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Wicked Fantasy: Orks: Children of Pain
by Joseph W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/28/2012 09:27:19
I have always been fascinated with taking “evil” creatures and making them more sympathetic. I think orks (to use the nomenclature of this book) should be more than faceless minions of evil sorcerers. They should have their own motivations for what they do. In many ways, I always thought of orks most like the Mongols of Genghis Khan: expansionist and obsessed with taking tribute. However, John Wick’s new book Children of Pain is a really cool take on orks and what role they can play in a Pathfinder (or retro-clone) campaign.

According to the prelude, this book comes out of a series of “Ecology of…” type columns from Kobold Quarterly. Mr. Wick wished to glimpse each major race through a mirror darkly, to change the basic assumptions of a race, to “give them a different feel. A different taste. A different style.” Children of Pain does a good job of that.

Fluff-wise, Children of Pain discusses how the orks rose up and slew their gods, eating them in the process and forming clans based on the powers gained by the deophages. From the book, it appears this happened in recent memory, which makes the world much more magical than I am used to running. I would ignore that part, and make the slaying of the gods as a kind of origin story.

Children of Pain devotes a lot of time to describing the tribal society of the orks. They are nomadic hunter gatherers who cross a tundra-like landscape. Their society is fairly well detailed, with sages, warlords and tribes. I think the concept of their religion is really cool. The orks believe pain is a sentient being that links them all together. They also have a system of storytelling tied to the scars on their bodies. Some scars are self-inflicted, but that only occurs for something significant that doesn’t necessarily cause physical pain. Mr. Wick certainly creates an evocative world, including some linguistic snippets to give the reader an idea of how the ork language works.

I am not the person to speak to mechanics, normally, especially as someone who doesn’t own Pathfinder. However, I will attempt that here, to give you an idea of what’s included. The first half of the book is all fluff, no mechanics are included. The end is almost all mechanics, and very little fluff hidden amongst it. However, there are some things revealed about ork culture in the powers, so they remain evocative without dominating the text.

First we have a list of ork racial traits. There are several things added to this list that bring standard orks in line with the fluff. First, they have the ability to feed animals their own blood to create hunting or riding companions. They also gain bonuses to attacks rolls when they are hurt (to represent their masochism), bonuses from their tribe (gods’ powers from their slaying), and psychological bonuses based on their own view of their reputation.

Class wise, there are three: a Blood Cleric, a Barbarian Archetype and a Bard Archetype. The Oracle of Blood is mentioned as a “new Oracle Mystery,” which I presume is a Pathfinder thing. There are all sorts of powers linked to using blood in lieu of other material components. From what I gather, the ork cuts him or herself and uses pints of blood to cast spells. They also have a series of other powers tied to level. The Barbarian Archetype (Gahthrak) replaces some of the Barbarian class features, as does the Bard Archetype (Fala).

Mr. Wick has been doing this for a while, and of course he produces top-notch work. The implied setting for th eorks is evocative and interesting. Orks from this culture of pain are a really cool enemy in a misunderstood, “noble savage” kind of way. They can also be bloodthirsty monsters. What I really like about this treatment of orks is that they can still be frightening enemies while being a real culture with real motivations for their bloodthirsty ways. This book is sympathetic to the orks, but doesn’t hinder the GM from making them villains. I highly recommend it!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Fantasy: Orks: Children of Pain
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Wicked Fantasy: Orks: Children of Pain
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/27/2012 09:58:40
This pdf by John Wick Presents is 26 pages long, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC/prelude, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement and 1 page SRD, leaving 21 pages of content, so what exactly do we get with these Orks (yeah, with "k", just like in German!)?

You have probably read the Wicked Fantasy-series of articles in KQ, but just to be sure: Wicked Fantasy centers on a new takes on classic fantasy races, a reimagining so to speak. An example would be the Uvandir, genderless (but male-looking), eternal dwarves who can toil all day and night, never starve etc. In this pdf, we get an expansive take on the Orks in the vein of a widely-expanded ecology-article.

The reimagining of the race essentially makes the Orks what you've come to know: An evil race, created by evil gods. Orkish doctrine, for ages, had them consume their foes to take in their strength and worship pain - until they evolved. For which foe might offer more strength than one's god? In a feat of unheard-of racial uprising, the orks stormed their god's sacred hall, vanquished their pantheon and ate them, thus gaining their strength. (Though some sages speculate that some orkish gods may have escaped...)

