RPGNow.com
Close
Close
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Wicked Fantasy (Full Book)
by Alex L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/11/2015 00:41:34
This book is simply dynamite! Wick's unorthodox reimagining of these beloved (and often stale) races is a breath of fresh air. The ideas he presents can become your new understanding of each race, or you can do what I did and treat the racial genesis story as a LOCAL genesis. So maybe not ALL orcs are "orks" but on this island, they are.

I haven't been so impressed with a supplement in a long time!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Fantasy (Full Book)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Play Dirty
by Andrew W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/09/2015 00:35:02
This should be in every GM's collection. Even if you don't use it, you'll wish you could.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Play Dirty
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Wilderness of Mirrors 002 Edition
by Cédric P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/09/2014 22:29:22
I think I prefer the original edition with the planet code-name roles. The graphic design and the layout was definitively better.
But this version work well. It just less sexy.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wilderness of Mirrors 002 Edition
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Wield
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/03/2014 08:19:27
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/07/03/tabletop-review-wield/<-
br />
Wield is one of those Kickstarter successes that just takes you by surprise. Looking for only three thousand dollars, Wield brought in nearly 1,100 backers and raised over twenty-seven grand! Not bad for a little game that could be yours for as low as five dollars. I know I was a backer. I mean, at worst I would be out five dollars and I’ve been looking for a game similar to Bloodlust, except in English. Hey, I may speak/read/write French, but very few of my friends do, and Bloodlust is only in francais. Wield definitely felts inspired by Bloodlust in terms of the core theme, but it differs greatly in both mechanics and demographics. Bloodlust for example is very dark and filled with mature themes while Wield can be for any age as it’s extremely setting-lite. Mechanics-wise…well, I can’t say I cared for Wield, and we’ll take look why below.

So what is Wield about? Well think of Elric and Stormbringer, Cyric and Godsbane, and other fantasy character wielding an intelligent magical weapon. Wield takes you into such a world, but instead of playing the hero who wields the magical blade or powerful mystic amulet, you will actually be playing as the self-aware item itself! That’s such a fun concept. The item can be anything from the usual weapon or armor to something more outlandish like a musical instrument, coin, or pet carrier. The only limit is your imagination.

There are comprehensive and detailed character creation rules for your item, known as a vatcha. Like any protagonists in a tabletop RPG, the vatcha have a goal to accomplish and will go through several thrilling adventures until they meet it or are destroyed. Character creation rules are easy as you choose an item you want to be, a goal to have and a way that your ancient artifact can be destroyed. Then you have to come up with a connection with each other vatcha being played. This creates a shared background and some potential story hooks for the person running the game. You should have a character up and running in ten minutes unless you and your friends are stumped for a connection between the flaming shield of doom and an enchanted mattress cover.

Things start to get a little more complicated when heroes come into play. You see, each vatcha is wielded by a hero, but a player does not play both their vatcha and its hero. No, instead, you play your vatcha and the vatcha of SOMEONE ELSE’S hero. This creates more potential for storytelling as well as conflict. While this is an interesting idea in theory, most people don’t like to play more than one character at a time. Sure there are exceptions like Dungeon Crawl Classics where the norm is to start out playing two-three characters per player, but the majority of games feel best when one person plays one character. Wield realizes asking a person to play two very different characters, one human and one a magical item, can be difficult so it suggests using two different voices or to have the hero card in front of your mouth when speaking as the hero, so everyone knows which one is talking/acting. That’s totally fine and it works for me. The problem I have is that this can lead to PvP conflict and that rarely turns out well for a gaming party. If player A wants the hero to do something the vatcha does not (or vice versa), which will probably happen more often than not, this can lead to some groups getting catty or spiteful towards each other. It could even lead to the hero trying to destroy the vatcha or the vatcha dispatching with the hero and looking for a new pawn to wield it. This is either going to be a good thing or a very bad thing, depending on the makeup of your group. If one or more player is immature or treats tabletop gaming as SERIOUS BUSINESS, this can turn out poorly indeed. If however, everyone remembers it’s just a silly fun game, these kinds of inter-character conflict can become a lot of fun and allow for memorable adventures. Just be sure you know your troupe well before deciding to play Wield.

Another alternative is to let Fate (the GM) play the Heroes as it would any other NPCs. This is a little more traditional and may work better as Fate does create the heroes. Otherwise when the heroes are handed out randomly to the Players, it’s like getting a pregenerated character as you would at a convention or starter set. It’s harder to become emotionally attached to a pregen, so some people playing Wield might not enjoy playing someone else’s creation. At the same time, heroes are actually meant to be disposable in Wield as the vatcha are the main attraction in this game. A Vatcha will go through several heroes as the game goes on, especially if you are playing a series of adventures or a campaign. Of course, a vatcha disposing of its hero may lead to hurt feelings by the person playing the hero, but again, it all comes back to making sure your group has the right mental makeup to play Wield. It’s definitely a niche game best left in the hands of a specific audience.

Another interesting aspect of Wield is that neither heroes nor vatcha level up, gain new abilities or advance in the same way one usually thinks of in a role playing game. In fact, both will stay the same from character creation to character death. This is definitely a game about role-playing and not min/maxing, which I like. Of course, people do like to see some sort of change or progression in the game and that’s where powers and control come into play.

Each vatcha can have up to three domains of powers. They don’t have to have three mind you, and generally having a single domain instead of two or three can be more helpful if you want to specialize in a specific power set instead of being multi-faced. Think of it as extremely skilled or a jack of all trades, master of none. Now the vatchas have these powers but they can’t directly use them. That’s what the heroes are for. They need a human patsy to channel the powers. However the more power/powers given to the hero, the less control the vatcha has over its would-be patsy. Too much power and the hero can take control, as well as learn the way to truly destroy the vatcha. It’s a very interesting give and take to be sure and with the right party makeup, Wield offers some unique and wondrous role-playing opportunities.

Now we come to the mechanics, and it is where the game falls apart in my opinion. You generally roll 2d6 to resolve things, but there are also sorts of ways to get bonus dice such as if your personality, background or vatcha power are relevant to the roll. A couple pages later, it mentions you can get up to two more bonus dice for proper equipment for a task. So your roll can get up to 7d6. That’s fine. So is the ladder of command. You have no roll for easy tasks, a target of 6 for a hard tasks, 12 for heroic, 18 for epic and 25 (shouldn’t that be 24) for impossible. Again, this is a fine scale as well. The problem is going to be remembering and justifying the bonus dice you get for each roll. I think that you’re going to see people forget more often than not all the options for bonus dice until after they have rolled. Challenge will also be highly depending on how Lax or tough Fate is as a GM.

Combat is where things get pretty weird and this is where the game will either really intrigue you or really turn you off. Unfortunately it did the latter for me. Every Player has to decide to attack or defend. You can’t do both. Fate counts to five and then if you are going to attack, you have to point at who you want to attack with one to five fingers outstretched. If you are going to defend, you place an arm across your chest with one to five fingers outstretched. The number of fingers outstretched means the difficulty roll you are willing to make. The five levels are the same for tasks (0, 6, 12, 18, 25). Now everyone has to do this at the exact same time, which can lead to a bit of a cluster. Then after everyone’s choices are revealed, you can choose to switch from an attack to a defense roll. Then all the rolling starts. However, there is no initiative in this game, so instead of a carefully laid out turn of events, Wield becomes a little too chaotic for my liking, with everyone rolling and resolving at the same time. It could also be that I didn’t care for the examples or descriptive text in this section. Nothing seems to flow well or read smoothly in the mechanics part of the book. I think there are a LOT of easy ways to improve things, and that Wield will be one of those games that lives or dies based on how well a local GM house rules the thing. I think if the team behind Wield had spent a little more time defining the rules (20% of the rulebook is fiction) and devoted some more pages to it, a lot of the potential for mishaps could have been easily avoided. Wield is a very rules lite game, which I enjoy, but this is one of those times where I feel combat could have actually used an overhaul.

So Wield is one of those games where I’m not sure if I really like it or not. I love the concept and character creation aspects of the game, but playing the game can be a real mess and utterly confusing for younger or casual gamers. Because of the high chance for PvP issues, it’s also a game that should only be played by people whose feelings don’t hurt easily and who can remember that a RPG is something to experience, not something to WIN. I think once the Wield Companion comes out and I have a lot more time with the game under my belt I can give Wield a definitive thumbs up or down. Right now I’ll say “thumbs in the middle” as it’s a very unique product and if you pick it up and dislike it, you’re only out five dollars. Compare that to money spent on Pathfinder or some other game that requires multiple 30-40 dollar rulebook purchases. My advice is give the electronic version of Wield a try and see if it is right for you and your friends. If not, at least you have an interesting curiosity piece in your collection.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wield
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

The Flux
by James C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/26/2014 09:03:34
This is an amazing game, or should I say the glue for many different games. As one of the reviewers confessed, I to have gaming ADD and I own more games than I will ever play in my lifetime. I have always wanted to have a way to play the different games and settings without having to keep starting up new campaigns. This is a brilliant concept that will allow for some really cool Eternal Champion style play.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

All the Days of My Children Hospital
by James J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/18/2014 16:21:01
It's a pretty simple party game, 12 pages of rules and a character sheet. What it does in such a small space makes for a very dynamic game.
A character is a thumbnail sketch of a personality. It takes all of 5 minutes to set this game up. Generate three true things about your character, and two secrets for a hero and villain each. I love the dynamic.

What is required is a GM / Director that understands scene structure, and a pile of players that understand Ad-lib /narrative style Yes, and.. type of narrative play.

Not for the usual Dungeon bash crowd, there is no combat whatsoever. But I really liked the way this was executed.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
All the Days of My Children Hospital
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Houses of the Blooded
by Thomas S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2014 10:00:27
Well done and well written. If your looking for a game of intrigue, betrayal, and revenge this game fits the bill.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Houses of the Blooded
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Cat (Revised & Expanded)
by ash d. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/20/2014 20:07:08
Great concept, but...

I've been playing this occasionally with friends, and the idea is brilliant - playing as cats (with every stereotype from moggy to inbred pedigree) is brilliant fun. The problem is... Well, the rules kinda suck.

They just about hold together for general gameplay, but you quickly hit situations that make the rules seem unfinished - you can spend magic points, but there's no mention of how you recover them. You can give other characters traits as rewards, but can't gain them otherwise, and so on - there's a few typos as well. If this was a first draft, it'd be understandable, but billing it as 'revised' when there are both rules and basic formatting errors is a bit off.

The setting is great, and I'd love to give the author money for an Actually Really Revised edition, but as it stands you'd be better off nicking the campaign idea and using a rules-light generic system like Fate Accelerated.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Cat (Revised & Expanded)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Wicked Fantasy (Full Book)
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/18/2014 17:51:03
Wicked Fantasy is a really bad Pathfinder RPG race book.

What it is instead is a really good fantasy RPG book.

And that's why you should absolutely buy it.

Let's break it down.

(Up front, I've met John and enjoyed playing RPGs with him a few times, interviewed him about Wicked Fantasy and other projects on Out of Character, and I backed this Kickstarter.)

The first Wicked Fantasy "race supplements" came out some time ago. I got copies of them in the DrivethruRPG Featured Reviewer queue, I read them, and didn't review them. The reason why was because I couldn't see how the race described could fit into a Pathfinder game. D&D3 and 3.5 were pretty generic, but not completely so - Pathfinder is much less generic and has a much more clear aesthetic for its "classic fantasy races". In the context of its classes and world (Golarion), it makes sense and is fine. So the best "new elves!" or "new orcs!" supplements for Pathfinder didn't stray too much from the Pathfinder aesthetic, whatever new ground it broke was right next door to Pathfinder, so I could put the "new orcs!" into the game world I bought from a different publisher last week, or in 1986, and it would be fine. To really be a functional product in this sense you need to not to be too different.

