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Enemies of NeoExodus: Lucia Krille (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/13/2018 05:59:13

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Enemies of NeoExodus-series clocks in at 7 pages, 1 page front cover, 1page SRD, ½ a page advertisement, leaving us with 4.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Lucia Krille’s story is one that is told behind the scenes of the legends of our games a vast multitude of times – the tale of mediocrity as a thief, whose life was changed in one single moment, one that ended up changing towards one life of exceptional peculiarities with one opportunity, when a package she stole burst into magical flames, changing her…and allowing her to turn her skin to granite, granting her limited self-healing as well as DR, natural armor etc. – to become a being of living stone. Thus, her base CR 4 stats do not make use of classic level-structures and instead follow a design paradigm closer to the creation of monsters, though grounded in standard NPC design. This makes reverse-engineering of the statblock rather difficult, with e.g. her initiative of +6 seeming to contain a +3 inherent bonus – at least, that’s the only explanation I could find. Similarly, her Ref-save is really high (+11) for her HD and seem to have a similar bonus featured in her stats (good save +5, +3 Dex…which means that +3 is unaccounted for re items, feats, etc.) – while personally, I don’t mind this, it’s something that a few of my readers want to know about, so yeah.

From this set of stats, we further follow her story, as Lucia became jailed by the alchemist Mikando Moor, only escaping after the lab burst into flames, consuming her benefactor-turned-captor. This hardened her, obviously. Odd, though: her Ref-save actually gets worse with no apparent reason for that in the following iteration. That being said, regarding saves, CMB etc., the values and attributes simply don’t line up – there are some glitches here. On the plus-side, I love how she has gained new abilities, like seeing through smoke and cinder – it makes for a cool progression mirrored in her abilities.

As she continued work as an enforcer/secret weapon of crime lords, her use of powers began to increase the changes within her, slowly granting her more powers, including elemental abilities in her CR 11 iteration. Finally, she makes, at CR 16, the transition into an ever-changing, potent elemental creature.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting on a formal level, are very good. On a rules-relevant level, the statblocks unfortunately sport glitches, which, in spite of the creation mechanics being a bit opaque, becomes evident when comparing the different iterations. Layout adheres to LPJ Design’s gorgeous 2-column full-color standard for NeoExodus files. The artwork of Lucia is amazing. The pdf has basic bookmarks, in spite of its brevity. Kudos!

Neal Litherland’s Lucia Krille is, idea-wise and ability-wise, a really cool NPC/adversary/foil. I really like the progression of Lucia, which makes using her as a recurring character with evolving abilities rewarding. Similarly, I enjoy the unique signature abilities she sports. At the same time, however, the builds do suffer from some obvious errors – I can live with inherent bonuses here and there, but once some basic stats don’t line up, things become a bit troubling. That being said, while not perfect, the pdf is inexpensive and may well provide a worthwhile adversary to challenge your PCs. Provided you are not as picky as I am regarding these things, you’ll get a nice adversary. My final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, though I cannot round up for Mrs. Krille.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Enemies of NeoExodus: Lucia Krille (PFRPG)
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Adventure Path Iconics: Path of Kings (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/27/2018 04:09:30

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Adventure Path Iconics-series clocks in at 19 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 17 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Now, first things first: The respective NPCs are made with a 20-pt.-buy option in mind, but we get scaling notes for both 15 and 25 pt. buy campaigns. However, no other notes for the generation process are provided – instead, we dive right into the respective pregens. The characters have all been created with the Kingmaker AP in mind, but may be used, obviously, just as well in other contexts.

Now, as a plus, each of the characters comes with notes for further advancement at higher levels. Annoyingly, spell-references there, if any, are incorrectly formatted – they are capitalized and not italicized in the advancement notes of the pdf, which is a pretty basic snafu. Plus-side: Special abilities are reprinted, if any. Each of the characters also comes with roleplaying notes as guidance for the players, a sample quote and a nice, full-color mugshot.

