RPGNow.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Victoriana - The Concert in Flames
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/29/2014 18:19:14
Ring Side Report-Concert of Europe

Originally posted at www.throatpunchgames.com, a new idea everyday!

Product-The Concert in Flames
System- Victoriana
Producer- Cubicle Seven
Price- ~$20 here
TL; DR- Great adventure, but only for the GM. 87%

Basics-Can you stop Europe from burning? An ancient evil is being awoken by a small group trying to upset the tentative balance of Europe and bend a fiend to their will while the fate of the Concert of Europe rides in the balance. This book also provides GM with extremely detailed notes on the geopolitical standing of the Europe countries in 1856.

Mechanics or Crunch-This is NOT an option book, but that doesn't make it a bad book. This book adds some new mechanics like new races and a new country specific creature or enemy for each of the different regions discussed. It's good, but you should not expect some new options and creatures each page like a player's option book or monster manual. The countries do have great write ups describing the make-up of each country, so you can quickly create things like a group of upscale Russians if you need them at a moment's notice. The adventure has simple stat blocks for each enemy which will make running the adventure easy and quick. What's here is well done, but you cannot go into this one hoping for tons of new crunch. 4.5/5

Theme or Fluff- This is where the book truly excels. Just like the base book, this book could almost be an excellent historical reference if you strip out the steampunk and magic elements. Each country in 1850's Europe gets an in-depth write-up. The adventure itself has a ton of depth as well as a great story for your players to run amuck in. The story has elements of government intrigue, magic, religion, and some trans-country train adventure. It's great steampunk fun. 5/5
.
Execution- While the fluff and crunch are great; the execution has a few problems. There are some art to break up the text, but there are too many pages with just black text on grey background. This is a classic case of textbook problem. I do like some the way the book is divided. But, the font is a bit too small. And, there is just too much of it. This book also makes an inexcusable error for any fantasy book discussing geography. There is NO detailed map of Europe! Nor is there a map of the adventure train routs. While the countries are basically the same as real world 1856, a better map would have really helped with adventure design and the adventure in the book. I do like the pictures from the adventure as you get some nice hand drawn pictures of some of the major characters. All together, this isn't a badly executed book, but some flaws do hurt the overall presentation. 3.5/5

Summary- If you want to take your players across Victoriana Europe, then buying this book is a no brainer. GM's get all the information they need to make each European country feel distinct from one another with far more depth than there is in the base Victoriana book. If you want crunch options, then this book isn't for you. The adventure in this book is a fun romp across Europe as the players try to keep the Concert of Europe from falling apart. If that's the kind of adventure you and your players want to play, this is a great adventure. However, if you don't want to control the fate of the world and just want to play a game in London, then this is one to pass. There are some concerns I have with the execution, but those won't prevent you from enjoying this book if you want some excellent write ups describing Europe. If you want some cross European intrigue and a great adventure to start that controversy, go get this one. 87%

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana - The Concert in Flames
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Rocket Age - The Trail of the Scorpion
by David N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/20/2014 06:07:16
This campaign book is excellent, incredibly meaty and just plain fun. The overarching threat of the Red Scorpion feels incredible and really unites all the very different missions.

It also acts as a tour of the Solar System, taking you to some very exotic locales and introducing a huge variety of new creatures, people and technology. The ever-present story hooks are as interesting as ever of course and even include the possibility of exploring the truth behind CS Lewis' greatest work.

I really recommend this book even to those who aren't a fan of pre-made campaigns. Even if you only took parts from various adventures I think your money would be well spent.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age - The Trail of the Scorpion
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Victoriana 3rd Edition
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/18/2014 21:43:47
Ring Side Report-Victoriana 3rd Edition

Originally posted at www.throatpunchgames.com, a new idea everyday!

Product- Victoriana 3rd Edition
System- Victoriana
Producer- Cubical Seven Entertainment
Price- ~$25 here http://rpg.drivethrustuff.com/product/116730/Victoriana-3rd--
Edition?term=victoriana+3rd
TL; DR- You can't go wrong with Steampunk, Lovecraft, Penny-Dreadful Shadowrun! 93%

Basics-Ever want to mix steampunk with Victorian sensibilities and add a ton of Middle Earth to the equation? That is the mix for Victoriana-an RPG set in 1856 where magic is semi-common place, steam power is beginning to conquer the world, and "heroes" are called from all walks of life. This is a whole RPG in one book, so let's break this down into its important parts and numbers.

