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Otros comentarios dejados por esta editorial:
Roger's Jollies Pirate Map Kit
por Herley F. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 01/02/15 15:06:02
it was an awesome detailed ship with nice interior and exterior ...I loved the ghost version!
that being said the lower level was very dark difficult to make out and the front of the ship has a void space ...don't know if this is a nautical thing but would of made a good storeroom or something

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Imaginary Friends
por Declan T. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 01/10/14 11:38:04
This review contains a couple of spoilers, be warned!

Well, I bought this book with high hopes since I had liked other adventures from this published before, and they were pretty good.
I won't lie- I was disappointed.

There is good stuff here, the organisation depicted- SPIDER, is a solid mid-level threat for a superteam to take a break from fighting VIPER or DEMON or whatever. This I like, and it takes up a good chuck of this book.

But I bought this for the adventure, which, although usable, needs a lot of work.

It's not particularly well-written, and it's a very complex scenario so it needs to be clear and concise. Instead it's rambling and nonspecific.
Some of the dialogue as written is just terrible, and has a real tin-ear quality to it. (Bizzarely there's also some really good dialogue as well- did it have two different writers?)

The tone of the adventure is very uneven and it includes comedic cartoon-like characters and brutal, horrible deaths. Some graphic disturbing scenes and also traumatised child NPC's. All of which makes for a strange little adventure.

There are some good points- three fairly original, powerful villains are written up, and all have potential for repeat use. There are plenty of plot seeds at the end dor those short on ideas, which I always am!

Overall, too expensive for what it is, but there are nuggets of good stuff to be had.

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The Widening Gyre
por Eric W. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 05/16/13 13:33:00
Good quality PDF with legible text and useful illustrations. Reads like a genre book for Steam Punk as much as a specific campaign setting. Provides a good overview and useful examples including inspirational quotes from sources from the Victorian era and from contemporary works set in it.

I appreciated all the content, and only wished there were more. Many of the sections could benefit from expansions and added detail and samples. I hope the sales justify supplementary books in the future.

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Unkindness (ICONS, HERO)
por Quinn M. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 12/07/12 14:04:14
A good villain is a key element for a good adventure. The Raven King fits that bill (great artwork inside showing him in all his glory) and the potential for using him again is VERY high. There are 24 plot seeds included to create future adventures. There is a darker plot element involving domestic violence, but it is handled thoughtfully by the author.

On the negative side, I did note that under the sample encounters, 'A Speedy Delivery Gone Wrong' and 'Four and Twenty Ravens Baked In a Pie' that the same paragraphs are REPEATED.

I didn't purchase this with the idea of using either Champions or Icons to run it, so I have no concerns about stats really. A good plot and a good villain should not rely on some part of a particular game system to work. As has often been noted, especially for super hero adventures, the GM should tweak the villians to matchup with his player's characters.

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Pretty Hate Machines
por William W. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 02/07/12 19:04:27
A fun, over -the-top adventure for the HERO system featuring a cast of villains that would make great recurring nemeses. The crumpled-paper background image makes the text a little difficult to read, but overall it's a great product.

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Terracide
por Ray L. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 02/02/12 21:15:31
Overall:
I found Terracide a generally well thought-out campaign setting, both comprehensive and a fun read in many parts. The setting is compelling and for the most part realistic (IMO surprisingly so for an RPG).

The book is well-organized and laid out, with sections on the timeline and the worlds of Terracide; human organizations; alien races; life in the 24th century; character creation and some sample characters; equipment (including weapons and armor); spacecraft (with rules for designing them as well as some sample vehicles); combat (personal and vehicular); Marathon Free Station (a potential location for a Terracide campaign); and a GM’s Vault for privileged information. Appendices include a glossary, reading / resource list, and a sample listing of spacecraft names.

Pros:
The setting (worlds, alien races, organizations, and so on) has variety and depth. Each of the seven alien races is very different not only from humans but from each other. The 21 organizations described (government, corporate, criminal, and otherwise) give the GM plenty of material for creating adventure plots, as well as ways to assist or hinder the player characters.

Characters can be easily individualized with many templates for altered genetics, background, education, time in the military / government / criminal enterprises as well as various occupations -- although playing actual aliens isn’t an option. The ten sample characters illustrate Powerful Heroic-level characters that might be typical for a Terracide campaign, and can be easily used as allies or foes for the player characters.

Realism seems the watchword in Terracide. Space-traversing characters have to worry about things like g-forces, spin-gravity, and the like. (This book includes penalties and other info on combat in spin-gravity, as well as martial arts for use in zero-gee and spin-gravity.) Space isn’t just a minor background detail in Terracide but is instead something the players will have to take into account in many things their characters do.

Cons:
If characters are expected to purchase new / replacement equipment and ammunition throughout a Terracide campaign, some cost guidelines would have been useful. Actually, money seems generally ignored throughout Terracide, except in a discussion on the Economics of FTL Travel or as background flavor. This despite the Money perk being included in various character Templates.

With the frequent mention of alien technology throughout Terracide, I found the lack of examples of alien technology a distinct oversight. While each race’s writeup mentions the type(s) of tech that race specializes in, some specific examples in the GM’s Vault would have been nice.

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Terracide
por Harry R. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 01/05/12 08:45:19
(The following is my OPINION & all relevant disclaimers apply, I do not believe I am misrepresenting the product, but if I am it's not intentional.)

THE STUPID IT BURNS!!!

No, Really.

This product looks good on the surface (i.e. Blurb/Product Description) but, In My Arrogant Opinion (if it was Humble I wouldn't be posting it here would I), falls over somewhat in the execution.

Some of the things I have issues with are:
1) The use of chemically powered ("ElectroThermal-Chemical" & Rocket/Gyrojet) projectile weapons when electromagnetically (Gauss/Railgun) propelled slugthrowers are available, with the latter presumably dropping fewer contaminants into the closed air systems of the Ships, Stations, & Habitats, that are all humanity has left to live with. Also *Fire* is generally going to be considered _A Bad Thing_ in the sorts of environments humanity is left with in a galaxy where we haven't got any other planets habitable by the majority of the baseline & modified human populations.

2) I can't see why those building space colonies, especially in other star systems, would build temporary accomodations into an available asteroid, presumably one with a useful mineral composition, so they can build a completely artificial habitat that is inherently less robust, more expensive, & probably smaller (maybe use a smaller asteroid while you start work on a larger one, or move it into the desired orbit or something).

3) Excerpted from page 6: "Aliens are not like us. They aren’t even remotely humanoid in appearance, didn’t evolve on Earth-like worlds, don’t breathe oxygen, and most don’t have spoken languages. Dealing with them successfully requires specialized knowledge."
Excerpted from pages 36 & 37: "There have been reports of Terran VI systems ‘reverse engineered’ by the Cytherians and sold to other species which have difficulty working with these fast-thinking aliens, which has led some to question their ethics on the subject of intellectual property laws."
Umm... What?
Nowhere is it stated or implied that the Cytherians (one of the Alien races) are bound by treaty or contract to respect Intellectual Property laws of Human origin or interpretation, & since the whole concept of "Intellectual Property" is a moderately recent (last 2 or 3 hundred years I think?) legal fabrication officially intended to encourage creativity, & sharing of the results thereof, by providing the creative with renumeration & recompense they wouldn't otherwise recieve, this is, for me, a MAJOR kick in the "Willing Suspension of Disbelief". (I would also note that Humans routinely engage in "reverse engineering", both in Real-Life, & as major background element of the setting, but there is no suggestion that it indicates humanity in general is abnormally unethical).

4) The editing (as discrete from the proof-reading which is great) also leaves something to be desired, specifically the author keeps change tense & apparently which time period is being referred to, from chapter to chapter (or possibly from section to section, I was a little to busy venting into a chatroom to actually track it specifically).

The rest of what I dislike about the product is all about choices I would have made differently, or views I don't have in common with the author, & thus does not (again IMAO) deserve mention here.

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The Wreck Of Alpha Central
por Tim L. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 11/27/11 07:57:49
There are good writers, and then there are great writers. Lizard is a great writer, his setting overflows with playable ideas, creative kick-starters (triggers I call them) and engaging discription. The classic SF genre trope of a world city when it gets wrecked -- think Star Wars Episode III and the Imperial planet city cut off and the lights go out -- gets a thoughough workout here with logical extensions of what would happen and some things that aren't logical but wonderfully bizaare you would never think of (the way the energy is kept shut off is both plot point, source of intelligent traps, and big bad wolf to defeat or work with). Although written for HERO system, the background itself is nearly systemless (only a few statblocks here and there) so can be used in any setting. Highly, highly recommended.

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Unkindness (ICONS, HERO)
por Thomas B. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 09/15/10 17:47:28
The Good: Unkindness does provide a very interesting new villain, with a complete adventure AND twenty four additional plot seeds to use with the villain after the adventure is finished.

The Bad: If you are buying this for ICONS, the ICONS part of it feels like an afterthought. I know it is a lighter system than Hero is, but the ICONS support comes entirely in stat blocks. In parts where skills are discussed in the adventure, Hero Knowledge Skills are mentioned, but Specialties in ICONS are ignored, etc. The art is inconsistent as the cover art is...not great...but some of the interior art (especially the Raven King) looks wicked.

Conclusion: For a Hero adventure? Great buy. For an ICONS adventure? Eh, maybe, and that's the perspective I'm looking at this from.

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The Fires of War (M&M)
por Ethan P. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/08/10 17:15:10
We reviewed this product back in Gamer's Haven Episode 40 – Gender Roles in Gaming (aka the obligitory Women in Gaming Episode), which you can listen to here ... http://www.gamershavenpodcast.com/?p=254!

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The Algernon Files 2.0 (M&M)
por Ethan P. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/08/10 17:14:58
We reviewed this product back in Gamer's Haven Episode 40 – Gender Roles in Gaming (aka the obligitory Women in Gaming Episode), which you can listen to here ... http://www.gamershavenpodcast.com/?p=254!

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Kazei 5 (HERO System)
por Frank M. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 03/26/10 19:58:15
I recently purchased Kazei 5 for a couple of reasons. I’m a hero system player and aspiring GM but don’t really have the skill in the system to work out the true crunch of the system – so I need a framework to hang things off of.

Secondly, with the new Hero 6th edition I don’t want to go through and try to convert things from 5th ed.

Finally, I’m a little tired of the generic fantasy settings and wanted something more modern.

Kazei 5 works on all of these and does so very well. Considering that the book has been created more by fans and freelancers as opposed to a company of paid staff, the professionalism of the book is even more impressive.

I have the bookmarked PDF version through choice – I live in an isolated area and prefer to receive things quickly rather than waiting a week. I also like the ability to search for text. But a hardcopy version is available for those that prefer.

After the introduction, which explains a few of the setting assumptions and concepts, the book goes into specifics concerning many of the powers and abilities that will effect characters; namely Cyberware, Cyborgs, Cyberspace, Espers and Mecha. While I consider cyberware and cyborgs merely an extension of the same thing, this is probably going to be a major part of the game so extra coverage is justified. The cyberspace rules could use a little work in my opinion but are innovative in approaching what could be a problematic rules area.

The book also explains that you can remove any or all of these concepts and the system still works. In my campaign, since I’m not a big fan of Mecha, my plan is to change (nerf) it to more powered armor rather than giant robots.

The real meat of the book comes next where it talks about character options, how skills can be customised, etc. It then goes into specialist equipment characters (and NPCs) can have. It uses the system described in the Hero book Dark Champions and it is very useful to have access to that as the list provided in Kazei 5 is not comprehensive and even suggests that Dark Champions supplement this. However, the equipment that is included is definitely well thought out.

The next section, also very meaty, contains details of the future timeline for Kazei 5 as well as details of what has happened on each continent. It does include a great deal of detail on what has happened in the US and South East Asia – Japan and China specifically but there is plenty of scope for a GM to set campaigns elsewhere. Indeed, I plan on setting my own game in Melbourne, Australia. This is my favourite section of the book and I can’t help thinking perhaps it should have been earlier in the book which would have helped me make sense of some of the things that came before. Still, this is a minor quibble and doesn’t really detract from the book itself.

Finally there are some NPCs which help expand the US and SEA sections of the world as well as providing me the vital templates I’ll need to fashion my own NPCs. As well there is a GM only section which reveals many of the secrets of the campaign as well as a ‘future timeline’, a feature I haven’t seen before but I find very useful and intriguing.

All and all, Kazei 5 is an excellent book for anyone who wants to start or play in a cyberpunk, anime or even a futuristic Dark Champions setting. The permutations are somewhat endless – the concepts of zero zones could be expanded into a post apocalyptic campaign. For myself, I’m not terribly keen on the anime elements like ‘cat girls’, but they are easily edited out without getting rid of other game elements. It’s given me pretty much everything I want.

4 out of 5

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The Algernon Files 2.0 (M&M)
por Chris H. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 02/27/09 00:14:29
I Look forward to uses this book in my game i know BlackWyrm games is a good comp and look froward to this item

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Gestalt: The Hero Within (HERO)
por Gordon F. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 12/01/07 09:46:29
The Upside:

Gestalt: The Hero Within is a Superheroic Setting using the Hero System. The setting evolved from years of actual games, which means the concept of the setting works well in a game.

Two capture the idea of the setting the book opens with a monologue from a Gestalt. In short Gestalts are the embodiment of ideas from the collective human subconscious. The ideas is simple, elegant and an excellent basis for a campaign that wants to explore more than Good Guy vs Bad Guy.

Chapter One - Campaign Basics. Starting with the basic idea of what the campaign is and isn't, and introducing the idea of Gestalts, the superhuman template of the setting. This chapter serves as the introduction to the setting.

Chapter Two - Character Creation. First things first, the book goes into the type of character the setting embodies. Each character has to pick an archetype, or the kind of Idea they want to embody in play. Though sometimes Players like to go and do something else, the setting does have room for a few different kinds of Origins, several of them are directly related to the Gestalt Idea. Then the chapter does what is probably my biggest complaint regarding this book (not the Setting, but how it's presented) - it provides ways to get around Superhuman Origins Not Present In Gestalt. To even present the ideas seems counter productive to the intent of the setting completely. As long as you're going to play a setting play it as intended or find another setting, but built in rules to ruin the feel is just a bad move.

Along with picking an Archetype, Gestalt characters are goal focused, this can become a major part of playing an Idea Made Real. Power Level is another aspect of the Gestalt game that is different from your average game. The point levels will be familiar to Hero Gamers, but each Power Level has a defined set of parameters and restrictions they work within. From Novice to Beyond (PCs are advised they should play Experienced, Respected or World-Beater depending on the game focus). To get to a higher level (and thus more raw power) requires point expenditure. This has the advantage of having the GM keep the game at certain levels and within certain parameters, characters won't get too far apart in major combat abilities. The down side is natural growth can be stunted, or characters may all start to homogenize as they max out their abilities levels. To help solve some of this Niches are introduced - Niches allow a character to fulfill a specific specialized role (the classic archetypes such as Brick, Speedster, etc) and exceed the parameters in one area while restricting themselves in another.

A new Skill is introduced Gestalt Control, where a Player is allowed to alter plot elements based on concept and a skill roll - it's a very metagame construct. Gestalt Immortality is a new Power for the setting, for those Gestalts that can't be truly killed except in a very specific way. A Variant on Luck for Gestalt is introduced, creating another metagame mechanic (though this one less intrusive that Gestalt Control and a moderately common use of the Luck Power in Hero).

Technology in Gestalt-Earth gets some mention, how it interacts, works and to what levels it exists. Gestalt Family Powers is a very cool concept, for Gestalts of the same (or similar) types they have a chance to influence each others abilities (transferring power for example) to some extent through a contest of wills. Disadvantages is also talked about since a very important part of a Gestalt is the drive behind the character - the over riding need of the Idea being represented, Disadvantages model some of the aspects of a Gestalt that are rigid or can be used against them in their unwavering need to follow their concept.

Chapter Three - History Of Gestalt-Earth. This is a history of Gestalt-Earth from the very first Gestalt in nineteen-eighty nine to roughly the present day. It touches on major events in the Gestalt perspective and alters quite a bit of Real World History to suit the game setting. The side bars are full of extra tidbits, and text boxes cover some things in more detail.

While not really required reading for players, it would be advised that they at least be familiar with major events. The history is thorough, with plenty of holes for an enterprising GM to drop his own tidbits into it to customize a campaign.

Chapter Four - Background Characters Of Gestalt-Earth. The is the NPC chapter, with descriptions of many of the major villains and heros of Gestalt-Earth. It starts with a note on PCs however, letting you know that the game should focus on the PCs, but not always make them the center of the game world. They live in a big place full of other superheroes after all.

Arch-Villains are up first. Starting with the worst of the worst we have a host of the truly evil to choose from. From those who want to control the Earth, to those that just want to destroy it outright. Major VIllains provides some bad guys of lower caliber, and sometimes lower ambitions. Minor Villains moves further down the chain to people who are, for the most part, simply criminals.

A good range of Villains are presented, write-ups for many of them are later in the book which is good. This section provides just descriptions of villains, making it easy to simply create them for your system of choice if you don't play Hero.

Along with Villains are the Heroes. Starting with America's Finest we cover those Gestalt's that cover the entire nation (or planet). After that major US cities are covered in more detail providing mostly names of Gestalt's in each city for Players to interact with. From major to minor Gestalts.

Adversaries INC covers those who aren't all bad, and aren't all good either. Some are neutral or have agendas that cause them to cross back and forth - just like in the real world - between doing a lot of good and a lot of harm.

Also in this chapter are some notes on other Gestalt related aspects of the world. Gestalt Events are odd happenings not connected to a Gestalt, but are still connected to their point of origin (the Gestalt Dimension) in some way. A note on Lost Worlds is made - there are none in this game. There are Fantasyscapes, which are connected to the Gestalt Dimension which can fit the purpose should a GM need on.

Gestalts Around The World covers NPCs on the rest of the planet. Covering just about every major country and region on the planet you get even more NPCs to work with should you want to go globe trotting, or simply provide some information on what's happening outside the PCs immediate influence. It helps make Gestalt-Earth truly filled out with superhumans.

Chapter Five - Sample Gestalt Archetypes. This chapter belongs with Character Write-Ups really, but it ranks as one of the most useful chapters for setting up a Gestalt-Character. This is a number of Gestalt types with a description and a Package Deal for the Hero System. A wide range of Archetypes are covered from Acting to the combat oriented Mythical Warrior. A wide range is given, not just focusing on types that you might find PCs playing in a game (after all, a Food Gestalt may not make a great PC). This is very good because you get to see that Gestalts cover all of human interest, and it can help the GM put together a variety of NPCs for different kinds of scenarios. Each Archetype also has a plot hook or three associated with it to kick start the imagination.

The only complain here is that it is smack in the middle of basically Campaign Background chapters. The chapter seems oddly out of place for what it is providing.

Chapter Six - Extraterrestrials. There's more than just Earth out there. Not a lot more, but enough to make things interesting. The history of Gestalt-Earth's extraterrestrials is short, but useful for lots of stories. The Ar are divided into three sub-cultures and are directly related to Humans, in fact they're transplanted humans from eight thousand years ago. They are joined in outer space by the wholly alien Fndnti and Eiko. The first technologically superior to just about everyone and keep to themselves. The Eiko are a classic evil alien race, though not quite bent on conquest but they do see humans as offensive and are planning to wage war on them.

Chapter Seven - The Gestalt Dimension. At the heart of the Gestalt idea is the Gestalt Dimension. This is the physical representation of the Human Subconscious, populated by it's own host of strange things. This is the origin story of every Gestalt. It has it's own rules that it operates under, this is a good example of using the Hero System in a different manner to get a specific effect. A Fantasyscape is a pocket in the Gestalt Dimension that acts out or embodies human dreams of some kind, such as a Fantasyscape of Faery tales.

The whole idea behind the Gestalt game is really embodied in this chapter, taking the human psyche and giving it a physical outlet. The idea is so simple and elegant in execution it's hard not to like it.

Chapter Eight - Everyday Life In Gestalt-Earth. This chapter covers most aspects of the rest of the setting. Attitudes towards Superbeings, both in general and from the point of view of specific entities. Technology and where it has advanced and where it is roughly the same as the Real World. Including Gestalt Prisons and technology advanced by Gestalt scientists and such. And a host of mundane things and how Gestalts have affected them (like media, space exploration and religion). One really cool part of this chapter is the section on Gestalt Slang, a big list of words and terms you can use to add a lot of color to a game.

Chapter Nine - Character Write-Ups. This chapter starts with some information on how to handle NPCs in a game world full of them, as well guidelines for integrating the PCs into this world. Then it goes into write-ups of many of the major NPCs from Chapter Four. These are the ones PCs are most likely to interact with. A wide range of Archetypes are provided, so we get to see how various Gestalts are fully fleshed out and not just those that are more adventure or combat oriented would look. Both Villains and Heros are provided. Also detailed here, and talked about in earlier chapters, are the Leviathans, which can be thought of as Anti-Gestalts as they exist to do one thing, find and kill Gestalts. They make good continuous opponents.

Chapter Ten - Campaign Secrets. This is the behind the scenes look at Gestalt-Earth. Detailing all the plots brought up earlier in the book. Who is doing what, why, when and how. Along with a nice "Why haven't they conquered the world yet" text box covering all the major villains and why they haven't actually succeeded.

Chapter Eleven - Campaigning. This is general advice on setting up and running a Gestalt Campaign. From variant campaign ideas, focusing on the play between Gestalt Need and Human Need. And of course it touches on how to use Gestalts without a Gestalt Campaign, because as the book pointed out Gamers can be contrary. This chapter contains some good overall advice for any GM, not just ones running Gestalt and is a good chunk of information.

Chapter Twelve - Adventures. This is two adventures for a Gestalt Campaign. The first is a good introductory adventure to get the PCs involved in the game world. The second is intended as a more ongoing scenario, a little less linear and good for incorporating into a full campaign.

Chapter Thirteen - Scenario Seeds. This is a big collection of plot hooks and adventure ideas you can use in a Gestalt Campaign. From one off adventures, to campaign seeds, interludes, ongoing scenarios. It's all here. These are taken from various points in the middle of the book which is peppered with scenario ideas in the side bars. Having them all organized in one spot is a helpful feature for the over worked GM.

The Downside:

As I said before, the one sticking point to this as a sourcebook is that it provides too many ways to sidestep and get out of the concept behind the Setting. This is, in my opinion, a massive mistake. If you don't want to buy into a setting don't play it. And any enterprising gamer can adapt just about anything to their needs - officially provided ideas do too much to subvert the presented material.

As an aside Blackwyrm Games provides a PDF Download for Players which has a really good section on actual creating a Character for a Gestalt Game, this should be in the main book. As is it kind of feels like they said "oh, and you can play too" by doing that. If space was a concern then I would suggest cutting out How The GM Did It explanation of setting up a Campaign that is the last half of the Chapter Eleven.

The Otherside:

The setting is both unique and interesting. In fact it's probably the best superheroic setting I've encountered, it really grabs the idea of what it means to be More and focuses on the concepts behind our heroes and villains.

The book is thick and full of information. This is a completely fleshed out setting and presented almost completely without System Information. It's good for anyone wanting something a little different from a superhero campaign.

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The Fires of War (HERO)
por David G. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 07/31/07 00:00:00
Another great product from the people that brought you the Algernon Files! I loved that some of the characters in this book are also included in the Algernon Files (but much more experienced) it gave a real sense of history and a continuation of the campaign timeline, and gave me some great ideas for developing my own NPC's in my own campaign. As in the Algernon Files the characters do not share pages, making them easy to print out individually for filling. The art was great, and in colour (a rarity for HERO products). I wish all products were this much fun to read!


LIKED: Accessability. Timeline building. Fantastic product!

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


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