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Wormskin Issue 6
by Thomas Z. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/20/2017 15:32:49

Esoteric, whimsical, malevolent, hallucinogenic and funny, Wormskin is a delight of 1980s fanzine goodness delivered in the 17th century. I especially enjoyed the brews and inns of Prigwort and the unseasons.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 6
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The Complete Vivimancer
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2017 11:03:30

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive supplement clocks in at 90 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 85 pages of content. It should be noted that the pages adhere to a 1-column standard and the pdf is formatted for an 6'' by 9'' (A4)-booklet size-standard - if you print this out, you could potentially try to fit multiple pages on one sheet of paper, but I would not recommend that here, due to some elements of the layout. Instead, I'd suggest going for the PoD-softcover. My review is primarily based on the print version of this supplement, which was kindly provided by one of my patreons, with the task of finishing a review of this pdf at my earliest convenience.

All right, so the default OSR-rules-set for this supplement would be Labyrinth Lord, though conversion to other rules systems is pretty simple. The vivimancer class gets d4 HD, 9-level spell progression and behaves basically like a magic user specialist. In basic games, only humans may be vivimancers, while in advanced games, elves and half-elves also qualify, capping at 11th and 10th level, respectively. For our convenience, the level-progression and save-tables have been reproduced.

Magical research is unlocked at 9th level, and 11th level usually provides a stronghold. House-rule options for the transparency between vivimancer and magic-user tricks are included. Some vivimancer spells reference a save vs. polymorph, which is treated as the petrify/paralysis save.

But what is a vivimancer? Something absolutely awesome. I mean, everyone, at this point, knows necromancers. Well, vivimancers are just as creepy, if not more creepy: Scientists of life, often disturbing and amoral, who can twist the very forces of life to their very whims. Existing in the borderland between science and magic, they allow you to blend the weird and icky; or add science-fantasy to the game...or add some other thematic ideas. The magic per se can be reskinned in a variety of ways...but before we get to the magic per se, let me mention something I adore here:

You see, the spells the vivimancer gets reward planning and consideration - but they often require a bit of forethought: The concise rules for laboratories and their constructions is a dream. They fit on one page, are crisp and can easily be tied into e.g. LotFP's magic-user lab-rules. They also present a resounding rebuttal to the notion that OSR-supplements don't need or require precise rules or that they restrict imagination - this page is beautiful. Similarly, the concise rules for experimental subjects and tissue samples taken are BEAUTIFUL. Oh, and guess what? All rules fit on 3 pages, 4 with the table. And they can't be misread. Old-school designers, take a cue here. This is how it's done.

Now, the beauty of this crisp, extremely professional presentation continues with the spells:On the left-hand side of each page, you have the spell-name, duration and range, and if applicable, suggested houserules. Better yet: Houserules do actually include observations in how they impact game-balance, allowing the referee to make informed decisions about their inclusion. Now the spells are organized by spell level first, alphabetically second, and they are not only creative, their balance with regular magic-user options is pretty much impeccable as well: From the utility tricks like a not 100% reliable means of detecting poison (so no, it doesn't wreck any plots) to binding familiars; from conjuring forth creeping homunculi to warp the bones of your victims, the spells evoke a very powerful leitmotif of biomancy: The manipulation of flesh to form pockets, to control hormones, to enhance senses or meld the flesh of victims all evoke a sense of the delightfully uncanny, with a tint of body horror thrown in for good measure. Surges of temporary life, accelerated bodily functions, absorbing faces (!!!), using insects as messengers - the classic tropes of witches etc. are blended with the strange and evocative for spells that fit perfectly and that feel somewhat...real, in lack of a better term. The magic generally feels like it could work as a strange form of pseudo-science, adding a sense of almost occult legitimacy to the spellcasting tradition.

Staunching or speeding up the flow of blood, reversible anthropomorphism, growing new appendages...have I mentioned the spell to decode the genome of a target? Artificial creatures can thus yield the name of their creator from their genome, while enhancements thereafter provide a similarly cool angle to pursue Reverting biology can be pictured as a means to offset the power of the vivimantic arts - with a sole focus on preparation and the modification of living tissue, vivimancy is potent, but ultimately, it is balanced ingeniously and perfectly via its limited focus and the means to undo its radical incisions into nature. And yes, dear fans of Jack Vance, the vats of creation, to a degree, represent the backbone and heart of this tradition. Need I honestly gush more about how amazing these spells are? I do? All right: When I read this book, I immediately felt compelled to convert the spells to ALL of the rules systems I play in. I absolutely adore this tradition and its superbly creative spells. Have I mentioned the 9th level option to create an artificial intelligence? The CONCISELY-presented psionic awakening? Have I mentioned how much I love how PRECISE and yet open the crunch herein is? And yes, if you don't have a preferred psionics system, an option for the like is included among the appendices.

The book is not just the vivimancer and his spell-list, though: We also get a wide array of thematically-concise "magic items" - which may well be creatures in this case. Let me mention some names - they're pretty much all you need to know: Assassin bug. Brain leech. Lockroaches. The latter are btw. stick insects that you can use to open locks. This could be straight out of a China Miéville novel. Lab equipment. Seeds that grow huts. A whole class of magical lenses. Let me quote something here: "This [...] tree [...] looks like a normal tree, bedecked in exotic yellow flowers. It is only upon closer inspection that one may notice that the tree is actually covered in a network of blood vessels. Indeed, if the tree's flesh is cut, it will bleed..." And yes, they produce healing fruit...though eating that is a rather gruesome, bloody affair...Mandrake types, philters that prevent or enhance the fertility of the target creature (allowing for those delightful interspecies crossbreeds...), solvents that reduce to essential salts... these items are amazing in their creativity, their focus, their themes. Wands that instill spasms can also be found.

Oh, and yes, animal and plant mutations all get their own page of tables for randomly determining them, and we get a basic spell-list with 12 spells per level as well.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant hiccups. Layout adheres to a crisp and cleanly-presented 1-column b/w-standard with nice sidebars. The b/w-artworks sport the same style as the cover and can sometimes contain a bit disturbing visuals - but that lies within the nature of this magic. The pdf has no bookmarks, which constitutes a major comfort detriment that costs the electronic version 1 star - I'd strongly suggest going for the print version. The softcover has the name on the spine and is well-made, so yeah, get that one.

Gavin Norman's "The Complete Vivimancer" is a joy to behold: Precise and to the point, it provides the glorious innovation that you can find in OSR-gaming and supplements it with tight, crisp and precise rules. The balancing of the spells makes sense; the spells are glorious and the magic items chapter is similarly glorious. In short, this supplement is FANTASTIC. This book is worth getting. Heck, even if you don't like OSR-gaming, this should be worth its asking price: The material is inspired and warrants conversion. Yes, that good. Fans of dark fantasy or weird fantasy, LotFP, DCC, etc. should definitely consider getting this gem. In fact, if what I mentioned even remotely strikes a chord with you, then get this. I know that NONE of my campaign settings will ever lack the art of vivimancy. As an aside: A conversion of these guys may actually make running a cleric-less/divine magic less setting easier.

This is absolutely fantastic and one of my all-time favorite old-school rule-supplements. It should be part of the library of any self-respecting OSR-referee. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Complete Vivimancer
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Theorems & Thaumaturgy Revised Edition
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2017 11:01:37

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive supplement clocks in at 138 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page blank inside of front cover, 2 pages of editorial/ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 131 pages of content, so let's take a look!

First things first: This review is mainly based on the softcover, though I do also have the pdf. Both were provided by one of my patreons for the purpose of a review at my leisure. The pdf is formatted for an approximately 6'' by 9'' (A5)-booklet-size and you can, if you choose to print this out, fit up to 4 pages on a single sheet of paper.

The default rules-set assumed by this supplement would be Labyrinth Lord, and the material, over 160 new spells codified for three magic-user specialists, is not just simply lobbed at the reader: Instead, we begin this book with a series of considerations for the referee (or labyrinth lord) to add these to the game: The book provides exemplary guidance in that regard, talking about consequences of introducing this material. Similarly, there is an assortment of options to tweak the game using these spells: From fallible scroll-us to limited or reduced chances to learn, the different options are presented in a concise and crisp, exemplary manner, providing perfectly concise rules for both Basic and Advanced era games . The notion of spells as treasure is also explained in a rather detailed manner - it has been a while since I felt that a book offered guidelines this concise.

The book, generally, sports 3 different sections: The Elementalist chapter would be first, and the design notes continue the theme of guidance and explanation, providing an insightful expansion to the subject matter at hand. The elementalist, just fyi, does not simply focus on one element, but is a master of the classic 4 - and while elemental summoning is very much a potent aspect of the class, the spells do not just run the gamut of the classics, including the high-powered option to conjure the deadly and hard to control brimstone monolith, or with power word: petrify. What about a bubble of atmosphere? The power to lift land into the air to generate floating castles and the like? Yes, this is an evocative section.

We also receive a great selection of items - amalgams of contradictory elements, the ashes of leng that blow away with visions...some cool items here.

OSR-gamers who have been clamoring for a crisp and precise representation of the necromancer can similarly find that within this book: From binding spirits to choking targets, pronouncing rotting curses or taking on the visage of a corpse, the spells cover the classics, beyond the standard undead control tricks and death magic. Exterminating vermin, preserving bodies...and of course, zones of weakening, death magic and the like can all be found for these guys here.

Once again, we do get a selection of magic items, including the blood jewels of Orcus, magic shrouds, rules for skeleton keys (literal ones) and variant shrunken heads are cool - and yes, there are teeth that you can plant to grow skeletons...yeah, the material does quote classic tropes, and does so well.

Regarding the presentation of the spells, we have spell, name, spell level, subtypes/schools listed, as well as range and duration. Spell presentation is by level first, alphabetic second. The final (and imho by FAR best) chapter of the book details the vivimancer - though unfortunately not all of it: Still, this is a great teaser, though if you're primarily interested in the class, get "The Complete Vivimancer" instead. It has more material that that contained within this book.

The book closes with a brief bestiary, with b/w-artworks for all critters - death cap fungi, para-elemental stats, elementines (mini-elementals), flame agarics, monstrous fly agarics, fluid beasts, soil beasts, wind horrors and leprous dead make for a solid array of creatures.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on a formal and rules-language level. The content is crisp, concise and well-balanced. Layout adheres to a 1-column b/w-standard. The artworks with the full version are really nice b/w-pieces (though it should be noted that a few show exposed nipples in a non-erotic manner, so if you're prude about that, bear that in mind). The pdf has no bookmarks, which constitutes a serious comfort detriment for the electronic version. The softcover I have sports its name on the spine and is a nice little book - I'd recommend print, if in doubt.

Gavin Norman's massive collection of magic tradition is an inspired look at three iconic traditions. It is extremely fair to allow the customers to get the art-less FREE version to check out the content, so if you're in doubt whether it is something for you, check it out. That being said, I am frankly not 100% sure I'd get this again. The book is crisp and its precise rules-language is, for the most part, really well-made and professional. However, the best part of the book, at least to me, is the vivimancer...and to get the most out of this guy, you should get "The Complete Vivimancer"; in direct comparison, this book feels more like a teaser.

This also extends to presentation and layout - the vivimancer book just looks better to me, with its crisp layout.

While this sounds negative, it shouldn't be - this is an amazing book of OSR-magic, with even old and tired tropes like necromancers and elementalists getting some concise and well-made, creative options.

So, how to rate this? Should you get this?

Well, I'd STRONGLY suggest getting at least the art-free version and leaving a tip - if you like what you see, get the book. If you're like me and a jaded bastard who has seen too many books and thus isn't too into the first two chapters, check out the vivimancer chapter and get the phenomenal book on this specialist.

All right, then...how to rate this? To me, at least, this is a good book - but a third of it can be found in the vivimancer book, in a greatly expanded manner. For a FREE book, this is phenomenal - that version most assuredly deserves 5 stars, in spite of the lack of bookmarks. The commercial version is cool, but not necessarily a must-own in my book. My final verdict for the regular version will hence clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Theorems & Thaumaturgy Revised Edition
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Theorems & Thaumaturgy Revised Edition (No Art)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2017 11:00:57

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive supplement clocks in at 138 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page blank inside of front cover, 2 pages of editorial/ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 131 pages of content, so let's take a look!

First things first: This review is mainly based on the softcover, though I do also have the pdf. Both were provided by one of my patreons for the purpose of a review at my leisure. The pdf is formatted for an approximately 6'' by 9'' (A5)-booklet-size and you can, if you choose to print this out, fit up to 4 pages on a single sheet of paper.

The default rules-set assumed by this supplement would be Labyrinth Lord, and the material, over 160 new spells codified for three magic-user specialists, is not just simply lobbed at the reader: Instead, we begin this book with a series of considerations for the referee (or labyrinth lord) to add these to the game: The book provides exemplary guidance in that regard, talking about consequences of introducing this material. Similarly, there is an assortment of options to tweak the game using these spells: From fallible scroll-us to limited or reduced chances to learn, the different options are presented in a concise and crisp, exemplary manner, providing perfectly concise rules for both Basic and Advanced era games . The notion of spells as treasure is also explained in a rather detailed manner - it has been a while since I felt that a book offered guidelines this concise.

The book, generally, sports 3 different sections: The Elementalist chapter would be first, and the design notes continue the theme of guidance and explanation, providing an insightful expansion to the subject matter at hand. The elementalist, just fyi, does not simply focus on one element, but is a master of the classic 4 - and while elemental summoning is very much a potent aspect of the class, the spells do not just run the gamut of the classics, including the high-powered option to conjure the deadly and hard to control brimstone monolith, or with power word: petrify. What about a bubble of atmosphere? The power to lift land into the air to generate floating castles and the like? Yes, this is an evocative section.

We also receive a great selection of items - amalgams of contradictory elements, the ashes of leng that blow away with visions...some cool items here.

OSR-gamers who have been clamoring for a crisp and precise representation of the necromancer can similarly find that within this book: From binding spirits to choking targets, pronouncing rotting curses or taking on the visage of a corpse, the spells cover the classics, beyond the standard undead control tricks and death magic. Exterminating vermin, preserving bodies...and of course, zones of weakening, death magic and the like can all be found for these guys here.

Once again, we do get a selection of magic items, including the blood jewels of Orcus, magic shrouds, rules for skeleton keys (literal ones) and variant shrunken heads are cool - and yes, there are teeth that you can plant to grow skeletons...yeah, the material does quote classic tropes, and does so well.

Regarding the presentation of the spells, we have spell, name, spell level, subtypes/schools listed, as well as range and duration. Spell presentation is by level first, alphabetic second. The final (and imho by FAR best) chapter of the book details the vivimancer - though unfortunately not all of it: Still, this is a great teaser, though if you're primarily interested in the class, get "The Complete Vivimancer" instead. It has more material that that contained within this book.

The book closes with a brief bestiary, with b/w-artworks for all critters - death cap fungi, para-elemental stats, elementines (mini-elementals), flame agarics, monstrous fly agarics, fluid beasts, soil beasts, wind horrors and leprous dead make for a solid array of creatures.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on a formal and rules-language level. The content is crisp, concise and well-balanced. Layout adheres to a 1-column b/w-standard. The artworks with the full version are really nice b/w-pieces (though it should be noted that a few show exposed nipples in a non-erotic manner, so if you're prude about that, bear that in mind). The pdf has no bookmarks, which constitutes a serious comfort detriment for the electronic version. The softcover I have sports its name on the spine and is a nice little book - I'd recommend print, if in doubt.

Gavin Norman's massive collection of magic tradition is an inspired look at three iconic traditions. It is extremely fair to allow the customers to get the art-less FREE version to check out the content, so if you're in doubt whether it is something for you, check it out. That being said, I am frankly not 100% sure I'd get this again. The book is crisp and its precise rules-language is, for the most part, really well-made and professional. However, the best part of the book, at least to me, is the vivimancer...and to get the most out of this guy, you should get "The Complete Vivimancer"; in direct comparison, this book feels more like a teaser.

This also extends to presentation and layout - the vivimancer book just looks better to me, with its crisp layout.

While this sounds negative, it shouldn't be - this is an amazing book of OSR-magic, with even old and tired tropes like necromancers and elementalists getting some concise and well-made, creative options.

So, how to rate this? Should you get this?

Well, I'd STRONGLY suggest getting at least the art-free version and leaving a tip - if you like what you see, get the book. If you're like me and a jaded bastard who has seen too many books and thus isn't too into the first two chapters, check out the vivimancer chapter and get the phenomenal book on this specialist.

All right, then...how to rate this? To me, at least, this is a good book - but a third of it can be found in the vivimancer book, in a greatly expanded manner. For a FREE book, this is phenomenal - that version most assuredly deserves 5 stars, in spite of the lack of bookmarks. The commercial version is cool, but not necessarily a must-own in my book. My final verdict for the regular version will hence clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Theorems & Thaumaturgy Revised Edition (No Art)
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The B/X Rogue
by Mica G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/05/2017 19:43:28

I intend to buy EVERYTHING put out by NGP. Everything... The B/X Rogue and the B/X Warrior have now replaced the fighter, paladin, ranger, thief, and assassin in all my games. It plays a nice balance between keeping things appropriately old-school (there are some optional rules in the beginning explaining what skills might be everyman skills) and providing a great list of talents to pick from that will have almost no two warriors alike. There are some things I was surprised to not see in there (like shield bash for the warrior) but it's not too hard (and even a little fun) for the GM to add more skills to the list.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The B/X Rogue
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Theorems & Thaumaturgy Revised Edition (No Art)
by Mica G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/05/2017 19:21:03

It is creative geniuses like Greg Gorgonmilk and Gavin Norman, the gnomes behind Necrotic Gnome Productions, that make the OSR community so freaking cool and exciting. Theorems and Thaumaturgy is really a must have for any GM running a retro-clone, wanting to add some variety to their magic-users. And how generous is it of them to put out a free version?! Great imagination, great writing, and wonderful ideas expertly executed will make your magic-users gleefuly cast some of the most bizzare spells, turning ordinary encounters into some truly weird events to remember. I cannot wait to have my magic-user PC find the Impregnate spell and see what he is going to do with it!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Theorems & Thaumaturgy Revised Edition (No Art)
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Wormskin Issue 4
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/24/2017 08:39:23

This series has scored a hit with every issue. One of the most useful features is the modularity of the content. You could play an entire game in the Dolmenwood or use various aspects of it to enhance pretty much any fantasty setting, from gritty low-magic to the highest of high fantasies.

This issue is the best of the lot, an encouraging sign that these are getting better and better. A particular highlight of this issue and the previous is the Abbey of St. Clewd. This location gets creepier and creepier the more it is explored and embodies the history of the setting in a way that allows for excellent player engagement.

The Attacorn is also a great monster. It and its siblings could provide the basis for an entire campaign.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 4
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Wormskin Issue 3
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/24/2017 08:36:54

This series has scored a hit with every issue. One of the most useful features is the modularity of the content. You could play an entire game in the Dolmenwood or use various aspects of it to enhance pretty much any fantasty setting, from gritty low-magic to the highest of high fantasies. A particular highlight of this issue and the next is the Abbey of St. Clewd. This location gets creepier and creepier the more it is explored and embodies the history of the setting in a way that allows for excellent player engagement.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 3
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Wormskin Issue 1
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/24/2017 08:33:50

This series has scored a hit with every issue. One of the most useful features is the modularity of the content. You could play an entire game in the Dolmenwood or use various aspects of it to enhance pretty much any fantasty setting, from gritty low-magic to the highest of high fantasies. A particular highlight of this issue is the deep dive into fungus and the particularly excellent d30 table that accompanies. The root thing is also an eminently usable monster.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 1
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Wormskin Issue 5
by Billy L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/24/2017 07:15:04

I've been reading Wormskin since the first issue, and running a campaign for sevearl months now set in Dolmenwood, and thus far it has never disappointed. Issue #5 is without a doubt the best yet. The section concerning the Drune, a cabalistic organization of sorcerers and warlocks who've been hinted at for a year, lived up up to all my expectations. You won't be disappointed in picking up this issue either, or if you've not read Wormskin at all, just buy all of them. You won't regret it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 5
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The Complete Vivimancer
by Michael R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/09/2016 22:42:08

A campaign setting in a character class. Brilliant, interesting, weird, gross stuff. Great art and writing.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Complete Vivimancer
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Theorems & Thaumaturgy
by Ben S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/23/2016 03:49:03

A great book complete with new classes and spells. If you like the Vivimancer (Which is my personal favorite), the Complete Vivimancer is a must have book as well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Theorems & Thaumaturgy
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Wormskin Issue 1
by rowdy s. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2016 16:34:27

I picked up a hardcopy of both issue one and two of Wormskin as I was impressed by the preview and the price was right. Having just got done reading them both, I'd say I was pretty happy with my purchase....with a couple of suggestions/ nit picks. 1) Both issues have information on drugs/ narcotics/ fungus effects/ compounds. As this magazine is covering a campaign setting, ok...sure, but how about just making that an issue of the mag unto itself? 2) Same with the Cat stuff. Now, I love cats and I thought the cat character class was cool, but again...how about doing ONE issue covering it all? 3) Going back to the Fungi of Dolenwood, there is a line saying that "roll on the enchantment table (see future issues of Wormskin)". I can NOT tell you how much that drives me crazy. If you refer to a table, it should be right there in the same book. So, when WILL we get that table?

Overall, I enjoyed the mag. Liked the Moss Dwarf, the art was well done and I did not notice a lot of typos. Looking forward to the next issue!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 1
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Publisher Reply:
Hello, thanks for taking the time to write a review and glad to hear that you enjoyed the first two issues! I wanted to reply to a couple of the points you raised, just to explain a bit of the background around why we\'ve done things the way we have. Regarding the \"X will be detailed in a future issue\" references: we try to make each issue a stand-alone package, as far as possible, but it\'s in the nature of what we\'re doing (i.e. detailing a campaign setting over the course of many issues of a zine) that that\'s not always possible. There are always going to be loose ends or things which are left unexplained due to limited space. (That is, until we reach the hypothetical final issue of the zine, when everything that\'s going to be explained has been.) That said, thanks for giving this feedback! We\'ll certainly try our utmost to minimise such references, in the future. And regarding your point about combining related content -- the fungi and psychedelics, say -- into one issue: our aim is to collect a varied set of articles and types of content into each issue. There\'s a lot of stuff to include: hex descriptions, spells, classes, monsters, villages, random tables, etc. My feeling is that an issue with mixed types of content makes for a more interesting read than one which focuses solely on one. Again, \"your mileage may vary\", but that\'s the reasoning behind the choice. Thanks again for your feedback! (Issue three should be out in late June / early July, by the way, and will detail some more hexes and monsters, give some historical background info on the setting, and feature the first level of a dungeon in the wood.)
Wormskin Issue 1
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/03/2016 20:48:00

I bought this zine off the recommendation of Martin Ralya and holy crap I am so glad I did. The art is beautiful and the writing follows suit very nicely! Thought my OSR game of choice is Lamentations of the Flame Princess and the stats here are presented as Labyrinth Lord it's still all OSR so the heart is in the right place. I purchased the Print-On-Demand version and it is lovely. The size and quality are exactly what I would like for a POD zine with gorgeous color covers and a nice content level for the price. There are exactly three things that might be listed as cons:

  1. Very slight formatting error (although I'll be damned if I can find it now so no big deal)
  2. The fungus table has a reference to a future issue of Wormskin (I'm buying them all but a con for folks that just buy this one)
  3. I find the forest texture very difficult to read in print (print is grayscale, PDF is color)

That last one is the only real con for me but it's offset by having the pdf where the colors make the map just look dandy.

In addition to the pros of all of the articles being full of flavor and general awesome, I LOVED the fungus tables. Grimalkin are cool, Moss Dwarfs are rad, but I would buy this again just for the fungus table and its potential hooks.

Well done, y'all!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wormskin Issue 1
by Ahimsa K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/12/2016 09:37:37

This seems to be just the beginning of a pretty cool setting. Some of the art is stunning and I don't use that word lightly. The Moss Dwarf is quite cool and something I want to play. (Their resistance to spoors alone can break a few adventures I can think of.) It seemed incongrous that they had minuses to using metal armor and weapons but could specilize in lock picking, which surely involves metal, but that's a pretty small quibble.

The list of Fungi is another resource with value for almost any game and is a great inclusion. The Fae cats I could take or leave, and I would have liked to see more than one monster included in the "Monsters in the Wood" section but overall this is really a cool ass thing.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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