Mechanics or Crunch- At this games core, it's a simple d6 pool game. Let's see how that plays out on each level:

Base Mechanic- Victoriana is a d6 dice pool game. Each task you do will be a combination of an attribute and an associated skill. Shoot a gun? Dexterity and firearms. Ride a Wyvern? Presence and Animal Handling. A few small things make this game amazingly fun and different from other dice pool games. One is the numbers you want. You are looking for 1's and 6's. Even better, 6's explode and you roll them again counting 1's and 6's. AND THE 6's KEEP EXPLOIDING! I love the dynamic addition of exploding dice in any game!

Task Difficulty-Most tasks you perform require two successes with some task allowing partial successes. That is a quick and easy mechanic for deciding failure and success. The system builds on this simplicity by adding "black" dice. Want to mix dangerous chemicals on a bumpy train ride? Well you roll your normal Attribute and Skill, but you also roll 3 BLACK dice. These black dice work just like normal dice, but they take AWAY successes. AND, they explode like normal dice! AND, THE PLAYERS ROLL THEM! This puts some of the pressure on the player and it's just pure fun as a GM. If you have negative successes at the end of a roll, then you have a foul failure. These situations are where the GM gets to absolutely play with the player. Guns break. Mechanical arms are ruined. Spells summon crazy monsters. It's the whole nine yards of bad things for a player. Some tasks have opposed rolls like attacking and dodging, but black dice can still be added to both sides of a combat. If you're shooting in the dark, and my bad guy is dodging while on a slippery floor, both sides get to add black dice to their rolls. Whoever has more successes wins.

Combat-You could have an RPG without combat, but why!? Each round players can choose to do one action (move, attack, cast a spell, etc) at no penalty. However, a player can do up to his/her dexterity in actions per round. Each action the player performs divides the dice pool for that action. Run and shoot? Divide your pool by two. Run, shoot, and mix a bomb? Divide your pool by 3 for EACH action. Your black dice are NOT changed as your divide your pools! You can do anything you want, but the more you do, the worse you can fail! Damage also is dependent on d6's. Each weapon has a damage value. If you score more successes than your target, you get to roll a number of d6's equal to the damage value for your weapon counting the 1's and 6's as before WITH EXPLODING DICE! After you count your successes, you add your initial number of successes to your count and the opponent subtracts his/her armor and takes the difference as damage.

Character Generation-Character generation in this system is divided into two broad categories: completely homemade or guided. If you make your own character from the soles of your feet up, have fun! If you want a little more guided approach, then you can build your character by selecting your background, breeding (social standing and race), build package (where you fit in the breeding and background), spend attribute and skill points, and earn and assign extra build points via drawbacks and other abilities. It's pretty simple, but flexible allowing all kinds of different characters to populate the world. As a word of caution, this system has the kind of flexible that a few example characters could help to keep players from killing themselves during character generation.

Magic and Machines-It wouldn't be magic and steampunk without magic and machines. Magic is divided into a few different categories. Basically, each mage has training in one of these areas of magic and makes still tests as previously discussed. It's simple and quick. The different types of magic all feel different as hermetic wizards throw around all kinds of elemental magic, while people of faith have much more religion based magic like healing and exorcism. All magic uses another metric called quintessence. Quintessence is spent to cast spells and is recovered over time and rest. Also, if you don't have quintessence, you can just take damage. I LOVE cast till you pass out systems! This is only the tip of the iceberg, but magic does feel like magic and not just another skill roll. Machines on the other hand are built once and then never have to be paid for again. They may require fuel like steam or gas to run, but the different machines fell like they have different functions. Most of these functions have different actions than magic, but part of the theme is how magic is beginning overtaken by the age of steam. Some of these devices even require magic to be built! Whatever steampunk idea you have in your head, based on the marvels here, you can build your favorite toy!
Order and Chaos- Victoriana's spiritual fight isn't between good and evil. Don't get me wrong, good and evil are here, but the major fight is between the forces of entropy and order. The RPG spends some time outlying that order isn't necessarily good as a crazed priest of order can easily be as evil as a demonologist of chaos. Players can decide to side with one or the other, and when they do an action that advances their side, they can get dice depending how advanced they are on the cogs of their faction. Order provides a straight bonus to an action, while chaos provides many more dice than order, but you have to roll these dice to see if you succeed. It's a fun addition to the game, but one that your players and you will have to choose to get deep into.
Summary-I love what is here. It's simple in a good way, quick, and flexible. It's got a fun feel with action and puts some of the dirty, hard choices in the players hands themselves with black dice. I love when I make the players be the bad guys for a change! 5/5

Theme or Fluff-Victoriana is an "almost Earth" setting. Even with elves, magic, and steam powered robots, people are not all that different. So, this book assumes that history will pretty much follow the same path to 1856. And, you know what? It works really well! I liked the world this book built. Also, if you remove all the "wizard/steam robot did it" references in the setting back story, the first half of the book is a well done summary of European history till 1856. Honestly, a world with different races (really different races not just Spanish compared to English, but Ogre compared to hog-faced beastmen soon to be German Chancellor) explains the wars in Europe better than the petty motivations that have occurred through all of our real history. The story of this world drew me in, and I sat and read the intro fiction as well as the world guide. It's a well done world with lots of depth to help you understand the world and live in it as you game. 5/5

A note on history, truth, and the "isms"- Victoriana is set in a time when it was amazingly awesome to be a white, European, rich male. For every difference from that standard, things got steadily worse. This RPG introduces the realities of that life, but doesn't dwell on them. It leaves how much of that you want to throw into your game up to you. That's important since some players might not be too comfortable roleplaying in a time when a husband could not technically rape his wife. And, if you wanted to, things could get worse from there. Sexism, racism, and specisim are alive and well here, but the book walks that line well and wholly lets the GM and players decide how much of the more horrible parts of history and alternative history they want to explore. I feel it's important to note that there are some possible adult themes, but they are handled well. If you just want some pulp steampunk with orcs and magic, then you can easily get that from the system too.

Execution-I liked this book, but the problems I have with this book are not getting enough book. What's here in this book is great, but could use a bit of help to distinguish information from background text. The book is black and white. That's not a bad thing, but some of the information isn't as highlighted as well as it should be. My next major complaint is the lack of examples. Combat and character generation could both really benefit from an example of creating a character and how to systematically tear another character to bits via combat. I liked the layout in general. The pictures did a great job explaining the world and people and keeping me engaged. Even with this complaint, my comments are positive. 4/5

Summary-If you want some steampunk, some magic, and some Victorian history; you can't go wrong with this system. Character generation is easy, actions have the players doing more thinking then just roll one die, and combat is quick. This RPG runs like a good watch-it looks like lots of too complicated moving parts, but when you really get down to it, you see its got a simple, elegant design. Magic and machines are there, but the subsystems that make them run are not overly complicated. A new player could easily play with either of those systems with no trouble. My only complaint is I feel more examples of combat, encounter generation, and characters in general would have really helped players get into the system easier. It's not a game breaker, but it's something to note. Overall, I love this system. If you're looking for your steampunk Shadowrun fix, you cannot go wrong with this one! 93%

Full disclosure: I was provided a reviewer copy.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana 3rd Edition
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Rocket Age - The Lost City of the Ancients
by Ian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/14/2014 14:25:33
Very good starter adventure, lots of options, plenty of play options.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age - The Lost City of the Ancients
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space - Arrowdown
by Ben S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/08/2014 04:41:17
Good Doctor Who adventure complete with the Doctor himself. Well written and well presented.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space - Arrowdown
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space - Arrowdown
by Sebastien A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/07/2014 12:30:33
It is a good adventure for a first time game master and it is easy to run.

I can only give it a 4 stars because you kinda have to know what are the Autons and because the bit with the Dalek being the source of the problem is a bit confusing, or could be for non fans of the show.