The first character herein would be Davor the Loresteeped, a half-orc wizard with a bonded object, who had a tough time growing up due to an absentee father. His mom did her best to raise him, though, and he did complete his apprenticeship. That’s pretty much the extent of the story here. Minor aesthetic complaint: There are two superfluous line-breaks in the AC-section – alas, not the only such glitch: The elven fighter Faunra has “CG alignment medium humanoid” in her header line; there usually is no “alignment” word here. This would also be a good moment to note that her atk-values for weapons in her statblock are absent; while it’s easy enough to discern them, it’s annoying. It should also be noted that she is carrying medium load for her Strength score, which is not reflected in her movement rate, an oversight that can be found with quite a few characters herein – it’s an uncommon choice and would be more player-friendly if it was noted somehow.

Beyond her, we get a human bard (Felix) and a dwarf barbarian (Gegig) – none of these characters come with archetypes or the like. In Gegig’s case, it’s a bit sad to see that no premade rage-modifications have been supplied as supplemental material. Gegig is also referred to incorrectly as “she” in the fast movement and rage sections.

The NeoExodus-specific races that make up the next 4 pregens, alas, fare no better: Gryn Ogyn, a prymidian ranger, is lacking CMB and CMD stats, and with Dex 16 and Improved Initiative, he should have initiative +7, not +5…and that is before the reactionary trait (which A LOT of characters herein have…without that choice making much sense). Rangi the half-giant paladin sports a similar glitch, and one of the traits and the background mentions Torag, which I’m pretty sure is an infringement on Paizo IP. He also lacks a couple of racial traits. There would also be a Sasori rogue and a p’tan cleric to complement the pregen array.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting, alas, are not up to the standards we require, particularly for pregens. On a formal level, minor oversights and glitches can be excused, but as soon as they start to seriously compromise the rules, things become problematic. Layout adheres toa nice 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. We also get a second, more printer-friendly version.

I’m sorry to say this, but I cannot recommend Gabriel Jewell’s pregens for Kingmaker. The characters sport several really nasty hiccups in the statblocks, which is baffling, considering the relative simplicity of the builds – no archetypes, no uncommon choices. The background stories are also painfully vanilla as far as I’m concerned. Finally, the pdf had a real chance with Kingmaker’s subsystems: The pdf could have noted preferred roles later, etc. Nothing. This pdf is really rushed and rather unimpressive. Compared to Legendary Games’ pregens, I can’t really find a reason to get this. I am honestly sorry, but my final verdict will be 1.5 stars, rounded up due to the nice mugshot artworks. Content-wise, I couldn’t find anything nice to say.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Path Iconics: Path of Kings (PFRPG)
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Page Portfolio 009: Bloody Mess Background
by Cody B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/19/2017 19:07:24

thought it would be images i can drop into the background but its acrually full pages. they do look good though!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Page Portfolio 009: Bloody Mess Background
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Infinite Space: Themes: The Outlaw Crew (SFRPG)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/06/2017 19:37:29

The themes provided by LPJ for Starfinder made me decide to allow all of my characters to take second Themes for their characters. Here are Themes missing from the original Starfinder offering. No matter how good your Mystic is, having a Doctor in the party is essential. And being an Envoy with the Captain Theme makes much more sense to command a starship.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Space: Themes: The Outlaw Crew (SFRPG)
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Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 4 - The Clockwork Catastrophe (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/04/2017 03:51:11

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The fourth level of The Halls of the Eternal Moment clocks in at 19 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, leaving us with 14 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

As always, we begin with notes on the general property of the dungeon’s level – walls, light, etc. After level 3’s relatively tame treatment of PCs, the fourth level is back to the attrition tactics – 40% chance of being attacked, per hour. OUCH. Now here’s a mind-bender: Once the alarm is triggered, the dungeon RAW becomes easier – the ambushing default encounter is replaced with a reactivation of dormant constructs, which are finite. One note: The statblocks provided for these encounters sport some glitches: Formatting (bolding inconsistent) and also ones that influence the rules. On the plus-side, a total of 6 ghostly phenomena (harmless dressing to enhance atmosphere) is provided.

Utterly puzzling: Remember how level 3 had temporal anomaly effects? Well, they’re gone once more, in spite of level 4 being lower. I don’t get it.

All righty, let’s take a look at the content, shall we? From here on out, the SPOILERS reign – potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

Okay, just GMs around? Great! So, the basic premise is that the dwarven engineer Talpidae tried to dig into the dungeon with a massive clockwork contraption. That did not go well, as the title very much implied. The catastrophe killed the crew, who now haunt these halls – they are a persistent threat…and strangely, once alarm has been triggered, they vanish. Instead, clockwork laborers and archers animate…and indeed, the pdf does employ the theme of temporal twists a bit: There are rooms stuck in time, for example. Downside: As mentioned before, the mechanical aspects fall a bit by the wayside and no, there are no puzzles that employ this angle. The PCs can’t prevent the catastrophe or influence it.

On the plus-side, while the AMAZING potential of the premise isn’t used fully, there are some nice hazards and pieces of the engine that are still operational…and lethal. Down-side: Their damage type hasn’t been properly codified. That being said, the mole machine is really interesting: Its mobility is limited and it behaves mostly like an amazing hazard – smart PCs can have a BLAST here, while those foolhardy may well end up being blasted to shreds. Defeating it is HARD, but incredibly satisfying, making this the highlight of all levels released so far. In fact, the cool encounter against the machine single-handedly improves the rating this pdf would have received. On the downside, a visual representation would have helped, big time, picturing this threat.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are okay – there are a couple of glitches that should have been caught, including several that influence the rules-integrity of the content herein. Layout adheres to a nice 2-column full-color standard. The pdf’s artwork is stock and has nothing to do with the module. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Cartography, as in the whole series, is very rudimentary and somewhat inconsiderate – while we get a key-less version, secret doors etc. are not either version and they are not redacted.

Jeff Lee, Michael McCarthy, Rich Redman and Louis Porter Jr.,’s fourth dungeon-level does a lot of things right: The leitmotif of the dungeon does tangentially influence the proceedings. The level itself is, theme-wise, interesting. The boss fight is creative and phenomenal. In fact, this has the makings of a good, even a very good, dungeon-level. But it feels like interest was lost at one point – one careful pass to fix the issues and slightly streamline the aspects that, mechanically, are rough around the edges, and this could have scored higher. But as much as I like the boss, from the lack of global effects to the minor inconsistencies, the hiccups accumulate and tarnish what would be an easy 5 star + seal module, had it received a bit more care in realizing the evocative, cool premise of both dungeon and level. In the end, I can’t go higher than 3.5 stars, rounded down for this – it is VERY rough around the edges and needs some work by the GM to shine, but concept-wise, it does have its definite strengths.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 4 - The Clockwork Catastrophe (PFRPG)
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Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 3 - The Clairvoyant Halls (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/03/2017 04:22:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The third level of the Halls of the Eternal Moment clocks in at 15 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 12 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, as in the levels before, we get a concise summary of the properties of the dungeon regarding its walls, lighting etc. However, we do get a cool unique dungeon feature – within these walls, you can find columns made of skulls – and inside the skulls are eyeballs that twitch, unless they are actually observing someone – in which case they become eerily still and staring. Oh, and guess what: The theme of the dungeon FINALLY comes into play. While the header of “Temporal Fluctuation” has not been properly formatted, there is a 1 in 8 chance per room (same for random encounters, 3 are provided) that a fluctuation begins: A total of 5 entries can be found - +1 initiative, -1 atk and Ref-saves (this one, annoyingly, makes up 2 entries in a 5-entry-table – why duplicate them??), -4 to Perception and +4 to critical confirmation rolls. …yeah, I kinda expected something cooler as well.

Anyways, as the write-ups of the monsters show, there is a leitmotif here – namely sight or lack thereof – the undead are beheaded and blind and isitoqs are included as well.

…and that is as far as I can go without delving into major SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, only GMs around? Great! So, first of all: After two levels sans a unique boss, guess what we get? Bingo, a cool and actually really creepy villain, namely Illquis of the Thousand Eyes, a nasty derro necromancer. While the statblock isn’t perfect, it’s good enough for most…and the derro can actually see through the ocular columns throughout the level, as per clairvoyance (nor properly italicized). This allows an even halfway competent GM to instill a surprising sense of paranoia and eerie creepiness. The resting restrictions of the previous levels, just fyi, are gone…and indeed, paradoxically, the level may actually end up being easier on the PCs than previous ones: For one, the necromancer creates headless zombies, beheaded and isitoqs as primary minions – all of which have in common that their CR is really low. Similarly, even blind beheaded swarms may be taken out with relative ease. While a gray ooze makes for a nasty challenge, the primary combat antagonist here is clearly the derro.

That being said, the traps featured this time around are significantly more interesting than those on the last level, with a vertigo trap or a charnel pit that has been granted limited, churning animation – particularly the latter represents the strongest trap in the series so far. More so than the mechanical challenges, this level excels beyond level 1 or 2 in the respective rooms – “The walls and ceiling of this room are festooned with braids, ropes and nets, all clumsily woven from what appears to be humanoid hair. The room’s two doors are decorated with wreaths crafted of the same material.“ That is CREEPY. The whole level, with its theme and leitmotif, manages to instill a more unique and interesting atmosphere.

Now, as for the maps – they are still bare-bones; player maps have not had secret rooms redacted and GM maps lack the secret room notes. Similarly, the lack of most terrain features, even in icon form, on the maps means that a GM has to do some work on them. This is not a go-play module.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re good, but weaker than in previous installments – I noticed a couple of minor hiccups, some pertaining rules-relevant material. Layout adheres to the nice two-column full-color standard of the series. Artwork is stock and has nothing to do with the material herein. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The cartography still remains a big downside of this series.

Jeff Lee, with additional writing by Michael McCarthy, Rich Redman and Louis Porter Jr., finally delivers on the promise of this complex, at least in part. While I wasn’t exactly blown away by the temporal effects, they at least provide a unique descriptive angle for the GM. The fully statted boss and the leitmotif of this level are the stars, though: While mechanically less challenging than the wars of attrition that were level #1 and #2, this level feels, paradoxically, rather tame – particularly when considering level #1’s at times hyper-deadly traps. Mechanically, this is not the most impressive level herein.

However, it’s the first level that reaches the level of originality and flavor I expected from the series: The writing, always a strong suit for the series, is tight in this one; the flavorful rooms and creatures encountered are unique and horrifying and the paranoia an even moderately competent GM should be able to elicit here is just FUN.

While surprisingly easy (apart from the boss), the dungeon level is interesting, flavorful and cool. That being said, editing isn’t as tight here and, as mentioned an abundant number of times, the maps are puzzling in how inconsiderate they are. Still, the writing and unique theme of this level make it worthwhile – though the formal hiccups, alas, make it impossible for me to round up from my final verdict of 3.5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 3 - The Clairvoyant Halls (PFRPG)
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Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 2 - The Rattling Crypt (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/02/2017 04:20:07

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second level of the Halls of the Eternal Moment clocks in at 17 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page of SRD, leaving us with 14 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, we begin this installment with a brief summary of the opposition and a nice d20-dressing table that sports descriptive hooks and concrete items, for a total of 40 entries – nice and adds a sense of consistency to the level and the adversaries – kudos there!

As before, we get helpful information on floors, walls…and slender pillars, which almost take up a square – destroying these can cause a ceiling to collapse (Okay, how much squares? The whole room? Whole dungeon?) and in some cases, they are connected by iron chains. Both these and decorative copper chains mentioned come with proper stats – so as far as general features goes, this is a step up from level 1.

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, only GMs around? Great! If the name of this level wasn’t ample clue – undead would be the leitmotif of this level of the Halls of the Eternal Moment…and they are organized. Under the leadership of the ghast Benivuul and his ghoul lackeys, the roaming skeletons and zombies make for a persistent and dangerous threat. Camping is impossible, with each hour and each campaign attempt resulting in a random encounter – on the plus-side, this level can actually be emptied of the scouring undead, though leaving for too long sees other things move in…Nice: the nature of this second cadre is briefly discussed.

The level kicks off with a sliding staircase trap and foreboding graffiti can be found throughout the level, adding a special sense of gravitas to the whole proceedings. Trapped, evil altars and concealment-granting cob-webbed sheets and an evil altar used for undead creation, cacophonous traps – the undead in the level are keenly aware of the traps and make good use of this gauntlet, which plays significantly better than its vanilla premise would lead you to believe. While it’s a bit strange that room 22’s text refers back to room 22 for a patreon goal. Some passages/secret doors lead to patreon goal rooms and are not included in the pdf.

As a whole, I enjoyed this level more than the previous one – though personally, I would have made even more use of the slender pillars – they are a unique architectural feature that could have yielded some interesting additional options regarding 3D-combat, pits, etc. Their rules-language could be slightly more precise, but oh well. More significant: Apart from the traps, all adversaries herein are painfully vanilla – don’t expect archetype’d, templated or class level’d foes herein – standard critters.

Speaking of which: If you hoped, like I did, that the temporal angle and the potential for cool shenanigans with undead (like in several OSR modules) and traps, I’ll have to disappoint you – the leitmotif of the dungeon remains a backdrop at best.

Now the maps, while still very bare-bones, do sport icons for the pillars, which is nice. Icons for altars etc. are also provided and while the maps are anything but nice to look at, they are a bit better than those in level 1. Slightly annoying: Secret doors are not designated as such on the GM map and on the player’s map, they have not been redacted.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, I noticed no undue accumulation of glitches. Layout adheres to a really nice two-column full-color standard. Artwork is stock and has no relation to the material depicted herein. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks. Cartography, while still bare-bones and not up to the level of detail I’d like to see, particularly regarding player maps/VTT-capabilities, but they are a bit better than the ones for level 1.

Rich Redman, Jeff Lee, Michael McCarthy and Louis Porter Jr. have written a per se solid undead-level here. The chain/pillar motif is cool and I frankly wished the module did a bit more with it (swinging rooms! Crossing pits on chains! Immortal undead that need to be buried… (due to the temporal nature of the dungeon, one could explain reverting collapses…) There are so many cool ideas there that the module simply doesn’t use. The rattling crypt is creepy; it is deadly; it is well-written…and it is, as far as undead dungeons go, painfully vanilla. It’s deadly mainly due to the fact that you can’t properly rest, but a strategic group can empty the level – the boss is underwhelming and so are the enemies encountered. The module doesn’t make use of the cool dungeon-premise, but I expected that; what I did not expect was that it reduced its cool, evocative terrain features and leitmotif only to this extent – the pillars and themes here could have carried so much more.

Don’t get me wrong – the writing’s pretty good and the dungeon level is pretty nice…but at the same time, it falls short of the potential of both the dungeon and the level; the standard enemies and the less than impressive maps also don’t really help this module. If you’re looking for a solid undead-themed level, then this certainly does the job…but honestly, I know a lot of undead-themed dungeons and levels that may, in parts, have weaker writing, but more interesting mechanical components, better components to set them apart. As a whole, this is, to me, this was a rather weak and disappointing installment – not bad per se, but also weaker than level 1. My final verdict will clock in at 2.5 stars, rounded up by a margin due to the low price and in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 2 - The Rattling Crypt (PFRPG)
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Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 1 - The Overgrown (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/28/2017 04:40:31

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The first level of The Halls of the Eternal Moment clocks in at 17 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 13 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This level has been claimed as a home by the druid circle of the ages – and as such, we have a nature-theme on our hands here. The pdf notes walls, ceilings, etc. and also provides notes for wandering monsters, simulating a kind of organic and dynamic environment. Each of the rooms comes with read-aloud text, which can help GMs less confident in their improvisation skills.

So far, so good, so let’s go into SPOILER-territory. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All righty, only GMs around? Great! So, the monsters that constitute the major inhabitants would be leaf leshies, giant caterpillars and headless, fungal zombies held together by dark magics – somewhat annoying – their SQs etc. have not been reprinted in their statblock, meaning that you’ll have to look these up. Each of the rooms does have something to do – a skill to use, a hazard like poisonous vines. Specially planted trees that hamper movement and creative traps, including organic responses by the creatures herein make for an overall interesting dungeon – and a hard one. There are traps here that WILL insta-gib a PC – 6d6 smashing stones into which you may run due to being stricken with fear by a magic pool – this is not a dungeon for noobs.

Indeed, the lack of a maximum value of inhabitants in the monster-placement for cleared rooms etc. means that rest etc. can be a much sought-after commodity – and personally, I applaud that. I do not applaud the boss fight versus a spirit, who animates a fungus leshy, who governs the respawns of leshies – not because I don’t like the boss fight, but because the animating druid spirit is not really covered – killing the fungus leshy ends the influence of the spirit, which is weird to see in a game so steeped with ways to deal with spirits and the like.

Okay, admittedly, I’m stalling. You see, the main draw, to me, for the dungeon is its fluid, erratic time – I said as much in my review of the prologue. And yes, temporal weirdness can be found here. In the dressing. And as a justification for the critters showing up. Do you need temporal tricks to navigate a room? No. Do you get to solve time-based puzzles? No. Are there special ramifications for certain areas? No. The execution of the amazing leitmotif falls flat for me. The dungeon-level is wondrous, yes, but it does not come close to fulfilling the promising theme.

There is another aspect where the pdf does not reach the levels I hoped for: The map. While it comes with a keyless version and while it’s in color, it just shows the rooms. Secret doors are not redacted and neither terrain feature, not traps are noted on either map, making their use rather annoying – basically, you have to print them out and fill them in yourself. Don’t get me wrong – I don’t need gorgeous maps – but I’d like to at least have maps that note the basics.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good – I didn’t notice a big accumulation of glitches, but some formatting decisions/requirements to look things up are a bit questionable. Layout adheres to a really nice two-column full-color standard and the pdf sports solid stock artwork. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Cartography is worse than in pretty much every comparable dungeon, providing just blank and empty rooms – the work required here by the GM represents a serious comfort detriment.

Jeff Lee, Michael McCarthy, Rich Redman and Louis Porter Jr. have per se written a cool dungeon-level here. The leshy-theme is cool and hasn’t been done to death and the hazards and traps are deadly, challenging and fun. That being said, this pdf falters in the details – it is, most of all, inconvenient. You have to look a lot up; you have to basically fill in the maps to render them operational. One of the rooms notes “Don’t go down the Well” as a header and reference to Rappan Athuk – referencing a superior book may not have been the smartest move here. You see, the dungeon, let me make that abundantly clear, is NICE. The rooms are varied and interesting. At the same time, it is VERY inconvenient to use. I have had an easier time using OSR or 5e-dungeons in PFRPG than with this one, courtesy of a couple of really unfortunate decisions and the cartography being this incomplete. A wholly barebones dungeon. No chairs. No landmarks. No secret door “S”; no trees. I don’t get it and I have never seen anything like it, not even in really rudimentary DIY-supplements.

My disappointment regarding the unrealized temporal angle notwithstanding, this would be a worthwhile dungeon, were it not for these inconveniences. As written, I can’t go higher than 3 stars for it, stars earned solely earned by the good ideas that are herein and the quality of the writing. Let’s hope level 2 fares better…

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Dungeon: The Halls of the Eternal Moment Level 1 - The Overgrown (PFRPG)
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Infinite Space: Hazards: Stellar & Xenobiological (SFRPG)
by Erik K S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/25/2017 02:57:36

Very cool product! Sure, it's all of 6 pages but 5 of them are devoted to new hazards, nasty creatures and extraterrestial dangers to beware of. There's just enough detail there that any DM/GM can add whatever 'fluff' is needed to make new material a danger PCs will be MUCH more cautious about whenever they're investigating (fill in the blank). It doesn't matter whether the PCs in question are bioforms or constructs, there's some nastiness in here that will make everyone more than a LITTLE nervous, especially if they're near the presence of a corrosive cloud or a corrosive membrane. The cybernetic slime is bad news as well. I think they need a little more imagination in the naming department but otherwise, for a measly 1.49 credits, you can get this which has enough info to launch at least 2-7 adventures.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Infinite Space: Hazards: Stellar & Xenobiological (SFRPG)
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Haven: City of Bronze Campaign Setting
by Wesley F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/08/2017 05:13:45

Pros -Low price tag (~$2) -Great ideas for plot hooks, characters, and locations even if used out of this settings

Best Feature -Seven additional allegiances (Keep in mind a page and a half of information, however)

Cons -Vague Content information (You really don't know what you are buying) -Very poorly edited writing (poor grammar, sentence structuring, spelling, innapropriate use of slang)

Final Thoughts and Rating Overall this product should be at a mininum of a 4 star rating simply for the pricetag to content alone, depite the lack thereof. The primary issue of this product is the seemingly disregard for the english language. If it was an occasional typo or grammatical error it would be completely understandable. This is not the case and is an issue on nearly every single page. In my opinion this is not acceptable as it reflects the lack of effort put into the product regardless of the displeasure in the consumer. i will not be purchasing anymore products from this company.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Haven: City of Bronze Campaign Setting
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Image Portfolio 006 Fantasy Cityscape
by Dale M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/24/2017 14:39:48

This product I've had for a while and never reviewed (but should have). It is a solid collection of 21 b/w fantasy cityscapes (and 2 of that 21 in color). Previously, these were in PDF and extracting them was not always the best. As such, it was not extremely useful.

Recently, however, the publisher released these as TIFs. OMG is that SUPER HELPFUL!!! Now these are ready to use.

Thank you for doing so. I hope the rest of the series (oh which, I have many) are also released as TIFs as well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Image Portfolio 006 Fantasy Cityscape
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Crisis of the World Eater: The Collected Epic (PFRPG)
by Ron F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/16/2017 17:31:19

Crisis of the World Eater: The Collected Epic Review After reading this adventure I felt compelled to review it. I love my traditional fantasy, but I do get tired of it every now and then. Currently I play 5e, though I've played every thing from Basic to 4e and Pathfinder. I love my D&D.

I say all of that to give you a perspective of where I'm coming from. I was not aware of this product until about two months ago. It was a PF product which already had it Kickstarter and looked a little weird to me to be honest. On a whim, I decided to download the free prequel A Warning Too Late. I was blown away. The story was compelling, the layout looked nice, and the art was top notch. From that point I waited for the release of the main story.

I was not disappointed. The whole campaign is as good if not better than the prequel! It is the most epic "D&D" story I've read. It is fantasy, but blends sci-fi and superheroic action so well. I have never seen such a product. Amazing!

If I have one criticism of the product is that there were some things missed in the editing pass: A mislabled footer here, a "@@" reference there. It's nothing that can't be fixed. And seeing as LPJ Design is essentially a one-man show with a team of freelancers this thing is not uncommon.

I gave the adventure 5 stars. I don't even PLAY Pathfinder anymore and I bought this the day it was released. I will have to convert to 5e myself but that's no problem for me.

Also, the fact that so many 3PP signed on to write side treks for this campaign is like nothing I have ever seen. Crisis of the World Eater is Epic in that way. I cannot wait for the other allied 3PP to release their stuff so I can run a high-octane campaign of super-epic proportions.

Get this adventure!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Crisis of the World Eater: The Collected Epic (PFRPG)
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Image Portfolio 027 Romans & Robots
by Troy T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2017 09:44:57

Outstanding illustrations for small publishers who need to artwork for their product. The combination of Romans and Robots is an odd mix, but there was sufficient number of Romans for my needs.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Image Portfolio 027 Romans & Robots
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Image Portfolio Platinum Edition 14: Storn Cook
by Troy T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/03/2017 12:12:49

This is an excellent example of the quality artwork availble from this line. The illustrations from Storn Cook are of the highest quality. Thank you for providing it as a stock art resource.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Image Portfolio Platinum Edition 14: Storn Cook
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Rocketships of Pulp Destruction
by Matteo G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/18/2017 10:21:16

In its current state, this product is not well made, for a simple reason, it wasn't checked enough and so it wasn't corrected. For instance, the table detailing the venusian starship weapons is wrong, a literal copy paste of the chronian starship weapons table, this mistake leaves one of the three races without any weapons for their vessels. This error should be easy to correct, the second chronian table should be substituted with the correct venusian weapon table. The product is otherwise interesting, it expands the rules for the starships from d20 modern, using them in a different setting, inspired by the old pulp novels, i really like it and i think it could be valued at least 4 stars out of five, but only if the reported error will be corrected.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Rocketships of Pulp Destruction
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