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Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
by Zachary H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/27/2008 01:30:05
I'm a vagabond, a wanderer of tabletop gaming. From my early forays in Palladium Fantasy and hideously houseruled 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons games to my appreciation of Risus, Two-Fisted Tales, Epic Roleplaying, Rolemaster, Traveller, Rifts, and everything in-between, I have played and ran a tremendously large number of roleplaying games.

I've tried Troll Lord Games' Castles & Crusades before, had my Castle Keeper Screen signed by Gary Gygax himself in 2007. And though the sessions and demos I ran were fun, there was always something else to try. And several projects in 2008 also ensured my free time to dedicate to any single game was severely lacking.

But in now coming back to it, and in loving both the exciting modern products out there and the original and homages to an earlier time in gaming, I have found Castles & Crusades to be so much of what I've been looking for. Very few times (I can count them on one hand) has a game purely "clicked" for me. As in I got it--I got the feel, the system, the direction. And that's what happened when I took my C&C Players Handbook in hand (and screen) once more. What did it? I don't know--a desired refinement of how I run my games, an re-examination for what I want out of my hobby, whatever. But I did want to share just a little of why I am so absolutely, genuinely, enthusiastically pleased with Castles & Crusades:

Bridging A Gap: I have friends who were weaned on the older editions of D&D, and those who have played nothing but 3rd Edition. Castles & Crusades allows me to sell elements of both those experiences, giving us a common meeting ground and a larger player base from which to draw. Its familiar to veterans, and easily picked up by novices.

Time: Plain and simple. Look, I have a wife, 2 kids and 1 on the way, and a lot more responsibility than Young Zack ever did. C&C's system, the SIEGE Engine, is so simple that it usually takes all of 3-5 minutes for gamers to get the gist of it. I want to be able to use all the resources I've built up over the years, run a game that encourages active, fast, inspiring GM (CK) rulings, not pace-killing rules lookup. I want low prep time, employing notes and material I already have. I'm ready to get back to the basics, and get down to gaming in a faster and leaner fashion.

A Place To Build Upon: Castles & Crusades is a framework. It isn't a toolbox so much as a sturdy workbench. This is seriously one of the most easily-houseruled games I have ever seen. You want skills, feats, some new magic system? Want to use THAC0? Have some insane d20 rule you plug into every game you play? Castles & Crusades not only allows you to plug those items in, its modularity will make it easy to do so. We are talking compatibility not only with the various prior editions and the d20 crowd, but efforts like Basic Fantasy, Labyrinth Lord, Mazes & Minotaurs, Fight On!, True 20, Paizo's and Adventure Games Publishing's docket of releases, and more. Hey, I have something from Iron Gauntlets I might throw in there. Or I can do nothing, and be just fine that way. There's just too much goodness out there that I may wish to look to for inspiration, and Castles & Crusades promises the integration of that goodness, easy-like. It's a baseline for it all.

A Style I Want: I don't want hours spent on hair-splitting character builds. I don't want reams of special powers for each player. I don't want skills and rigid, multiple modifiers to get in the way of player initiative and creativity. I want me as a GM (CK) and my players to remember when we made rulings, not remained bogged down in rules. This ties into time constraints, but I want a fast-play, unified mechanic. I want the standard tropes and hallmarks of our shared hobby heritage there, unwarped. I want strong character archetypes. I want player backgrounds to matter in the course of play. I want so much of what has made the Old School Renaissance of gaming so inspiring to me and others. Of course, many of these lie at the feet of each Game Master/Castle Keeper, and can happen in any game. But its still good to have an RPG that's on your side about it.

I've never been a one-game, one-system guy. There are too many great games out there I want to run--Epic, Rifts, Traveller, we aren't through yet. One day, I will again get to run In Harm's Way. And Castles & Crusades is ok with that. I know its there, willing to undertake any sort of tweaks or mods I might find in my travels. But I do know what game I'm coming home to for now. Castles & Crusades is my choice going forward to take advantage of the Old School Renaissance (heck, its my staging area for it), to keep that link going to a wider pool of players, and to maximize the time I have for quality, generation-spanning fun. That's why I'm on board with Castles & Crusades as my fantasy D&D cousin of choice. And together I see us, my friends, and eventually perhaps our kids having great adventures...

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
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zzz-10th Day of Christmas Sale [BUNDLE]
by Marc G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/25/2008 17:04:32
They say that nothing is free, but it in this case it's true!

