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RR3 Van Richten's Guide to Vampires (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/25/2013 06:27:57
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/11/25/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-van-richtens-guide-to-vampires-advanced-dungeons-dragons--
second-edition/

Van Richten’s Guide to Vampires is not only my favorite supplement for Ravenloft, but it just might be my favorite for all of Second Edition AD&D. More importantly, it’s easily the single best release about vampires in the history of Dungeons & Dragons. Hell, It’s hard to think of a release for any other system that matches up to the sheer quality of this one, and that includes White Wolf’s Vampire games. It’s the magnum opus of the late, great Nigel D. Finley, and considering he was the mastermind behind such products as The Tome of Magic, Draconomicon, Shadowrun Second Edition, Tir Tairngire, and multiple releases for games I love like Vampire: The Masquerade, Chill and Earthdawn, that should tell you just how amazing this release is. It’s something all Second Edition AD&D fans should own, and honestly, if you use vampires in your tabletop game at all, for whatever reason, you should own this too. Now, if you need concrete, specific reasons as to why you should purchase this, read on. Otherwise, just go purchase it now.

There are fourteen chapters to Van Richten’s Guide to Vampires. Each one of them is more narrative and descriptive rather than filled with stat blocks and mechanics. This is for the best, as AD&D and Ravenloft in particular already had tons of mechanics for vampires, but the problem was most Dungeon Masters were just using them as generic monsters to fill dungeons with. The disgust from seeing DMs use vampires inappropriately or as cannon fodder is what caused Ravenloft to be born in the first place, and Findley definitely uses this book to ensure readers can get inside the heads of the most iconic of undead. How they think, what drives them, how they differ from mortals now that the subside on the life force of the living. So on and so forth. It really is a must read for anyone even remotely thinking of using a vampire, especially in a high fantasy setting.

Chapter One is “Introduction,” and it is a narrative by the character Rudolph Van Richten, explaining why he is writing this book (yes, the entire thing is in character rather than third person, and it works beautifully), along with background information on why he hunts monsters. Chapter Two is “The Background of Vampirism,” and it tells the possible origins of vampires, the general genetic makeup of this type of undead and a bit on different racial variations, like dwarven or elven vampires. Chapter Three is your first chapter that is devoted to stats and mechanics. “Vampiric Powers” starts on with in-game narrative about the most common powers vampires have in AD&D. The ability to Spider Climb or assume Gaseous Form at will, hypnotism, shapeshifting into animals and the like. It also introduced Salient Abilities, which are powers unique to a specific vampire. This idea helps a vampire from becoming generic and also lets you customize a creature to throw players off while also making your vampire a memorable antagonist. After this narrative, you are given a ton of charts and stat blocks to help you customize your vampire. You get to see how a vampire’s stats improve with age, and a list of eighteen salient abilities that range from being able to charm while in Gaseous From to draining four levels with each successful hit. Yikes to all.

Chapter Four is “Creating New Vampires,” and it’s mostly self-explanatory. It gives multiple ways a vampire can be created rather than just the old “killed by a vampire drinking your blood” motif. Chapter Five is “Vampire Weaknesses,” and this too is rudimentary. Findley gives us a list of common AD&D vampiric weaknesses, like running water, holy symbols and sunlight, but also expands this to possible other weaknesses for unique vamps, ranging from classic folklore issues (such as having to count poppy seeds) to mirrors keeping a vampire at bay as well, instead of just refusing to show their reflection. Chapter Six gives us “Destroying the Vampire,” and this is basically a continuation of the previous chapter.

Chapter Seven is entitled “Magic and Vampires,” and it covers multiple spell groups from AD&D, like Illusion/Phantasm, Enchantment/Charm, Necromancy and so on, listing how spells may have different than intended effects on vampires. It also talks a bit about vampires wielding magic items, but not much. Chapter Eight, “Life-Blood: Vampiric Feeding Habits,” talks about ways vampires feed, how much blood they need versus how much they WANT, and also why they must do it. It also talks about alternatives to blood (again, to make a vampire unique) and also what the victim feels when being drained. Chapter Nine, “The Sleep of the Dead,” talks about what passes for slumber amongst vampires. Why they must do it, whether or not they need to sleep in a coffin or have their tomb lined with native soil. Things like that. You also get mechanics for a sleep deprived vampire, which is neat. Chapter Ten, “Hibernation,” continues this discussion by going into details about long sleeps, or what V:TM called Torpor. This chapter helps to explain how vampires can survive many centuries as well as gives you a way in which they can be especially vulnerable at the same time.

Chapter Eleven is by far the most interesting chapter in the guide. It is called “Relationships Between Vampires,” and it talks about not just how a vampire embraces another, but also the relationship that forms between those two vampires afterwards. There is the common master-slave vampire dynamic, but this chapter also gives you a new way for a vampire to create an equal, such as a vampire mate (as well as how to engage in a vampire based divorce). Of course, not all vampire relationships are positive ones, so this chapter discusses how to run combat BETWEEN vampires and how age comes into effect. Perhaps most interesting is that the chapter does delve into homosexuality amongst the undead, but very briefly and as a side note. Still, that was pretty progressive for 1991 and especially for AD&D at the time.

Chapter Twelve is “The Mind of the Vampire,” and it discusses the psychology of being undead. Why does a vampire do what it does or think what it thinks? How does immortality change one? The chapter also talks about why vampires are generally listed as Chaotic Evil by AD&D alignment terms. It also discusses how a vampire can indeed hold its original alignment for a while, but why Van Richten believes they all eventually turn to Chaotic Evil. Mainly this is due to a long life and a growing detachment from mortals and the way they think. It also discusses the ego and arrogance of a vampire and also what to do with an insane one.

Chapter Thirteen is “The Façade,” and it talks about how vampires may pose as a human or mortal in a local area, and how they are eventually discovered by some foolish or nosy person. It also discusses WHY a vampire might want to have a public life. Finally, Chapter Fourteen is “Retained Skills,” and it talks about what abilities, spells, powers and the like a vampire can retain if they had class levels before being embraced. More importantly, it also tells how they can level up! Now that’s a scary thought, isn’t it? The chapter also ends with a warning to not make vampire PCs and why. This is also the note the book ends on, and it’s a very smart one indeed.

All in all, Van Richten’s Guide to Vampires is one of the best supplements for AD&D Second Edition ever written, and it’s certainly the crown jewel of all Ravenloft supplements. I know I’ve said this multiple times throughout this review, but if you’re thinking of running a vampire against your PCs, regardless of system, you should really have this book on hand to use. This is a must have for almost any gamer. It’s truly a joy to have this publicly available for purchase again.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
RR3 Van Richten's Guide to Vampires (2e)
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The Paradox Room
Publisher: Monte Cook Games
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/22/2013 06:47:47
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/11/22/book-review-the-paradox-
-room-the-strange/

By the time this review goes live, there will be less than twenty-four hours until the Kickstarter for Monte Cook’s newest RPG, The Strange ends. At the time of writing, the Kickstarter campaign has raised over $300,000 with the help of 2,252 backers. Although The Strange won’t be breaking Numenera‘s numbers by any means, it does mean that Monte Cook has pulled in well over $800,000 between the two Kickstarters, and that’s insanely impressive.

Speaking of Numenera, The Strange will be using the same base system that its predecessor uses (The Cipher System is the name for the rules and mechanics), so it should be mostly compatible. In fact, The Strange could easily be one of the previous eight worlds that preceded the Ninth World. I’m a huge fan of Numenera and so I’m expecting to enjoy The Strange just as much. For a merely fifty dollars you can get electronic/digital versions of every product created in the Kickstarter, which is a pretty good deal. I’m not trying to sell you on the Kickstarter, just stating that I missed out of the Numenera one, and I regret it, so I’m trying to give those of you unaware of the Kickstarter a chance to join in before it ends.

Now, with that said, let’s talk about The Paradox Room. The Paradox Room is a fifty-five page collection of two short stories. Its existence was funded by the Kickstarter and it is currently being made free to everyone, not just backers. Click here, scroll down and grab your completely free, no strings attached copy. This is awesome to see and it will give you a chance to see if The Strange is right for you. Now, since this is just two short stories, you’re not going to get any mechanics, rules, character creation, stat blocks or any real explanation about the setting. Thus there are aspects of both stories that will make more sense once we’ve all read the core rulebook, learned the set definitions for specific game terminology and the like. That doesn’t mean the stories will be a confusing mess – just that you’ll have to fill in a few blanks here and there with assumptions. The stories are pretty clear and if anything, the questions about The Strange that it leaves you with has you wanting to learn more rather than with a feeling of, “What did I just read?”

I will say though that I’m glad I got this for free as $2.99 seems a bit steep for fifty or so pages of content, especially when you got three stories and 80+ pages for the same price with Tales of the Ninth World, the first Numenera short story collection. So make sure to grab the free version of The Paradox Room before it gets pulled down. Who knows? It may just give you the impetus to buy the game itself. I should also mention The Paradox Room comes in three forms – epub, mobi and pdf, so that you can read the two short stories in whatever fashion works best for you. Note that only the PDF version comes with cover art though.

The first story is “The Stranger” and it is by Monte Cook. The plot is pretty straightforward and it does a great job of illustrating what The Strange will be like. In “The Stranger” an iconic fantasy creature makes its way from its world/plane of existence/parallel universe/whatever into our version of reality. Of course such things as this creature don’t/can’t exist here and this shows just what can happen in a worst case situation of this scenario in The Strange. I really loved this story, but I always seem to really like Cook’s short fiction, so this wasn’t a surprise to me. I think I learned more about The Strange from this single tale than I did from reading the many Kickstarter updates about it.

