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Dust Warfare: Core Rulebook
by Matheus C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/19/2013 13:36:34

It's a very good book and great game! Very easy to start and very fun to play!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dust Warfare: Core Rulebook
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Legend of the Five Rings: Legacy of Disaster
by Orin M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2013 12:02:44

Listen, I'm gonna be straight with you here. L5R's RPG isn't for everyone. Try this out before you actually buy anything to see if it's for you but i gotta tell you, it's a lot of fun if you can hack it.

In this you'll find all the basics about how to play laid out, the core flavor of rokugan introduced and a colorful beginner's scenario to play through. Everything you need to decide if this is an RPG for you.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legend of the Five Rings: Legacy of Disaster
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Midnight: 2nd Edition Core Rulebook
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/30/2013 23:36:35

WHAT WORKS: The production values are amazing. The flavor text is generally short but evocative, and the art almost universally compliments the feel of the setting. A ton of information is provided (it is a 400 page book), giving ample material to run the setting out of the one book (or so I assume…I do own the whole game line). A lot of effort has gone into making the world oppressive. In many ways, Midnight is more horrific than classic horror settings like Ravenloft. Also, there is no metaplot. The game line never really advances the timeline, so the setting is truly yours to do with as you will.

WHAT DOESN’T WORK: I would kill for a version of the book that isn’t written for d20, though I do have a great Savage Worlds conversion downloaded. I don’t necessarily need more supplements, but the line being available via print on demand or something would be great. The setting is written with the assumption that the heroes will always fail, though with no true metaplot being present, that can be worked around.

CONCLUSION: Midnight, along with the Art Haus Ravenloft, is the best thing to come out of the d20 era for me, regardless of how I feel about the game system. I’m eager to give the Savage Worlds conversion a go, and I’ll report back on how that goes here on the blog. I went out of my way to ensure that I purchased the entire Midnight collection in print (I even own the first edition and Against the Shadow, both of which were largely folded into Second Edition), and I’m glad I did. And while I will run the setting harsh, the outcome will ultimately be very much in the hands of the PCs, not myself or the designers’.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2013/01/tommys-take-on-midnight-second-edition.html



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Midnight: 2nd Edition Core Rulebook
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Legend of the Five Rings: The Book of Earth
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/02/2013 19:31:44

Second in the series of elemental-themed sourcebooks for the timeline-neutral 4th Edition, the Book of Earth is the latest release on PDF.

The Book of Earth focuses on the facets that are relevant to Earth, as broken down to a look into War, the Court, Magic, Enlightenment and the Setting. Like the Book of Air, the Book of Earth also provides a self-contained setting that can be dropped into any campaign. For those looking for new Mechanics, they follow the same format as Book of Air, and have it all on the last chapter of the book.

I find that the approach of showing off each of elements as part of a greater culture and further subdivided per clan is a unique one, and the Book of Earth has some very good insights. My favorite section would have to be a discussion on armor, and the focus of Shiba Artisans creating ornate and functional armor for the bushi of the Phoenix was a very insightful touch.

I'm certain that Crab Clan fans will be very happy to get this book due to the focus and attention it gives to Heavy Weapons as well. There's also a quick section that shows how to use non-standard Skill / Trait pairings that focus on Willpower and Stamina, some of the most underused traits that get some interesting new combinations for both combat and non-combat characters alike.

That said, all the Clans get something from the book. The discussion on armor, castles and sieges for example, apply to all the clans. GMs and Players alike will find inspiration and plot hooks dripping from nearly every sentence, and I can see how this can be an inspiration for character concepts that go beyond the usual Bushi-Courtier-Shugenja trifecta. Sumai Champion bushi? Why not. Shiba Artisan focusing on Armor? Absolutely.

Those who are looking at the spiritual side of the element need not fear as there's a discussion on Earth magic, as well as the families that excel in it. The Tamori family for example is given some spotlight time here, as well as the infamous Chuda family. New Earth spells will make many shugenja players happy, and the Monks get their own set of kiho to shake things up.