The orcs of Wicked Fantasy were so different that I couldn't envision putting them into most of the fantasy worlds I liked. Just try envisioning them in the Forgotten Realms, for example, one of my all-time loves. There are many good things about the Forgotten Realms, but thematic boldness sure as hell isn't one of them. Wicked Fantasy orcs would stand out like a sore thumb in such an environment. Similarly in quasi-modernistic Golarion, faux-noir Eberron, or gloom-and-doom Midnight. It didn't mean Wicked Fantasy orcs were bad, it just meant that to tell if they were good, I'd have to work up a whole fantasy world around them and I'm a broken down old man, not a young, vigorous gamer like the kids today, I don't have time for all that. So I reluctantly set them aside - as really exciting and interesting as they were, I just couldn't fairly review them.

A few months later I got word the Kickstarter was coming out. I lamented this indecision of mine regarding the quality of Wicked Fantasy material to my wife who said I was being stupid, "You just said you really liked it, so put some money in it, what's the issue?" She's always right about these things.

So I dropped enough cash on it to get the hardcopy, shut my eyes and waited. (This is the best way to handle Kickstarters by the way.)

When I finally got the full Wicked Fantasy book, everything changed. Now I could see the orcs in the context of a fully fleshed out world - these orcs make thematic sense next to these humans, these halflings, these gnomes. Indeed, the full Wicked Fantasy collection actually gives you a fully fledged fantasy world that, with the community creation rules already in the D&D and Pathfinder DMGs, is absolutely playable.

It's interesting seeing a fantasy world presented through the lens of its races. "Race" isn't the best word for all this stuff, but "species" doesn't work because that's scientific and these worlds aren't, and anyway you can totally get your elf girlfriend pregnant, so IDK. D&D calls it "race" so that's what we ended up calling it. In Wicked Fantasy, the traits of each of the races are intertwined with their origins, their legends, their history and most importantly to play, their cultures. This is a game about cultures, and characters who emerge from these cultures will be EXTREMELY fun to play with each other.

That's really what it comes down to. Wicked Fantasy is still about being adventurers - still about going into dungeons or across wildernesses - still about battling monsters and bandits - but the motivations of the characters become more fleshed out by a choice that normally just adjusts a few ability scores (death to ability scores) and changes your appearance.

The ten races covered are humans, elves, gnomes, dwarves, orcs, ratmen, kobolds, gnolls and goblins.

Here are a couple of examples that should give you some idea of why I see these cultures as so fruitful for actual Pathfinder/D&D3 play:

Humans value philosophy and knowledge - they labored under many tyrannies until they liberated themselves, created city-states and a great elected Senate to rule, along with controlling the money supply and other modernizations. However, human lands now face corruption from without and from within. They need heroes to revitalize or challenge their values. Human clerics and inquisitors may champion philosophy and intellect instead of veneration of the gods.

Halflings (called "haffuns") fled a terrible underground menace two hundred years ago and almost instantly insinuated themselves into surface society as servants and dogsbodies. They value social (and sometimes even physical!) invisibility, secrecy and partnership. When they die their families perform a ritual to keep their ghosts in the home they served. However, many challenge this culture in different ways since they have reached the surface. Their families give them bonuses depending on what sorts of professions their families have (the first time the Profession skills have ever been worth anything in D&D3 history.)

Just these two should show you the wealth of roleplaying opportunities afforded adventurers in the world of Wicked Fantasy - the human who blindly serves a decraying Republic bickering with a halfling who sees too well the injustices of the system....or perhaps a human who prefers the cool intellect of philosophy to the warm emotions of hearth and service advocated by their halfling partner. Put these partners on a quest for glory and virtue and their interactions will be memorable and exciting.

An epub version is also available in this packet, which gets a big reviewer bump up from me.

If there was anything I could list about Wicked Fantasy that could improve it, I would say it would be a section for each of the races focusing on the core, expected elements of a D&D game. Why do people from these cultures become adventurers? Why would they team up with other adventurers? What would drive them to battle monsters and obtain magic and loot? D&D4 did this, to great effect, and I think it should be something everyone is thinking of when supplementing a D&D experience. Given what D&D games are about, what specifically do you bring to that core game experience?