Thus, via the divinely-infused bloodlines, Orks changed and diversified and had to deal with the lifting of the red haze of rage, for now, they encountered a state of mind as of yet unknown - free will.

The nomadic tribes have made tentative peace with the other races, as they seek to understand the powers their newfound freedom and the darkness of their ancestors blood offer them. Depending on the bloodline of one's ancestors, special abilities and dispositions are available to the green-skins. 6 of these divine bloodlines are included.

The Orks can also create so-called Feth'Ork-creatures by feeding animals and beasts their blood in order to mutate the critters into allies and negate the loathing regular animals exhibit when encountered by Orks.

I mentioned the worship of pain as well and it defines Orkish culture to this date - their sacred scars, the Va, all come with their stories and knowing these has to be earned. More importantly, 5 masochistic feats enable Orks to harness the power of pain and actually get stronger via hurt, pain and punishment. I really loved these feats and while they seem to be kind of powerful, the steep price they demand is worth the benefit. 3 feats are focused on the divine bloodlines and we get a new mystery for the oracles, the so-called blood mystery, which essentially provides the tribal shamans and makes for a neat piece of writing. We also get a new archetype for barbarians and one for bards, the latter being rather interesting, as it focuses on insulting foes and bolstering allies via epic story-telling, thus hearkening back to our own world's intricate webs of poetic allusions displayed in saga-literature and Heian romances like the Tale of Genji, to quote only two.

Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are good, though not stellar: I did notice about 7 glitches on my first read-through and an additional pass at editing would have been nice, as some of the extensive bookmarks consist of only one letter. layout adheres to a 2-column standard and comes in full-color, with a parchment-like background and neat pieces of artwork. I really liked the writing, which makes this pdf rank among the most compelling ecology-articles I have ever read. On the other hand, though, I feel that some of the pieces of writing like the feats could be more concisely-written: I had to re-read some of the feats before I got how exactly how the crunch is supposed to work. Were I to rate only the quality of the writing, I'd settle for a higher rating, but as presented the glitches and minor hick-ups just accumulated and thus I'll settle for a final verdict of 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Aegis Project
by Victor J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/21/2012 12:25:20
This game is full of great ideas for military and mecha games that I have wanted to see in print for some time. The rules seem to support the proper feel of play to go with these ideas. In particular, the three historical periods presented have differences in how some aspects of play are handled within them that would seem to give each a different flavor.

There are numerous typographical, grammatical, and other errors, however, which can get quite distracting and are not at all what one expects from a finished product presented by such a vaunted creator. This feels like a good, solid rough draft, and I would dearly love to see it get the polishing it deserves. In its current state, however, I must regrettably give "The Aegis Project" two stars.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The Aegis Project
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Wicked Fantasy: Orks: Children of Pain
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/17/2012 21:45:08
John Wick knows Orks.

If you want to add some more color, life or some just "more" to your Orks/Orcs then this is the book to get.
These are not "misunderstood" orcs, these are orcs that got tired of the lot fate and the gods left them and they took matters into their own hands. We get a little history, a little bit of orc language and some orc shamanism. But the neatest part are the Orc tribes based on the heroes that took that monumental step.

John Wick is a fantastic writer and it is nice seeing him back on a subject he knows well and in truth helped redefine with Orkworld. I have no idea how much this work was influenced by the previous work, but all I can say is this one is worth the price.

I have had my own ideas for orcs, but this book has made want to change some them. It is that interesting.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Fantasy: Orks: Children of Pain
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Eldritch High: A Little Game about Wizards, Witches and Warlocks
by William W. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/14/2012 09:55:19
Eldritch High puts players into the roles of students at the Alexander Circe Academy for the Study of the Esoteric and Eldritch Arts - a four year high school that locates teens that have magical powers, shelters them, and aims to direct them on the proper path.

A ton of roleplaying potential is packed into this little 39-page RPG, which is played with a deck of standard playing cards for each player and the headmaster (GM).

Characters are created by answering questions about their background - Where are you from?, What do you look like?, What is your stereotype?, etc. - and then choosing their class schedule and electives. Players choose a class that their character is a Prodigy, select Gifts (Elven Blood, Teacher's Pet, etc.), and choose one of the five dorms for their character to take up residence. All of these items are filled out on a character sheet that resembles a class schedule form.

Each of these details grants them bonuses in potential Risks, those moments when a character attempts an action. A Risks involves pulling cards from the deck - one card for freshman, two for sophomores, and so on - plus any bonus cards from Gifts, Dorm, and so on. Drawing 10 or more value in cards allows the player to take narrative control of the story, and any unused cards can be saved for additional opportunities to add details to the story.

The game is formatted to model the high school experience - game sessions represent a week of a semester, players choose how much of their character's downtime is spent on studying, practicing, and goofing off - each with potential benefits for the character. An extensive Headmaster section that covers metaplots, dating (including brief rules for character romance), exploration, and more.

If all of this seems somewhat familiar, and you're wondering if this RPG could be stripped down and refitted to play in the world of a very popular series of fantasy school novels - the simple answer is yes. But the setting presented here is intriguing enough to encourage running it as is.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch High: A Little Game about Wizards, Witches and Warlocks
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No Loyal Knight
by Anthony B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/04/2012 04:05:26
Those familiar with the writing of John Wick will know that once they start reading No Loyal Knight that two things will happen. The first will be that Wick's voice, this time adopting the hard-bitten tones of world-weary, spell-slinging PI Jefferson Carter, will slip deep inside your head, take a hit of your best whiskey without so much as a by-your-leave, and tell you tales of honor, revenge, and the sick, life-altering weight of regret that won't let you rest. The second thing...?

The second thing is that you will know you will read it again. Soon.

No Loyal Knight is a set of hard-boiled detective cases with a strong evocation of mood and motive, with as much left clear yet unsaid as ballsy and laid bare. Each tale moves along like a freight train on a downhill grade. In the magical world of Jefferson Carter, noir has never been quite so dark - nor quite so grimly amused.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
No Loyal Knight
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Wicked Fantasy: The Reign of Men
by David B. S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/01/2012 23:17:55
Having been a "GM" for over 20 years, I have a habit of always wanting to "house rule" rpg supplements. It doesn't matter if it's a module, a campaign, or a creature. I just can't help myself! And I love nothing more than getting my hands on a product that goes "against the grain", turning a classic rpg idea or trope on it's head.

Wicked Fantasy's "The Reign of Men" does just that. This Pathfinder-compatable pdf's mission is to give a new or different twist to the role of mankind in a fantasy campaign. You see, Man is the "Old Race". We were here first. The other races came after. Elves are the new kids on the block. I like that.

We get an explanation of the history of Man and his outlook on life. Then from out of the blue, we are told a shocking truth. I won't spoil it for you, but it explains why man has the courage and the will to perform the amazing feats he does.

Next, we are given background that a GM can use as the backbone of his or her campaign. Political structure, a calendar, and a sketch of the 10 great city-states of Man. These cities are ripe for dropping a group of adventurers into them! Each city has just enough background info to get a GM's head swimming with adventure ideas. As an added treat, each city grants its citizens a related skill bonus of sorts. I must admit having done this with homebrew races and cultures, but never cities. Neat idea!

Then, human-centric Racial Traits and Feats are introduced, some of which are quite clever (see, the Hometown-related traits).

Lastly the Philosopher and Palantine Archetypes are presented; which are a twist on the Cleric and Paladin, respectively. Nothing mind-shattering here, but the archetypes fit the idea and concept that the author is trying to convey, so no foul-no harm.

The pdf itself is in full color, a surprising touch, especially for the fantastic price! Unfortunately there is no Table of Contents and no Index; but the pdf is nicely bookmarked- and for a 32 page pdf, that will do, I think.