Again the Book of Earth is a great addition to the L5R 4th Edition line. Much like the Book of Air, the book manages to expand the depth of culture and history of the setting while still remaining iconic and accessible to new players. Solid writing, combined with L5R's always excellent artwork make this one a winner.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legend of the Five Rings: The Book of Earth
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Legend of the Five Rings: Second City Boxed Set
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/11/2012 20:22:21

It's been quite a wait for us who rely heavily on PDF copies of rpg books, but the Second City Boxed set that was released earlier this year has finally made it to electronic format.

I have to admit that I've been curious about this product for a while now, as I'm not entirely caught up on the canon storyline of L5R. Making a whole boxed set placed in what can be considered to be a very new development of the story is an interesting choice, as it does help people like me understand what is actually going on.

The Boxed set download is actually a group of PDF files for easier downloading. These include:

The Pillow Book A Map of the Second City A "for printing" version of the map The Campaign The City The People The Journal of Yogo Tanaka

It's a hefty download, but that's par for the course in L5R pdf books. Besides, most of the time the gorgeous production values and layout are always worth it.

The Maps

Both maps of the Second city are in full color, showing the massive scale of the city in question. It's impressive to look at and gives you a good idea as to just how many people can fit in this place. The difference between the files is just that the for-printing version is cut up into 8 pages, while the other has the entire map in one big image.

I did notice that there didn't seem to be any labels of any sort, so it's really a collection of buildings with some farmlands and a walled city in the middle with a palace in it. I'm curious as to why there weren't any labels, or if the files will be updated later.

The Pillow Book of Ide Arahime

The Pillow Book is a 20 page work of fiction meant to serve as an in-character guide to the Second City as written from the point of view of Ide Arahime, a Unicorn Clan author. Presented as a journal of the author's travel and experiences in the Second City, it presents an interesting "outsider's" view of just how different the Second City is compared to traditional Rokugan, and perhaps to the more astute L5R fans, just how many concessions were made to exist there.

The Author touches on all aspects of life, from the look and feel of the place, to the stranger customs, artwork, and architecture. There's a lot to be learned through the fiction, and I found it to be interesting reading and a good way to slowly introduce the differences to those unfamiliar with the colonies.

The Journal of Yogo Tanaka

This second journal is another in-character account, but serves as a record of Yogo Tanaka's investigations and how it slowly gets out of hand. The writing is well done, and I have to admit that it works well for it's purpose, which is a supplement to the Campaign included in the Boxed Set. I'd rather not go into too much detail with regards to the contents lest I spoil any pertinent information, but the book makes for an interesting prop for the campaign.

The Campaign

This pdf contains the rather... plainly titled, "The Campaign" which is a full length campaign meant for characters using the Second City setting. It's an extensive campaign, with interesting characters and a compelling villain go to after.

The campaign itself is fairly broad, starting from Rokugan proper and spinning off into a tour of the Second City setting itself. It's a strongly investigative campaign that lends itself well to characters and players who are more interested to mysteries than pure combat, though there's enough of that as well to show the unique dangers posed by the new setting.

I'm glad to see the variance of plot hooks in the campaign, and it suits a good mix of characters from different clans as the varying points of view and approaches to solving a problem can come in very handy.

The Campaign ends with a bestiary of the various monsters in the Second City setting, including the Destroyers and stranger creatures that can threaten even the most stalwart of samurai.

The City

This book is the one that provides the meat of the setting. Starting off from the History of the Second City as the Rokugani understand it. There's some mention of the Ivory Kingdoms, but the section starts from the rise of the Cult of Rhumal, and Kali-Ma the Destroyer and how Empress Iweko I proclaimed the colonies as territory of Rokugan.

The book also goes on to discuss the layout of the city, complete with sections of the map as presented in the PDF complete with the annotations I was looking for with regards to the important locations in the city. I'm starting to understand that the maps are the ones that can be provided to PCs who are new to the city, and they can be free to add their own notes as necessary, while the GM has this for reference.

Each district is covered in great detail, with all the locations given a thorough treatment and notable NPCs scattered throughout. The RPG team of L5R is known for being thorough, and it shines through in this book.

The last chapter of the book goes into the smaller details, including the routes by which people travel to and from the colonies, and a discussion of the culture and mannerisms of the Second City and how they differ from Rokugan main. A mini-Emerald Empire supplement, if you will.

The People

This PDF goes into the detail of the various social structures in the Second City, including the Ivory Court, the government of the Colonies. This is a great way to preserve the political / intrigue feel of Rokugan in a new setting. With so much to be discovered and explored, this is new territory even for the political characters as they try to push the influence and control of the Second City for their clans.

The next chapter discusses the movers and shakers of the setting including Otomo Suikihime, the notorious Imperial Governor and the various ministers of the setting. While strongly tied to the colonies, those who don't plan to use the setting can always transplant these characters into their own settings with little to no trouble.

The People of the Second City discuss the Great Clans and the Imperial Families. Again these are a host of NPCs that can be used to populate any campaign, and help paint a vibrant (and well populated) location.

Not to be forgotten, the minor clans and wave men of the setting also get their own chapter, discussing the opportunities and nature of their presence in this brave new frontier.

Fnially the last section discusses a smattering of new Paths for the Great Clans and Basic Schools for those native to the Ivory Kingdoms.

The Second City Boxed set is huge. It's also an impressive body of work to bring to life a new and exciting development to the L5R universe outside of traditional Rokugan.

While I have to admit that I was initially lukewarm to the idea of this sudden shift outside of the borders of the Empire, I do appreciate the advantages of changing the status quo in such a traditional society. The NPCs and locations presented in the Second City are all done by a team whose enthusiasm shines through, and I'm glad that the team has managed to make sure that none of these characters are mere caricatures.

The usefulness of the set for those who don't plan to use the Second City is still high, as even if you don't end up using the setting, the NPCs alone are worth the price of admission.

Those GMs who wish to have a campaign get their wish, and it's certainly one that spans the length of the Second City and the empire, with equal opportunities for politics, investigation and combat.

The two books are nice for flavor, and the journal makes for a great prop for the campaign. I'm ambivalent about the pillow book however, but it can still be useful for new players who aren't in the mood to slog through The City book.

Is the Second City Boxed Set worth the price as a PDF product? Definitely. There's a ton of detail here, and one could easily run a full campaign with just the contents of this box and the corebook and never look at another supplement again.

The Second City Boxed set continues the winning streak of the Legend of the Five Rings 4th Edition supplements and I'm more than happy to say that it can certainly add tons of value to anyone's L5R Collection.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legend of the Five Rings: Second City Boxed Set
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Grimm: Core Rulebook
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/08/2012 12:28:10

WHAT WORKS: I love the archetypes. The world is very, very expansive and has a lot of room to play around in. Great production values (love the picture of the Wolf Man being kicked in the nards). Plenty of options without getting overly complicated. I always like a magic system that has a little risk to it.

WHAT DOESN’T WORK: Imagination may be a tad overpowered, as may the Dreamer archetype in general. Despite often being promoted as being a suitable RPG for kids, the default Grimm Lands may be too dark for that. Grimm was originally a setting for the d20 system, and you can still see a few d20isms floating around in it.

CONCLUSION: I was a big fan of Fantasy Flight Games when they were producing stuff like this, Dawnforge and Midnight. The Grimm RPG line only ever had the one book released for it, but it is really complete with enough material in the book to run a full campaign and enough examples for you to expand the game if you need to (such as with Keepsakes and the like). The biggest flaw that the game has is that it doesn’t make a compelling case to not use Imagination as your Iconic Trait or pick The Dreamer over the other archetypes, from a min-max standpoint. Grimm seems like it could be amazing fun for groups willing to play kids…especially since the kids definitely have the ability to kick butt as they grow.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2012/12/tommys-take-on-grimm-rpg.html



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Grimm: Core Rulebook
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Fireborn: Player's Handbook
by Asen G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/30/2012 15:14:29

Very good game, which didn't get the attention it deserves. WARNING, I'm assuming you have and use the errata file. Don't know why FFG aren't offering it as a free download, but it's relatively easy to find on the Net. If you're not using it, the rules are a mess. That said, I like the mechanics. It's giving a very authentic feeling, and is one of the first games to solve both the issues of using mental actions in combat, and the issue of a character attempting multiple actions at once. Add to it playing in both modern-day London, and in the Mythic time, and you get a very entertaining game!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fireborn: Player's Handbook
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Legend of the Five Rings: The Book of Air
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/26/2012 21:52:00

The Book of Air is the first of a new line of sourcebooks for the Legend of the Five Rings series of books, that uses an interesting approach towards expanding the setting.

L5R has always been an interesting setting with regards to the depth and detail of the society of Rokugan, and this series of supplements expands on it by breaking down the topics according to the themes of the five elements of Rokugan: Air, Earth, Water, Fire and Void.

The Book of Air focuses on the facets that are relevant to the element of Air, as broken down into various chapters that look into War, the Court, Magic, Enlightenment and the Setting. The book also provides a self-contained setting that can be dropped into any existing campaign. New Mechanics are also present in the book to sate the needs of those who are looking for new rules to implement into their games. Needless to say, every clan gets something out of this book, so Crab and Lion players need not worry about being left out in a book that seems so focused on the softer side of Rokugani life.

I’m pleased to say that the organization of each of the chapters is very well done, with the book going into extensive detail with regards to the facet being discussed. The role of archery for example, is treated in the general form, then broken down into the various specific traditions of each of the clans. The chapters go into detail with regards to War, Courtly Politics, Magic (my favorite chapter due to the Kitsu Spirit Legion), Enlightenment, the world of Rokugan and a Politics-heavy Campaign setting.

Each of these are discussed without interrupting with mechanics. Instead all of the fluff is presented up front, and all the mechanics sorted out in the final chapter. This makes for an interesting format as it makes rules lookups so much easier, while letting people who enjoy the fluff (or need them, as with most GMs) read and digest the information without switching back and forth from concept to rules thinking in every other page or so.

The Book of Air is a worthy addition to the excellent Legend of the Five Rings 4th Edition line, expanding on topics and lending even more detail to the unique nature of the clans. Given the quality of the writing, combined with excellent artwork and layout and the new format of organizing the information in the book, I find myself looking forward to the rest of the series.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legend of the Five Rings: The Book of Air
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Legend of the Five Rings 4th Edition
by Michael H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/16/2012 21:16:19

I have been playing Legend of the Five Rings off and on since I discovered the first edition of the game back in 1999. I have always been a fan of Japanese history, culture and folklore (no expert by any means, just a fan). Prior to finding this game I had become hooked on Rurouni Kenshin and I was looking for a game that captured the mythical and epic nature of medieval Japan. Legend of the Five Rings was the game that filled that need for me.

Prior editions of the game were tied intricately to the ongoing storyline which was being driven by the Legend of the Five Rings collectible card game. While in a lot of ways this was a good thing it often left players of the RPG just a bit behind the curve when it came to developments in the setting, slaves to a game in which they had no say. The Fourth Edition of L5R has finally freed players from this burden and empowered players to enjoy the time frame in the setting they want to explore.

The second edition of the game was tied very closely to Dungeons & Dragons and overall it felt like an underdeveloped product although it did bring several interesting mechanics to the table. Third edition marked a separation from D&D but as time went on the game became more and more complicated to play. While no one can deny the quality of the game it was hard to play the game without feeling a bit overwhelmed. One of the major focuses of the fourth edition was returning the game to a simpler core set of rules which maintained the flavored development by previous editions without crippling players with an overpowering game system.

For the most part I feel the game succeeds at fulfilling that goal. I finally had a chance to play L5R 4E at GenCon 2012 and I walked away a very happy gamer. The system was easy to use but versatile enough to handle everything our group threw at the game master. Combat was fast, fun and deadly without being tedious to track. Each character was infused with the L5R flavor that we have come to know and love.

L5R 4E is a game that has finally come back into its own. AEG got everything right with this edition and once again I find myself 100% engaged with the product line.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legend of the Five Rings 4th Edition
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Legend of the Burning Sands
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/07/2012 00:44:47

After what seemed to be an eternity, Alderac has finally released the PDF version of the sought after Legend of the Burning Sands RPG into the wild.

Released back in the days of 3rd Edition L5R, Legend of the Burning Sands (LBS) was a huge thing for me when it came out as it broadened the scope of L5R's setting of Rokugan, and introduced new cultures and factions that were all interesting and potentially fun to play.

LBS takes place in Rokugan's sister setting, the Burning Sands. Despite sharing the same "World" the Burning Sands was an entirely different setting with it's own cultural norms and societies that are a far cry from the asian-inspired nature of Rokugan.

The Burning Sands is a harsh desert that holds multiple cultures, whose lives revolve around Medinat al-Salaam, the massive city ruled by the Caliph. Nine factions exist in the city: The Khadi, Qolat, the Ashalan, the Assassins, the Ebonites, The Jackals, the Ra'Shari, the Senpet and the Yodotai.

The city of Medinaat Al-Saalam is the focus of the game, and constitutes the majority of the attention to the setting. Everything from demographics to economics is given attention, and there's enough material for a GM to spin off more than enough plot hooks for a lengthy campaign.

Of these factions, seven are given a chapter to themselves. These are the Ashalan, Assassins, Ra'Shari, Senpet, Yodotai, Jackals and Ebonites, and compose the playable factions in the game. Each of these are given a thorough treatment which include their histories, secrets, methods and techniques unique to each faction.

The system is pretty much the Roll and Keep system with minor tweaks aimed towards showing how magic here is very different from importuning Kami in Rokugan. Familiarity with L5R is nice, but the system is treated in full as to not require the L5R corebook to run a game.

There's also a bestiary of the local wildlife, and a Jinn creation system to simulate these mysterious (and dangerous) beings native to the Burning Sands.

Legend of the Burning Sands is stuffed with information, and sometimes it feels that the artwork had to be sacrificed to make space. There's art for each of the factions, but aside from that, there's very little else out there. I don't mind, but it might intimidate a few readers who aren't used to seeing walls of text.

Despite its age, I still recommend Legend of the Burning Sands. It works well as both a standalone product and as a supplement for the L5R games, and introduces an entirely different setting with its own interesting cultures. The setting is still every bit as interesting and compelling as it was the first time I picked it up as a CCG, and I'm more than happy to see that I can now run my own adventures in the Burning Sands in tabletop form.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legend of the Burning Sands
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Anima Beyond Fantasy: Core Rulebook
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/14/2012 21:54:12

Introduction: I'll admit not having played Final Fantasy or other Japanese video roleplaying games. I'm still familiar with genre, and even visuals alone will tell you that these fantasy games are quite different than their western counterparts. And, while Japan has its tabletop RPGs, few have been translated to American markets. Indeed, Anima, which looks on the surface to be a tabletop rpg version of Japanese computer rpgs, was originally published by Edge Entertainment in Spain. That doesn't make it any less qualified to be a thorough and detailed treatment of the genre. However, its complex character generation rule may put gamers off.

Character Generation: Anima character generation is flavorful but highly detailed and complicated. If you're the type who approaches character generation as a spreadsheet budget, or someone who must create a super-exotic mondo-unique uber-butt-kicking character (or, much worse, have a player who wants to be one), expect to spend quite a bit of time going through several chapter's worth of character creation options. But if you limit first characters to the same basics the sample character uses (yes, Ki, Magic, and Psychic abilities are not basic!), you should be able to play soon enough. After their first game, players you can your players recreate their characters or introduce new ones. If you do a search on "anima roleplay character generation", you should be able to find jmbowman's Anima character generator.

Combat: Anima combat is straightforward, with optional complexity. Each turn you have an action, often an attack. In an attack, you and your opponent both do a "skill die roll" of an attack skill (eg. Attack Ability) versus a defense skill (eg. Dodge). You then cross-index the difference (negative numbers can cause counterattacks!) against armor. This results in a percentage which you multiply against your weapon's damage to determine how much damage you actually do. (This is easier done than said, since Anima provides a table and 100% damage is a multiple of ten.) Additional rules and modifiers are provided for ranged and optional hand-to-hand and ranged attacks.

Sourcebook: Much of the gamemaster's section is source material: Gaia's history, Countries and Cities, Organizations (factions), The Supernatural World, and Powers in the Shadow (conspiratorial organizations influencing Gaia), Hell (supernatural worlds and their races), Light and Darkness (deities and mechanics for their gifts), and Supernatural Presence (how much of the world's reality is centered around a character -- including the PCs).

Gamemaster: Other gamemaster sections include gamemaster advice and guidelines, Common Characters (common NPC stats), Creation of Beings (detailed mechanics for creating special creatures), Creature Compendium (example creatures), and a character sheet.

Art and Layout: Bring out your iPads. At 322 full-color pages, you're not going to print this out. It's too bad that Anima doesn't have a printer-friendly or text-only version.

Conclusion: This is not a casual roleplaying game. The system is complicated, and the source material extensive. However, if you're looking for a detailed tabletop treatment of a Japanese video game, Anima is a definite choice.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Anima Beyond Fantasy: Core Rulebook
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Legend Of The Five Rings Live Action Role-Playing Game
by James H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/27/2012 17:34:37

Just on a read-through, this game looks rather good. Having played Mind's Eye Theatre, a game with a similar rules ethic (ie card pulls instead of hard skill), I can tell it's something that would work in practice. The information is well presented and clear, and I never got lost reading it.

A big problem I have is that the book promises a section on costuming, but doesn't deliver on this. It's a shame, because it's something that open-book LRP books tend not to delve into enough. It doesn't really detract from the presentation of the book or the quality of the game information, so this isn't a major thing.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legend Of The Five Rings Live Action Role-Playing Game
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Dust Warfare: Core Rulebook
by Don N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/09/2012 00:24:31

I love the look of the book. The graphics are done very we'll. The reading compression is high. The only issue is the organization of the book. I find I have to constantly flip around the book because information is not grouped together very well.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dust Warfare: Core Rulebook
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Dust Warfare: Core Rulebook
by Dan C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/25/2012 16:25:58

First off the quality is GREAT.

I purchased the download in addition to the Hard cover book. I would have purchased both no matter which came out first. It does have a couple typos, a couple charts were wrong, but overall it is a great game and I really enjoy it. They have already released a FAQ, covering the typos, fixing the charts and explaining a few areas.

I think the rule set is very easy to follow. Some people complain that it is not detailed enough, but I don't nor do my opponents have a problem with it.

I am a diehard fan of Dust both Tactics and Warfare therefore, my opinion is based as such. It is well worth the twenty dollars. I really like that with the same miniatures I can play two different but similiar games depending on my mood and my opponents.

I look forward to the additional releases and will purchase both hardcover and a download copy.

I really don't think you can go wrong with the download copy. This is the first time I have ever purchased anything from the Wargame Vault and if the quality is always this good then I know I will be making additional purchases.

Hope this is helpful.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dust Warfare: Core Rulebook
by Lee L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/25/2012 13:04:54

Dust Warfare is a full on miniature wargame, set in the world of Paolo Parente's world of Dust. Designed by Andy Chambers and Mack Martin, this alternate World War II game adds in a touch of the science fiction element. With various sized walkers that replace traditional tanks, Laser Grenadiers, Zombies and phaser weapons, this game steps froward from the Dust Tactics board game in so many ways!

While some were never upset with the idea of it being a miniatures board game, I know many who were waiting for this version of the game, as they didn't have the satisfaction brought about from the hobby elements of a true wargame. The cards used in games of Tactics are not used in Warfare. Instead, each unit has an entry in the book that has all its relevant information at your finger tips. The stats are also slightly different for some weapons, but that is out of a need to make them more playable in this new system. The addition of ranges to the weapons and movement for units enhances the game play in many ways. It allows for more tactical play and also allows for creative and stunning terrain elements to be added to your table. The terrain rules are quite unique in the fact that one piece of terrain may cause issues for a walker, but still be cause a troop to have no restrictions at all and vice-versa. It also means that scenarios can be flexible and story driven without sacrificing fun or smooth game play. These new rules were designed with organized play in mind as well. The tournament and campaign systems are set up to help organizers and players make each event a unique and rewarding series of games for the players involved. The Battle Builder for tournament play is a great addition to the system and something that as a playtester for Dust, I did not get to see until the rules came out. It is an awesome way for you to be able to look at your opponents list and them bid Scenario points towards the upcoming game to try and give themselves some advantage in terrain, objectives, or battlefield conditions. Each player has without sacrificing fun or smooth game play. These new rules were designed with organized play in mind as well. The tournament and campaign systems are set up to help organizers and players make each event a unique and rewarding series of games for the players involved. The Battle Builder for tournament play is a great addition to the system and something that as a playtester for Dust, I did not get to see until the rules came out. It is an awesome way for you to be able to look at your opponents list and them bid Scenario points towards the upcoming game to try and give themselves some advantage in terrain, objectives, or battlefield conditions. Each player has a limited amount of Scenario Points [2] to spend on these and a roll of 5 dice determines who has to start allocating their points first. These will be used in tournaments and can be used for pick up games as well.

Dust Warfare uses the same core mechanics for "hitting" and "damage", as well as actions, but that is about where they similarities end. Cover, saves, and reaction all work very different in this game. It is all a smooth transition and after a game or 2 you will not notice the changes that much [to be honest, I like these rules much better]. The rules are simple and easier to use and make the play move faster than in Tactics. Reaction, for example, you do not have to roll to try and react, you just get a reaction marker that removes an action from the unit. So, you can not react if you have already received a reaction marker this turn. They have also added rules for Suppression, this can affect your units actions as well as being a way of keeping track of if a unit is in retreat or not.

Each unit is worth a set number of AP and players agree upon a number of AP to play before selection their forces. The game has three different point ranges; Small [200 AP or less], Medium, also called a Tournament Engagement [between 201-400 AP] and Large [401 AP or more]. Players must choose at least one platoon, but may opt to add an additional platoon structure for each 150 AP [or part there of]. So in a 200 point game a player may opt to make one platoon or can have 2, keeping in mind that each platoon mush have at least a Command section and a mandatory 1st Section choice for each one. Each platoon may also take up to 1 Hero for each 150 AP [or part there of] allowed. Some Heroes also have a Special ability called Leadership that allows them to be the Command Section of your platoon. If you use them in this manner, they count as the Command Section, but also count toward the number of Heroes you can take.

The dynamic way you build a force and the scenarios you can play with these rules make the system and exciting and fresh new game. I for one can not wait to face an opponent with an all Zombie and Axis Ape army just to see what they can do!!!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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