I can do for now!
Orbis Mundi
by David L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/05/2014 15:27:27

I've only had time to skim Orbis Mundi at this point but I am very favorably impressed with the work so far. The history is informative and can help bring a bit more realism into any medieval setting game (esp. D&D) for those who want something more than the typical fantasy which is little more than modern society w/ different costumes (magical elevators? magical signs that flash like a Vegas casino etc.)

Formating of the Pdf could be done better; it was sometimes hard to tell where the side bar ended and the text resumed.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Orbis Mundi
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Farm, Forge and Steam
by Thorbj?rn S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/22/2011 13:08:52

I've been doing world building for a long time, and have also for a long time purchased and read various guides and books on history, and on the construction of realistic campaign worlds. With Farm, Forge and Steam, I hoped I had picked up a document that would allow me to put numbers on some of my questions.

Unfortunately, I didn't get that.

The first five chapters provides an overview of the subjects of the Farm, the Forge, and Steam, such as diseases and demographics, the development metallurgy, and the development of machine power versus muscle power. Good stuff that both provides an overview, and sprinkles it with interesting examples. It also concentrates not only on Europe, but also takes the occasional look on China, the Americas and other cultures.

At the end of each of the first four chapters, it provides a few rules for your world building purposes. Unfortunately, they are mostly fluff, and rarely have much substance. They are good to keep in mind, and will give your campaign character, but they don't provide any skeleton to build that campaign on. After the farming chapter I hoped I would get a table for the proportion of farmers to specialists, the farmland required and typical city sizes. After the forge chapter I hoped for information on when various metals appeared where and what prerequisite technologies were for their use. I really hoped for some type of step-by-step technological progression somewhere (settlements before agriculture, agriculture before smithing, furnaces before steel).

But I didn't really get that. Sure, the answers to some of those questions are buried in the text, but they aren't set up so I can take this document, and make myself a bronze age civilization. Or a fantasy world with a "roman" civilization surrounded by barbarians.

Chapter six is dedicated to pointing out some flaws in some fantasy world. It does provide food for thought, but doesn't actually provide any help on what you should do, only what you should not.

Chapter seven briefly looks at magic, taking the stance that magic must equate to technology. From there it makes a couple of conclusions which I've already seen made in dozens of internet discussions on the subject. Nothing new here.

In conclusion, buy it for the history and fluff, not for the worldbuilding promises.

LIKED: The first five chapters

DISLIKED: Provides no solid information for the creation of a playable fantasy campaign world.

QUALITY: Nice pictures and layout. Noticed no spelling errors or layout problems. But it doesn't implement bookmarks, so you have to scroll to get from chapter to chapter.

VALUE: Nice for a guide on historical development, abysmal for guide on campaign world creation



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Farm, Forge and Steam
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Orbis Mundi
by James H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/01/2009 22:40:41

An excellent and useful historical supplement written specifically with Medieval gaming in mind. Although it's not an exhaustive look at Medieval Europe, it does far surpass most gaming supplements dedicated to the subject.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Orbis Mundi
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Orbis Mundi
by Miguel d. L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/20/2007 13:16:26

This book will be quite helpful for those who are trying to develop their own game world as it addresses a realistic medieval economy. And ads one of the most comprehensive equipment lists I've ever seen in a long, long while.

However there are some material in this book which is of questionably usefulness for a gamer. Don't take me wrong I love history, but I do think the author spends far too much pages defending his position on how medieval life really was. It would be necessary for a scholarly work, but I just don't see why it is needed in a way. It is also quite centered in France and the UK, what, I presume, will content anglo-saxon readers but not this Spaniard (not to mention it ignores many cultures that have been the model of great fantasy realms since Conan).

I also feel the author could have provided a method so that D20 gamers could more easily use this supplement (it will work with any system) rather than explaining why D20 is not realistic. (Old news to me, anyway).

Aside from that, it is a rock solid book, that any GM should read; I'm sure it would spark many ideas and, more surely, would improve any adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Displaced
by Derek H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/13/2007 00:00:00

The other review covers the contents of the books in depth.

Even though I think this is a great product, I want to warn others what its core mission is. It is not Sliders or Stargate or anything with constant travel; it covers people and materials that make a one way trip to another time or world. And it does that very, very well.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Displaced
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Displaced
by Michael S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/03/2007 00:00:00

Displaced A roleplaying toolkit written by Phillip McGregor.

I recently purchased and downloaded the two-volume set of Displaced. The first volume is "Lost in Time and Space" and the second is "Survival and Rebirth."

McGregor is an Australian High School history teacher who has been involved in gaming and game design for about thirty years (about the same period as myself). Therefore, he knows plenty about history and how games and gamers function. Fascinated with the SF trope of alternate timelines and parallel worlds, Phillip McGregor has written two very large and very detailed books on how to best simulate this type of adventure with an RPG.

The first book- "Lost in Time and Space"- is fairly short (just 74 pages), but manages to very succinctly deal lethal blows to the average gamer's notions of history and time travel adventuring. This book discusses how history is written and perceived, including how our so-called understanding of history is so fatally flawed by our educational processes and prejudices.

In the course of this essay, McGregor shows how differently people of the past thought and acted. He details how displaced adventurers can be trapped by their preconceptions and assumptions. Space is set aside to deal with how such a party would survive and how time-travelers would or would not be able to affect the past.

The first book concludes with a short, neat bibliography reviewing some of the more well-known genre books, including Islands in the Sea of Time, by S. M. Stirling, 1632 by Eric Flint, and rather significantly, Lest Darkness Fall by L. Sprague DeCamp. He also reviews several RPG's of the genre, including Stargate: SG1, GURPS: Infinite Worlds, and EABA, among others.

The second book of the Displaced set is "Survival and Rebirth". It is the far-larger of the two, topping out at 207 pages. And it needs every one of them.

This book explains how technology works; how it is made, how it is maintained, how it is repaired, what materials are required to do it, and, more importantly, what tools are needed to make the tools that will be used to build the tools to make the technology. By the time I finished reading book two, I was thoroughly amazed that our civilization worked at all! It seems to be hanging by a series of very delicately balanced juggling acts, themselves suspended on the rather taut thread of energy production.

This book tells you how and why things work. It also tells you just how difficult it will be for our displaced adventurers to create and maintain any of that technology in a more primitive milieu. All of it is interdependent, requiring many other seemingly separate developments to exist. This is all very impressively researched and my hat is off to Phillip McGregor for managing to dumb it down for his reader's understanding.

Next there is a very impressive catalog of assorted technologies and how difficult each would be to create and how much each would relatively cost. My favorite is the Sten submachine gun, which apparently can be produced as far back as the Roman Republic with only a little extra effort. My prejudice towards flying machines was well-fed in the volume with the inclusion of hang-gliders, ultra-lights, and small aircraft- many of which are buildable in very primitive eras.

Following this, McGregor then provides a set of different "gifts" that the GM can give to his displaced adventurers in the form of air-raid shelters, malls, secret bases, future tech labs, a small Australian town, and the McMurdo station in Antarctica (among others). This Christmas present of resources for our heroes would more than enable any RPG group to survive and exceed in an alternate past. McGregor includes hints about what might be found in freight containers, Liberty ships, survivalist's basements, junkyards, and the like.

Of particular note is the inclusion of the Australian town of Nyngan (population 2500). This is significant because Phillip McGregor goes to great trouble to detail as much about Nyngan as possible; including maps, power, resources, stores, schools, police and fire stations, local mines and gas wells, airport, and so forth. What he has done is extremely evocative of Eric Flint's 1632 novel(s).

In Flint's story, the West Virginia Appalachian coal town on Grantville is scooped up and transplanted to the year 1631 in Thuringia, Germany, in the middle of the Thirty Years War. When Eric Flint set out to tell his story, he based Grantville on a very real Mannington, WV, and took great pains to constrain his characters and resources to what would realistically be available. Phillip McGregor has done likewise with his similarly populated town of Nyngan and it would seem that he intends that players would potentially use the descriptions to put Nyngan into a similar situation- not necessarily in the Thirty Years War, but perhaps in the slightly later English Civil War, perhaps? One especially interesting comparison between the two towns is that Mannington, WV has the typically American abundance of firearms and ammunition. The Grantville version of the place has easily 17,000+ guns, including a Vietnam-era smuggled home M-60 general purpose machine gun. In the case of Nyngan, just about the only weapons available are in the hands of the NSW Australian police department, and consist mainly of sidearms and a few shotguns. This contrast between the restrictions on firearms in the two different countries will make adventuring from displaced Nyngan very interesting indeed.

Book two winds up with a thorough set of tables detailing all of the equipment, weapons, and vehicles listed in the book, in their correct readouts for D20 Modern, Action!, Spycraft, Impressa Express, and EABA. While this is a generous layout by McGregor, he makes it plain that he prefers Greg Porter's ground-breaking EABA system to the others. Also, while he lists Action!, McGregor fails to mention that Battlefield Press has released Eric Flint's 1632 roleplaying game using that system. Battlefield Press chose to address just the first book of the series (so far), and the volume has received mixed reviews (primarily due to the lack of a promised coherent map and key of Grantville and it's surroundings), but is still an excellent, basic introduction to gaming in that period.

I found Displaced to be a thought-provoking, useful toolkit filled to the brim with excellent critiques and essays on the problems of cross-time adventuring. Extremely reasonably priced at $9.99, Displaced only lacks an actual adventure and game rules, and those are easily obtained- in some cases as free downloads. Indeed McGregor promises that there will be future volumes coming, using the EABA system. I look forward to them. <br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: The honest assessment of the treatment of history in RPG's. The complete lists of gear for various systems.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: Didn't quite go far enough and actually give you a game. Lot's of typos here and there.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Very Good<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Sadly, as much as anyone tries, there are *always* typos in the first edition of *anything* ... the advantage of pdfs (especially those available through RPGNow where purchasers get the ability to download any updates *for free*) is that is extremely simple to correct any such errors! So, if you have/find any, please feel free to contact me at the email address in the book!
Orbis Mundi
by Esa E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/15/2006 00:00:00

If you are after more "realistic" (as in, more like middle ages) feel for you fantasy campaign, get this (and don't forget Farm, Forge and Steel).

IMHO, McGregor has put together excellent piece of text about middle ages and points out many things that you might not event think about in "normal" fantasy game.

This might not be a ready-made sourcebook for setting games in the middle ages, but rather a book to give you a lot ideas for your own game. <br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: Well written, researched and contains good pointers where to go for more. <br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Orbis Mundi
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Farm, Forge and Steam
by Matthew A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2006 00:00:00

A decent overview of technology. Not really much practical use for it though.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Acceptable<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Farm, Forge and Steam
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Farm, Forge and Steam
by C J C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/31/2005 00:00:00

I will start by saying the author of this book did a good job of summarizing and organizing many of the important factors that led to the development of civilzation as we know it in the real world. I was familiar with some of the sources in his bibliography and was looking for some enlightenment into other areas with which I was unfamiliar, as well as into how this knowledge can be used to create a more "realistic" fantasy world (as oxymoronic as that may be).

In this endeavor, I think the author failed spectacularly. He seems infinitely more interested in addressing what are obviously big pet peeves of his about aspects of traditional fantasy worlds than in speculating on the effect magic and an interventionist pantheon of gods would have on their development. The reader is told far too many times about the absurdity of "big bearded" humanoids living underground and continent spanning empires whose technology remains static for millenia. There are a grand total of three pages in the book designed to address how the existence of magic would have an impact on the development of civilization.

Ironically, for a person publishing a book being sold on an RPG website, the author seems too grounded in logic, science and the real world to be of any help in envisioning how a fantasy world might have developed. We are told that in the real world, suits of armor would take months to create and would require several fittings. It would be absurd to have a store where one could walk in, slap down some gold pieces and walk out with a suit of chain mail. Well sure, it wouldn't be realistic, but the other world wouldn't be much fun to play in, no?

I will also add that the book did not appear to have been edited at all. The page numbers on the table of contents do not match the printed page numbers, new terms aren't well defined, there are sentences that have clearly been incompletely rewritten, so the result makes no sense. Proper nouns like Europe and Asia were not consistently capitalized, but at other times capitalization would be used to emphaisze words that aren't normally capitalized.<br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: Research into the hsitory of how civilization developed<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: Gross lack of imagination into how a fantasy world would be different from the real world. Poorly edited.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Disappointing<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Ripped Off<br>



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thank you for the comment about the incorrect page numbering. Somehow an old file with uncorrected page numbers was uploaded instead of the (then) most recent one. I have just (19/01/2007) uploaded a corrected file that fixes this and some other minor typographical or editing errors. (Including, undoubtedly, some of those you commented on). As for the rest of your comments, I am somewhat at a loss - the product *promises* to provide a logical basis for campaign design ... and says so, up front! In the product description! So to be praised for doing so in the first sentences of your comments and then castigated for it thereafter, when that was the purpose of the product *and* it was plainly stated that that was its purpose ... well, it seems strange. Thanks for pointing out the pagination error in any case. Phil
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