I would run it in a heartbeat to introduce people to Doctor Who.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space - Arrowdown
by arthur w. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/31/2014 22:41:20
For a good sample of how to play the game its valuable.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age - The Asteroid Belt
by David N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/31/2014 02:04:19
An excellent quick introduction to a region of space so far unexplored in Rocket Age. Like most Rocket Age supplements the emphasis is on story telling and adventure hooks. It also provides a number of new careers and factions to work for and against. You want to be an independent miner trying to eke out a living? A pirate? A corporate enforcer? Done.

The options are all there. For the price, there's no reason not to buy it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age - The Asteroid Belt
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Rocket Age - The Asteroid Belt
by Andrew B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/30/2014 02:19:35
I have to say, if anyone hasn't grabbed one yet, these short PDF offerings are really good value at under two quid! Avoiding spoilers here, but this one adds a decent new antagonist (or employer, depending on your PCs) in the form of 5th Orbit Excavations, and a number of interesting adventure sites to boot! Go get it!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age Core Rulebook
by Rory H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/28/2014 00:56:36
This is pretty much a perfect game for what it sets out to do. It emulates the pulp/planetary romance genre with a real warmth and enthusiasm, whilst building on a simple system and rich setting within which there is a huge variety of options for gameplay. If you find traditional sci-fi games a bit too involved, complex and serious in tone, then this may well be the antidote. The system is completely compatible with the Doctor Who range also, and the production standards (especially the layout) is topnotch. As stated, a perfect game.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age Core Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Victoriana - The Concert in Flames
by ian s. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/25/2014 11:43:24
Beautifully illustrated, well written, everything I have come to expect from Cubicle 7, my only quible stopping me giving 5 stars to this module is me personal greed, i would have preferred more information on Europe and less emphasis on the campaign episodes, but it was well worth the money and I look forward to their next release.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana - The Concert in Flames
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

The One Ring - Rivendell
by fabien m. m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/22/2014 00:16:24
While this is in many regards a very nice book, like all ToR books so far, it is rather lightweight and the "north" of Middle-Earth, which is such a rich, diverse and deep environment is flown over rather hurriedly. At approximately 2 pages of general description each, potentially fascinating regions such as the Coldfells, the Ettenmoors, Eregion or Angmar (and many others) are given a rather unfair treatment.

History is also skimmed over very quickly, which is very perplexing when you are dealing with the Dùnedain, Arnor and such loaded matters. Thus, as far as background, lore and information not specific to Rivendell are concerned, the book disappoints much and even then, had it stuck to Rivendell alone, so much more could have been written to give life to such a storied and powerfully evocative place.

It's quite paradoxical that if you want to play in the areas east of the Misty Mountains that the book is supposed to be about, you basically have to bring your own knowledge or do your own research from other sources. I would assume that the authors felt freer with Wilderland as it's sort of a terra incognita, and Eriador might have intimidated them. Unfortunate!

Other than that hefty disappointment to an avid Middle-Earth appreciator, the book does keep up with providing many gameplay aides, new mechanics, nice art, stats, quality writing and other such material to keep sessions and campaigns rich, gameplay-wise.

Certainly not a bad book at all, but definitely not a memorable one.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Rivendell
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

The One Ring - Rivendell
by Finn M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/17/2014 15:36:05
I like it a lot. More lore more beasts more stuff for my favorite rpg!!!!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - The Darkening of Mirkwood
by Gilles S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/13/2014 04:47:56
This product a must for it provide a frame of events within Mirkwood through 30 years. It has a desperate tone as years advance and it's really rare for campaign to have this kind of feel, and just for that it is worth the money. I have read comparison from The Grand Campaign for Pendragon and there are many common point for this two product, in my mind this is a compliment. Art is beautiful, really impressive like all painting (yes) of the TOR book. Satisfaying is the feeling that the player choice really alter the path of event for the best or worst. Cubicle7 has really catch the feeling of Middle-Earth and i'm really fond of their product. Hope this will continue.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - The Darkening of Mirkwood
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

The One Ring - Rivendell
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/06/2014 04:21:13
http://www.teilzeithelden.de/2014/09/06/rezension-the-one-ri-
ng-rivendell/

Als erster Erweiterungsband zu The One Ring jenseits des Wilderlands präsentiert sich Rivendell. Hier darf man nicht nur das Last Homely House besuchen, es gibt auch eine Beschreibung der umgebenden Lande bis hoch nach Angmar, und das Buch birst regelrecht vor neuen Monstern und Regeln für fortgeschrittenes Spiel.