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
zzz-10th Day of Christmas Sale [BUNDLE]
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StarSiege Introductory Manual
by Malcolm M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/18/2008 18:41:36
A valiant effort with one fatal flaw.

WHAT IS IT?

StarSiege is intended to be an all-in-one science-fiction rpg from Troll Lord Games, the makers of the justly-praised Castles & Crusades fantasy game. As the name implies, StarSiege incorporates the same simple-yet-clever "Siege Engine" dice mechanic which lies at the heart of Castles & Crusades.

The problem is, in the well-intentioned attempt to create an all-in-one science-fiction toolkit, the very simplicity and modularity which makes the Siege Engine mechanic so useful to players and Game Masters in C&C here gets buried under an avalanche of new game systems, sub-systems, acronyms, and terminology.

The resulting game is a good game, to be sure. The problem is, it's also ends up functionally indistinguishable from the dozens of other medium-complex SF game systems inhabiting the rpg landscape: d20 Future; GURPS Space; 2320 AD; Reign of Discordia; Mongoose Traveller, Alternity, and all the rest.

Author Josh Chewning has done a valiant job here; l have to wonder, though, if the failure of StarSiege to carry forward the defining adaptability and ease-of-use traditionally associated with Siege Engine games like Castles & Crusades has to rest with Troll Lord Games editorial.

At some point, someone in the company should've noticed that StarSiege -- while a perfectly serviceable SF rpg -- doesn't actually adhere to the _design spirit_ of the Castles & Crusades Siege system.

It's always easier for players and Game Masters to add on to simple game system, as needed, rather than to subtract elements from a complex one. This philosophy rests at the heart of Castles & Crusades' design.

In his well-intentioned desire to give players and GMs a fully-detailed SF toolkit, author Chewning has accidentally lost the defining difference (ease-of-use and core simplicity) which sets Siege Engine games like Castles & Crusades apart from the pack.

Again, I find Chewning absolutely guiltless -- he's done good work here -- the loss of the spirit of Siege has to fall at the feet of Troll Lord Games. Siege is their baby, in the end, and it falls to them to make sure its properly treated.

An author buried eyeball-deep in manuscript revision can't always see the big picture. That's what editorial is there for ...

FINAL VERDICT?

As above, StarSiege is a good medium-complexity all-in-one SF rpg. If that's what you want, it stands solid among the many other similar SF game systems out there.

If, like me, you were hoping for a game which would do for science-fiction gaming what Castles & Crusades has done for fantasy gaming, then StarSiege is not the game for you.

My disappointment at StarSiege's failure to be "Castles & Crusades In Spaaaace" in any sort of practical, game-table way originally had me leaning toward a 3 out of 5 score -- but, thankfully, I realized in time that, while the game does not carry on the Siege Engine legacy in any strong fashion, if taken as a stand-alone SF game it's certainly worth a 4 out of 5 to those who neither know nor care what game engine it incorporates.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
StarSiege Introductory Manual
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Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
by John S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/02/2008 21:32:51
Super clean system that is loads of fun to play and run. Highly modular so one can bolt on any desired complexity. I use this game with young children with limited reading skills; that is not to say that it is only for kids. A great game !

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
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zzz-Gary Gygax's Extraordinary Book of Names
by Christopher H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/08/2008 13:48:38
Okay ... it's a book of names. A big book full of lots of names. What else do you need to know?

Seriously, this book does have a few features that set it apart from other name books (like the Judges Guild Book of Archaic Names, for example). The first 20 pages, more or less, present an interesting and often useful discussion of names and naming. It's not perfect; some of the phonemic associations suggested on p. 20 are over-the-top and have no actual linguistic validity, while some of the claims made are just plain sexist ("A blunt or forceful name like Darg or Rathek should belong to a male," pp. 19-20) and others reflect the author Malcolm Bowers's (no, not Gary Gygax, despite the series title) own sense of aesthetics, which may not match the GM's. Indeed, some of the aesthetics proposed here are inconsistent on the same page; p. 20 tells us that a final /k/ sound "help vicious invective" but also convey "beauty, peace, and grace"--which should have clued Bowers in that his phonemics are mostly impressionistic nonsense. On the other hand, the brief discussion of onomancy and "true names" (pp. 21-24) could give GMs lots of interesting ideas to work into their campaigns, regardless of the rules set.

The bulk of this book really is a big list of personal names, arranged chiefly by geography and culture: Britain, Africa, America, Asia, Europe, the Mediterranean, and Oceania each get major sections with multiple subsections. Within each subsection, readers get a brief orientation to the geo-cultural group in focus, pronunciation guides, and lists of personal and family names, with other types of names (bynames or surnames, for example) also provided where appropriate. According to the publisher, readers ultimately get over 100,000 specific names in this format, making the book a good resource for GMs who need lots of NPC names, even on the fly.

The aforementioned name lists take up a little over half of the entire book, but there's more. A colorful epithet can add a lot to a name ("Richard the Lionheart" sounds so much more buff than "Richard I"), so Bowers gives readers a whole section devoted to generating colorful epithets. As befits a "Gygaxian" product, Bowers supplies a random table for generating the form of an epithet (d20 roll: 01-06 yields "description," 07-09 yields "thing," 10-12 yields "description + thing," and so on), but then the source lists that follow the random table aren't organized according to these categories! Not that GMs will have a hard time using these lists, but it would have been more convenient to have lists of "descriptions," "things," "actions," and so on labeled as such. The tables of titles are very Eurocentric, and while Bowers does offer some titles from non-European cultures to offset this, a strong bias remains evident ("Usually generic titles are enough. 'Chief' applies equally well to the head of any clan or tribe, for instance.) Book 3 also includes some suggestions for deriving names of organizations, military squads, and so on, which a GM can quite easily put to good use.

Book 4 deals with place names, and I was very pleased to find this section. Europe still dominates, but plenty of non-English words and word-fragments are given to fire a GM's imagination. Yet here the book fails to provide a service that would have been invaluable: the theoretical discussion of place-names stresses the meanings of names, but Bowers does not tell his presumably English-speaking readers what all of the various words mean! Thus, for example, Bowers gives readers a list of Arabic colors--aswad, azrak, asmar, akhdar, sinjabi, ahmar, abyad, and asfar--but he provides no guidance as to which color is which! For Bowers, "place names" includes names for taverns and inns--quite commonly needed in fantasy RPGs--and this section comes in quite handy.

In book 5, Bowers discusses the construction of completely fantastic names. Some of this discussion is very helpful ("One [thing] that stops most people is the dreaded 'unpronounceable' … This sort of thing is pretty much pointless in a game where you have to speak the name out loud"), while other parts devolve into purely arbitrary pedantry ("One [apostrophe] in a made-up name might be considered debatable; more than one is unforgivable"). If you're stuck for a fantasy name, try choosing one from Bowers's lists on pp. 172-182. There's even a random syllable table on p. 183 if you want to throw caution completely to the winds, and this table is followed by a whole series of tables broken down by creature type (for goblins, trolls, orcs, fairies, etc.).

If you're in a silly mood, grab one of the names from Appendix A - Spoof Names, and throw your PCs into an encounter with the wizard Levy Tate or sic on them the unshakable bard Oliver de Plaice.

Although published in the "Gygaxian Fantasy Worlds" line, this book is not just for fantasy RPGs. Since most of the names presented are real-life names from real-world cultures, modern games can benefit from the book almost as much as fantasy games. Indeed, Appendix B - Name Distribution seems more useful for a modern game than a fantasy one. In this appendix, Bowers presents a country-by-country breakdown of naming proportions (based on a d% scheme). Yet the usefulness of this appendix is hampered by its use of categories that don't appear elsewhere in the book. For example, the entry for Denmark reads "Danish (01-99), Turkish (00)." "Turkish" is also an entry in for Germany, the Netherlands, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Iraq, and of course, Turkey. However, if you pull out your d%, roll a Turkish name, and then go looking elsewhere in this volume for appropriate Turkish names, you won't find any (save for four titles on p. 140), so you'll probably have to fall back on Arabic, though Arabic and Turkish are not the same language. So what's the point of listing Turkish and such in the name distribution tables if no Turkish names are provided in the book? (And what's up with the d30 tables? No, really, d30?)

The content of the Book of Extraordinary Names is quite helpful. I've used it to good effect as a GM, and expect to get a lot more use out of it. However, as a PDF product, the Book of Extraordinary Names falls terribly flat in one important regard: it's neither bookmarked nor hyperlinked, making navigation through the 210-page beast an annoying and time-consuming proposition. And since the book is sold as a secured PDF, one must either crack the security to add one's own bookmarks, or live without bookmarks and spend precious time scrolling through to find the right page. That's got to cost the product at least one star in the ratings.

Some players and GMs might be put off by the $20 price tag on the PDF download, even though this represents an enormous savings off the $35 printed edition. Compared to other name lists, though, it's by no means out of line. Some other "name generator" products give you c. 200 names for $5--that's about 2.5¢ per name--but the PDF version of Gary Gygax's Extraordinary Book of Names gives you over 100,000 names (or so says the publisher) for $20--that's more like .02¢ per name, plus you get all of the value-adds that I've mentioned above. So yes, $20 is a significant outlay, but if you accumulate several smaller products for $5 each, you'll soon find yourself at $20 with only 800 names in your pocket. I wouldn't necessarily recommend the product for players, who just need to generate names for a few PCs, but for a GM looking to fill a world with memorable NPCs, this book comes in very handy and beats the price curve on similar products (even in its printed version, actually).

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
zzz-Gary Gygax's Extraordinary Book of Names
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Castles & Crusades Monsters & Treasure 2nd Printing
by Malcolm M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/29/2008 16:39:17
The true successor to Dungeons and Dragons continues!

THE DETAILS

Monsters and Treasure is the second of two core books for the Castles & Crusades fantasy rpg, and it too features C&C's defining gameplay ethic of old-school feel, combined with modern, streamlined rules.

The monsters in Monsters and Treasure will be familiar to anyone who's played earlier editions of Dungeons and Dragons. Most of the fiendish faces from the original Monster Manual are here, as well as a few creatures recognizeable from later works, such as the Monster Manual II and the original Fiend Folio. All in all, though, the monsters in this volume will be very familiar to anyone who's played D&D before. A number of the monsters are subtly changed from what one might expect but, by and large, the faces remain the same.

Be advised that most of the creatures here are "terrestrial" in nature. Those looking for lists of demons and devils and other so-called "outsiders" will not find them in this volume. Elementals make an appearance, but angels, devils and djinni are absent from this book. The Quasit shows up, but his bigger infernal brothers are nowhere to be seen.

Also, those looking for a collection of monsters unique to Castles &Crusades' Aihrde setting are advised to wait for the upcoming Monsters and Treasures II, which Troll Lord Games is presently hard at work finishing.

Those who simply can't wait for new monsters, should check out the short Monsters of Aihrde PDFs available here on RPGNow -- and those who want to challenge their players with the smaller flying dragons seen swarming on the cover of the C&C Player's Handbook, might also want to check out the Miasmal Dragons PDF. Personally, I was grateful to have these "lower level" dragons with which to harass players all the sooner.

The second half of the Monsters and Treasures book presents the Castles and Crusades OGL version of the treasure and magic-item section of the classic Dungeon Master's Guide.. There are some changes here; certain new things, and certain old things left out, but most of these changes are subtle, and aren't likely to leap off the page and punch you in the eye on a quick read-through.

As with C&C in general, Monsters and Treasure is not about remaking classic rpg gaming from the ground up, recasting it in an entirely new form; rather it's all about streamlining and simplifying while preserving the fun factor -- cutting down the rules clutter so that the rules serve the story of your game, instead of getting in your way.

So, a lot of the Treasure section will seem familiar to owners of past editions of the DMG: treasure charts; magic item charts and descriptions; special weapon property charts; notes on how to create (and destroy) magic items; notes on how and when to award treasure. If you've played fantasy rpgs before, you know this stuff. And if you haven't played before, author Robert Doyel breaks it all down for you in clear, uncluttered prose.

Doyel's writing is solid throughout; he manages to communicate ideas well, and seems constantly aware that certain readers will be new to what he's describing. While he does not pander to the new reader, nor "dumb down" the content in any way -- wisely remembering that rpg games are largely for adults, and for smart kids with an interest in the material -- Doyel still keeps his writing lucid and focused at every opportunity. He's there to communicate concepts, and he does it well.

The art inside Monsters and Treasures is all black and white, but chief Castles and Crusades artist, Peter "Twenty Dollar" Bradley contributes some high quality, evocative monster illustrations. However old-school C&C may seem in certain ways, Bradley's art is definitely modern, and definitely professional.

SHOULD YOU BUY IT?

I'd say yes. While it doesn't bring much new to the party, in terms of monsters or magic items which long-time gamers haven't seen before, the book itself is still an excellent practical example of just how Castles & Crusades consciously streamlines OGL fantasy material into something far more user-friendly.

The book should also prove a great resource by example for those Castle Keepers (Game Masters) with a lot of pre-fourth-edition D&D material they'd like to convert to C&C.

FINAL VERDICT?

Four out of five stars. It's a solid, professional product in all respects, but it would've been nice to see a few wholly new monsters, and few more new treasures (there are a couple) among all the usual suspects. As above, I guess we'll have to keep waiting for the upcoming Monsters and Treasures II for the truly new stuff.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Monsters & Treasure 2nd Printing
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Castles & Crusades Quick Start Rules
by andrew t. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/08/2008 03:24:10
Castles and Crusades seems to be a very simple game system, geared more towards ease of play and the interaction it represents than tons of charts and tables. This is an introduction to the game, and looks like it conveys the basics very well.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Quick Start Rules
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Castles & Crusades DB1B Haunted Highlands Deities
by andrew t. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/08/2008 03:21:15
I've always been a fan of the Celtic Mythos. I've heard nothing but good things about the Castles and Crusades game, so I look forward to implementing this aid and tossing some different dieties in the mix.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades DB1B Haunted Highlands Deities
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Castles & Crusades Monsters of Aihrde II
by Nicholas B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2008 10:59:40
Nice package of useful &C monsters at a good price. Easily adapted to other retro clones, too.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Monsters of Aihrde II
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Castles & Crusades Monsters of Aihrde I
by Nicholas B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2008 10:57:45
Nice little package of monsters for use in C&C (and other rules-light D&D clones, I imagine). Set in the Airdhe universe but easily extracted! The price is great, too.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Monsters of Aihrde I
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Crusader Journal No. 1
by Nicholas B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2008 10:51:52
Fun 1st issue of the magazine from Troll Lord Games. More of an industry piece and less useful if you're looking for C&C content (later issues have a lot more to offer for C&C players, though).

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Crusader Journal No. 1
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zzz-Castles & Crusades Monsters and Treasure
by Christopher N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2008 06:10:03
M&T is a great addition to C&C. It's well-illustrated, has small stat blocks (yeah!), a good selection of creatures and treasure, and has that great old-school feel that only C&C can provide. The only downside? The price! $19.95 for a PDF? The dead tree version costs the same!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
zzz-Castles & Crusades Monsters and Treasure
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Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
by Christopher N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2008 06:07:09
I'll admit it, I love C&C. It's old-school-meets-new-school philosophy just rocks. Make no mistake about it, this game will take you back to a time when RPGs seemed (and were!) a lot simpler than some of the bloated behemoths we have today. C&C isn't for everybody - I'm sure there are some 3.0/3.5/4.0 addicts out there who would never dream of playing C&C, but I'm not one of them. C&C is simple, quick, and fun. It is, IMHO, a far better successor to AD&D than 3.0 was. And on sale for $10? How could you go wrong? So, buy this little gem, strap on your chain mail, sharpen your sword, and pound those miserable little kobolds into the ground!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
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Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
by Klayton K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/08/2008 19:08:50
I've been using the supremely elegant C&C rules for six months now (along with all my old 1st Edition AD&D stuff, which is easily convertible), and my games have never been better. Castles & Crusades is brilliant. Add a smattering of 1st Edition stuff for creative inspiration, and you have an ideal combination for storyteller DMs who prefer fast, narrative-driven play.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Castles & Crusades Players Handbook 3rd Printing
by Malcolm M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/02/2008 15:33:01
Without a word of a lie, _this_ is the true, modern successor to original Dungeona and Dragonse.

Castles & Crusades isn't just another "retro clone" knock-off. Not even close. Rather, it evokes all the elements which made classic D&D so much fun, while marrying these to a slick, simple, flexible and _modern_ d20 dice mechanic.

No need to wade through pages and pages of skills and feats at character creation. The unified dice mechanic here (called the SIEGE engine) will also let you choose (and demonstrate in play) what makes your character noteworthy -- no skill lists or feat descriptions required.

Best of all, Castles Crusades is based on the WotC Open Game License, so (with a little simple adaptation) all of your old D&D stuff from 1e through 3.x can be used with Castles & Crusades.

I could write pages elaborating on why I think C&C is worth at least a look from interested gemers. Instead, I'll just say this -- having bought the two core C&C rulebooks, I'll never willingly play D&D again.

If any of what I've said resonates with you, drop the ten bucks and check it out while this full-edition PDF is available. You've spent more on less worthy game products, I can almost guarantee it.

5 out of 5 stars.

Forget the grognards. Forget the WotC phanbois. Forget anybody with a "brand loyalty" agenda. I wanted fantasy rpgs to be alll about imaginative fun again, and Castles & Crusades gave me that. It has my highest possible recommendation.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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06.Castles & Crusades Monsters & Treasure
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