Overall this is a really fun product that would be great to integrate somehow, someway into any fantasy campaign- Pathfinder or not. And hopefully, we will see other race-centric products pop up from the talented Gillian Fraser and Mr. Wick duo, although it's good to see the humans strut their stuff first, for a change! And they do it with style!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Fantasy: The Reign of Men
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The Aegis Project
by Jeff V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/30/2011 16:29:43
Let me preface this review by saying two things:
1) This is my first experience with John Wicks work (nope I never played or even read Legend of the 5 Rings *gasp*!) so I really had no idea what kind of product this would be. I can say that I really DID enjoy reading it. Really liked the creativity of it and definitely was entertained by it.
and
2) I have no idea what kind of time and money constraints John Wick had placed on him or that he even may have placed on himself. I know by looking at some of his YouTube videos it seemed like he was working with a very set deadline in mind and that may have had some bearing on why he made certain decision about what was included or left out in the game. I just stumbled across the game via RPGNow and I love sci-fi, mecha and the like so I decided to give the game a shot. This review is coming from someone who was very in the dark about how this product came to be and I'm judging solely on MY interpretation of how the game is to me and from what little I had to go by on the product's description page. AFTER I bought it I did some exploring and realized that this game was originally some kind of community or patronage type product.

Now having said all of that...

The Aegis Project is definitely an interesting game. It's seeped in gritty, hard, military drama (think Aliens, Space Above and Beyond or the reinvisioned Battlestar Galactica) which is a very good thing ;)
It is filled with some really unique and interesting ideas and gaming concepts. The theme is nothing new, but it the treatment of it is. It's an epic scope game as well, covering 3 seperate eras of human strife and battle. There's a lot of background the game covers. It has many unique concepts and it really offers some cool ideas for a setting.

Unfortunately as a "gritty 80s mech game" my opinion is that The Aegis Project misses it's mark. When I think of 80s mech the first things that come to my mind are games like Battletech and Robotech. Companies like FASA and GDW really defined hard sci-fi rpgs in the 80s with settings like Renegade Legion and Traveller 2300, but The Aegis project is nothing like any of these games or settings.

Now to be fair the author states that Battletech does what it does and it does it well. No one can make a "better Battletech". Battletech has all of those fiddly little bits like size, weights and various points allocations (armor, heat, movement, etc.) and there are many other games that mimic this or expand on it in their own way. Battletech spawned an entire style of rpg genre - the "wargamers RPG" where tabletop hex or inch based combat dominates the game, but a roleplaying element pervades the whole setting allowing players and gamemasters to experience the world outside their giant robots as well. There are tons of mech and sci-fi games that follow this great lineage (CAV, Heavy Gear, Renegade Legion, Crimson Skies, and so forth)

The problem to me is that because there are so many mecha games that follow in the pattern of Battletech (including things like tons of points allocation, wagame style battles, schematics for various mech and/or other vehicle types, divided clans/houses/tribes/what have you, etc etc) I automatically assume some of these "tropes" are necessary, or at least expected for this type of genre.

The Aegis Project does not have any of these things. In fact it is the polar opposite, being a very narrative style fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants, loosely defined and make it up as you go kind of play. Not that I think that kind of gaming is bad or wouldn't be fun to play or run, but it just doesn't seem to fit the whole 80s mech style rpg.

Which brings me to my next point. The Aegis Project is BIG. With cover and ads in the back it runs at something like 177 pages. For an indie style game this is a pretty large PDF. Despite it's size however it lacks a great bit of DETAIL. The Aegis Project presents a lot of different kinds of character classes and pieces of gear, but it doesn't detail ANY of these very much at all. In fact in paints in broad sweeping strokes and leaves everything else to be developed by the GM and players. Again this is not necessarily a bad thing, but in a game of this genre and scope you would expect some things to be fleshed out a bit more than they are. I found the mechs especially lacking, which of course should be the main focus in a game of this style. Details about organizations, corporations, and planets is sketchy at best. Gear for the most part is glossed over except for some very cool specific pieces to individual character classes. Even The Enemy of the players is kept for the most part pretty generic. While I can appreciate leaving sections of the game open to customization by individual gamemasters I think maybe overall it's a little TOO open to interpretation. I don't think I seen a game which touches on a rich history be so... undefined.

Art is pretty sparse as well with only maybe a dozen or so illustrations used throughout the book. There are some ambiguous pictures of first era mechs, but I think they are intentionally illustrated in a way to show that mechs really don't have a set defined look and (like everything else in the universe) can look however the players and gamemaster want them too. There are no detailed line drawings of weapons, schematics of vehicles or images of intense combat. In fact not much of anything is depicted reinforcing the feeling of "lack of crunch". I was really yearning for a lot more visual or descriptive context for this game.

Where The Aegis Project really shines is it's system. It seems very fast and easy to run with lots of opportunity for chracters to shine as heroes. It's based on rolling several 10 sided dice for skill checks with certain results producing successes and multiple success stacking to produce more powerful results. Hmmm... my description makes it sound kind of bland. It is not. There's a lot more to it, but I hate to spoil it here in the review. Suffice it to say I thought the system looks very easy to use, run and modify. It reminds me in some ways of popular "fast and furious" play styles such as Savage Worlds (though it is a completely different kind of system than that game)

At the time of writing this review there were quite a few grammatical errors throughout the PDF, but nothing too terrible (and clearly I am NOT an English Major and have no room to throw stones). Hopefully though a revised version will come out fixing some of those errors.

Overall I think the game is really interesting, a good read and a great idea mine both for campaign ideas and rules concepts. As a complete package though I find it a little lacking and I personally couldn't run it as-is without a lot of extensive planning, but I'm sure there are other gamemasters that could read through this and have a game up and running in just a few hours.

Thanks for reading through all of this review and I hope it helps you make a decision about The Aegis Project.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Aegis Project
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The Aegis Project
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/17/2011 22:35:20
Overall, The Aegis Project is a solid game with an interesting setting and a rules-medium approach. There are narrative gaming elements woven in with more traditional systems that make this something of a unique product.

The writing is clear and concise, and I feel that the game does hit all the right notes for a military-esque 80′s mecha game.

It requires input and a measure of proactiveness from the players but I feel that this is a good thing. The Aegis Project is easy enough to learn and can be picked up and run with a few hours of study and is suitable for most groups. The game is fairly self-contained and doesn’t seem to require further supplements to really make it shine.

The artwork is fairly bland but serviceable, but I feel that with additional artists or perhaps colored artwork, the product could be made even more compelling.

You don’t have to be a fan of John Wick’s work to enjoy the game, and even old traditional types like me can get into it.

---

This is an excerpt from my full review on my blog. if you'd like to read the whole thing, kindly visit: http://wp.me/5H0U

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Heroes: Children of the Mirror
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/12/2011 07:08:56
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2011/10/11/tabletop-review-wicked--
heroes-children-of-the-mirror/

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to be a superhero? Of course you have, we all have. Even to this day, sitting at your job, staring out the window you daydream of looking down on the masses with your watchful eyes as the omnipotent protector, or the malevolent villain. Now comes the part where your nemesis steps in, either putting a stop your diabolical plans or to take you out without mercy. However, in this world, there is no holding back. If you destroy your villain, you gain his power to help the unknowing citizens. You destroy the hero? You gain his power to reap the rewards of an even more nefarious quest. This is the world corrupted by the obsidian mirror. The world of the Wicked Heroes.

Wicked Heroes: Children of the Mirror is a quick, sixteen page handbook written by John Wick, a designer who has had his hand in creating Legend of the Five Rings and the 7th Sea games. Wicked Heroes is described as a “horror supers game” that will be included in the Big Book of Little Games that will release in November of 2011. It is very quick and easy read, with a clear premise of the world, along with protagonists and antagonists that can make their appearance in the game that can be as short as one night, or as long as a full campaign.

After giving a brief explanation of the world, Wicked Heroes begins with its entire character creation system spanning over the vastness of a single page. Characters are created with five questions: Who am I, how did I awaken, what is my Gift, what is my Curse, and what is my motivation? The fun doesn’t really begin until you get to the Gifts and Curses. Mentioned at the start of the character creation section is the need for a deck of cards. When you get to the Gifts, you have the player pull a card, and depending on which one they received, they can end up with powers like the ability to freeze something immediately to -150 degrees, or summon a force field around themselves. There are 48 separate powers that can become a character’s blessing, with aces and jokers causing different things to happen all together. Next in line to be chosen for characters are the curses. The Curses section is chosen by cards as well, consisting of Hate, Fear, Greed, and Lust. The only differences are that these curses are much more open to exploitation by enemies and players alike. After the fun of seeing which blessings and curses a character receives, the player must choose what motivates their character and allocate points for each one, which will certainly come in handy later in the game.

Wicked Heroes does not run on the classic dice rules, but rather uses a card system to chose whether you succeed or fail. Without giving away the structure of the game itself, gifts automatically succeed. This is a good way of making it a true supers game, especially since it cites the reason that other well-known superheroes don’t need to “see if their powers activate,” so why should you? The other parts of the game are dependent on risks to invoke the power of the cards, which will give you “slammers.” These slammers will then help you change the world, the only problem is that the structure of the game is a little too lenient on how the slammers are used, letting the player who received the slammer narrate the outcome of the risk. This leaves too much gray area for a player to completely change the GM’s outcome of the situation.

The book continues to describe conflicting risks and the “Yes, But…” rules. These rules are for within-the-group actions, which can boil down any conflict to the classic playground argument of “Nu-uh,” and “Yeah-huh!” The book describes a situation of characters fighting over the loot they had found. One character plays a slammer on their turn to pick up the bag, which the next character plays a another slammer and declares that the bag is too heavy and requires two hands to carry it. My issues with the rules were only exacerbated by the further definition of the “Yes, But…” rules. This allows a character to use a slammer to “modify the previous outcome.” In this case, a player used a slammer to say that the original character had picked it up, but there was a large rip, causing the loot to spill out. When putting these rules to the test in a group, all civility left the second a conflict within the group arose. Eventually a victor was declared, and the “smelly one” sulked after their loss of cards.

At the end of it all, do I think that Wicked Heroes: Children of the Mirror is worth $5? Yes. For a price equivalent to an average iPad app, I think this game gave more laughs and entertainment to make up for the money. The creation system was fun for randomly generating a super hero that could be used in other supers games, and the background for the world would make an interesting storyline for a more structured roleplay system. This is also a great system for a one night game that no one wants to create an elaborate story for, and everyone always seems to have a deck of cards lying around, making it a system that could be picked up quickly. The learning curve of the game isn’t steep, allowing this game to be played with children as well as adults.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Heroes: Children of the Mirror
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Eldritch High: A Little Game about Wizards, Witches and Warlocks
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/05/2011 15:46:25
A great little game that you can learn and start play in about an hour.
I love how the character sheet looks like a class schedule. The mechanic is a card based one and it lends it self well to alterations. The rest of the game is pure role-playing and story telling. If you ever read a YA supernatural book, watched an episode of Charmed or Buffy, or read a Harry Potter book then you have an idea of what you can do. OR better yet, if you were ever in High School and thought "this is ok, but what I really need is a Fireball to liven things up!", then this the game for you.

Even if you don't use the ultra simple game mechanic there are plenty of ideas here for your favorite game. Just now run it in a magical high school.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch High: A Little Game about Wizards, Witches and Warlocks
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Wicked Heroes: Children of the Mirror
by Curt M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/12/2011 00:37:15
This is a great game if you like imaginative, narrative driven, seat of your pants roleplaying. Like Mr. Wick's other little games, this one can sustain long gaming sessions. I played it the other night and had a blast.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wicked Heroes: Children of the Mirror
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Schauermarchen by John Wick
by Daniel D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/31/2011 22:00:55
4 stars but barely. It took me 15 minutes to read. Like any sucker that bought this book I failed to really read the reviews and bought in on John Wick's name alone. For what it's worth it is good. A evocative, creepy setting, that could be adapted to Little Fears, Grimm or WOD Innocents. Yet you could probably do just as good on your own by reading the teaser. So my complaints have less do to with the material and more the price. For as long as this book has been out and how much material it encompasses it could drop to 99 cents and probably be worth it. Art doesn't exist and layout is alright. If you want something to fill your sessions between your regular game or something to add to your kid centric game this would fit but for the price I would get it only if you really had nothing else loaded. To the author: stick this in the Big Book, because alone it doesn't feel worth it.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Schauermarchen by John Wick
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Play Dirty
by Chris B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/25/2011 12:15:37
A great read! Excellent ideas for the gm who is having trouble with "cheese-ey" players. Don't be the guy who runs the game be the game master who everyone loves to hate.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Play Dirty
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The Flux
by josh e. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/05/2011 20:37:38
To be blunt, I have Gamer ADD. As A GM I fear it has been a bane and a detriment to my players. They never get a sense of continuity, never get a chance to build their minions into powerful world figures, and never get the chance to spend more than a month or two tops with the same game.
Flux is the ruleset that I've been waiting for. It's a simple, elegant way to tie together several games in such a way that the players can actually look forward to playing more than one game, or switching between games rapidly.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
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