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DICE-Tractions: Dice Racing, Mini-Game #104
by Dierk D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/29/2014 12:50:54
11 Seiten ? Stimmt: 1 Cover, 1 Inhaltsverzeichnis, 3 Seiten Regeln, ... UND 6 SEITEN WERBUNG! Normalerweise bin ich Besseres von Avalon gewöhnt! Das zweite Mal bei Avalon eingegangen. Nie mehr bei diesem Preis-Leistungsverhältnis!

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
DICE-Tractions: Dice Racing, Mini-Game #104
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DICE-Tractions: Dice Football, Mini-Game #106
by Dierk D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/29/2014 12:45:20
18 Seiten ? Stimmt: 1 Cover, 1 Inhaltsverzeichnis, 6 Seiten Regeln, dann nochmal 4 Seiten die Zeichnungen vergrößert... UND 6 SEITEN WERBUNG! Normalerweise bin ich Besseres von Avalon gewöhnt!

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
DICE-Tractions:  Dice Football, Mini-Game #106
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Heroes Weekly, Vol 2, Issue #20, The Ancients
by Matthew H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/04/2014 12:53:03
Sounds like an interesting idea, but there is no "there" there. A supervillain team of ancient magical creatures? Awesome! But all that you get is five small paragraphs giving type of creature and attitude, plus a write up of a minion. That's right, the villains have not a single stat or hint as to powers. I feel ripped off at a dollar, if I'd paid four dollars for it I'd be livid. Avoid.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Heroes Weekly, Vol 2, Issue #20, The Ancients
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APMR #1, Avalon Mini-Games #120
by alain D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/10/2014 18:20:17
this is a" no purpose" miniature rules. the cost for weapons or armor/defense is not indicated. many mistakes. (bastard sword supposed to be more lethal are not). it' s impossible to hit an ennemy with a sword who deal 1 dammage, if a light armor deduct 2 dammages...and what about shield? etc... are you kidding? No, you deceive people. It's a shame, i' feel so angry. these "rules" worth nothing. The Worst rules I ever seen.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
APMR #1, Avalon Mini-Games #120
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Arrows of Indra
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/08/2014 02:56:05
Recently, a controversy about the consultants for Fifth Edition D&D reminded me of a guy who I hadn't thought about in a long time, "RPGPundit", the author of this work. I eventually worked out with searches and so on that someone associated with his publisher had come onto story hyphen games dot com, a forum I post on, and suggested that we buy RPGPundit's products because story gamers might like them.

He didn't quite see why the author believing that people that post on story hyphen games dot com were "swine" intentionally trying to destroy RPGs might affect our thinking on whether to buy his game. After all, if the game was good, why should it matter that the author considers us saboteurs and infiltrators? Couldn't we, logically, gain our greatest revenge by playing his game and enjoying it? And anyhow, haven't we, in this grand postmodern world, fully acquiesced to the "death of the author" school of criticizing texts, which posits that the author's intentions are of only glancing relevance to a text's quality?

On reflection, I had to consider this attitude capitalistic in the most admirable sense of the word. As the atheist Bible salesman said, "If you rubes are buyin', I'm sellin'!" Well, shucks, when you put it that way, mister, I'm buyin'! (Technically I got a copy free for being a Featured Reviewer, but you all knew that. You all did know that, right?) So let's talk about Arrows of Indra.

Arrows of Indra says it's an Old School Fantasy game in an "Epic Indian Fantasy World". Now, I've read some pretty epic fantasy stories from India, the Mahabarata and so on, but I don't have a lot of expertise in the area, so my analysis will be strictly from the position of the setting's playability and the stories that can come from it. Someone else will have to weigh in as an India expert to say if the game reflects the world well, or appropriately, not me.

As I mentioned in another review (Hulks & Horrors), "Old School" tends to leave me cold as a too-broad statement that encompasses too many approaches to give me a solid idea of what it's about. In fact, that's one of the main weaknesses of Arrows of Indra, it occurs on the first full page of text - it says that it's not going to try to tell me how to play.

Normally I leave "what could be improved" to the end of my review (trusting that nobody of sound mind would ever read to the end and therefore leaving readers with an unalloyed positive impression) but since this flaw is literally right up front, I think I should mention it now. This game does not present a clear picture of the role of the GM and the role of the players in the game. It doesn't indicate an objective for either of those roles. I don't think the roles necessarily need to be "defined", since yes, I do know that in an "old school" game the players say what their characters do and the GM says what happens. But I do need to know by what principles I should GM or play this game. Vampire: the Masquerade, for example, urged GMs to create Themes and Tones to help organize their game, and take careful charge of the initial situation of the characters in order to launch them on their way. Champions comes with extensive advice and even mechanics to help me realize the world of superheroes and villains. I get that people don't want to write what a GM does for the thousandth time. But what players are told to do really does matter to how the game is played; if the game is meant to be flexible, then exactly how it is flexible and how to make a decision to "flex" is very relevant to player experience.

This is probably the biggest flaw in Arrows of Indra. If a second edition were to be released, I would highly recommend more detailed descriptions and tools for players (including GMs) to make decisions about how to play the game in an enjoyable fashion.

Anyway, the introduction also reassures us that we won't need to know that much and that what's presented is not in any way considered a reflection of real religious beliefs or a description of an actual caste system. (Someday I would like someone to straight up say "this RPG contains a reflection of my personal view of this religion/political system" and see how that goes, but today's not that day.) I am surprised to find there's no "bibliography" in the game to help me develop my game further. Especially in a game based on a real-world culture and myths, I definitely would like to know where the designer feels I should go for targeted inspiration.

The character creation system includes the normal array of attributes ("4d6 drop lowest?!?! How old school can this really be?!!? *flips table*"), before delving into the caste features and, interestingly, a family background generator. The cool thing about the family background generator is that it contains a simple overview of what the player character can expect to inherit and when. In tons of fantasy stories and fables, inheritances play a huge role, and it's often overlooked.

Although I was being jokey about the 4d6 thing, I actually think the caste and family background generators take this game away from the "old school" experience as I've normally seen it explained. It's hard to take on the principle of disposable low-level characters when I've taken the time to generate my siblings, parents, and their social situation. That seems to me to be a more story-based approach, like the background questions in White Wolf games or lifepath generators in Cyberpunk or FATE. All in all, so far this seems like a pretty solid story-based character generation system for a fantasy adventure game.

And thank the heavens there's two pages of names. If you aren't at least a little embarrassed by the proliferation of "$1 for a list of names!" products here (and yes, I've bought and used them), then maybe you haven't clicked around the site that much. If you've got a game and you've got a culture in that game that I can't get names from the local phone book, then maybe a couple of pages of names would help. Stories are only as good as the characters in them, and if the name of a character is way off, the story is way off.

Character class selection is next. There are some things about it I quite like, other decisions are more questionable. It is possible, for example, though unlikely, for a character to not qualify for any of the character classes. (This could be fixed by altering the rule about when a player may discard a character in the ability score section: instead of handling it by a sum of the ability score bonuses and making it optional, make it mandatory and tie it to the character creation requirements.) I know that in certain "old school" games, character balance is something to be avoided rather than pursued, but it does seem rather extreme that a player who rolled random ability scores will not only gain the bonuses associated with those scores, have access to better character classes, but might even get a bonus to their XP if they got lucky enough. This doesn't seem like a good way to test player skill, to make so much ride on the random rolls at the beginning of the game. Again, some guidance on how players (including GMs) should approach in-play decisions would be very helpful to understanding the characters classes' strengths and weaknesses in various situations in their story.

I would say the best thing about the character classes is that they really make me want to play them, especially when paired with the next section.

One thing I've liked about many "old school" games I've seen is that they lack skills, or have a much-truncated skill system. As a guy who calculated half-point skills in GURPS and rubbed his forehead working out where to put an NPC's skill points in D&D3, just having characters DO things is just fine by me. However, when playing a character in a world that's very different from our own, it does help to have an idea for "what can I do in this situation". Arrows of Indra does what very few have done - it just makes the selection of skills random. You just roll on a chart and boom, that's what your character knows how to do. Interestingly, the magical effects that some of the characters can perform are also selected randomly. I love this approach, it fits right in with the quick-chargen ethos of the game. You buy your equipment and get going.

As I mentioned earlier, the "Game Master Procedures" section is more concerned with giving the mechanics of the game than in describing how you should apply those mechanics and how you should generate the situations those mechanics occupy. Task resolution adds a d20 to an ability score, with bonuses and penalties.

The same vagueness that I mentioned above infects the XP rules, though. Characters get experience for the value of the treasure they obtain and sell, not for what they hang onto or give away. (You can optionally give out some XP for "grand gesture" gifts.) This doesn't seem to fit the purpose of treasure in the fantastic India stories I've read. And it seems like it would provoke some decidedly un-Epic actions on the part of the characters. A GM may also grant XP for any reason they wish, but with no information on the specific principles of a GM in an Arrows of Indra game, I'm left with no information on what would be a good or bad reason to grant XP. This area of the rules, like the role of the players in general, needs to be fleshed out.

The surprise rules stand out as both clear and very effective. You are going to want to re-read these because they are going to be among the deadliest rules in the book. And they definitely are going to support some very wily moves by the players. (This is also in line with some of the Indian fantasy stories I've read too, the heroes there had no compunction about ambushing bad guys.)

Not knowing much about Indian myth and folklore, I hesitate to weigh in on the extensive Gazetteer section except to say that it seems like a fairly normal fantasy setting - villages and cities, wilderness and dangerous environs, and so on.

One half-step that I would like to see expanded into a full step is the description of gender roles in the world. It seems wishy-washy, saying that if a GM wants, they can permit a woman character to be free of their strict gender role and become an adventurer as in a normal party. I would prefer to see text that says bluntly that the social rules of the setting only apply to the characters insofar as the players desire - if a player wishes to be an exception to any in-fiction social rule, they should be supported in doing so by their fellow players.

There's an interesting description of a third gender role, a man who is raised and takes on the social role of a woman, and it said the opposite might be possible in your campaign as well. Again, I would like to see this area fleshed out and firmed up. Contrast for us a woman who does not conform to her social role (running away from home, learning how to shoot a bow, being real cool) and a woman who is accepted (or not) into another gender role. Still, it's a solid opening to these issues that a lot of other games don't even mention. Steps like this are vital for a game of this type, that is trying to bring us to a fantastic culture.

I love megadungeons and the Patala Underworld ties a megadungeon format to the setting's religion very tightly - the characters can literally descend to hell battling monsters and taking their treasure! That's pretty awesome. Although I appreciate the random room and monster generation tables - this is the only way to handle a megadungeon in this type of format - I do think that either they should have been greatly expanded (the chance that you'll come across the same type of magic spring more than once, for example, seems high) or, perhaps better, saved for a supplement. This would have undermined the author's goal of a one-book game from the introduction, but I think it could have better served the phantasmagorical and exciting material that I felt was over-compressed.

A monster guide and treasure and item list round out the game (the Gods and Religion section should properly be moved to the Gazetteer section). By this point it shouldn't be a surprise that the monsters are fun and you're gonna have fun interacting with them.

It has bookmarks and they're good. The character sheet, though attractive, is not very useful since more than 1/4 of it is taken up with ability scores and bonuses. It would make more sense to have more room for skill descriptions since some of those introduce new mechanics specific to your character.

All in all, Arrows of Indra creates an interesting fantasy culture and situates its adventurers in it much more firmly than the typical "old school" game. It contains all the elements of a great story game: a GM to set up a situation, players to play out their characters' actions in that situation, and the GM works out the consequences with the systems the game provides. It even puts in moral values and questions via the Holy/Unholy alignment system, reflecting favor or disfavor with the gods. It is flexible enough to handle political stories (so long as someone gets stabbed), wilderness stories, and even, with the literal descent to hell, mythic stories. As a story game, Arrows of Indra definitely delivers. (Since I already went over how it could be improved, I won't do that again like I normally do.)

As someone who the author believes to be working as hard as I can to destroy RPGs, it's impossible for me to decide if Arrows of Indra meets its goals. Am I the target audience? Surely not, surely this game was created specifically to repulse me and all swine like me. In that case, the game was a failure since I quite liked it. Perhaps its goal was to force me to play in a way that I would dislike, thereby driving me from the table. But it failed there too - if anything, it's not firm enough in its vision of what the players of the game should be doing. Hm.

Instead, let me take on that 'death of the author' postmodern capitalist attitude - let me flip through the atheist salesman's Bible.

If I separate the text from the author completely and just look at whether it appeals to me, a modern story-loving gamer, there's no way I can say it doesn't. It presents a compelling world, has cool ideas, sets them up for quick entry, and executes them efficiently. This is a world ripe for stories of adventure, loyalty and family in a culture I want to explore and experience.

Maybe you don't appreciate being called a swine and you don't want to buy a RPG by a guy who thinks you're attempting to destroy RPGs. That's understandable. Of course in a corporatist world we are all compromised and the only proper attitude towards anyone we buy things from is unreserved hostility and suspicion, as the pressure of money corrupts all human...wait, didn't I start this review *praising* capitalism? I think I better sign off before I make things worse. You can make up your own mind at this point, surely.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Arrows of Indra
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Arrows of Indra
by Levy K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/18/2014 14:24:14
I am going to give it a five because this is not only a sound OSR system, but the closest thing to India mythology I will ever get to in table top. Seriously this is the best one on the market that I know of. RPGPundit had taken great care with his work and it shows. It isn't your typical OSR game, but that is because it wants to do the setting right.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Arrows of Indra
by Chris M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/09/2014 16:02:41
I bought this product for 2 reasons.

1) I've always thought ancient Indian mythology would make an awesome gaming setting and "Arrows of Indra" does not disappoint. It's inspired me to go back and re-read parts of the India epics the "Mahabharata & Ramayana".

2) I wanted to show my financial and moral support for "The RPG Pundit" who authored this work. To let him know he's not alone in the gaming community in his disdain towards the SJW's (Social Justice Warriors) and Cultural Marxist who constantly attack him and seek to control discourse in the on-line RPG community. Keep on fighting the good fight Pundit.

First they came for the Simulationist Gamers, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Simulationist Gamer.
Then they came for the Tactical Combat Gamers, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Tactical Combat Gamer.
Then they came for the Old-School Gamers, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Old School Gamer.
Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

~ Gwarh

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Horizons Issue #2
by Mark G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/29/2014 07:28:17
I'm giving Infinite Horizons #2 ezine 4 stars. If I had bought it, I'd go 3 but you get a lot here for free. First off, the cover art is really cool and I'm loving the alien. Must scour it to see if there's any description given for it (or stats). I think the prestige classes are good, especially the Guardian who I'd select as sort of an elite guard or guard leader, seems a bit more of a non-player character but can be worked around. I liked the one-handed shot feat, the new gear (lots of weapons!). The paper model by Fantasy Cutouts was really neat and is based on a most interesting ship design. Might have to have a go. There's also an excerpt from JD Wallington's Temple Alliance Origins, Book I called A New Beginning. Very atmospheric first-person tale. Scott Virtes' Alien Flop short story I liked even more, mainly because I enjoy dialogue. There's others I haven't even read yet. Loved The Horror of Colony 6 and the art samples of Gordon Napier!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Horizons Issue #2
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Avalon Quests
by Olivier M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/22/2014 03:39:02
I was really excited about this product as I enjoy solo gaming, especially of the RPG kind, but there are very few options out there for such gaming.

Sadly, Avalon Quests feels unpolished to a point where it's uncomfortable to read through and use as reference.
Mostly, my qualms are with the layout and organization of the rulebook and the travel book which make it rather hard to understand how things work. For example, the travel book references "Sections" multiple times, but these are not indicated. If you read everything, you can guess at which paragraph they begin, but having to do that isn't normal.
The use of roman and arabic numerals to refer to the adventure or rules books is commendable, but remained confusing to me. Various typos do not help. The night encounters section is a blatant copy/paste of the day encounters, down to the table number being the same. As such, tables 3.3, 3.3.1 and 3.4 are noted 2.2 and so on.

Ultimately, it's a mess, and while I have been prodding at this in the hopes of getting some solo gaming going, I find myself exhausted and frustrated before I even start. Today I decided I wouldn't even think of trying this for a long while.

Other things of note about this product:

* The adventure provided requires 6 PCs. I find this to be too much. Soloing is not easy to begin with and while I have played one-on-one games controlling 4 PCs, I can't imagine doing it with 6, especially without a GM to catch my mistakes. It might be worth trying a multi-player yet GM-less game with such a party though.

* Art is really subpart, though tactical maps are provided for various encounters.

* There is a lot of content, whether random region events or adventure specific encounters and quests, which makes it even more frustrating that I feel I can't get to it in a comfortable fashion.


Overall, there is a lot of potential here, but right now, it's a rough stone ripped off the wall and it's in need of some serious cutting and polishing before it can become pleasant to play.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Avalon Quests
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Battle Axe Dwarf War Band [BUNDLE]
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2014 12:23:48
This game is hard to rate. I feel some elements of the game are worth 5-Stars while others are barely worth 1-Star.

Concept: 5-Starts. I think the idea of a card-driven skirmish minis game is really good. I especially like the deck building aspect where the availability of Battle Cards is limited to what Faction and which Figures you are playing.

Rules: 4-Stars. In general I think the rules are pretty good. The one thing that bothers me is how damage works. In general the rules are streamlined and quick (deep enough to be interesting) but when assigning damage you have to use a chart where you cross reference the attackers damage type (piercing, slashing, etc) with the targets armor rating. This really slows things down and complicates an otherwise fairly quick and simple system. If I were to spend much time playing this game I would definitely create alternate house rules for damage.

Quality: 1-Star. This is where the game falls on its face. Some of the artwork is pretty good but a great deal of it seems rushed and poorly done. There are Massive amounts of typos, word-substitutions and formatting errors. Many of these errors are on the cards that you play the game with. There is no excuse for this amount of errors present in a product that you are asking customers to pay for.

Conclusion: I'm not entirely dissatisfied with this purchase. While I'm unlikely to ever play with the game as written or use these components I may very well create my own game and components based on some good ideas that I got from this product.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Battle Axe Dwarf War Band [BUNDLE]
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Battle Axe Orc War Band [BUNDLE]
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2014 12:21:54
This game is hard to rate. I feel some elements of the game are worth 5-Stars while others are barely worth 1-Star.

Concept: 5-Starts. I think the idea of a card-driven skirmish minis game is really good. I especially like the deck building aspect where the availability of Battle Cards is limited to what Faction and which Figures you are playing.

Rules: 4-Stars. In general I think the rules are pretty good. The one thing that bothers me is how damage works. In general the rules are streamlined and quick (deep enough to be interesting) but when assigning damage you have to use a chart where you cross reference the attackers damage type (piercing, slashing, etc) with the targets armor rating. This really slows things down and complicates an otherwise fairly quick and simple system. If I were to spend much time playing this game I would definitely create alternate house rules for damage.

Quality: 1-Star. This is where the game falls on its face. Some of the artwork is pretty good but a great deal of it seems rushed and poorly done. There are Massive amounts of typos, word-substitutions and formatting errors. Many of these errors are on the cards that you play the game with. There is no excuse for this amount of errors present in a product that you are asking customers to pay for.

Conclusion: I'm not entirely dissatisfied with this purchase. While I'm unlikely to ever play with the game as written or use these components I may very well create my own game and components based on some good ideas that I got from this product.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Battle Axe Orc War Band [BUNDLE]
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Battle Axe Orc Warband
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2014 12:20:15
This game is hard to rate. I feel some elements of the game are worth 5-Stars while others are barely worth 1-Star.

Concept: 5-Starts. I think the idea of a card-driven skirmish minis game is really good. I especially like the deck building aspect where the availability of Battle Cards is limited to what Faction and which Figures you are playing.

Rules: 4-Stars. In general I think the rules are pretty good. The one thing that bothers me is how damage works. In general the rules are streamlined and quick (deep enough to be interesting) but when assigning damage you have to use a chart where you cross reference the attackers damage type (piercing, slashing, etc) with the targets armor rating. This really slows things down and complicates an otherwise fairly quick and simple system. If I were to spend much time playing this game I would definitely create alternate house rules for damage.

Quality: 1-Star. This is where the game falls on its face. Some of the artwork is pretty good but a great deal of it seems rushed and poorly done. There are Massive amounts of typos, word-substitutions and formatting errors. Many of these errors are on the cards that you play the game with. There is no excuse for this amount of errors present in a product that you are asking customers to pay for.

Conclusion: I'm not entirely dissatisfied with this purchase. While I'm unlikely to ever play with the game as written or use these components I may very well create my own game and components based on some good ideas that I got from this product.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Battle Axe Orc Warband
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Battle Axe Dwarven Warband
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2014 12:19:34
This game is hard to rate. I feel some elements of the game are worth 5-Stars while others are barely worth 1-Star.

Concept: 5-Starts. I think the idea of a card-driven skirmish minis game is really good. I especially like the deck building aspect where the availability of Battle Cards is limited to what Faction and which Figures you are playing.

Rules: 4-Stars. In general I think the rules are pretty good. The one thing that bothers me is how damage works. In general the rules are streamlined and quick (deep enough to be interesting) but when assigning damage you have to use a chart where you cross reference the attackers damage type (piercing, slashing, etc) with the targets armor rating. This really slows things down and complicates an otherwise fairly quick and simple system. If I were to spend much time playing this game I would definitely create alternate house rules for damage.

Quality: 1-Star. This is where the game falls on its face. Some of the artwork is pretty good but a great deal of it seems rushed and poorly done. There are Massive amounts of typos, word-substitutions and formatting errors. Many of these errors are on the cards that you play the game with. There is no excuse for this amount of errors present in a product that you are asking customers to pay for.

Conclusion: I'm not entirely dissatisfied with this purchase. While I'm unlikely to ever play with the game as written or use these components I may very well create my own game and components based on some good ideas that I got from this product.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Battle Axe Dwarven Warband
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Battle Axe Basic
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2014 12:11:51
Concept: 5-Starts. I think the idea of a card-driven skirmish minis game is really good. I especially like the deck building aspect where the availability of Battle Cards is limited to what Faction and which Figures you are playing.

Rules: 4-Stars. In general I think the rules are pretty good. The one thing that bothers me is how damage works. In general the rules are streamlined and quick (deep enough to be interesting) but when assigning damage you have to use a chart where you cross reference the attackers damage type (piercing, slashing, etc) with the targets armor rating. This really slows things down and complicates an otherwise fairly quick and simple system. If I were to spend much time playing this game I would definitely create alternate house rules for damage.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Battle Axe Basic
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Avalon Quests, Adventure #2
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/05/2014 09:01:48
Utilising an innovative system to enable a single player to participate in a full-blown party-style Pathfinder RPG adventure without even benefit of a referee, this is no mere 'adventure' but a full-blown campaign with a whole bunch of things going on to get involved with. There are places to visit and people to interact with, a whole complex world in which your party can wander.

Narrative is atmospheric and interesting and despite the mechanical constraints, even combats have the potential to be interesting as the set-up and opposition tactics are well explained. Most come with a map showing the starting positions of both sides, giving considerable scope for the development of party tactics, and there are frequent opportunities to insert a random element to opponents' behaviour to keep things lively.

A nice touch is the addition of 'Friendly Encounters' which add interest along with considerable variation introduced by various rolls and tables to determine both precise who is encountered and what their response will be. You can meet caravans, mercenary bands, military patrols, rangers, travellers and more - but with several pages to determine the precise nature of each encounter there is massive scope for variation and realistic interaction.

Naturally, there are also 'Unfriendly Encounters' - those where there is a strong potential that the meeting will end in violence. After all, meet a bunch of goblins and it's likely to end in a brawl! Still, there is scope for variation - they might, if they spot you first, choose to evade an encounter. And if all this wasn't enough, there are also random monsters to be found.

Complete with a tracking sheet and the all-important hex map upon which all this adventure occurs, if you cannot find anyone to play with here's something to keep you entertained. For that matter, if you are short of ideas for a game, you could use the randomised encounter generation system and other elements to put something together for a more regular group.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Avalon Quests, Adventure #2
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