In any event, all together these supplements are much, much greater than the sum of their parts. You absolutely should check out this exciting world through the eyes of its well-detailed inhabitants.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Fantasy (Full Book)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Play Dirty
by Oliver O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/25/2013 22:15:08
What was John Wick thinking?

Look, I watched a couple youtube videos that Mr. Wick put out - the first recommended to me in a John Four newsletter. And based on the video picked this PDF up.

I am intrigued by some of the concepts presented here, but am a little turned off by what I perceived to be a lack of humility about role-playing in general (in one video Wick wears a shirt that says: "I don't have an anger problem, I have an IDIOT problem!" - yeah, that guy...). I think that being a GM is partially about embracing the role of mentor such that role-playing continues to be a healthy part of our culture for decades to come - a tradition passed generation to generation, not unlike comic books. Mentoring requires patience and kindness, in my opinion.

I think that Mr. Wick has a bucket-load of intelligence, but comes up a bit short on the wisdom end of the spectrum (D&D taught me there is a good reason why these are two distinct stats, neither one dependent on the other). I got a sense that he was very passionate about gaming, but really didn't like/respect his fellow gamers that much. The one dude he described in a positive way was so completely humble, down-to-earth and selfless, that I have to wonder if he had allowed himself to be completely dominated by the situation/GM.

At any rate, once you get past the self-absorbed tone, you get some poignant anecdotes about Wick's gaming group that provide some solid amusement. That being said, I still contend that the number one reason gaming groups break up is because people get mad and frustrated with each other - I would never encourage a GM to fan the flames of discord unless he is trying to not have a gaming group.

In Wick's defense, I also think that allowing for a real sense of danger in your game is a great tool for immersion and getting the players to care about what is going on (Like in Game of Thrones, for example). I think that where I differ with Wick is that I believe in collaborating with the player more, rather than imposing myself on the game, or wounding the player for my own gratification. I don't think I could defend an act of cruelty as glibly as he does.

Bottom line - I say get the book! Join the discussion!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Play Dirty
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

All the Days of My Children Hospital
by Michael D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/19/2013 16:34:08
An overall anemic roleplaying game that seems more like a party game than something worth planning a bunch of weekends over. Not horribly broken (like, say, Eldritch High) but nothing to make it stand out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
All the Days of My Children Hospital
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Cat (Revised & Expanded)
by Edit G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/20/2013 16:36:46
I love cats, and RPG, mixing them sounds really good.

I have never played with Cat yet, because we didn't have any storyteller who knew the system, and some members of my rpg team criticized it harshly. I owned the previous edition too, and I have really wanted to try it (I had a character and his story).

Technical difficulties:
I can't read it with Stanza on my iPod with "unknown format" error (it has problems with the DRM), so I haven't read it from beginning to the end, I just dipped into it on my pc. I know that the files are okay and the quality is good, because I can open them (also the epub with Calibre), and read them, just it isn't comfortable this way.

Positive changes:
There was some question with the cat magic points and etc, I saw it is solved in this version (but it is funny, because when you sleep, you are in the dreamworld too)

Unchanged difficulties:
A member of my rpg team first question was what if there are more than two participant in a fight? F.e. more cat against a bigger enemy (like in a bad horror movie. I think - but I only think and there is no changes in the gamerules - the side with more participants has some advantage - and with it some advantage dice.

Design:
I loved the previous edition. The cover art was simple but suggestive. The inside graphic were childish or dreamlike, I liked them, as I liked the curly font.

The new cover art is... well, do you know the Cat - musical? Because that comes into my mind when I see a dark background with two cat eyes. I don't like the big book - little games text art either. It seems hollow to me.

The inside graphics are correct. The pictures are more uniform, that can be a good thing, but it is easier to find a good idea or feeling from the many different style pictures from the previous edition, some with lighter, dreamish mode, some with darker shades. But in the new edition there are only edited photos, and mostly dark and stern picture.
Tl, dr: It became a more professional in design, but I think with this it lost from its playfulness.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Cat (Revised & Expanded)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Eldritch High: A Little Game about Wizards, Witches and Warlocks
by Michael D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/06/2013 22:52:57
This game is... something I wish I could play as intended. It's so creative and has so much content crammed into just under 40 pages that captures my heart. The premise, the unique card based resolution mechanic, the way that character advancement works. The whole thing is full of great ideas that make me want to give this game a 5 star rating, but I can't and that's for one simple reason. The core elements are poorly realized.

First, the Freshmen Schedule (the mechanic for determining your "stats") has very strict (and unclear) rules on how you're allowed to arrange your Courses that forces you to focus heavily on using Magic and hobbles customization.

Secondly, the Homework method of advancement (gaining certain amounts points to improve your character with as you go through your classes) is horribly unbalanced with the option to Study for Exams being both highly necessary since not passing classes can get you expelled and a total waste because the benefits for passing are either easily replicated by other options for cheaper or have such a high investment threshold that you won't get them without failing other classes.

Thirdly, the card based resolution is based off of achieving a static target number with no accounting for difficulty and how many cards you draw is largely based on a combination of your Grade Level and your ranks in different Courses (which is also based off of your Grade Level). Since this is based so much on one thing and scales so rapidly, this means that Freshmen are grossly underpowered and higher grade levels are grossly overpowered with no happy medium anywhere.

Overall, the game is way too restrictive and poorly balanced for me to recommend.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch High: A Little Game about Wizards, Witches and Warlocks
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Wicked Fantasy: Uvandir: The Pride of Craftsmen
by Frank M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/02/2013 19:21:17
Based on an article in Kobold Quarterly, this takes dwarf cliches up to eleven and creates a species both familiar and alien: creatures born from the earth itself, obsessed with perfection, for whom a punch to the jaw is more eloquent than words. This supplement explores the culture, language, and psychology of this take on dwarves.

Others have complained about unbalanced feats in the WF series. I can't comment on how well or poorly the Pathfinder stats work, since I don't use Pathfinder. Also, if you're fine with plain old D&D/Pathfinder/every-other-FRP dwarves this supplement might not be for you. If, however, you want surly, drunken, perfectionist dwarves with hidden depths and an inhuman mindset, pick up this supplement.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Fantasy: Uvandir: The Pride of Craftsmen
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Houses of the Blooded: Wilderness
by Brian H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/13/2013 08:40:02
I'm a huge fan of the Houses of the Blooded universe/setting/concept, etc. and this book, in large part, lives up to the high standard set by the base book and continued through "Cornets but Never Crowns". The ability to place Provinces on the edges of the civilized world is an interesting one, and I think that it could add to the intrigue/politics of most games. Especially given the new Vassals and resources that the wilderness Regions and Holdings make available. I also particularly enjoyed the idea of un-blooded adventuring groups and how they tied into "polite" Ven society. More than just adding a new way to play the game, it also adds a new dimension to noble politicking and provides vicious new options for dealing with troublesome blooded neighbors.

I have one basic complaint about the new content that this book provides: Specifically, several sections felt rushed and particularly light on detail. For example, in discussing the Blooded of the Boar, we are treated to a lengthy discussion of their unique virtue, but the discussion on what it means to be Boar in blooded society feels rushed and incomplete. In discussing the new Ork vassals the author references a nearby chart that does not appear to exist. Shortly thereafter, in discussing the first of the new Ork types, the author discusses the "Ancestors" and their importance. However, the reader is never told who/what they are. In addition, certain terms (i.e. Heartsheath) are never defined. Then, in discussing the second of the new Ork types, the author mentions that they suffer from Corruption rather than DOOM!. But nowhere is this concept explained. Finally, in discussing the Q'val, the author mentions the importance of noting Accomplishments and how they may allow for the increasing of Devotion. But this concept is never fully described. Indeed, the chapter dealing with the Q'val seems to end rather abruptly.

Don't misunderstand, I greatly enjoyed this book and I think that the content is fantastic. I'm already plotting how I'm going to introduce large chunks of this material into my currently running game (mostly likely to the dismay of my players [*cough* demons *cough*]). My complaints stem from a mere handful of the more than 200 pages of content and should not be read as an indictment against the book as a whole.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Houses of the Blooded: Wilderness
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 93 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG