RPGNow.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Arrows of Indra
by Thorin T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/18/2013 09:08:36
Arrows of Indra is one of the very few mythic India RPGs on the market today. In fact, the only other ones I know of are d20 supplement Sahasra and the upcoming mythic India game, Against the Dark Yogi. (Full disclosure: The author of this review is affiliated with this later game.)

Arrows of Indra sells itself as an Old School Renaissance (OSR) game set in ancient india. And that's exactly what it is, which in my opinion could be either a good or a bad thing, depending on what you're looking for in the game. The real distinction lies in whether you're looking for an India game foremost that happens to be OSR, or an OSR game that happens to be set in India.

Looking at the meat of the game, like many OSR games, Arrows of Indra is basically a recreation of 0e D&D with some of the kinks worked out. This includes a random cavern generator, random encounter tables where you can roll up encounters such as "Asura Demon, Class B," and random loot tables with D&D-style magic items and coins listed in gold, silver and copper pieces. All of these elements do a very good job of keeping with the old school D&D feel of the game.

Where the game falls flat is in emulating the sort of stories and feel found in Indian myth. A starting character in Arrows of Indra is very much a 1st level old school D&D character. They may have a fine and deadly time crawling through India-themed dungeons, but they're not going to be even remotely comparable to the characters featured in Vedic myths. And this will remain true even with many levels under their belts.

Another way in which Arrows of Indra fails to emulate Indian myth is when it comes to having rules to support some of the amazing feats performed by Indian heroes. Heroes in Vedic myth build bridges by shooting arrows, leap miles and rip up trees to use as improvised weapons. Nothing remotely on this level of power is supported in Arrows of Indra.

The OSR part of the design also shows up in the rules for siddhis (magic powers). These are represented in the game as special skills, that once purchased, may be used once per day in much the same way as D&D spells.

The classes in the game are basically the D&D classes with an Indian-themed veneer applied to them. The siddhi is the wizard, the thuggee is the assassin, the priest is the cleric, the fighter is the fighter, the thief is the thief, the yogi is the monk.

That said, Arrows of Indra does have a fairly extensive bestiary, featuring most of the creatures one would expect from an India-themed game, as well as a odd variety of D&D-esque monsters that made it into the game as well.

The writing for the game is clear, the editing is decent and the game also has a very crisp layout that is both simple and visually appealing. The cover art is very nice, but the interior art is… well… it's on par with 0e D&D art. That is to say it lacks the quality I am used to seeing in modern games, but perhaps it fits the OSR feel of the game well.

Overall, I would recommend this game to anyone looking for a specifically OSR game. I might recommend this game for someone looking for a specifically Indian game, but with some reservations on what to expect in terms of genre emulation.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Arrows of Indra
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Dungeon Tiles and Walls
by Ricardo N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/17/2013 12:26:01
This is a great set for the creation of dungeon environments with modular pieces. The textures look great when printed and are consistent with each other.

I would like to stress the fact that the pieces are easy to build. Seriously, each pillar or wall section takes only a couple of minutes to cut and fold. I enjoyed cutting the pieces and building some test rooms to see how they fit together, and the results look good. The assembly system for the pillars and walls is simple and the built-in tolerances mean that you do not have to be super precise when cutting. All pieces can be stored flat, which means that they do not have to take a lot of space when not in use. Just be sure of printing in thick cardstock, so that your pieces can endure the folding and unfolding.

It is possible to use this set to build completely flat maps, using the provided tiles and connectors. Since the connectors are used to create passages between rooms, you do not need a lot of different versions. Need an L-shaped corridor? Use two straight sections linked with an elbow connector. Going up one step, it is possible to add some stand-alone doors to mark passageways, common doors and gates. Once again, the slottable doors allow variation without having to build lots of pieces. To fully utilize the set, one can build pillars and walls to have a completely three-dimensional dungeon model.

I hope that expansions are added to this product line, including different types of stairs, dungeon props and different wall and floor textures.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Tiles and Walls
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Arrows of Indra
by Curt M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/12/2013 22:58:26
I come to this game both as a veteran tabletop rpger and as a practicing Vaishnava, so Arrows of Indra is effectively the closest thing game-wise to Green Ronin's famed Testament for me. The previous two reviews do a great job of summarizing the book. I particularly like the author's approach to the caste system and to "magic" in the game [totally not Vancian]. The yogi class doesn't work for me as written because it's basically the AD&D monk. Yogis in the source texts aren't combatants. I do really like the inclusion of celestial weapons, but though there is a charioteering skill, there are not chariot fighting rules, nor are there rules for the Vimanas, a real missed opportunity. There's really a lot to like here, but I have one major beef: Krishna is never discussed as human in the source texts. He's either identified as the original personality of Godhead or as the completely realized avatar of Vishnu. Rama, on the other hand, is Krishna-Vishnu playing as the perfect human being. Also Hanuman was never king of the vanaras. He was assistant to Sugriva. Thanks to the RPG Pundit for putting this out there. Good Gaming, and Hare Krishna!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Arrows of Indra
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Arrows of Indra
by Joseph B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/12/2013 12:13:49
Arrows of Indra, written by the RPGPundit and published by Bedrock Games, takes the "standard" 0E rules and uses them as the basis for a game of heroic action set in Vedic India. I confess I've been looking forward to this game since I first heard about it as an adjunct for my own Greyhawk campaign, and (full disclosure) was happy to receive a reviewer copy of the pdf.

Shortest version: I like this game so much that I'll happily plunk down the money for the hard copy version when it becomes available in a few weeks.

There's much here in terms of mechanics that players used to 0E or its descendants will find familiar; there are character classes (priest, priest-shaman, fighter, virakshatriya (a sort of paladin), scout (a sort of ranger), siddhi (magic-user), thief, thugee (assassin), and yogi), character races (the normal fantasy Europe races are not to be found, but we have barbarians, monkey-men, serpent-men, bird-men, and mountain-spirits) with nice bits of Vedic Indian folklore as their bases, and alignment (holy, neutral, and unholy). Nothing feels like a retread of the older material so much as a re-imagining of it because of the new mythological basis, and all is written in a very clear style.

There are new pieces to characters as well, the most significant being caste. It should be unsurprising that caste plays a large role in a game set in a mythological Indian setting, and there are both mechanical (dalits get +1 to CON and -1 to CHA, for instance) and in-game social impacts for each caste; brahmins run the risk of imperiling their family's status if they pursue a career as a warrior, for instance. The importance of family in the setting is strong, and rules for generating one's family are provided to give more background.

Combat is somewhat different than the 0E system, much more in line with modern sensibilities; the basic system is roll+modifiers must beat armor class to hit. There is an extensive section of skills which are linked to each character class; the magical effects of priests and siddhis are treated like the skills of any other class, which certainly makes for a quick, consistent, and easy system for new players.

There are the expected sections of monsters and magic items (both either taken from Indian mythology or Indian-ized versions of familiar D&D examples), but what really sets this work apart is the setting of The Bharata Kingdoms, which is a very gameified and mythologized version of ancient India. For someone like me, whose knowledge of this culture is extremely limited, the presentation of the setting was terrific, familiar enough that I could hang my hat on some things, while at the same time being exotic enough to have a very different feel from most fantasy campaigns. The sections on the Patala Underworld, a sort of cross between the underdark and outer planes, was especially thought-provoking. Rob Conley did the maps, which serve their purpose well and should be easy enough to use during play.

All this is accomplished with what was, for me anyway, just the right amount of foreign terminology and jargon. Too many settings seem to operate under the impression that all it takes to make an exotic setting is to use hundreds of weird names, but that ends up being nothing more than an exercise in frustration for all but the half-dozen die-hard fans who are willing to memorize the glossary. Arrows of Indra avoids that pitfall; a mace is still a mace.

All in all, this is a fantastic game, and it's a terrific introduction to a lively mythological setting that most people who are used to either Medieval Europe or China/Japan as their default fantasy setting would be well-served to explore.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
How to Spice Up Your Game
by Matthew T. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/11/2013 14:17:49
This PDF is presented in clear easy text, with simple layout and pleasing but minimal decorations. The writing is also clear and concise with only a few grammatical errors to break the flow.

"How to Spice up your Game" consists of 6 techniques GM may use to shake up their games. Each technique is fully explained with tips for incorporating it and examples of its use.

The techniques themselves range from the useful (using restricted PC knowledge to foster surprise) to the tricky (giving players control of the story -- including voting on story elements!) to the kinda obvious (miniatures -- but even here, there is some useful information). Other techniques include using riddles and puzzles to challenge the players over the characters, and using mini-games during an RPG to simulate in-game activities. Some of these ideas are not fully developed and others will radically alter gameplay. All of them will require careful thought, and some of them will require group discuss, extra GM work and/or some experimentation before they can be usefully incorporated into a game.

All told, "How to Spice up your Game" is a thoughtful little book with some intrigue ideas that GMs -- particularly new GMs or GMs that find their games becoming routine -- will find a useful starting point for trying some new things at the table.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
How to Spice Up Your Game
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Arrows of Indra
by Robert F. M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/11/2013 13:21:15
Once upon a time, a young DM of the old school bought a book called Deities & Demigods. Among its dizzying array of the mythos he expected and "knew" (Greek, Norse, Arthurian), there were also sections on ones he'd barely heard of. And his favorite of the Asian selections was the Indian mythos, with its many-armed gods and ascetic pacifists with real spiritual power. Wouldn't it be great, he mused, to make a campaign based on that?

Fast forward an embarrassing number of years, and the now-seasoned DM of many editions began to draw up notes for his very own homebrew Indian setting. He hit the interwebs searching for what others had done (because like any good DM, he is an inveterate cannibal), and lo, he stumbled upon Arrows Of Indra. It seemed to be everything he needed, complete with Indian races & classes, rules for caste systems, and even detailed benefits of "enlightenment."

The author of Arrows Of Indra states that his goal was to create an old-school roleplaying game based on Indian mythology that is at once exotic enough to be intriguing and familiar enough to be instantly recognizable to fans of old-school gaming. He meets the goal spectacularly.

The races are all interesting, and the classes seem to be re-skinned standard old school archetypes (the fighter, the thief, the scout, etc., are all here; the paladin is now called the virakshatriya, mages are sidhis, and so forth). This is the part that's instantly-recognizable, so much so that a reader could be forgiven for thinking at first that there's not much new here.

But read on past the char-gen and combat rules, and you get to the part where Arrows Of Indra really shines. There are some early hints in the skills section for priests and sidhis, and the enlightenment powers, and it all blossoms in the chapters on the Petala Underworld (talk about the ultimate mega-dungeon!), the Guide to the Bharata Kingdoms, and the Gods & Religion section. In these places, you really get the feel of Vedic India, and it's clear the author really knows his source material intimately. Everything a newbie needs to know about these subjects is located in one place, and there's no "homework" required.

I can to Arrows Of Indra hoping to find a source to cannibalize for my own campaign. I now find myself wanting to play the game as-is, or at least adapting its rules to my homebrew, rather than sticking to my standard of the last few years, and trying to cobble the setting together from multiple sourcebooks.

In all, Arrows Of Indra is an excellent product, and the perfect introduction to a mythology and culture than few RPGs have ever even tried to do right. Miss it at your own risk.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Arrows of Indra
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Heroes Weekly, Vol 2, Issue #4, Crime Unlimited
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/24/2013 11:05:12
Whilst the idea of a 'Supervillain supermarket' is not new, this is a good presentation of the concept that has been thought through in some detail.

The basic concept is simple. Supervillians do not operate independently, at leas, not all of the time. They need hirelings, they need items you cannot buy off the shelf and so on. So they have to go to an organisation that will supply their needs, no questions asked, cash on the nail, thank you very much.

Novel features of Crime Unlimited include its mobile nature. They prefer to operate out of a club or bar, but shift location every few weeks. It's almost a status symbol amongst the supervillain community to know where they are this month. Once accepted as a customer, you can literally get just about anything that you need - but don't cross them: they don't like that and tend to react forcefully, indeed terminally.

Adventure seeds around them are provided for both Hero and Villain games. For example, you don't always have to pay cash for that weapons grade plutonium you need to fuel your death ray, if it suits them they'll have you owe a favour instead. But they might sell that favour on to someone else... Or ask you to do something you really don't want to do.

Plenty here for you to weave into your adventures, complete with main characters statted up for Heroes Unlimited. If you play a different super-powered game, it shouldn't be too hard to re-stat them, and the concepts will, of course, hold good.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Heroes Weekly, Vol 2, Issue #4, Crime Unlimited
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
How to Spice Up Your Game
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/13/2013 06:59:00
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/02/13/tabletop-review-how-to--
spice-up-your-game/

How To Spice Up Your Game is a short book about using techniques to better play tabletop role-playing games. If that sounds horribly dumb and dry to you, trust me it’s not, this is actually quite a good little book. I did not expect much from the title, to be honest. It’s not professionally produced or anything, but it is nicely laid out, has a nice background, and lots of illustrations of dice. This book is focused on material for game masters, and if you are looking for more material like that check out a few of the other books I’ve reviewed in this area:

The GM’s Field Guide To Players

Never Unprepared: The Complete Game Master’s Guide to Session Prep

This book is very straightforward in its approach; there is no foreword or lengthy sections explaining things about game mastering, there is only a brief introduction and then six techniques of spiciness. Each technique is a different chapter and contains smaller sections explaining the concept, the effect on gameplay, ways to implement the concept, tips, and examples. Each chapter makes up about three pages.

The first chapter, for example, is about the concept of “restricted knowledge” which is a pretty common and well-known tool with GMs (if not always well-implemented). This really needs no explanation as it is exactly what you think it is: essentially keeping players from playing the game from the meta level instead of the character level by letting individual characters have knowledge instead of the entire table. Some other concepts need more explaining, like the next chapter which is entitled “Explore the World”. You really need to read this chapter through to figure out what the author means by this and how it affects play, as the title is too opaque and the implementation not obvious enough for someone to grasp it immediately.

Overall, I was really impressed with this book. Though small, there are a lot of really great ideas that are well explained and presented here. Each concept is presented in such a way that you can read it and find yourself nodding your head, instantly thinking about your gaming group or a game you have run and where you could have used these concepts. The chapter on “representation”, where you help your players visualize the game world by using real world analogs or other helpful correlations, happened to hit home for me regarding a game I am running right now, and how I could help the players visualize the place they are in right now and involve them more in the space. The author offers variants and shallower or deeper levels of all of the techniques, so that a GM can play around with using these ideas and see if they need to really focus on them or if they can keep them in the background. The cost does seem a bit prohibitive, but I have no qualms about saying this is worth the six bucks being asked. It’s a bit steep for a short, non-professional book on GMing, but this is really good stuff and I will be printing out a copy of this to keep on hand. Now that is saying something!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
How to Spice Up Your Game
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Game Geek #37
by PEDRAZZI G. G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/08/2013 09:34:37
A well made and complete product. Thanks. How about a subscription?

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Game Geek #37
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Heroes Weekly, Vol 1, Issue #22, The Professor
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/07/2013 05:06:20
This issue presents a neat minor-league supervillain called The Professor. His backstory is quite amusing, a wonderful two-bit villain who has kept his day job and so can only pursue his nefarious plots at the weekends, or maybe the odd evening after work as long as he doesn't stay out too late!

The poor fellow has been a bit of a failure in life - both career-wise and socially - and to be honest he seems set fair to make as little impact on the 'Super' scene as he has in real life. It's difficult not to feel a bit sorry for him.

Several ideas for incorporating him into your adventures are provided, rather neatly divided so that he can be a villain or a hero - or at least, try to be - as best suits your campaign needs. He's really supposed to be a vilain so the option is given of him trying his hand at being a superhero after his attempts at supervillainry have proved so uttlerly unsuccessful - a nice touch!

A full character sheet, complete with colour illustration, as well as paper 'standee' miniatures of The Professor and four generic SWAT team members (why? Oh well, they'll probably come in useful..) round this issue out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Heroes Weekly, Vol 1, Issue #22, The Professor
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Kitbag 2, Sidearms
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/05/2013 09:13:39
I have not yet met a Traveller player who is not fascinated by his character's weapons! Here is a neat selection of sidearms that any Traveller character should be delighted to have about his person... or indeed, in his kitbag!

It opens with a brief yet scholarly introduction as to what constitutes a 'sidearm' - basically a small offensive weapon designed primarily for self-defence, capable of being carried more or less constantly without getting in the way, yet able to be brought to bear whenever the need arises.

This is followed by a selection of such weapons, each with the sort of loving description that the average gun-bunny can drool over yet clear enough for those for whom weapons are mere tools to understand just what it is that they are purchasing. For those who like to see what they are getting, there are clear diagrammatic line illustrations (in colour, of course).

The real joy is in making them sound interesting and realistic. Pull out your Tactical ShotSystems Intimidator next time you venture down a dark alley, perhaps. Far better than just grabbing a snub pistol....

The one thing I miss is a handy chart of the relevant game mechanics. They're all there, but embedded in the text. As the text is a delight to read, that's no hardship... but the chart is useful once the bullets start to fly.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kitbag 2, Sidearms
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Kitbag 1: Universal Weapon Systems
by D J N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/05/2013 04:09:36
Overall I liked this booklet. I'm not fond of "modular weapons" where by switching accessories one weapon does everything. For the most part, however, this booklet made it believable and I'll be using some of these in my games.

The drawings were well done. I will be looking for the rest in this series.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kitbag 1: Universal Weapon Systems
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Heroes Weekly, Vol 1, Issue #17, Jail Break
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/03/2012 05:28:04
Put simply, this is a neat little jail break caper than can be run as a stand-alone or as part of your regular campaign. The situation is clearly presented with several options, from the default of rescuing one Dr. Plague from the clutches of law enforcement through to having to rescue a fellow superpowered player-character...

As a one-off, it can be fun to play the villains for a change. Even if your characters are normally on the side of the angels, even good guys sometimes run foul of the law... this is especially an occupational hazard if your party are typical superhero vigilantes rather than sworn officers of the law (and even those sometimes end up on the wrong side of the bars for real or alleged violations).

Various preparatory options are presented to allow the characters to scout out the 'Superhuman Containment Facility' at the local precinct house and then to gain access to those held within, giving plenty opportunity for them to talk and investigate and infiltrate before the inevitable brawl begins. Once it does, there are 'regular' police officers to prevent the escape attempt (if you want any superpowered ones, you will need to find or roll them up for yourself), and the caper is additionally provided with some nice plans of the precinct house and the Superhuman Containment Facility so that you can play out events with a good idea of your surroundings - including the use of miniatures or counters if preferred.

A neat and clear caper, well suited to a single session of play.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Heroes Weekly, Vol 1, Issue #17, Jail Break
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Avalon Models Free Sample Jan 2012
by Ken B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/27/2012 18:06:29
This is a very simple package providing 5 ea. figure flats and no other information on any game play. Children could achieve some activity with it.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Avalon Models Free Sample Jan 2012
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Avalon Design Elements, Celtic Set #4
by Steffon W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/25/2012 07:38:08
Delivered in PDF form. This means if you use Illustrator or InDesign like myself it's difficult to 'pick apart' the elements for use. These would be much more use as vectors or another format like svg. Avoid.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Avalon Design Elements, Celtic Set #4
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Publisher Reply:
The product also comes with a Tiff file of each design element, which can be used by any sort of software, or converted into sny format you like.
Displaying 31 to 45 (of 338 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG