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Dungeon World
by Tomer G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/22/2016 11:43:34

If I have to run any sort of game that feels anything like Dungeons and Dragons, it's going to be Dungeon World. This is the perfect RPG that has all the elements of classic D&D lore and feeling, and for whatever reason just exudes the flavor I felt playing D&D as a kid 30 years ago.
Additionally, it's a great starter system for anyone familiar with classic RPGs, but looking to get into the Apocalypse World style of GMing and games. The book reads partly as a how-to for the system itself, but so much of it actually reads as a how-to for GM-ing in general. The advice here is great for running almost any role playing game.
Absolutely fantastic game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
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Dungeon World
by Jaan E. S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2016 13:05:24

Dungeon World is one of the best indie RPG's out there. It combines celver mechanics with a strong poetry layer that darws you in. It is also a very diverse game playbol both by pepole who never played a RPG in their love as well as pepole who have played RPG's for most of their lives. It takes the best parts of Apolcalypse World and adds it's own flavour to it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Joshua F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/19/2015 17:18:34

Been playing since ad&d1e. These rules support what I always wanted out of the tabletop experience. This is a great entry point to tabletop, easy to learn and fast ro set up, it is deeply satisfying for veteran players as well. Cheap enough to be an impulse buy, but after using it online I wanted a physical copy. The approach to running a game directly translates to any system, and has flatl out made me better GM.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Spencer S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/04/2015 12:29:08

Great system to introduce people to the DnD genera.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/01/2015 01:47:03

This is such a good book. I learned a lot about dming from this. The partial successes and interesting failures really add to a game. The section on fronts completely changed the way I run campaigns / adventures. I've recommended the front section to many people off the back of "My campaign isn't working how I expected it to." conversations. I'm running a lot classic D&D adventures using Dungeon World and I no longer have so much of an issue waiting until my players are a specific level before throwing stuff at them. First level characters are more powerful than 1st level D&D characters, there isn't such a gap between levels, and the way monsters are designed means the game runs in a narrower power band than D&D. There are bits about this game that are obviously good and there are bits about this game that are subtly good.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Eric P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/22/2015 20:59:34

I played this game several times with different roles. I found it easy to learn with clear language and instructive book. For those taking the role of GM, Dungeon Worlds great mechanized tools for great game mastering techniques written in a plain language. I recommend it for anyone who wishes to learn the role of GM.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Jody C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/05/2015 13:15:39

Great system, even if your not going to play it is a wealth of ideas and information for players and game masters.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/10/2015 11:19:38

Dungeon World is a "D&D-like" game based on the Apocalypse World game engine. Like a favorite of mine, Monsterhearts, the base system has had some changes to reflect the nature of the game being played. So DW features stats named "Strength", "Constitution", "Dexterity", "Intelligence", "Wisdom" and "Charisma". This makes playing DW a little more familiar to those of us that cut our baby teeth on D&D.
DW is a large book, 400+ pages and it basically details the sorts of things one can do in a D&D-like game. I keep saying D&D-like because that is really what this is. This is not D&D, nor is it a clone. It is a different system to achieve the same sort of stated goals. Though there are other things you can do as well.
There are a lot of reviews for DW out there. It is a well reviewed game with good reviews. I have not played DW myself, so I can't speak for the game play, but the rules read easy enough.
In DW there is a very basic mechanic (The Move) and it is up to the player to describe what that is. After that it is a simple Attribute+die roll vs. Target Number roll. In this case the Target Number is 10, but things happen if you roll a 7-9 or below a 6. This is similar to many modern games. The attribute modifiers for DW are the same as most Old-School D&D/Clones, ie 18 = +3 (not +4). This makes using your current character a bit easier in some respects.
Chapter 3 covers the Character Creation. Chapter 4 covers Basic and Special moves. Each chapter after that is dedicated to each of the character classes and their class-specific moves. Each class gets about 8 pages, and then some more for spells. All the classics are here. The Barbarian is even added as a seperate file as a value add.
Chapter 13 covers how to Game Master, Chapter 14 covers the first session and Chapter 15 covers areas or Fronts where the action will happen. Not bad chapters actually.
Chapter 17 covers the monster creation and use guidelines. After the monsters are divided up by locales or by theme.
Chapter 18 cover equipment including magic items.


What does DW offer the D&D Player?

Given the more narrative focus (and less crunch) of DW, D&D players can get some more tips on role-playing, setting up adventures and more immerseve play in general. It seems to me that DW was created as a retort to 4th ed D&D and it's focus on battle-mat play. It is rather compatible though with 5e. Many of same ideas in terms of playing a character or running a game are in both games.
For $10.00 for a PDF and at 400+ pages it would be a nice resource for a group wanting to continue in the same world or the same characters, just looking for some more depth and faster play.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/02/2014 07:02:14

WHAT WORKS: Holy smokes...talk about taking the World Engine and running with it. These guys clearly have a fondness for D&D tropes, because you don't write a 400 page book about emulating D&D tropes in a different game system without having some kind of fondness for it. Again, speaking from experience, the World Engine does work pretty well, so long as you're not afraid to improvise. The bestiary is impressive and covers a LOT of ground (not surprising, given the context of the game). Lots and lots of explanations.


WHAT DOESN'T WORK: They may have updated it since then, but the PDF I've got had some clickable bookmarks and page numbers that went back to the first page instead of where they were supposed to go. This is still going to be an exhausting game if you can't improvise well (or your group just doesn't want to play along).


CONCLUSION: This is D&D for folks who don't want to play D&D. If you like the D&D tropes but want something lighter and more free flowing, this is a really good choice. If there's something that isn't quite clicking with the game, some folks made a Dungeon World Beginner's Guide as well that'll help you out. Given my experiences with tremulus, I'm inclined to consider Dungeon World for my group's eventual visit to Ravenloft, though part of me really just wants to go into an open setting and see what happens. It covers a TON of ground...before turning around and giving enough advice and examples for you to tinker with it however you need to in order to fill out the game you want to play. Adding it to the short list of games I want to get to the table sooner, rather than later.


For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogsp-
ot.com/2014/01/tommys-take-on-dungeon-world.html



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon World
by James L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/15/2014 16:53:44

I really enjoy the type of game that Dungeon World encourages, but unfortunately it just didn't seem to click for me. I also can't wrap my head around the notion that this is supposedly a rules-light system, yet it's 400+ pages. It doesn't bode well when a common recommendation is to read a free fan-created Beginners Guide just to understand this game.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Powers For Good #0
by Joseph R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/13/2014 12:32:16

I haven't actually gotten a chance to see it on its feet yet, but from reading the rules Powers for good seems like a simple, fast, and low prep option for running super hero games.


Character creation is dead simple. Emphasizing troop style play the group as a whole creates a team and peoples it with super heroes. These heroes are loosely defined by their powers and a few key character elements. The game favors troupe style play, and players can switch characters between sessions easily.


The game play focuses on fast resolution and resource management. A diminishing die pool mechanic is used in a clever way to give the game play some depth.


All in all I'd highly recommend it for anyone wanting a good engine to play around with Legion of Super Heroes or X Men style super groups. While the game suggests that Justice League would be another option the game doesn't have any real way to model the difference between a Superman and a Shining Knight.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Powers For Good #0
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Powers For Good #0
by Fred B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/21/2014 14:13:56

Simple, Narrative Elegance.


The game starts by creating your team of superheros. You choose the team's name first. After that, each participant (Players and the GM) names two heroes. Yeah, just create two super hero names. That's it. This is actually a brilliant idea. Names are always something that people struggle with, and good names will spark creativity around the table. Now, you assign a power and personality to each of those oddballs. Done!
Next, you choose which of those heroes you will play this time (you can change heroes after each adventure). Flesh them out with 2-5 extra powers and you are good to go! Personally, I love this approach - it works great as a pick-up, or even a convention game, and gives you enough info to start roleplaying.


The system is simple, but also brilliant in it's simplicity. You get a set (core) of dice: d12, d8, d6 and a d4. You don't assign them to anything - you just have it. Treat it as, I don't know, your hero's current power. When you need to roll, you pick up any dice you want and roll them. If the total on the dice is greater than the Difficulty Level (GM never rolls dice, only assigns difficulty) - you succeeded!
Now, for each die you did not use in the roll, you get a Determination Point - you use those to add to your roll on 1 to 1 basis. If you failed - you get an extra point as well. Simple, and keeps players from using all their dice all the time (you want those Determination Points).
But wait! That's not all. "Each roll has consequences" - the book says. The die with the highest result in the roll is reduced in size (so d12 becomes d10, d8 - d6 and so on). This small rule makes teamwork encouraged. As even if you and your friends roll tons of dice to achieve something, only one of those will be reduced. Also, at least in my mind, the little line about the consequences tells the GM, that when describing success, they should always go with: Yes, but.


And that's it for the system - quick, simple and narrative - just like I wanted. Well, there are tips on how to GM and a sample "adventure" in the book. Both good chapters, explaining the narrative GM approach in some detail. So, even if you never played a story or narrative game in your life, you can get the hang of it.


Oh, one more thing - the game is licensed under Creative Commons - so nothing is stopping people from releasing their own hero teams, scenarios, rules etc. I really hope that people will jump on this game and start creating - I want to see Powers For Good #1, #17 and even #200!


Caveat: The game does not have much art, but what is there is really neat, full-page, supers lineart. But that's it. Because of that, some pages seem "naked" with just one column text. It doesn't bother me, especially at the price of admission.


This "review" was first published on my blog: http://level27geek.b-
logspot.com/



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Powers For Good #0
by James D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/19/2014 17:42:38

A super simple game with easy-to-follow guidelines for team and character creation. This should get a group of experienced players up and running in minutes and less experienced players should have fun learning the basics of role-playing. Certainly worth the price of a beer. :)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Powers For Good #0
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/13/2014 10:00:55

The introduction is brief, explaining that this first work in the Powers For Good line keeps it simple: one team of super heroes to play, one bunch of villains to go up against and the rules necessary to make it all work. One person is the GM, everyone else plays a 'hero apiece. Oh, and you need funny-shaped dice (the sort that are familiar to most role-players!).


On to Getting Started. Here we learn how to create characters. It's simple. Start with the team of superheroes, giving the team a name and listing the members, each person present (including the GM) suggesting two names. Then each player chooses which of the team they'd like to play (which doesn't have to be one that they suggested) and rounds that character out some. Those characters not chosen are the supporting cast and have greatly reduced statistics, being reduced to a brief description of their personality and powers. The player-characters are described in much the same way, only in greater detail - but still in narrative form. No numbers or dice as yet.


Next comes Playing the Game. Play is divided into two phases: Preparation and Action. Action occurs when the characters are acting in the face of an external threat provided by the GM, Preparation is everything else they get up to. Both are handled in the main by verbal descriptions of what characters are doing, the dice generally only come out during Action when a character wishes to use a superpower to accomplish something.


And here's the fun part. That's when you choose which dice to roll for what power - and it's not fixed, you choose each time. The thing is, as a 'core' each character has a d12, a d8, a d6 and a d4 - each can be used once during a given sequence of actions. Once you have chosen, roll the lot and compare the total against a GM-set target number - exceed that and you have succeeded in whatever you were trying to do. To reflect the character getting tired, those dice that were used are then reduced in size (a d12 becomes a d10 and so on down the line until the d4, if used that's gone), but are available for the next thing that you want to do. Once the Action is over and things calm down a bit, you increase the dice by one step again; and once the whole scenario is done, you reset back to the core values. Oh, and you can gain determination from various circumstances, which can be added to your die rolls.


The next section explains the GMs role, how to run the game and what sort of things you need to provide: information, threats and so on. There are some wonderful ideas for spurring the characters into action - vital components hit, things that collapse (under the characters, maybe) and the like. There are notes on managing the dice, setting target numbers and creating (and using) villainous plots to effect.


Finally, there's an adventure for you to try all this out on: Doctor Fission vs. The World. It is presented in outline, but is clear to follow and - being quite basic - should not require too much preparation to run effectively. The action should be fast and furious in the best comic book style!


If you want a fast, simple game that captures the essence of superhero action in an elegant and straightforward style, this is worth a look.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Powers For Good #0
by Jeff T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/12/2014 21:51:44

Simple and elegant, words you don't often hear used to describe a tabletop RPG. I look forward to seeing more from this series!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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