Rezension: The One Ring - Rivendell

Das lange Warten ist vorbei! Kaum eine Veröffentlichung habe ich so sehnsüchtig herbeigesehnt wie das neue Settingbuch zu The One Ring: Rivendell. Bei The One Ring stand bisher die Welt des Hobbits eindeutig im Mittelpunkt: Das Regelwerk beschrieb die Charaktererschaffung, Kulturen und natürlich das Spiel selbst. In Tales of Wilderland wurden spielbare Einzelabenteuer hinzugefügt. Wilderland als Setting wurde dann durch The Heart of the Wild detailliert, eine epische Kampagne dazu lieferte The Darkening of Mirkwood. Letzteres setzte The Heart of the Wild zum Spielen voraus.

Das Erfolgsrezept scheint man jetzt auch nur geringfügig ändern zu wollen. Rivendell beinhaltet Setting-Informationen zu den Landen westlich der Misty Mountains: Das östliche Eriador, die verlorenen Reiche Arnor, Angmar und Eregion, Rivendell selbst und angrenzende Regionen. Die Karte reicht von Bree im Westen bis an die Berge und damit verschiebt sich der Fokus vom Hobbit schon sehr stark zum ersten Band des Herrn der Ringe. Mehrere wichtige Stationen der Reise Frodos und seiner Gefährten sind hier beschrieben – zumindest, bevor es in die Minen von Moria geht.

Es ist bereits jetzt bekannt, dass ein Abenteuerband namens Ruins of the North erscheinen wird, und dieser wird auch Rivendell als Settingbuch (und der Karten wegen) voraussetzen. Wobei die Verlagsentscheidung durchaus nachvollziehbar ist: Ursprünglich war ja ein ähnliches Modell wie bei Fantasy Flight Games' Star-Wars-Reihe geplant – also jedes neue Setting (Rivendell, Horse-lords of Rohan) wieder mit den vollen Regeln zu veröffentlichen. Das haben uns die Schöpfer von The One Ring dann doch erspart, damit halte ich die Koppelung von Abenteuerband und Settingband für hinnehmbar.

Inhalt

Tolkiens Werk war ja mal in D&D als Inspiration gelistet – im berühmten Appendix N. Wer jetzt diese liebevolle Beschreibung Rivendells liest, der fühlt sich nicht nur an Bilbos und Aragorns Passagen in den Ring-Romanen erinnert, der kann auch einen großen Respekt vor dem Original spüren. Mag D&D Elfen und Hobbits als Klassen und später spielbaren Rassen ein Denkmal gesetzt haben, dieses Buch verneigt sich viel tiefer vor dem detailreichen Stil Tolkiens als Erschaffer einer Welt als D&D das je konnte oder wollte. Ganz ehrlich, so etwas überrascht mich in einem Rollenspielprodukt! Das Produkt heißt eben nicht Eriador, sondern Rivendell und die Autoren offenbaren durchaus, was die eigentliche Magie des Last Homely House ausmacht.

Elrond allein zu Haus

Der nachfolgende Settingteil ist detailreich gestaltet und interessant, ich stelle mir aber dann doch die Frage, wie man in diesen Landen als Gruppe zurechtkommen soll. Alle Rückszugsorte (Sanctuary) befinden sich entlang der East Road: Bree, Rivendell, und ein Refugium der Ranger. D.h. im Umkehrschluss, dass zumindest laut Settingband fast die ganze Karte keinen dieser für The One Ring zentralen Orte hat. Hinzu kommt, dass zwar Bree, die Brücke über den Brandywine und der Old Forest auf der Karte sind, aber explizit darauf hingewiesen wird, dass die Beschreibung dieser Orte in einem weiteren Settingband kommen wird. Rivendell ist also das einzige Sanctuary, das in diesem Band auch beschrieben wird. (Ein Veröffentlichungsdatum für den Band mit Bree findet sich nicht. Mehr zu den Plänen des Verlags hier.)

Zum Vergleich: Das als dichter besiedelt beschriebene Wilderland beschreibt mehrere Sanctuaries, die sogar den Spielern bekannt sind – fast ein ganzes Dutzend ist hier für Spieler in der einen oder anderen Form von Beginn an zugänglich. Hinzu kommen noch kleinere Zufluchtsorte wie das Easterly Inn, die Dörfer Stonyford und The Toft – aber diese muss die Gruppe erst entdecken, bzw. von ihrer Existenz erfahren. Rivendell eignet sich eindeutig nur für starke, erfahrene Gruppen, die lange, strapazenreiche Reisen unternehmen können, ohne auf Zuflucht angewiesen zu sein. Der SL oder der angekündigte Abenteuerband Ruins of the North mögen da noch ein oder zwei Orte nachpflegen, aber der Settingband beschreibt in dieser Hinsicht praktisch nichts.

Wer den Wegen Frodos folgen will, findet in diesem Band die Barrow Downs, Weathertop, die Midgewater Marshes, die East Road, die Last Bridge, die Trollshaws, Rivendell, den Redhorn Pass und Caradhras. Darüber hinaus sind die verlorenen Königreiche von Arnor beschrieben, die bösen Lande von Angmar, sowie das ebenso verlassene Eregion und die Flussquerung von Tharbad, wo einst eine große Brücke stand. Die Orks von Mount Gram runden das Ganze ab. Die südlich gelegenen Dunlands werden hingegen Bestandteil des Bandes Horse-lords of Rohan sein, ebenso wie Isengard. Wer Details zu den einzelnen Ruinen will, wird auf den Abenteuerband Ruins of the North warten müssen.

Aufrüstung

Insgesamt ist der Band definitiv dafür da, auch fortgeschrittene Gruppen zu fordern. Im Rahmen der Veröffentlichungen kommt das gut hin, einige Gruppen werden ja schon länger spielen. Regeln für knackigere Monster sind ebenso enthalten wie die für die Erschaffung magischer Gegenstände und Artefakte. Man merkt an den gelisteten Target Numbers, dass die Latte jetzt höher gelegt wird. Werte von 18 oder 20, die für Anfänger schwer zu packen sind, tauchen jetzt häufig als Zielwerte der Proben auf, auch bei Corruption Tests – wo der Spieler nochmal einiges an Erfahrung investieren muss, bevor er hinreichend hohe Werte in Wisdom hat.

Welche Monster findet man in solch scheinbar leeren Landen? Tatsächlich enthält Rivendell eine ganze Fülle Untoter – von den Barrow Wights aus der Ring-Trilogie über Geister, Erscheinungen, wandelnde Tote hin zum Witch King of Angmar, den mächtigsten der Nazgul. Teil dieses Bandes ist ja schließlich seiner verlorenen Heimstatt gewidmet. Dazu gibt es noch erwähnenswerte Trolle entlang der East Road und andere Gefahren. Es werden aber nicht nur einfach mehr Monster gelistet, es werden neue Monstereigenschaften präsentiert, mit denen man die Gefährlichkeit existierender Kreaturen noch weiter erhöhen kann.

Im Gegenzug dürfen Spieler sich nun mit magischen Gegenständen rüsten. In The One Ring ging es hauptsächlich um Gegenstände besonders guter Machart, die man immer weiter verbessern konnte. Jetzt gibt es auch besonders magische obendrein. Zuerst war ich anhand dieses Bruchs etwas verwirrt – schließlich musste man sich die ursprünglichen Aufwertungen mit Erfahrungspunkten kaufen! Aber tatsächlich stellen die magischen Artefakte eine sinnvolle Erweiterung der bestehenden Regeln dar, und kein Punkt der ursprünglichen Investition muss deswegen verschwendet sein. Magische Qualitäten werden durch verschiedene Ereignisse entdeckt, und das graduelle Ansteigen der Nützlichkeit ist auch gewahrt. Alte Aufwertungen kann man gegen neue eintauschen und kulturelle Besonderheiten werden auch nicht durch magische ersetzt. Das ist auch stimmig: Wie sollte auch ein über Jahrhunderte verschollenes Schwert direkten Bezug zum Beispiel zur Kultur der Beornings oder der Woodmen of Wilderland haben?

Hierbei tritt bei den Waffen und Rüstungen insbesondere der Valour-Wert in den Vordergrund. War bisher Valour vorrangig bei Angstproben und bei sozialen Begegnungen nützlich, kann dieser besondere Mut jetzt auch in Verbindung mit einer magischen Waffe massiv die Eigenschaften derselben verstärken. Das gleiche gilt für Wisdom in Verbindung mit Nichtwaffen – ein magischer Ring oder Spiegel kann dem Weisen halt mehr nützen als dem Haudrauf. Ein magisches Mithril-Kettenhemd kann leicht wie Luft sein, ein Umhang die Spielfigur unerkannt durch einen Raum voller Goblins führen. Manche Waffen spielen ihre Stärken gegen bestimmte Feinde aus, die mächtigsten elfischen ihre gegen alles Böse aus Mordor. Die Vorteile sind teilweise massiv, und sollten eher einer Kampagne im fortgeschrittenen Stadium vorbehalten bleiben.

Ober-Elfe oder gleich Aragorn?

Regelteil und Regionales wechseln sich denn auch munter ab. Passen die magischen Schätze eher zum angestrebten Powerlevel, und vielleicht sogar noch zu all den versprochenen Ruinen, so sind die zwei neuen Heroic Cultures zutiefst mit der Region verbunden: die Rangers of the North und die High Elves of Rivendell.

Beide Kulturen werden im Buch als übermäßig stark beschrieben. Es braucht allerdings ein bisschen an Recherche, bis man erkennt, was denn eigentlich so stark sein soll an den Rangers. Bei genauerem Hinsehen merkt man, dass die Werte der drei Hauptattribute die Summe 17 erreichen anstatt 14 bei den Kulturen aus Wilderland. Der Charakter startet mit 14 Extraskillpunkten anstatt 10 als previous experience. Die erlernbaren Virtues und die Cultural Rewards sind auch sehr mächtig. Der Preis hierfür ist aber auch hoch: Normalerweise regenerieren Charaktere Hope aus dem Fellowship Pool. Ein Ranger kann das nicht! Er regeneriert regulär nur dann einen Punkt Hope, wenn seinem besten Kumpel, dem Fellowship Focus, nichts passiert. Ranger müssen mit ihrem Hope-Pool also noch viel stärker haushalten als andere, was die höheren Attributwerte im Laufe einer Kampagne deutlich relativiert. Sowohl Rangers als auch High Elves haben höhere Kosten, ihre Waffenskills zu steigern, das Gleiche gilt für Wisdom und Valour. Die zusätzlichen Skillpoints zu Beginn sind somit besonders gut im Steigern von Waffenfertigkeiten angelegt, reguläre Skills folgen schließlich der normalen Progression.

Hochelfen können wiederum keine Shadow-Punkte regulär abbauen, sie können dies nur durch das Markieren eines Skills tun. Das reduziert zwar den Shadow-Wert einmalig, dafür kann es passieren, dass der Shadow-Wert genau dann wieder steigt, wenn man den Skill braucht und schlecht würfelt. Beide Kulturen sind also besonders anfällig für den Zustand Miserable – die Rangers, falls sie mehr Hope ausgeben, als sie auffüllen können, die High Elves, wenn ihr Shadow zu schnell steigt. Bei den regulären Startwerten der Skills starten beide Kulturen auf dem gleichen Level wie alle anderen: 29 Punkte, die so verteilt werden, dass Skillrang 1 einen Punkt kostet, Rang 2 drei und Rang 3 sechs Kaufpunkte.

Ein bisschen schlampig wirkt, dass die Anführer dieser neuen Kulturen keine Meinung übereinander haben, und die Meinung anderer Kulturen über diese beiden Völker werden auch nicht explizit nachgereicht. Bei den Rangers mag das noch angehen, schließlich leben sie ja im Verborgenen. Es wirkt aber so, als hätte man einfach das Template aus dem Basisbuch übernommen. Ich nehme an, im Adventurer's Companion wird diese Einstellungsfrage für alle spielbaren Kulturen vollständig behandelt werden.

Im Auge des Bösen

Ein kleiner aber feiner Satz an Zusatzregeln unter dem Titel Eye of Mordor bildet noch besser die Grundstimmung der Ring-Romane ab. Je sichtbarer oder mächtiger eine Gruppe ist, desto mehr Widrigkeiten werden dieser Gruppe durch den Schatten im Land selbst und durch den Feind entgegengestellt. Eine Gruppe Hobbits fällt erst mal nicht besonders auf, aber wer mit Rangers oder gar High Elves reist, Magie anwendet oder sich in anderer Weise besonders bemerkbar macht, wird früher oder später zum Gejagten.
Dieser Regelteil hilft, die düstere Grundstimmung des Dritten Zeitalters zu transportieren. Eine besonders gefährliche Queste wie die Reise nach Osten und Süden in den ersten beiden Ringbänden wird so besonders gut im Spiel abgebildet. Man merkt, dass sich die Reihe vom Hobbit wegentwickeln wird, auch wenn Rivendell in beiden Werken eine Rolle spielt.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Rivendell ist eindeutig nicht billig. Auf den 144 Seiten ist aber einiges an Inhalt geboten. Das Produkt wirkt hochwertig in jeder Hinsicht, man kriegt also auch etwas für sein Geld.

Erscheinungsbild
Wie andere Produkte zu The One Ring glänzt Rivendell auch insbesondere durch seine Präsentation. Das Buch ist analog zu dem bereits erschienenen The One Ring: The Heart of the Wild strukturiert, und auch in der grafischen Gestaltung orientiert es sich stark an diesem Vorbild. Wird eine Region der Karte genauer beschrieben, wird auch der entsprechende Kartenausschnitt präsentiert. Eine ausreichende Anzahl Illustrationen ist im Buch vorhanden, jede einzelne davon weiß zu überzeugen. Der gute Eindruck der Gesamtserie in Bezug auf Layout, Ästhetik und Lesbarkeit setzt sich auch hier fort.


Bonus/Downloadcontent
Keiner.

Fazit
Eine Bewertung eines Buches steht ja auch immer unter dem Einfluss der eigenen Erwartungshaltung. Ich hatte mir von Rivendell erhofft, dass ich damit eine Wilderland-Kampagne flüssig nach Eriador erweitern würde können. Das ist nicht der Fall. Tatsächlich versteckt sich in Rivendell ein Erweiterungsregelwerk und eine Region, die das Spiel mit erfahreneren Gruppen ermöglicht und interessant hält. Es bleibt abzuwarten, auf welchem Schwierigkeitsgrad sich andere zukünftige Bände ansiedeln.

Die Gesamtnote beeinflusste auch das Klein-Klein, das mit der Zerhackstückelung der Regionen betrieben wird. Spielen in der Welt des Rings wird so erschwert, und da der Verlag die Bücher zwar kontinuierlich, aber in einem vierteljährlichen Rhythmus auf den Markt bringt, kann es durchaus noch ein Jahr dauern, bis signifikante Teile der Spielwelt abgedeckt sein werden. Wann Rohan kommt wissen wir, auch die spielbaren Kulturen werden dieses Jahr noch deutlich erweitert werden, aber wann das westliche Eriador, Lorien, die braunen Lande, Mordor oder Gondor kommen werden, wissen wir noch nicht. Geduld ist gefragt!

Ansonsten gilt: Der Band ist liebevoll gestaltet. Die Regeln wirken aus einem Guss. Die Regionalbeschreibungen sind sehr gut, auf Ruins of the North darf man darum sehr gespannt sein. Mit der Erweiterung zum Eye of Mordor wurde ein Mechanismus nachgepflegt, um das Spiel mit dramatischen Begegnungen sinnvoll zu erweitern.

Die Reihe bleibt sich selbst und dem zugrundeliegenden Material treu. Für eingefleischte Spieler von The One Ring ist das Buch definitiv ein Muss!
Unsere Bewertung

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Rivendell
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 242 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG