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Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
by David J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/08/2011 22:15:27
Mechanics: Low in crunch, with the ability to be entertaining the key to success. Easily understood and used. I personally prefer more mechanistic games, but this looks idea for the people who like to concentrate on colourful description of speedy action (and in fact vivid and creative description of action is the key to winning).

Worldbuilding: The mechanics are good enough but not quite my cuppa. But the middle third of the book containing various faerie locales would be a valuable addition to any fantasy or superhero campaign whether you use the game system or not.

Adventures: There are three adventures at the end, the first being an "Arabian Nights" styled attempt to help a dreaming mortal artist seek out inspiration, the second being the discovery and attempt to foil a villain who is part fairy tale, part James Bond Villain, and the third being a rewritten version of the classic fairy tale "Donkey Skin" that I find to be a considerable improvement.

All in all this is a great package, and I can recommend it to you.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
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For Want of a Snail
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/30/2011 07:47:48
Dreams... usually when an adventure starts "You awaken..." it's usually to an unpleasant situation you have to resolve, in Rêve it's the normal state of affairs, and the dreamlike-quality of the game is evident from the outset as the characters find that they just ARE where it is that they need to be for events to begin. Who ever expected a dream to make total sense?

Giant statues of snails having haunted their dreams, they awake to find a road lined with... giant statues of snails. In the normal bizarre logic of dreams, it becomes obvious that they ought to follow this road..

As you might expect, the town they eventually find is obsessed with snails, which they breed and race with a passion. Although life proceeds normally here, with a major event in the snail-racing calendar approaching rapidly, all is not well - there's a murderer on the loose. Perhaps the characters will find the murderer by interpreting their dreams and asking in the right places, or they may prefer to get a snail and enter the races for the prize that featured in the dream they had at the beginning.

The translation catches the whimsey of the original, yet flows as smoothly as if it was written in English, complete - or is that replete - with snail puns.

That's it, delightful, gentle, dreamy... completely suited to the consensual hallucination that is this game, an evening of pure slightly crazy delight for your players. Just don't eat the snails!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
For Want of a Snail
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Reve: the Dream Ouroboros - - Complete Rulebook
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/03/2010 11:13:37
The book opens with a rambling foreword by the author, touching on how this is a complete rewrite - as the translation of the original I'm reading is of the 2nd edition of Rêve de Dragon - of the rules, suggesting the order and way in which it should be read and the like, before getting to the underlying philosophy of the game: that a dream exists only whilst the dreamer is dreaming... and that in similar vein, the alternate reality of a role-playing game only comes to life when someone is playing that game. The aim in creating the game is to provide a ruleset that facilitates the shared dream of the in-game reality.

The whole is divided into three books, the first of which is called Journeyers. For this game is about journeys: be they quests, searches for enlightenment or indeed actual travels. It begins with the rules for creating a character, or Journeyer. Each is described by a comprehensive list of 18 characteristics, assigned in the main by point-buy, as well as skills and other attributes. Interestingly, the details of actually acquiring skills and the like are left until later despite a fairly comprehensive outline of how a character is described mechanically, the discussion then moves on to the crux of this ruleset, the resolution table, which is brought into use whenever it is not clear whither an action will succeed or not. Although verbose in presentation, it's a ruleset honed down to the core essentials - a means of describing the character in a manner that facilitates task resolution. The rest is left to the role-playing and storytelling capabilities of the gaming group.

Task resolution revolves around a single Resolution Table, cross-referencing the character's relevant skills or characteristics against an assigned difficulty, and rolling a percentage against the target number thus found. It's a neat and elegant system, and there are plenty of ways in which to tweak it to precisely what you need on each occasion: partial successes and partial failures, fumbles, improvisation when you don't know the relevant skills and so on.

The next chapter looks at the actual process of creating a character. It seems quite daunting at first glance, but provided one is methodical it's quite straightforward (if you feel that the mathematics are too complex or time-consuming, there's an Excel spreadsheet generator available from the Malcontent Games website!). No dice are involved, the whole process is one of choice. It does repay taking time to create the character that you want, and depending on the needs of the game you intend to play, working with the rest of the group to create a balanced party. The first choice to make is whither you want to be a High Dreamer (mage) or True Dreamer (all other journeyers) - the number of points available are the same, but High Dreamers need to allocate some to magic skills and spells. The characteristics, skills, and ancillary 'peculiarities' such as age, handedness, and so on are entered on the Character Sheet, thus providing the core description of the character. Next you start on the Journey Sheet, which is the living record of important variables during the course of play, and this book-keeping is quite detailed over and above the sort of hit points and spells used that is about all you need to know in many games.

The character is now detailed, but the poor dear is quite naked, so the next section deals with money and equipment. Again the way in which gear is recorded is detailed almost to the point of nit-picking. Precise location and exact weights are needed, the latter to calculate how encumbered the character might be. Just remember not to say that you have a pint of oil in your backpack, you need to specify that it's in a skin... or everything else in there will be ruined! The passage of time, however, is much more loosely handled with fairly vague 120-minute 'hours' (the Draconic hour) and six-second 'rounds' when you want to get precise, each round being sufficient for one action (usually a combat one). Movement is handled in a similar manner, normally you need only concern yourself with how far you can go in a day, unless it becomes necessary to know just how fast you can run over the space of a single round! Other matters are also discussed, such as how to act unnoticed and meeting deadlines, each provided with clear examples to aid you in seeing how to use the Resolution Table to good effect. To continue with the detail-oriented nature of this game, eating and drinking is discussed, as you are expected to keep track of what your character has eaten and drunk to ensure that he gets enough each day.

The next chapter explores health, discussing how characters become fatigued, and recover from it, moving on through endurance to the all-important matter of life points. If you run out of these, you die. The process whereby life points are recovered is quite complex, but explained clearly - it is becoming apparent, even before reaching the chapter on combat, that engaging in a brawl is not something to be done lightly: in this game, injuries really hurt, can easily be deadly, and take a long time to heal! Wounds, aid and healing are detailed as well, followed by a section on healing herbs. Naturally, physical injury is not the only thing to threaten a character's health: there are also diseases to catch... and such is the nature of such problems, life points cannot be regained until wounds have been healed, and wounds cannot be healed until you are free of disease! And then the discussion moves on to poisons and venom, and miscellaneous ways of getting hurt such as falling and fire.

Chapter 6: Combat then looks at the whole process, beginning with a section on weapons themselves - how they are used and the damage that can be done with them. Next up, armour and the protection that it gives. This dealt with, we move on to the combat round itself. In each six-second round of combat action, firstly intentions must be declared. As the round progresses, an action may be aborted but no modification to that which has been declared is permitted. Next a fairly complicated initiative calculation is performed, based on attack type, weapon to be used and character skill with that weapon... and each individual's initiative is modified by that of his opponent. Magic use goes before any physical attack, and after the brawling is resolved, movement and any necessary assessment of character health is dealt with. Once understood, it can flow reasonably well but does rely on all participants knowing what to do - I'd recommend a few practice fights to get the hang of it before you start adventuring in earnest. Everything is well-described and the numerous examples are clear and easy to follow. Once the sequence is mastered, effects like particular successes, fumbles, and armour deterioration are covered, followed by the rules for unarmed combat. This is divided into two types: pugilism (which covers any style in which you strike your opponent, no matter which part of your body you use) and grappling (where the combatants grab on to each other with the objective of immobilising the opponent). An elegant abstraction is used for grappling, where each success gives you a 'grappling point' against your opponent - if at the end of a combat round you have two such points, your opponent is immobilised and the next round you can cause subdual damage by reducing his Endurance. This chapter is rounded off with a one-page summary of the combat process.

The next chapter of the first book is titled The Archetype. This is more philosophical than the nuts-and-bolts rule mechanics that have gone before, and looks at the 'reality' of dreams. If the world of Rêve is the dream of dragons, what happens when a dragon awakens? A dream does not die when the dreamer awakens, it is remembered. But even if you're a skilled lucid dreamer, when you go back to sleep the dream is never quite the same. Character death in one of these shared dreams wakes the dreamer, but when the dream is resumed, the character is there again, often changed - in circumstance, in age, in characteristics and skills - but the core, the 'archetype' that makes him an individual remains. It's a bit like those people who believe in reincarnation and past lives, something always remains... reflected here by a listing of ALL possible skills, as the individual may have had knowledge in past lives that he does not have now. The discussion moves on to how experience is gained in the game - based on successful skill use - but then reverts to the more esoteric, as under stress, some of the character's past memories may surface during his in-game dreams. Mechanically, this is reflected by allowing a chance to convert stress points gained during the course of events to additional experience points which the player may assign to any skill provided that the current character has a lower skill level than his Archetype sheet shows for that skill. When a character dies, he is indeed dead in THAT adventure - and the usual grieving, scavenging over his possessions and funerary rites take place - but can reappear again, the same person yet different, somewhere and somewhen else. You can even meet people you knew in a past life, and maybe even share some memories of that with them. The final few short chapters deal with optional rules covering luck and destiny points, astrology, morale and even in-character affairs of the heart!

We now move on to the second book, In The Dreantime. This opens in philosophical vein - dreaming creates whole worlds inhabited by the dreamer, and while he's there, they seem to be real worlds. Dragons are the Great Dreamers, and it is the worlds they dream which are inhabited by the characters in this game. This leads onto magic use - if magic is an alteration of the world, and the world is dreamed by the dragons, then magic involves whispering into a dragon's ear and so getting him to change his dream, hence the High Dreamers, those who can exert such influence, do so by learning to speak the dragon's own language. But Draconic is not a language you learn like Greek or Welsh, it is more akin to Ursula K. LeGuin's 'True Name' concept, in which if you know the true name of an item, you gain power over it. Draconic comes in four forms, the ones that a High Dreamer studies influences the sort of magic he can work. High Dreamers perceive more than one reality: there is the Dreaming (the normal reality inhabited by all characters) and the Dreamtime (where the dragons are and mere mortals cannot go), and an inbetween place called the Dreamlands. It is here that High Dreamers go - in the astral state - to cast spells, making a 'journey' around the Dreamlands dealing with encounters until they reach the right place in which to cast the desired spell. It's a complex yet elegant mechanic, that makes spellcasting far more than merely picking a spell from a list and (provided you've not used up all your daily allotment) having it happen. Things can go wrong, sometimes horribly so and sometimes just leaving the hapless High Dreamer with an overwhelming urge to kiss a pig on the snout! If you feel it sounds like all too much bother, this probably is not the right game for you, but if you find it mystical and exciting, you are in for a treat. And this is just the general material, following chapters look at the four different types of magic, exploring both the underlying philosophy and the actual spells you can cast using it.

Magic done, the third book is Worlds and describes the actual game setting, now that we have covered how it all works. It's basically a heroic or mediaeval fantasy, the sort of world in which legends, fairy tales and sagas happen. However, being a setting created of dreams, there are some differences. There are, of course, multiple dreams - one for each sleeping dragon - and characters can sometimes move between them. (Haven't you ever had a dream about someone, then found out the next morning that another person dreamed about that same someone?) Another fact is that there are no deities, and hence none of the 'divine magic' that many fantasy games make available... although those characters who wish to believe in a god or gods can do so, it just is unlikely to have an in-game effect. What gets messier is the effect of dragons awakening. If one does, that is the cause - or is it effect? - of a single character dying. Somehow, there is a collective meta-dream shared by all the dragons, hence one character can die and a single dragon awaken, without problems for anyone else. But should several dragons awaken at once, a cataclysm maight occur amongst those who exist within the dream. These upheavals provide some of the history of this alternate reality.

A recurrent theme in this game is journeys - indeed, player-characters are called Journeyers - so the next chapter explores the principles of travelling between dreams in much more detail. Rifts allowing inter-dream passage, a dangerous meshing of dreams called a blur... each has dangers and opportunities inherent in them, and a tendency to 'just happen' rather than be there when the characters themselves want to travel between dreams. As every good journey includes sea travel at some point, the next things to be considered are matters nautical, especially navigation and storms. Oh, and you can get rifts at sea as well!

Next comes a chapter on Sciences, being primarily a resource for the in-game use of relevant skills; so there are list of plants that a botanist might find, diseases for medics to scratch their heads over and so on. Delights such as the floom, a fruit of extremely low nutritional value (remember, you need to track that your character has eaten enough each day), but which is popular with a larva that eats its way happily through a floom... and whose droppings make very nutritious eating, provided you can get over the disgusting taste! Naturally, mushrooms come in both poisonous and edible varieties, worth knowing which is which. There's also a collection of books, the most common texts that the most educated and wealthy folk might have access to, and the benefits you can gain from studying them. This chapter ends with a wealth of information on alchemy, for those wishing to practice it within the game. This is followed by a chapter on Creatures, not so much for students of zoology but a bestiary for the game. It also allows for non-human characters - giants, gnomes, the dog-headed hounders and mockturtles amongst others - or of course they can feature as NPCs and monsters. The animals are well-described and make biological sense... mostly. One delight is the oracle bird, which does indeed speak the truth but only answers a single question - and gets annoyed if you do not have one when it flies up. While it is reputed to taste delicious and has four legs as well as wings so there is plenty to go round, it is said to be bad luck to kill one. Fortunately for the hungry, there are sections on game and fowl. For less welcome encounters there are undead and disembodied entities as well.

Finally comes An Invitation to the Journey, three scenarios to get your game going. The first serves to get a party together, with beautiful meshing of wierd dreams and travel through a rift to let the characters know from the outset that this is a fantasy like no other. The second involves helping a suicidal Journeyer to regain her composure with the aid of a High Dreamer whom the characters must find and persuade to help. The third adventure is more complex, but involves a sporting competition and various events around it. Each adventure is clear and straightforward to run, even if you are new to this game, and filled with charming little bits of local colour that serve to make it all come really alive. This section rounds off with a gazetteer of the area in which the three adventures are set, so as to give the referee a starting point for further campaigning.

On the face of it, just another swords and sorcery fantasy game... but one with a charming air that entrances, with an underlying philosophy that actually works, delightfully presented in a faithful translation that catches the author's style, not just his words. It will not be for everyone, but for those who find it compatible, entrancing dreams await.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Reve: the Dream Ouroboros - - Complete Rulebook
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Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
by Chad B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/09/2007 03:48:40
Seven Leagues has converted me from a loyal White Wolf fan of many years; having revealed to me what a REAL 'Storytelling' game is all about.

The Setting, Systems, Characters, and other concepts flow together seamlessly through the unique utilization of Narrative Language. Even at Character Creation, the player's Description of their 'Protagonist' is what matters most. From character creation and throughout the 'Tale' (adventure/story), the most vital component is the use of Collaborative Narration (Very similar to what 'Stunting' is from popular White Wolf games- except here it is the core mechanic).

There are only three numerical values of the Seven Leagues character called 'Virtues'- representing intellectual, charismatic, and physical faculties. However, the player's DESCRIPTION of their character and actions determines how they can use these values. For example, an Ogre with the physical Virtue of 'Hand' rated at seven- might be very good at smashing things and standing up to grim punishment, but is probably not very nimble and acrobatic. Conversely, an Elf might also have a Hand at Seven but it may represent dexterity and agility instead of brute strength. A twelve-sided die is rolled and one of the character's Virtues is added, along with any modifiers awarded by the 'Narrarator' for good 'embellishments' by the players, and other circumstances in the story. If the sum is Thirteen, the Protagonist is Successful. Alluding to the above example, if the ogre is trying to dance his way across a high-wire, the Narrator will probably give the player a negative modifier because of the difficulty of the feat for an ogre.
Characters are further developed by special abilities and hindrances called 'Charms' and 'Taboos' (Player created descriptors like "Nature Magic" or "Turns to Stone in Sunlight", for example). Due to the uniqueness of the system, one charm isn't necessarily more powerful than another because conflict resolution depends on the narrative description of how they are used. The book gives an example of how Odyseuss intimidates Circe (who has a charm allowing her to shapechange humans) because of the descriptive applications of the character's talents.

The Setting for Seven Leagues is meant to take place primarily in Faerie, although there is some text devoted to mortals entering Faerie and creatures of Faerie entering the mortal world. The setting is elegantly detailed and truly remarkable compared to other game's grasping efforts to make Faerie a fun and playable setting. The different lands in Faerie are called 'Provinces' and they have a few narrative descriptor words that can give players a bonus to their rolls if they use the descriptor words in any of their embellishments during play. Many colorful Provinces and Antagonists are detailed in the Setting section of the book, from the archetypal "gloomy forest", to sentient animals.

Because of the nature of descriptive language being the fundamental element in Seven Leagues, it will probably appeal more to intellectual and mature players. It is "A Writer's RPG", in my opinion, "A Storyteller's RPG". In addition, the Narrator is entrusted with a lot of power as he/she is the arbiter of narrative modifiers given to players (which remember, are more important than the character's numerical values), so an honest and mature Narrator is required.

I would have liked to see a few more examples of play as I still have a couple of questions for certain situational conflicts. But perhaps they can be answered in an appropriate game forum.

Overall, I believe this to be a truly phenomenal game that can truly inspire the reader (and other game designers) as to what a Storytelling RPG really ought to be. After downloading the demo, I was thrilled. After playing a couple sessions, my hopes were confirmed. Seven Leagues is graceful and fantastic! Ingenious!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
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Publisher Reply:
Hi Chad: Thanks for the glowing review; appreciate it. If you have any questions about Seven Leagues in actual play, feel free to sign up at our discussion board: http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/7leagues/ Thanks again!
Reve: the Dream Ouroboros - - Complete Rulebook
by phillip h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/03/2007 17:42:20
The premise's of this game is very peculiar. The general idea is characters are part of a dreams of sleeping dragons, who are in turn(?) dreamed by the dreams(???), that is the player characters-at least that is what I got out of the book....Any way the dream world the characters inhabit is a kind of multiverse ala Moorcocks Elric/Hawkmoon/etc meets Alice in Wonderland/Wizard of Oz and maybe just a pinch of Lovecraft tossed in...

On the surface, it looks like a generic medieval FRPG, but as read more in detail, the games focus is shifted more to the weird world(s) and the story ("Journey") the players alter egos take, and less on Hack & slash dungeon clrawls- In othere words it is very French, which is okk since thats where the game originated from.

Strange as the foundation is, and as clunky as the mechanics can be- over all some how it made me like it. Aside from Artesia: Adventures in the known world , I have ot come across a book that made me want to try it just once-though I doubt I will. Still there is something about this weird, whimsical and facinating world that I found very appealing.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Reve: the Dream Ouroboros - - Complete Rulebook
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Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
by James H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/13/2006 00:00:00
Seven Leagues from Malcontent Games delves into subject matter that has never been covered in any great depth by the roleplaying industry as a whole - fairies. Certainly we have our modern 're-imaginings' of traditional folklore in Changeling and Delirium, but these games are just that - modern re-imaginings. Seven Leagues deals more with traditional folklore and the otherworldly realms inhabited by the fae, although some contemporary romantic themes do leave their imprint on the finished product.

Before we go much further, I should note exactly what I mean when I refer to traditional folklore here. In traditional English and Irish folklore, fairies were most certainly not of the friendly or singular disposition that the overwhelming majority of modern (e.g., late 19th and 20th Century) fiction portrays them as embodying. In traditional folklore, fairies were the medieval equivalent of what you probably knew as The Boogeyman when you were growing up. The good natured creatures that many people associate the word "fairy" with today are purely a modern innovation designed to cast yesterday's nightmares in a different light for the youth of today.

Now, having clarified that, while Seven Leagues definitely draws more inspiration from folklore as opposed to modern fiction, it isn't all doom and gloom (as previously noted, some contemporary romantic themes do make an appearance). The difference is one of focus and, in Seven Leagues, the focus lies more on creating an alien world steeped in magic and full of peril than being politcially correct or honoring modern literary tenets. If exploring a truly different kind of fantasy is something that appeals to you, then you'll find much to like in Seven Leagues. The game is definitely best described as indulging in the baroque, as opposed to the familiar.

Characters in Seven Leagues are largely defined using only words, although some checks and balances in the form of Virtues (i.e., attributes), Charms (i.e., benefits), and Taboos (i.e., flaws) are instituted in the interest of not veering completely into what is largely uncharted territory for many gamers. There are three Virtues in Seven Leagues (Head, Heart, and Hand) which correspond to mental, emotional, and physical aspects of a character respectively. Each of these Virtues is rated on a scale that ranges from 0 to 7+, with the Virtue rating being added to die roll results during actual play. Charms and Taboos may similarly effect die roll results, but are slightly more complex, taking the form of detailed edges and flaws.

Which brings us to Fortune. Fortune is bit of a conundrum, mechanically speaking, as it appears to fulfill very much the same purpose as Charms and Taboos, albeit in a temporary capacity (Charms and Taboos tend to be permanent character features). The initial explanation left me scratching my head, but ultimately what I walked away with is that Fortune seems to serve as a kind of a dual-faceted, variable, point pool aimed at adding a few more die roll modifiers into the mix. Personally, I?m not entirely sure that using Fortune is necessary, given that it seems to cover the same ground as simple situational modifiers or Charms and Taboos do (in fact, I could see myself running Seven Leagues without it).

Finally, characters are rounded out with a Legend. I use the phrase ?rounded out? loosely as, despite being the last step in character creation, it?s arguably the one step that adds the most to characters in terms of description. So, what exactly is a Legend? Just what it sounds like - a piece of prose that details the origins of your character, be they descended from fairies or mortals. A Legend is, quite simply, your character?s own mythology. It will, of course, evolve and expand over time as the game is played - much like legends of old evolve and expand as the characters around which they revolve do ro say things to impact the flow of a story. I?ve seen this concept used in many roleplaying games and it?s something that I personally enjoy, perhaps more so in the context of Seven League?s baroque realms.

The system of Seven Leagues will be, I suspect, a love it or hate it affair for many consumers. The game engine itself is extremely light and, while it does incorporate the use of dice (a single twelve-sided die) and numbers, it is largely focused on using descriptive language to both evoke action and atmosphere. The crux of action resolution itself revolves around rolling a result that is equal to or exceeds thirteen on the aforementioned twelve-sided die (you add modifiers to the die roll based on a number of different things, including a character?s Virtue ratings and their Charms or Flaws). If a player manages to do so, their character performs whatever action that they were attempting successfully, while should they fail to do so, the action outcome is also a failure. It is all very, very, simple.

For me, system transparency is a huge selling point, and Seven Leagues nails it. The nice thing is, it doesn?t do so at the expense of all detail, only at the expense of unnecessary detail (something that a great many game designers could learn from, in my opinion). Seven Leagues gives you absolutely everything that you?ll need to weave thrilling adventures, without weighing you down with rules that serve only to suspend the adventure to focus on metagame considerations. If you play RPGs to act out adventure, you?ll likely enjoy this aspect of Seven Leagues, but if you merely see RPGs as being advanced board games and think that the means matter more than the end, Seven Leagues will probably disappoint.

In the end, I think that Seven Leagues will appeal most to those consumers who enjoy a baroque fantasy experience, transparent rules, and the use of dice as randomizers. If you have a strong aversion to any of those three things, Seven Leagues may not be the game for you, but otherwise, I think that you'll find it a very satisfying experience. I?m not a huge fan of fairies or the fae in role playing games, but Seven Leagues gave me pause to rethink my biases - and I am certainly glad that I did.

[Note: This review was edited for spelling.]






LIKED: I very much enjoyed the transparent mechanics, with the possible exception of Fortune, which seemed to cover some ground twice. Additionally, I much enjoyed the focus of the game and the opportunity it gave me to view faries in a traditional context.


DISLIKED: Not much, honestly. Only Fortune sticks out in my mind as being somewhat awkward and, even then, I'm still on the fence for the time being.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied

[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
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Publisher Reply:
Thanks for the review. For anyone wanting another perspective, there's also a pretty comprehensive review at http://www.rpg.net/reviews/archive/12/12417.phtml. Thanks again!
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