The second story is called “Four Winds” and is by Bruce Cordell. I didn’t care for this one as much. It wasn’t bad by any stretch of the imagination, but it didn’t grip me like “The Stranger” or any of the Numenera fiction I’ve read so far. Of course, I find I like Cordell as an aqdventure writer but not as a fiction author. Case in point, I found The Lady of Poison dull and I had to force myself through the Abolethic Trilogy. Yet, Die, Vecna, Die is a personal AD&D 2e favorite of mine and I also enjoyed some of his third and fourth edition adventures like and The Sunless Citadel. Regardless, I found “Four Winds” to be the weakest piece of fiction from Monte Cook games so far, but it’s still an enjoyable story that helps to introduce the concept of incursions and pocket dimensions of sorts to the readers. The story is about an unnamed androgynous (as in the gender is never specified) Lakota who discovers what appears to not only be an ancient artifact from his ancestors, but to another form of reality altogether. Oddly enough s/he is not the only person from Earth there. Most importantly we learn honkies can’t help themselves from stealing from Native Americans, regardless of what reality we are in.

All in all, for a free snippet to get you interested in The Strange, The Paradox Room more than does its job. You get a nice snapshot of the setting and both stores are entertaining in their own right. At $2.99 it’s a bit pricey for what you get, but better to pay $2.99 to discover you don’t like something than to pay $200-250 for the “get everything” pledge on Kickstarter and find out THAT way that The Strange isn’t for you, eh? If anything this collection has me even more excited about The Strange and while I don’t think The Paradox Room is as good as Tales From the Ninth World, I can easily recommend this as a nice way to while away an hour or so (depending on how fast you read). Go grab the free version now and who knows – maybe this time next year, you’ll be joining me in the comments sections of my review of the core rulebook.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Paradox Room
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RR1 Darklords (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/15/2013 06:36:21
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/11/15/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-darklords-advanced-dungeons-dragons-2nd-edition/

As you can tell from the RR1 coding, Darklords was the first supplement release for TSR’s Ravenloft campaign setting. There had been an adventure or two published beforehand, like Ship of Horror, but Darklords was to be the first of many pieces to flesh out what ended up being the second most successful (and lucrative) campaign setting for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, Second Edition (Only Forgotten Realms did better).

Darklords takes a look at sixteen different Darklords spread out over thirteen chapters. Some of these Darklords would go on to have full adventures devoted to them, one would be the star of a SSI video game and still others would appear in published fiction. Yet others would never be seen again. It’s interesting to see how these sixteen big bads turned out because back in 1991, the sky was the limit for each character. Let’s take a look at them.

1. Anhktepot. The book starts out with one of my top five Darklords. Anhktepot was a great character for so many reasons. First, he was the best mummy in D&D history. Second, he was an evil worshipper of the sun, which always threw off a lot cleric PCs. Third, he was one of only three Darklords to star in a video game (Stone Prophet), making him arguably the most famous original creation for Ravenloft for mainstream gamers (The other two to appear in video games were Strahd and Lord Soth ,of course). He would also go on to have a very important adventure (Touch of Death) which would help to change the very makeup of the Dark Domain itself. The background of the character is an impressive one and his domain is especially cruel. Anhktepot is a lot of fun to use in any Ravenloft campaign and out of the sixteen in this book, he’s one of the four that went on to make a huge impact on the campaign setting.

2. Tristessa is a drow banshee who rules a realm of the undead. She is completely mad and wishes only two things – to find her lost child and revenge against the drow. The Darklord of Keening, Tristessa was an interesting take on the banshee and potentially one of the few Darklords PCs can make allies with (as long as they hate Drow too). Tristessa never came to much. She had a short story in Tales of Ravenloft but she was a Darklord that didn’t see much use from players or writers. Pity.

3. Bluebeard. This is exactly what you think. The classic French folk tale character turned into a Darklord for Ravenloft. I always thought this was a silly idea and honestly it seems like so did everyone else. He got a short story in Tales of Ravenloft and then was never used by anyone again except for a brief mention in Sword & Sorcery’s Third Edition version of the setting. Arguably one of the worst Darklord ideas ever.

4. Ebonbane. From one of the worst to one of my favorites. Ebonbane is a living evil sword who is trapped in a castle with the geist of its arch-nemesis – a paladin named Kateri Shadowborn. Ebonbane stars in one of my favorite Dungeon! adventures of all time – “Bane of the Shadowborn.” Because the goal of the adventure is to destroy Ebonbane, that and Darklords are its only real appearance in Ravenloft. I’m always very opposed to adventures where the goal is to kill a Darklord because that utterly defeats the purpose of one and is spitting in the face of what Ravenloft SHOULD be, but Bane of the Shadowborn is so well done and Ebonbane existed only for that adventure, so it’s one of the rare exceptions that I make on the subject.

5-7. The Three Hags. I never cared for the hags or their domain of Tepest, but they get an extremely long and well fleshed out back story here. In spite of that, most writers and gamers felt the same way about the hags as I did. They never received any mention in second edition besides this and their initial writeup and 3e only paid them a tiny amount of lip service. The triad of Darklords for a single domain does make it extremely hard to take them down if you’re using Ravenloft as a boss fight type setting (ick), but they are amongst the most forgettable Darklords in the entire setting.

8. The Headless Horseman. I was annoyed by turning Bluebeard into a Darklord, but I did originally like the idea of the Horseman as one. After all, he’s a very iconic figure in American horror and he’s so vaguely defined by his original creator that he works a lot better than trying to shoehorn Bluebeard (whose story has a complete beginning and end) into the Dark Domain. Plus one is ghost of sorts and the other is merely a serial killer. ANYWAY, I never cared for how the Headless Horseman was used by Ravenloft He is forever riding a horse and cutting off heads, with his domain being a single road he constantly runs down. That’s all there is. There’s no depths, definition or defining of the Horseman. He’s just schlocky cheap fear. The Darklord would appear briefly in an adventure and he too got a short story in Tales of Ravenloft, but he was one of the few Darklords to not see even a line of print in the Third Edition version of the Dark Domain. Alas.

9. The House of Lament. This is an evil living house that has one of several potential explanations behind what it is and why it does what it does. I always loved this location. The house is less a Darklord than a fine setting for an adventure, but it is really quite memorable and a lot of fun to use – especially on low level characters or people new to RPGs. Unfortunately, nothing ever became of the house and this was its only appearance besides a brief mention in third edition. Talk about your lost potential.

10. Von Kharkov. This was always one of my favorite Darklords. He’s a Panther that was polymorphed onto a person and then turned into a vampire. So he’s a vampire panther. It’s very convoluted, but the back story is rich and a lot of fun. Von Kharkov would appear here and there in several texts through second and third edition, but never very in-depth and never with a spotlight on him except for this book. He got a short story in Tales of Ravenloft and that was really his fifteen minutes of fame. Pity, because every player I know has a soft spot for this Darklord but no one ever seemed to know what to do with him on the writing side of things.

11. Merilee. A generic child vampire. She’s not actually a Darklord of a domain, so I always disliked her inclusion in this book. She’s also not very interesting and was realized to be a bit of a mistake as soon as this was printed. You never hear about her again and she’s definitely the low point of the book.

12. Captain Alan Monette. Another character who shows up here and is never heard from again. Too bad too, as he’s quite interesting. Monette is a werebat pirate who transforms based on the tides rather than the phases of the moon. Trapped on an island with a spooky lighthouse, Monette makes a great one-off villain but not the best Darklord. Fun to craft an adventure around though!

13. The Phantom Lover. Another one shot who is never seen nor heard from again, The Phantom Lover is badly defined, way overpowered and a pretty stupid concept. He’s kind of a Marty Stu unkillable incubus. Bleck. Definitely up there with Merilee as a low point in the collection.

14. d’Polarno. The darklord of a small domain, Marquis Stezen d’Polarno gets a story in Tales of Ravenloft and a few brief mentions in Third Edition, but that’s about it. He’s not particularly memorable either. He’s a souless drab being that can regain his original personality and love of life by using an enchanted painting to drain souls from victims. Another character best suited for a one shot adventure rather than as a Darklord.

15. Tiyet. Tiyet is a strange mummy offshoot that is pretty memorable as well as challenging to any PCs who encounter here as she doesn’t appear undead at all. Rather she appears to be a beautiful classical Egyptian woman. Her domain is all but emptied of life and she is a rather lonely and sad inidivudal, compelled to eat the hearts of the living. This is her only real exposure in Ravenloft save one or two very brief mentions. Like several other characters, Tiyet makes an interesting being to revolve an adventure around, but she doesn’t really work as a Darklord. A very interesting and well done read though.

16. Zolnik. The last Darklord in the collection is a skinwalker or Loup de Noir werewolf. He has a very impressive backstory and is one of the more memorable Darklords in this collection. Unfortunately, TSR decided to job him out and kill him off in the adventure Dark of the Moon, which I reviewed back in October. Why TSR would go to the trouble of giving these Darklords such rich back stories and deep characterizations just to kill them off in a short little adventure is beyond me, but I really wasn’t in charge of the line seeing as I was in sixth grade or so when it was released. Still, Zolnik might be killed off rather easily in a throw away adventure, but we’re looking at the content for him in Darklords and it’s top notch indeed.

So there you go. A look at the sixteen Darklords of Darklords. I’m not happy with four of the sixteen, but that means there’s a 75% quality ratio here and that’s pretty darn good. As well, Darklords is a must own for anyone even casually interested in Ravenloft to see just how much depth and detail was put into even a C-level minor lord of the Dark Domain. This PDF rerelease is a bit pricey consider the physical copy was only a dollar more back in 1991, but D&D PDFs do tend to be a bit overpriced compared to their contemporaries. If you don’t already own a copy of Darklords, I would still strongly recommend the PDF version at this price as it’s very well done, but you might want to check Ebay for a physical copy first as you can undoubtedly get it cheaper.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
RR1 Darklords (2e)
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The Devil's Spine
Publisher: Monte Cook Games
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/06/2013 06:19:19
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/11/06/tabletop-review-the-dev-
ils-spine-numenera/

The Devil’s Spine is the first adventure collection released for Numenera which was released earlier this year. I’ve been a huge fan of everything put out for the system. From the short story collection Tales of the Ninth World to the just in time for Halloween In Strange Aeons, the previous four releases for Numenera has really captured the imagination of many a dice hucking tabletop fan.

With The Devil’s Spine, we see a set of interlocking adventures that can form the basis of a mini campaign. However, if only one of two of the adventures captures your imagination, the adventures do work as standalone pieces for your gaming troupe and the book even gives you ways to modify them for just such an occasion. The important thing is that all four adventures give you that wonderful mix of fantasy, science fiction and outright weird that Numenera has quickly become known for. While the adventures might not be for everyone, especially as three of the four are mostly dungeon crawls, each does a fine job of showcase how familiar and yet alien the Earth has become a billion years into the future. I’ll admit that since Numenera feels designed more akin to Call of Cthulhu or World of Darkness where combat is secondary to exploration and information, The Devil’s Spine‘s was far too combat focused for my tastes, but the layout, follow through and glimpse into the Ninth World were all expertly done. My hope is that these adventures are not indicative that future releases will be equally hack and slashy, but only time will tell.

The first adventure in the collection, “Noble Pursuits” only works if you are playing the other three as it sets up the mini-campaign as a whole. Here the PCs will be in the home of a wealthy noble (reasons why may vary) when they discover a secret passage that leads to untold discovery, one of the most memorable creatures in the Ninth World yet as well as a ticking time bomb that gives this collection its title. After finishing “Noble Pursuits,” characters will have about three months to finish the other three adventures or die horribly. Some players may kvetch or whine about their characters being railroaded into this predicament, but honestly those players probably won’t be playing Numenera anyway due to its light rules set and focus on co-operative storytelling gameplay between the players and the GM. Besides, a threat to the PCs lives makes for good motivation and little wiggle room to get out of the campaign. I think we’ve all been in one of those situations where the GM puts a copious amount of work into a plot hook or adventure seed and at least one player throws the thing off rails. Here that won’t happen, but at least the manner in which the plot is foisted onto the characters feels organic rather than, “Too bad. It happens. GM Rules, PCs drool.”

From “Noble Pursuits” the PCs can then proceed to any of the three following adventures of their choice and complete them in whatever order they choose. In this sense, The Devil’s Spine is an actual sandbox campaign akin to video games like Fallout 3 or Grand Theft Auto V because the players have a choice of which sub-quest they choose to do next. Too often I see adventures where the writer leaves a lot of the work up to the GM and says, “Oh, but it’s a sandbox adventure” when really it’s just laziness and a totally incorrect understanding of what that term actually means. But I digress. I’m glad to see the sheer level of flexibility in these adventures and the fact the players truly do decide which of three tasks to do and in which order more than makes up for hamfisting the characters into this situation in the first place.

The three adventures have very different goals and locations. In “Viral Transmissions” you’ll be trying to foil the plans of a sentient virus. The adventure is very much like playing the video game Oblivion in that you’ll be travelling long distances, climbing up a tower and killing (most) everything in your path, reaching the top and then doing everything you just did in reverse. As I found Oblivion to be more than a little dull and repetitive, this was easily my least favorite of the four adventures in this collection. I did find the virus to be an interesting antagonist and many of its creations made for oft-kilter battles that forced characters to think rather than just use brute force to get by.

“The Mechanized Tomb” has characters acting as grave robbers in order to find an ancient relic known as The Impossible Blade. The tomb is full of many traps and puzzles and so this adventure tests the PCs brains and dexterity more than their brawn. Of course once you get to the end of the tomb, you get a twist and then have to deal with copious amounts of combat. This adventure has the least amount of combat, but it does hit in large gluts. I wished the combat/exploration bits had been parsed out more evenly but the huge change in focus and mood will definitely throw players off guard and remind them that the Ninth World is as chaotic as it is bizarre.

The final adventure in the collection is “Beyond the Maelstrom” and it has players to find a rare substance on the bottom of the ocean floor. Unfortunately there’s also a huge maelstrom off shore where the MacGuffin is, and so players will have to deal with that (and thus saving a local village). As well, this being the Ninth World, the Maelstrom isn’t just a naturally occurring storm. Interestingly enough, if you play this adventure as a solo, it’s risking a TPK. However, if you play it as part of a campaign, the Big Bad End Boss will be a lot easier to deal with (and not just because of the XP you’ve earned along the way). As well, as this adventure takes place under the sea, this is a great chance to really make the experience for your players stand out. After all, the real ocean is filled to the brim with genetic oddities and weird life forms as it is. Imagine what things will be like in a billion years! With the opportunity for players to experience aquatic combat, drive submersibles or even gain a genetic implant to let them breathe underwater, “Beyond the Maelstrom” is the one the stands out most from the usual, “Go through Dungeon A to get Item B while defeating Antagonist C along the way.” motif of this collection. I found it to be very entertaining and memorable, but as mentioned, you might not want to do this one as a one off, especially with Tier One characters.

The collection then ends with sixteen full colour half page images to present to players while they progress through these adventures. I loved this as it meant all the visual handouts were in one section in addition to being interspersed throughout the book. This makes for easy finding of the images when needed. Because so much of Numenera involves weird locations, creatures, buildings and events, sometimes a verbal description, even one from a very verbose GM, doesn’t do the concepts justice. That’s why it’s great to have all these visual aids available in this collection. Players can be shown just what they are encountering, but without being given a glimpse of the adventure text that should be for GM’s eyes only. I wish they had done this with the monsters in the collection too. It would have been great to have them lumped together in the back as a mini bestiary for ease of finding.

Overall, The Devil’s Spine is another fine addition to the Numenera series. I think it’s the weakest overall product for the line so far, but only because the collection backslides into old school Dungeons and Dragons hack and slash dungeon crawling, which has seem to be the exact opposite of what Numenera strives for in the core rulebook. The adventures are still well done, the boast some wonderful art and I can definitely recommend the collection to any fan of the cipher system so far. It’s just a heads up that these are very combat heavy and if that is not what you or your GM have in mind for Numenera, you might be better off homebrewing your adventures. For those that do pick it up, these four adventures will keep your gaming crew busy for many a session and also give you a nice look as how multifaceted and strange the Ninth World is.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Devil's Spine
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In Strange Aeons: Lovecraftian Numenera
Publisher: Monte Cook Games
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/31/2013 06:30:25
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/31/tabletop-review-in-stra-
nge-aeons-lovecraftian-numenera/

What a great piece to talk about on Halloween, eh? In Strange Aeons merges my favorite game of 2013, Numenera, with my favorite game of all time, Call of Cthulhu. Of course, depending on how you have been running/playing Numenera, you might have already done this. After all, both games are essentially ones of discovery over combat. Both games have player characters continually finding strange relics from the past to help them get through adventures. In Numenera‘s case, these items are ciphers – technological relics from the previous eight worlds. In Call of Cthulhu, it’s spells from a bygone age or alien technology that lets your brain travel across time and space. In both games you will encounter strange creatures, many of which are hard to describe because they are so alien to our vocabulary and imagination. In Numenera these are simply life forms that exist a billion years into the future. In Call of Cthulhu, they are horrible monstrosities for whom mankind is not even worth paying attention to at best and a minor distraction or lunch at worst. Who is to say however, that some of these mundane but bizarre creatures that populate the Ninth World are not Mythos creatures that the current world takes for granted or that could have even evolved or changed over time? Perhaps even the return of humanity to Earth is simply an experiment by the Fungi from Yuggoth or the machinations of an Elder God? Numenera is what you make of it after all, and the more you look at, the easier it is to see how a game of cosmic horror and a game of futuristic discovery and wonder can easily overlap to give gamers a truly unique experience.

In Strange Aeons is ten pages of bringing Lovecraftian creatures, themes and moods to the Numenera setting (the cover page and a page of recommended reading makes twelve). The first four pages are devoted to discussing how adding Mythos elements changes the Numenera setting. In truth, it’s not that much of a change. The Ninth World is already populated with strange alien technology, creatures and locations. So it’s not as if you are truly adding new elements to the setting. Instead, it’s more about how the Keeper presents the Ninth World to the player. Present new items not just with a sense of wonder but with sense of foreboding. After all, that cipher might shoot out a rainbow of glitter, or it could be a portal to a dimension of sentient screams that have long sought a way into our world. Maybe that odd box houses a glowing orb that makes anything it touches turn into chicken parmesan…or maybe it’s a puzzle box built by Phillip Lemarchand. That building players are exploring in hopes to find a cure to a virus plaguing a village might indeed hold a cure or even have been a hospital for a previous civilization. It might also have been the temple for the Great Old One Glakki. YOU DON’T KNOW because the Ninth World is caked with a billion years of unimaginables and so exploration and discovery may have a price your characters (and their sanity) were not expecting to pay.

Storywise, the GM/Keeper has to set the stage for this variant of Numenera. Describe things with a slightly ominous narrative. How do you know you can trust those strangers in the hamlet a few miles off? Perhaps the angles of that building cause a headache if you look at it for too long thanks to the non-Euclidian geometry in its makeup. Now that doesn’t mean everything is evil or out to cause character death. You just want to keep the paranoia level higher than usual. After all, a building COULD have non-Euclidian geometry, but that alone doesn’t make it evil. Maybe a race of benevolent cyborg parrots built it to travel dimensions. They key again is YOU DON’T KNOW, making the usual Numenera themes of discovery and exploration more Press Your Luck than Mysterious Cities of Gold. Do the players get big bucks or do they land on a whammy? A whammy in Lovecratian Numenera more than likely has limbs jutting out at strange angles, eyestalks that shoot out acid covered teeth and more tongues than mouths. The game is now risk vs. reward. Well, it always WAS, but not the risk is far more apparent.

The hardest aspect of Lovecraftia to pull off in Numenera may be the sense of being alone and insignificant in the universe. After all, there have been eight previous worlds and a billion years of history on this version of Earth. Obviously there must be something important about this ball of mud and water that has kept it going with all these different societies and alien races that come to visit. Think about it though. What happened to those previous eight worlds? Perhaps it is mankind’s horrible destiny to propagate, flourish and then suddenly be struck down by crossing a line into experiences and realms they simply were not meant to traverse into. Perhaps each of the eight civilizations were struck down due to a cosmic alignment of the stars. Perhaps the rise and slumber of Great Cthulhu is as cyclical as the seasons or winds. What happens when a player realizes that for all these previous worlds have accomplished, they are now but dust in the wind with no one to remember their deeds or names? What happens when they realize no matter what they do, their race is fated to die as horribly and suffer eternally in the same fashion as all those that came before them? That’s some heavy stuff and great roleplaying potential. Will a character strive to make a difference or will they collapse before the obvious weight of time and space that now rests solely on their shoulders?

In terms of actual stats and mechanics, this short little supplement provides a decent amount of content in that regard. There’s a new optional Sanity mechanic where you’ll lose points from your Intellect pool but also potentially gain permanent bonuses to your Intellect Edge. It’s a neat little system that simulates the Cthulhu Mythos trait from Call of Cthulhu (CM goes up, Max Sanity goes down) without adding any new stats or something to scribble in on those character sheets of yours. There are a lot of options for dealing with Sanity and its slow erosion in Lovecraftian Numenera. You are also given two new descriptors for characters (Mad and Doomed), which has some unique bonuses and hindrances. Both of which have some special GM intrusion effects which can really suck as the GM is sure to spring these at the worst possible time for the sake of exciting narration but the bonuses do make up for it. Plus, wouldn’t it be fun to play a madman on occasion? You’re also given stats for Deep Ones, the Great Race of Leng (Yithians), Mi-Go and even a Shoggoth! Of course, some players may find rapey fish folk to be mundane considering some of the truly weird life forms on the Ninth World, but it is what it is. Finally, In Strange Aeons gives some examples of reskinning creatures from the Bestiary to be more ominous and Lovecraftian.

All in all, In Strange Aeons is another truly incredible release for Numenera. I really only have three or four minor issues with the piece. I’m surprised that this wasn’t a section in the core rulebook. Perhaps as an appendix? I also didn’t see the point in the sidebar talking about Lovecraft’s racist tendencies. Yes, it’s a shame such a brilliant man was an overwhelmed with hate and fear of things he didn’t understand in a manner more mundane that those in his characters, but what was really the point of bringing that up? It would be like writing a D&D supplement and then bringing up some negative character trait of Gygax and/or Arneson. Finally, but this is highly subjective – I guess I feel three dollars for ten pages of content is a bit much in this day and age of crazy PDF deals for tabletop content. Again, all of these are minor things and it doesn’t keep the piece from being something I can highly recommend to fans of Cthulhu gaming or Numenera.

Now if, like me, you’ve already been running Numenera with a Mythos bent, then you probably won’t get much out of this except the stat blocks for creatures or the new descriptors. Much of this will be common sense or aspects you’ve already implemented into your Ninth World campaign. In that case, you really don’t need to pick this up unless you want the aforementioned pages on mechanics or if you’re just being a digital completionist for the system. For everyone else though, you’ll want to pick this up for the new layer this piece can add to a Numenera game and for the ideas and mechanics it contains. In Strange Aeons is simply a wonderful addition to the Numenera system and proof that a short supplement can still be an awesome or even a game-changing one.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
In Strange Aeons: Lovecraftian Numenera
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Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
Publisher: Catalyst Game Labs
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/29/2013 08:04:35
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/29/tabletop-review-shadowr-
un-the-assassins-primer/

Wetworks is a very tricky thing to pull off in a tabletop game, even one like Shadowrun. Players, and thus their characters, tend to look at themselves in a heroic light, so it’s generally very hard to get a group of characters to take on a Wetworks mission, especially if the target can be considered good or innocent. A mission to prevent an assassination, sure, that’s easy enough to get PCs to accept. You can generally even get them to take an assassination mission if you’re killing a really big bad guy, like an Aztlan uberpriest or horrible serial murderer. That’s similar to the “raid the dungeon to snuff out the evil necromancer in order to save the village” motif from fantasy RPGs. Killing a good NPC trying to whistleblow on an evil corporation though? At least one PC seems to balk every time, thus causing the adventure to be thrown out, and a lot of GM planning goes out the window. Even Shadowrun adventure writers have had to deal with this headache and throw in some caveats for those types of missions when they are actually published.

So enter The Assassin’s Primer. Although fifteen of the seventeen pages in this document are JackPoint style fiction, this is a great look at assassins. More importantly, you are given an example of how to make a “noble professional killer” in addition to a religious fundamentalist, a patriotic abattoir and a ruthless psycho who just happens to love murdering things. Not only are there interesting character designs here, but it will make playing and/or designing Wetworks adventures all the easier. There are four very interesting positive qualities and one negative one in the two pages of actual mechanics in this piece. The benefits and drawbacks are enticing and unique enough to make a gamer curious about playing an assassin, and they come with enough background information to give a GM plot threads aplenty while also helping the player to flesh out the back story of their new killing machine.

The majority of the piece is JackPoint style fiction, as I mentioned earlier. If you’re new to Shadowrun (Fifth Edition just came out after all), this means that the fiction is done from the point of view of a speaker, or rather a writer, on a super secret chat room/message board/web forum in the Matrix. As the piece goes on, you’ll see side comments and even conversations occur between JackPoint members. It’s the most common way the metaplot occurs in Shadowrun, and you’ll quickly grow to accept if not outright enjoy it.

Our speaker for this piece is new to Jackpoint, and unfortunately, it looks like his first post is also about to be his last. Quietus, as he calls himself, is about to be killed by his employer (an all too common occurrence in the Sixth World I’m afraid) for reasons we will never know. Before he goes, he decides to spend his remaining time creating a primer on assassins to help them be better understood in terms of what they do and why they do it. Oddly enough, Quietus states he is a lurker to ShadowSEA and is posting his piece there, but ShadowSEA hasn’t really been used for advancing the Metaplot since, well, 2050 I guess. I’m not sure if this was an error that got through editorial, if this is actually meant to be a piece for ShadowSEA and not Jackpoint (Which would be quite unusual) or something else. Still, longtime Shadowrun gamers will probably see that and wonder what exactly happened here.

The text is pretty straightforward. Quietus talks about who becomes an assassin and why, including his own personal transformation from starving Grecian refuge into a death dealer. Oddly enough, Quietus’ name and his story, coupled with what little information we are given about his teacher, had me wanting to crack constant Assamite jokes in this review, but it would be all too easy. Plus, if you’ve never played Vampire: The Masquerade, it would be lost on you. ANYWAY, Quietus breaks assassins down into three categories: the desperate, the psycho loonies and the idealists (generally those who believe they are killing for a greater cause). There’s also some great advice on weapons, armor, needed skills and other basics on how to be an assassin, and it’s all wonderful advice – for playing a character/NPC, NOT going out and doing it for real. There’s a lot of great content here for players and DMs alike here. Little bits and considerations most gamers overlook but shouldn’t.

There’s some great JackPoint interaction here too. There’s one huge hilarious bit from Clockwork the Hobgoblin, as it turns out he and Quietus have worked together before. We get to see what is hopefully foreshadowing the death of Haze. We get to see why it is so hard to believe /dev/grrl and Slamm-O! haven’t been shot dead yet on one of their runs. We get to see that Picador survived Storm Front more or less intact. So on and so forth. As just a piece of JackPoint fiction, The Assassin’s Primer does an incredible job of being both informative and entertaining. As piece on Wetworks operatives and how you can do them while still viewing yourself with a white hat on, I don’t think I could have asked for a better supplement. Okay, maybe a few more pages of mechanics or some tips on how to make a Wetworks adventure run smoother when a character refuses to take part. Those things would have made it even better, but you know what I mean.

Overall, I’m exceptionally happy with The Assassin’s Primer. It’s well written, imparts a lot of great information from an in-game point of view, a way to play a “lawful good” style assassin and some interesting new character creation bits. Oh and a new gun. The Assassin’s Primer might be a bit overpriced for those of you who only want rules, stats blocks and the like, but hopefully CGL will come up with something more towards your liking down the road. For those that like Sixth World metaplot in-game fiction, there’s a lot to love here.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: The Assassin's Primer
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Vault of the Dracolich (D&D Next)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/29/2013 06:24:07
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/29/tabletop-review-dd-next-
-vault-of-the-dracolich-dungeons-dragons/

Vault of the Dracolich is a noteworthy adventure for many reasons. It’s the first ever Game Day adventure to be released for public sale. It’s the second publicly available D&D Next adventure, with the first being Murder at Baldur’s Gate. It’s an incredibly large adventure, as it’s designed for four gaming parties, each consisting of four to six 4th Level characters. That’s a total of sixteen to twenty-four players! That’s like a V:TM LARP size adventure. As you can imagine, it takes more DMs to run the adventure (one for each party) and one person to coordinate what is going on. Now, you can scale the adventure down to have one troupe play it or to turn it into a set of five short adventures, but the adventures loses a little when you do this, as it’s meant to be a big chaotic crazy mess that is sure to be a memorable adventure for you and your friends. Outside of a Game Day event or a convention, it’s hard to think about when you could get enough people to properly play this adventure. Doubly so for a place to house all those gamers!

Sounds great, right? Well, there’s a downside to this PDF, which is that it only contains a fraction of what you need to run the adventure. Sure it comes with the adventure and two PDF maps (one for the players and one for the GM), but it’s still missing a LOT of content. For example, you need to have been a part of the D&D Next playtest to make this adventure work. Unfortunately, the playtest is now done. Sure, there are some of us that are still part of the process past the public playtest, but if you missed out on the playtest, you won’t have the rules for the game, the bestiary that contains all the monsters you need to run this adventure, character creation bits and more. So if you want this adventure and don’t have D&D Next, you should hold off until it’s publicly available. Otherwise you have an adventure with a lot of missing content you simply can’t run. Other missing pieces include the pregenerated characters and all the pieces that were in the Game Day 2013 kit, like the cling sheets to keep track of where each of the four parties is at, along with the location of the dracolich. Now, I realize we couldn’t get physical copies of these things as this is a PDF only product, but it would have been exceptionally easy to tag on all the missing content as a separate PDF. I don’t know if it was just a massive oversight by Wizards of the Coast when they added this to DNDClassics.com or what, but it’s a shame that such an incomplete product is available for sale. Well, at least it’s only five bucks, and you can use the adventure with previous editions of D&D if your Dungeonmaster has the time and patience to do so. However, because of the missing content and logistical issues that come with running Vault of the Dracolich, it’s hard to recommend this piece to the average D&D fan out there.

The adventure itself has between one and four parties infiltrating the lair of Dretchroyaster, a mighty Dracolich and the focus of the Cult of the Dragon. Forgotten Realms fans will recognize the name, as this is a pretty well known faction on Toril. If you prefer other campaign settings or a generic world, you can change a few names here and there to suit your world. The lair of the Dracolich is large enough that it accompanies four sections, ranging from a Lizardmen commune to a temple of the dead god Bhaal. Each of the four locations offers a very different experience, so if you decide to run all four parts as a mini campaign or a single party, things won’t feel repetitive. Each party must enter their chosen location and find an idol that lies within. The idols are the key to entering the chamber where the Dracolich has housed an ancient artifact of immense power. The ultimate end goal is to get that artifact out of the Dracolich’s clutches, be it absconding with it or destroying it.

There are some added twists for the multi-group setting, where characters and even entire parties can trade places thanks to some faulty portals. This is a really cute idea, but without the massive player experience it just doesn’t work, so I suggest nixing it. There’s also a very odd option for allowing players to continually resurrect from the dead, albeit with some negative consequences like lowered initiative, lowered hit points or even coming back as a wight. I really don’t like this option, as without the fear of character death, what’s the point of an adventure like this? My suggestion is let the death stand. After all, why would the Cult of the Dragon and/or a Dracolich house their prized possessions in a place where thieves and adventurers keep coming back from the dead? Obviously the PCs won’t be the first to die here. Just a bad idea across the board.

Overall, Vault of the Dracolich is a truly unique and highly memorable experience if you can get enough players and DMs to let the adventure unfold the way it was intended. It takes a lot of coordination, but the end result is well worth it. Playing Vault of the Dracolich as a campaign loses a good deal of its luster, but it still manages to be a really fun experience for all involved. Again, I can’t emphasize enough that the PDF version on DNDClassics.com is missing content needed to run this adventure, so if you don’t have D&D Next rules, you’re a bit out of luck here unless you want to homebrew the piece for an older edition of Dungeons & Dragons. A thumbs way up for the adventure as designed, and a thumbs down for releasing the adventure for sale without including the missing content. So everything evens out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Vault of the Dracolich (D&D Next)
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Hideous Creatures: Ghouls
Publisher: Pelgrane Press
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/28/2013 06:23:35
Originally Posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/28/tabletop-review-hideous-
-monsters-ghouls-trail-of-cthulhu/

Hideous Creatures: Ghouls is the fourth in Ken Hite’s line of Hideous Cratures short PDFs. The goal of each PDF is to try and mix up or change the way both players and Keepers think about Lovecraftian characters. Previous entries have included Deep Ones, Mi-Go and Hounds of Tindalos. The bad news is that I haven’t been that impressed with the previous releases, but the good news is that each entry has been noticeably better than the last. I am happy to report that, once again, Ghouls is the best entry in the Hideous Creatures line today, and it’s also a piece I am fairly positive about. Well, aside from the bad cover art that looks like it was rendered with CGI from the 1990s.

Ghouls runs twelve pages, but only nine of those pages are content. The first three pages are taken up by the cover, title page, and finally the introduction and table of contents. This means you’re only getting nine pages of content for $2.95, which is a bit pricey in this era of digital RPG offerings, but if you’re going to pick any of the Hideous Creatures series up, Ghouls is the one to get.

The piece starts off with a rundown on the Lovecraftian version of ghouls, which are notably different from those you’ll find in Dungeons & Dragons or Vampire: The Masquerade. While Mythos ghouls have canine qualities, the piece suggests throwing players off by giving them different animal qualities, such as rats and jackals. This is a good idea, and the only ones that are a bit off the wall are the suggestions like worms and flies. You’re also given a lot of information on why ghouls may do what they do. After all, like Deep Ones, they have some degree of humanity about them, but unlike their fishy friends, ghouls retain a degree of humanity once fully converting into their monstrous form. Hite suggests a whole bevy of reasons as to both an individual ghoul’s motivations, as well as the race as whole. Why they breed with humans, what their end game is and so on. Now, some of these postulations are contradictory, and that’s on purpose. You’re not supposed to use all of them. Just take one or two from the list and run with them. This piece is meant to be a sounding board for new and different ideas after all.

From there we get two pages of Trail of Cthulhu stats and mechanics, giving you new powers and abilities for a ghoul. I really liked the mechanics for a Ghoul-born changeling or half-ghoul, and how even an Investigator can become a ghoul and still play their character. Of course, at some point that Stability is going to hit zero… After the stats, we are given even more potential variations and story seeds for ghouls. There are thirty-one variations in all. As usual, the qualities range from really good ideas to terrible ones, but which ones are which will differ by the reader. After all, no one is going to like all thirty-one ideas and no one is going to hate them all. I personally disliked the variation that ghouls are undead, as that’s done everywhere else, and by having Mythos ghouls being living breathing creatures, this sets them apart from other creatures bearing the race name. However, someone might like their ghouls being undead and able to paralyze anything but elves, so this will work for them. Heck, this piece even has mechanics for giving Mythos ghouls a paralyzing grasp! I loved the Parisian take on ghouls, and the idea of ghoul priests wearing special robes and masks to set them apart. I also really liked the idea of a schism between ghoul sects – one that has a traditional old style way of doing things and a “new breed” that wants to speed up the return of the Great Old Ones.

Next we go into “Mythic Echoes,” which is where we see folkloric creatures that could possibly work as ghoul variants in your Trail of Cthulhu game. In the past we’ve seen some big stretches and poorly worded/researched items in this section, but with the ghouls, everything looked top notch to me. I especially loved seeing the Arabic Ghul get listed here, as it’s so overlooked by many gamers and game developers. After that, we go back into the mechanics side of things, where you are given a bevy of ways each skill in Trail of Cthulhu can net an Investigator information about a ghoul threat or menace. This, as always, is a favorite section of mine, as it really helps Keepers to think outside the box and players to realize that any skill is helpful if you look at it correctly.

The piece concludes with two story seeds and a half page bibliography. Usually the Hideous Creatures pieces have offered more story seeds, but they were generally of mixed quality. Here in Ghouls, we may only get the two, but both have a lot of potential as full-fledged adventures. One takes place in Chicago around Halloween, 1931, and the other can take place after one of five natural disasters. An enterprising Keeper can string all five together into a mini-campaign or really long adventure.

All in all, Ghouls is by far the best Hideous Creatures release yet, and the only negative thing I can say about it is that I think it should be priced a dollar less. I know, right? FEEL THE CRITICISM! This is definitely the only piece in the series I can strongly recommend, as the others have been mediocre, more or less. However, Ghouls is something well worth picking up, even if you don’t play Trail of Cthulhu. Any Mythos based RPG or even most horror games can freely adapt the material in this piece quite easily.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hideous Creatures: Ghouls
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Man-Made Mythology: A Comic Book RPG
Publisher: Critical Strike Publishing
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/23/2013 06:29:54
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/23/tabletop-review-man-mad-
e-mythology-a-comic-book-rpg/


Man-Made Mythology: A Comic Book RPG is the first offering from Critical Strike Publishing. Designed off the venerable 3.x engine, this game was made to allow the group to combine the flexibility of the OGL with the over-the-top action of the super-hero genre. Although this idea is not entirely new, it is something that this company approaches in a different manner than their colleagues.

The book begins off simply enough with the almost mandatory description of the hobby, a lexicon, and the methods for determining the characters starting Attributes. It is in Chapter Two that the company begins to illustrate their take on the comic-book world. Chapter Two begins with the racial descriptions and modifiers inherent to each of the four core races of Man-Made Mythology.

The first race presented is, of course, Humans. After that we come to Reptiods, an alien lizard species that came to Earth millennia ago. After that come the Synthetics, which are mankind’s success at creating artificial life and finally there is the matriarchal race of warrior-women – the Valkyries. There isn’t anything especially noteworthy about the starting racial choices, but they fill their roles well and give the Players several options to choose from without over-doing it.

Chapter Three begins with detailing the procedure to generate the characters Alter-Ego. Each Alter-Ego lists any sort of requirements that must be fulfilled as well as the Skills, Bonus Feats, and any Resource modifiers that come with that choice. The options here range from the bookish Academic, to Emergency Services characters, to Soldiers. The nice thing is that the choices also include things such as a Rural upbringing to flesh out the section.

In Chapter Four, the games Classes are presented. There are ten Classes available in the core-rules and these include enough options to make a variety of iconic characters. This chapter also begins with the Advancement guidelines and the rules for multi-classing. The individual Classes are presented in the familiar format found in most 3.x games, so one who is familiar with them will have no problem understanding them.

The same holds true for the next two chapters which go into detail about the games Skills and Feats. Although there are some new ideas presented here there is nothing truly unique to those familiar with the genre or overall 3.x games. There are some new feats presented, but these are mostly variations of existing ones that amplify the characters power usage and help further define their abilities.

It isn’t until Chapter Twelve after the mandatory rules on equipment, combat, magic usage and the like that the games super-powers, known as Mythic Abilities, are explained. There are fifty powers fleshed out in Man-Made Mythology and each comes with ten levels of modifiers to that power. The first mythic ability is Body Armor and while it provides basic protection it can also increase other attributes, mitigate critical hits, and provide damage reduction to the Character as they advance it. In my opinion there could have been many more powers given here and although the ones that do exist are detailed nicely. I just like my supers games to have a-lot of options when it comes to powers.

All in all I give Man-Made Mythology a thumbs in the middle. Is it anything entirely new and spectacular? No, but I feel it does a better job of emulating the genre than most of its predecessors using the 3.x engine. I am interested in seeing what other offerings the company provides as time passes, as I feel there is are a lot of options available for expansion. Man-Made Mythology could become a very well rounded game but only time will tell.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Man-Made Mythology: A Comic Book RPG
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Dungeon Crawl Classics #76.5: Well of the Worm
Publisher: Goodman Games
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/22/2013 07:35:24
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/22/tabletop-review-dungeon-
-crawl-classics-76-5-well-of-the-worm/

I’ve never understood the .5 style numeration of some Dungeon Crawl Classics adventures. There are several things that can trigger it – con exclusives, conversion from another system and so on. I just think it’s silly. Maybe a different track with its own numbering, ala old school D&D adventures? Con exclusives could be CE1, CE2 and so on. The point-five bit always sounds like it’s part of an adventure or to be tacked on as a follow-up to an earlier release. In this case, the adventure does state that it was converted to the Dungeon Crawl Classics system, but unfortunately it doesn’t say WHAT it was converted from. As a reviewer, that would have been nice to know for comparison and contrasting. I had to actually look up the original source, and it turns out it was originally DCC #29, back when these were printed for Dungeons & Dragons 3.5. It’s also worth noting the printed version of this adventure was originally only available to people who purchased two or more paper copies of adventures from Goodman Games. It’s nice to see that, for those who missed out on the original offer, they can still purchase a pdf version of the adventure. With all that out of the way, let’s get on with the review.

Well of the Worm is for four to six Level 1 characters, which is a rather small party for a DCC adventure. It’s a very short adventure which has characters going down a well to fight human headed worm monsters. I’ll admit that the enemies aren’t all that interesting a concept, but they can’t all be winners. Besides, just because *I* don’t think the well worms are interesting doesn’t mean that some other gamer WON’T. At least the adventure gives you three possible plot hooks to make your characters go down the well. One is especially weak (What are the chances all the characters are from the same village after all – how often does THAT happen?), but the other two are solid and diverse enough that they can spur your party into action.

Sure, it’s a bit odd that there is a massive cavern under a town’s dried up well, but it’s a fantasy game. Honestly, is that really the weirdest thing your players will have encountered in one of these? A good DM should really play up the tight quarters of the adventure. After all, this isn’t an expansive dungeon made by some evil big bad. It’s a naturally occurring cavern that just happens to have some hideous monsters living in it. I really like that the adventure calls attention to how cramped the location is and inflicts penalties on large weapons due to the lack of room to properly use them.

There isn’t a lot to see or do in Well of the Worm. It’s a fairly straightforward, linear dungeon crawl. Characters will hack and slash their way through zombies and well worms. For a Dungeon Crawl Classics adventure, the lethality of the quest is surprisingly low. I was surprised at how “easy” the adventure was for characters to survive compared to previous releases. That said, there are two very easy ways to die in this one. The first is taking a very large fall at the beginning of the adventure. The second is falling into a pit of the human headed worm monsters. Neither are very fun ways for your character to go. For the most part, though, this is a fairly standard and somewhat generic dungeon crawl. Even the two main antagonists are a bit predictable and pat. In fact the warm worm mother is almost ripped exactly from the video game ArcaniA‘s first boss, which is probably just a coincidence. There’s only so much you can do with worm monsters after all. There is one neat monster in the Zombie Ogre, especially its unique physical state. That’s definitely the most memorable and enjoyable thing about Well of the Worm. Unfortunately, it’s an optional encounter that may not happen depending on what players do.

There isn’t a lot of art to Well of the Worm, but what’s here is very well done indeed. There are two full page handouts that really help to make the adventure come alive, and as always, the DCC maps are the best in the industry today. The two covers (front and back) are full colour and are really well done, but I did have some people laugh at the absurdity of the monsters, which puts a damper on playing the adventure. After all, if the players can’t take them seriously, it takes a bit of extra work to salvage the experience.

All in all, let’s give Well of the Worm a thumb’s in the middle. It’s not a bad adventure by any means – just a rather generic and uninteresting one. It’s very well written, and I loved some of the details to the location and mechanics, but the adventure just didn’t really wow me. There are plenty of better (and cheaper) Dungeon Crawl Classics adventures out there. Again, this is not a bad adventure by any means, but I’d only recommend picking this up if you’re a completionist trying to get your hands on all of the adventures for the system.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #76.5: Well of the Worm
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Castles & Crusades Tome of the Unclean
Publisher: Troll Lord Games
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/17/2013 10:53:17
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/17/tabletop-review-tome-of-
-the-unclean-castles-crusades/

Tome of the Unclean is the latest release from Troll Lord Games for its Castles & Crusades system. This is the oddest release yet as it’s being made available even though the book is nowhere near finished. Instead, Troll Lord is trying out an installment plan option, something I’ve never seen a RPG publisher try before. It’s similar to episodic content for video games, in that you pay a lump sum up front and then will be given regular updates with new content. In this case the PDF will be automatically updated over at Drivethrurpg.com or RPGNow.com whenever new content is added. Updates should be every two to three weeks and there should be two to three monsters with each update. If you prefer to wait for the finished version, you can, but the PDF will cost five dollars more and the physical version of the book will be twice what you pay for the installment version of the PDF. I decided to go the installment route since it’s such an odd but intriguing concept and I wanted to see how things would go down. I have no idea what the eventual final page count (It is expected to be roughly 100 pages) will be or how the book will turn out quality-wise, but at least it will be an interesting journey, right?

Tome of the Unclean will be focusing on demons and devils. Yes there is a difference in most fantasy games. This first installment looks at three creatures: two demons and a devil and it clocks in at nine pages. Of course, two of those pages are the front and back cover and another two pages are devoted to the Open Game License and cover page. That means you get five pages of content for your ten dollars. Sounds crazy expensive, right? Well it is right now, but with each installment, you’ll more than likely start to get your money’s worth.

Tome of the Unclean currently provides a half page definition for devils and demons for Castles and Crusades. As a retro-clone, it is very similar to the old Dungeons & Dragons hierarchy for both. In this first installment you’ll get the classic Balor and a Glabrezu for the demons and Beelzebub for the devils. All three denizens of the Hells are written up nicely and are accompanied by an excellent illustration. This is a very nice start to what looks to be an incredible book and I’m really hoping that the remaining updates will be as great as the first impression. Speaking of art, though, the cover for Tome of the Unclean is just amazing. It’s one of the better fantasy pieces I’ve seen this year and Jason Walton deserves a special shout out for his work here (He also did the interior illustrations for this installment).

I definitely think that if you are a Castles & Crusades fan, you should go for the installment version of Tome of the Unclean. Not only will you get the book for far cheaper than you would otherwise, you’ll be privy to the editorial and writing process by seeing changes occur and new content being added with each update. Tome of the Unclean certainly is going to prove to be an entertaining and unique experience for tabletop gaming fans, even if the book doesn’t manage to stay as impressive as this first update. I know I’m excited to see this blend of classic D&D denizens of darkness with a new way of releasing a manual. Here’s hoping Troll Lord Games can keep the regular updates coming.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades Tome of the Unclean
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Guildhalls of the Deathless
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/15/2013 06:27:21
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/15/tabletop-review-mummy-t-
he-curse-guildhalls-of-the-deathless-world-of-darkness/



After an extremely successful Kickstarter, Mummy: The Curse was released at the beginning of this year to both critical and fan acclaim. If you read my extremely long and enthusiastic review, then you know that I consider it to be one of the two best releases of 2013 so far (along with Numenera). Guildhalls of the Deathless is the first supplement for Mummy: The Curse, and it’s a worthy second release for the line. Although it’s not as impressive as the core rulebook, and there are a few issues I have with the book here and there, they are minor ones, and with a fifteen dollar price tag, Guildhalls of the Deathless is an exceptionally good deal considering you are getting nearly two hundred pages of content that will help to flesh out your Mummy: The Curse campaign. You even get an extremely long adventure that should take multiple play sessions to get through, which is only the tip of the iceberg for an extremely long metaplot based campaign.

So let’s talk content. There are eight chapters to Guildhalls of the Deathless. The book is divided into two parts – one for players and one for Storytellers. Unlike the core rulebook, I can’t say that there is anything in Guildhalls of the Deathless that would spoil the playing aspect of the game – unless you read the adventure before you played it of course. You also don’t NEED to read or own Guildhalls of the Deathless to play Mummy: The Curse, but the book does give an extremely in-depth look at how the five guilds view themselves and each other, in addition to a long history of each organization and how they work towards restoring the glory of Lost Irem. If you’re picking up Mummy to read or run a game, then you will probably WANT to get Guildhalls of the Deathless as it is extremely informative and well written, helping to better define the five guilds. This will let the Storyteller better design inter- and intra-guild relations and give characters a chance to better understand their place within the organization they chose at character creation, as well as the place in the grand scheme of the Judges.

The first five chapters comprise the entirely of the player’s side of Guildhalls of the Deathless. Each chapter is devoted to a specific guild. Chapter One is for the Maa-Kep (middle management), Chapter Two is about the Mesen-Nebu (alchemists), Chapter Three talks about the Sesha-Hebsu (scribes), Chapter Four is about the Su-Menent (priests) and finally Chapter Five gives us the Tef-Aabhi (masons). I’m really glad each guild received their own chapter in which specifics were talked about, as they received a level of depth, history and philosophical discussion the core rulebooks imply but didn’t have room for. It’s great to see all five guilds in a single book too, instead of spread out amongst five small “Clanbook” style releases. Here we get everything at once, early on into the life of the game, and for far less than if you had to purchase the content in five smaller books. This is simply the best way to do this style of content and it really benefits the player. Note that reading these five chapters is bound to change your original impressions for each of the five guilds. The extra depth will change how you look at each one, and also give you insight into their own goals… as well as the internal issues plaguing each organization. All five chapters are really worth reading if you’re even remotely interesting in playing or running a chronicle of Mummy: The Curse.

The only real problem I had with the player side of the book is that the five chapters for the guilds are neither equal nor uniform. What I mean by this is that some guilds have more pages devoted to them than others. So, for example, you’ll learn far more about one guild than you would another. As well, the information you are given isn’t presented in a stable format, so one guild might see a sample PC presented within its pages, but the other four won’t have NPC stat blocks at all. I think editorial could have done a better job by telling the writers to outline each chapter in a uniform format. For example, maybe do a brief overview, then the information, then what other guilds think they know about the guild in question, followed by what the guild of topic thinks of the other guild. So on and so forth. That would have made the book flow a lot smoother, and it would be easier to find the information both players and Storytellers might be hunting for in a pinch. Instead, the chaotic way each chapter is written might make it enjoyable to read, but it certainly makes using the book as a resource while PLAYING a lot harder. An index would have been a godsend. It’s also extremely obvious that there are different writers for each guild, as the voice, writing style and content are so different from each other. Whether or not you would prefer a more uniform voice is subjective however, but I do wish the voices for the book would have blended together better, as the end result feels piecemeal instead of cohesive. I can’t emphasize enough how MINOR the above issues are, but they are noticeable and thus worth pointing out.

The last three chapters of the book are for the Storyteller. It’s odd because the bulk of the book is the Storyteller sections rather than the chapters on the guilds themselves. Those first five chapters and the introduction take up 78 of the 178 pages in the book. That’s less than half. In fact, the longest chapter (roughly 45 pages) is the adventure, which is only part one of a Chronicle. To get the rest of the chronicle, you’ll have to purchase a different book (most likely the upcoming Cursed Necropolis: DC release). I would strongly have preferred to see the Avarice Chronicle be released as its own separate supplement rather than spreading it as a tagalong throughout other books. That way, if you wanted the chronicle, you could get it in one shot instead of having to purchase multiple, possibly unrelated or unwanted, books and then having to cart all of those around (physically or in e-reader format) instead of having them in a single book. It also makes looking up information insane, as you have to hunt through multiple books (without indexes BTW) instead of, again, a single release. This was bad form from WW/OPP and I have to say I’m very disappointed with their decision to release the chronicle in this format. Again, this is a minor issue to me, but one I know other people will probably feel strongly about, so I’m bringing it up now as a head’s up that you will need to buy multiple books if you want the full chronicle.

Chapter Six is entitled “Keys to the Chamber” and it’s mainly about rules for guild (inter- and intra-) disputes and how to resolve them with dice and roleplaying. Obloquy takes up the bulk of this chapter, and it is an interesting read, but not something that will come up often (or at all) in your Chronicle unless you really want to tell a story about it or you are running M:TC like V:TM. The rest of the chapter is about creating and designing talismans (a magic item within the game) and some new abilities for your character. Guild Affinities can be purchased in relation o a character’s Guild Status rating. There are also new rules for Mummies combining their powers into one channeled effect. This is known as Unison. This can create effects up the equivalent of Level 10 Sekhem, which is insanely powerful. I like the Unison idea, although I do wish the rules for it were more defined and also not tucked into the tail end of Chapter Six in a supplement. I can see this being missed by a lot of gamers. There’s some great new rules and content in Chapter Six, and I can see why they were put in the Storyteller section instead of the Player area, as it lets the person running the game decide if they want to use these and if they want to make DISCOVERING this new option part of an adventure.

Chapter Seven, “Beyond the Door,” is mostly mechanics. Here you have more Guild Affinities, but these are geared towards specific guilds rather than the universal ones found in the previous chapter. Again, these are very much tied into Guild Status, so if a player didn’t take any during creation these are unavailable to him or her. You’ll also find magic items and NPCs here as well. The chapter is grouped by guild, which makes looking for information easier, but an index would have made finding and using the pieces in this chapter so much easier.

Finally we have Chapter Eight, which is the first part of the Avarice Chronicle. This is a huge chapter, the largest in the book, and the Chronicle is a mini campaign in and of itself, meaning it will keep players busy for many a playthrough. Now, will it keep them busy long enough for the second part of the story to be released? That I don’t know. This is White Wolf/Onyx Path Publishing, after all, and they do have some issues getting things out on time, even more so than most companies in the tabletop industry. As such, you might want to hold off on running this until part two is in your hands to ensure your characters aren’t stuck without anything to do until the new release. I’ve seen this happen to many a Pathfinder gamer after all…

The adventure itself, Crucible of Fate is an excellent one. It takes place in Washington D.C. (my backyard – literally; I look out my window and there’s the Washington Monument), which is a good place to hold the Grand Conclave – the largest gathering of mummies in thousands of years. After all, D.C. is rife with Egyptian style art and motifs. Who is to say that the inspiration for these things is not far older than the mortals suspect? Such a large gathering gives a fine explanation as to why there would be a clutch of mummies able to have adventures together all in one spot. After all, the hardest part about writing a Mummy adventure is figuring out a task that requires ONE Mummy, much less three or four. This particular adventure touches on all the basics. You get to interact with multiple Arisen, witness mummy politics, discover some potential heresy against Irem, Duat and the Judges, fight some unholy creations, and most importantly see the schism between multiple mummies regarding how to view the modern day world, as well as exactly where an Arisen’s loyalty should lie. The adventure is a lot of fun and you can definitely feel the metaplot hammer hitting the characters repeatedly here, so even if you don’t want to play Crucible of Fate, you will probably want to read it to see how the world of the Arisen is about to dramatically change.

All in all, Guildhalls of the Deathless is a wonderful release, and it compliments Mummy: The Curse beautifully. It’s not a flawless however, and whether the flaws Guildhalls of the Deathless contains are minor or major will vary by the reader. I was quite happy with this book and Mummy: The Curse continues to be the crown jewel in the New World of Darkness for me (although The God Machine Chronicle came close and Blood and Smoke might surpass it, but I’m starting to think the latter won’t hit until 2014).

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Guildhalls of the Deathless
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RM3 Web of Illusion (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/14/2013 06:55:24
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/14/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-web-of-illusion-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-edition/-


Web of Illusion is one of those odd Ravenloft adventures that neither fits the mood nor theme of the campaign setting, and actually works better if used as a generic mid-level adventure for PCs. This is not the fault of the adventure’s location, as Sri Raji is one of the more unique locations in all of 2e AD&D, and the Darklord of this domain is one of the more memorable in Ravenloft. Rather, the adventure simply eschews everything that makes Ravenloft, well, Ravenloft, and instead we are given a highly generic and somewhat dull experience that just doesn’t sit well with fans of the Dread Domain, and especially with those of Sri Raji itself.

One of the big problems is that the adventure lacks everything that makes Ravenloft so unique. There is no need for fear or horror checks because nothing about the adventure is scary, spooky, creepy or foreboding. It’s your general run of the mill, “Learn about a big bad guy, enter a dungeon and kill it,” affair. That’s hardly the type of thing one thinks of in regards to Ravenloft. Oerth or Toril based adventures, sure, but not the Dread Domain. Another problem is that there really isn’t a lot of story. The adventure is literally, “You’re magically in a new location. Here’s a magical artifact that can kill the evil being that rules this land. Have at it.” Sure you get a tiny bit of explanation from a few NPCs, but the adventure is so linear and dead set on rushing you into the dungeon crawl that you don’t really get a taste of the setting. This is funny, because the adventure includes a huge section from the Darklords supplement on the background and world design of Sri Raji. Seriously, why include over five pages of background information if your adventure turns this entire country into a one shot location that players will never be able to visit again?

Another thing wrong with the adventure is that it simply refuses to ever pull the trigger on the fact that Ravenloft is a pretty evil place where one constantly has to choose between the lesser of two evils. It turns the guilds of Sri Raji from a bevy of horrible choices that control the political intrigue of the country into a simple black hat and white hat side. Sure, the white hats are all Lawful Evil, but the characterization in the adventure makes them all closer to Lawful Neutral or Chaotic Good. That’s some bad design there. As well, if players drag their feet, the DM is encouraged to run a scene where their would-be allies claim to have infected the PCs with a weretiger strain of lycanthropy. However, the adventure balks at actually doing this, having it be a trick to make players go along with the adventure story. Not only is that kind of lame, but it’s Ravenloft people. Infect those PCs! Look at Dark of the Moon. Here players ARE infected with Lycanthrophy, and it really adds a layer of tension and fear to the adventure. Not with Web of Illusion though. God forbid you actually try to fit the theme or feel of the setting.

Finally, the adventure is just too disjointed for me. It feels like two different writers with two VERY different adventure writing styles each took half of the adventure and threw it together. The first half is a bunch of barely written scenes thrown together without any real order or continuity, and the DM is supposed to make sense of them. Then the second half of the adventure is written in a completely different style and is a very dry dungeon crawl that feels hastily inserted. Web of Illusion is just NOT a good Ravenloft adventure, and it’s kind of a middle finger to the entire campaign setting.

Now you would think after all that constructive criticism that I’d give this adventure a huge thumbs down. Actually, no. As I said at the beginning of the review, Web of Illusion is far from being a good Ravenloft adventure, but it works quite well as a generic hack and slash dungeon crawl. The actual dungeon crawl part of the adventure is really well done. In fact, in terms of explaining and showing how to properly use illusion magic, Web of Illusion is almost a must read for any DM or player who uses Illusionist specialists in the slightest. Showcase layered illusion and how to craft one on top of the other or make the dispelling of an illusion trigger a new and different one is simply genius, and it’s something 99.99% of players and DMs either overlook or never even think that deeply about. The illusions are the most dangerous aspect of the dungeon, and I think anyone who plays this will walk away with a newfound respect for that type of magic. The dungeon is tough but fair and the type of monster the Darklord turns out to be is always a fun one to deal with.

So a thumb’s down as a Ravenloft experience, but a thumbs up if you look at Web of Illusion as a generic hack and slash one shot, akin to what you’d find for say, Dungeon Crawl Classics. The two ratings balance each other out, and I give this a thumbs in the middle. I can’t recommend it if you’re specifically looking to run something Ravenloft for the Halloween season. You don’t have a lot of options to choose from over at DNDClassics right now, but there are definitely better ones than Web of Illusion for showcasing the Dread Domain. As a general adventure, five bucks for a sixty-seven page adventure is a really good deal nowadays, and there’s that great showcasing of how to properly use illusion magic, so it may be worth picking this up, depending on what you are looking for. In the end, Web of Illusion proves the old adage about whether or not to buy a Ravenloft adventure: if the adventure has you killing a Darklord, you probably shouldn’t buy it.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
RM3 Web of Illusion (2e)
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Dark of the Moon (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/11/2013 06:37:57
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/11/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-dark-of-the-moon-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-edition-
/

As I’ve said in the past, a good rule of thumb for whether or not a Ravenloft adventure is worth buying or not is whether the plot ends with you trying to kill the Darklord of a domain. If it does, put it down and look elsewhere. Of course, there are always exceptions to this rule. Ship of Terror is one. Bane of the Shadowborn is another. Thankfully, Dark of the Moon is another, even though you’ll be killing one of the more interesting Darklords in the game. The reason this adventure is able to get past the horrible idea of killing a Darklord (which should be all but impossible and trivializes what being a Darklord means as well as the entire campaign setting as a whole) is because you’re given a slow burn up to the inevitable climax. In essence, Dark of the Moon is more a mini campaign where trying to kill the Darklord only comes after a long series of grueling events where PCs will be tested not only by a horde of unwavering lycanthropes, but by the very elements themselves. Much of my time with Dark of the Moon both past and present reminded me of the old Wilderness Survival Guide from First Edition. For many gamers, Dark of the Moon will be the first adventure where they actually have to keep track of inclement weather damage, frostbite, hypothermia and starvation. For some, Dark at the Moon may be too intense for the gamer that just wants a standard hack and slash dungeon crawl. For others, the fact their players will have to deal with so many variables will be a new, exciting and interesting challenge. After all, weather is an enemy that you simply can’t defeat.

Dark of the Moon is designed for four to six players between 5th and 8th level. The adventure is pretty intense and more likely than not, members of the party will die from exposure to harsh temperatures or being eaten by werewolves. Do not underestimate how lethal this adventure is as it’s very reminiscent of some old Gygaxian penned adventures in terms of how easy it is for a PC to meet their final fate here. I’ve found that a Druid has the best chance of survival, followed by a Ranger or a Cleric. Indeed, a Druid may be indispensable to the party surviving both the weather and the werewolves in this adventure. The old AD&D adage about Mages being the best character the higher level characters get is thrown completely out the window here as for much of the adventure, Magic-Users will not have access to their spell components. So that extremely low Hit Point total combined with no magic just paints a massive bullseye on any Wizard PC that takes part in this adventure.

Dark of the Moon takes place in the domain of Vorostokov, which is an analogue for Siberia. Players will be brought to the domain by the mists of Ravenloft, ensuring that they will be ill prepared for a climate of endless frigid winter. Votostokov has little in the way of food as animals that are game animals are elusive and the weather is much too cold for the growing of crops. Villages are sparsely populated and it can take weeks of travel before you find one. As such, players are in a bind. After all, would you want to be wearing full plate mail in below zero weather? That has got to be painful. With the heroes realizing they are pretty unprepared for the weather (unless again, you have a druid or magic items like a ring of warmth), cold based damage is about to set in. So Players will be completely out of their element, both literally and figuratively lost in a land that they have never been in and freezing their collective asses off.

Which of course is when the hordes of werewolves show up. Much of Dark of the Moon is fighting and running from werewolves. If the players have magic, silver or blessed weapons, there will be more fighting than running but if the opposite is true, Pass Without Trace becomes the absolutely best spell in the game for the duration of this adventure. The werewolves in Vorostokov are very different from those players will have encountered before. Instead of your standard werewolves or loup-garou, the lycanthropes in Dark of the Moonare skinwalkers or Loup Du Noir, which actually doesn’t mean skinwalkers or skin changers in French. Discovering the differences between these creatures and your standard werewolves, is a big part of what will help characters to survive, especially as the way to kill the Darklord is extremely convoluted and may take multiple play sessions based on the rolls and wits of the players. There’s also the additional problem that at least on PC WILL be infected with lycanthropy, if not all of them. In Ravenloft you have a 2% chance per point of damage taken of developing lycanthropy – 3% if it is by the Darklord. Considering the sheer amount of combat and that for this adventure you roll after each hit and the percentage is cumulative, you’re going to have a werewolf or entire group of werewolf PCs. The good news is that being a werewolf will help them to survive the freezing weather, give them some nice damage prevention bonuses and help them to regenerate. The bad news is that it basically lets the Darklord of the domain mentally control them at will. A cruel DM will force infected players to find a cure for their lycanthropy after the adventure, but in Ravenloft, that is an exceptionally hard task to accomplish. A kind DM will let the players be free of the disease once the Darklord is dead and that’s what I’d strongly suggest. Of course some player at some point will want to stay a werewolf, but that’s a whole other problem you’ll have to deal with if and when it comes up.

Another interesting aspect of the adventure is how alignments blue here. You’ll find Chaotic Evil Rangers, a good aligned werewolf, and that your best bet for killing the Darklord is by allying with three evil aligned NPCs – two witches and a ghost. More than likely, there will be a few Powers Check rolls made by your players in this adventure. This is actually typical of a Ravenloft as you’ll find strange bedfellows as players must decide between the lesser of two evils. Truthfully though, the three allies you’ll need to make in this adventure aren’t evil in terms of how they are written, but Second Edition was pretty strict with classifying specific “races” (for lack of a better word) as a specific alignment with no room to budge. It’s odd the adventure does this with these three while making huge steps outside the usual alignment with the aforementioned good werewolf and evil ranger who still has access to all his class disciplines.

All in all, Dark of the Moon is one of the better “Kill the Darklord!” adventures for Ravenloft, mainly because while being the climax of the mission at hand, there is so much more going on, that it is only the focal point until the very end. Dark of the Moon will last you several playsessions and while it’s not a top tier Ravenloft adventure, so to speak, it’s still a pretty enjoyable one. You could do a lot worse for a five buck adventure, especially since this one will last you multiple playsessions and really test you as both a player and a Dungeon Master. I definitely recommend this, but with the caveat that you and your players really have to be willing character death or a permanent change into a evil werebeasty.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dark of the Moon (2e)
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Howls in the Night (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 10/11/2013 06:36:58
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/10/11/tabletop-review-ravenlo-
ft-howls-in-the-night-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-editi-
on/

It’s October and what better time for DNDCLassics.com to FINALLY start re-releasing some more Ravenloft adventures than in the month of Halloween. Until now, DNDClassics.com had only sported subpar releases like The Created, the badly written, Children of the Night pieces and the wonderful Monstrous Compendiums for the setting. This month however, we’ve seen four Ravenloft adventures released so far, which is great to see. Today we’ll be looking at Howls in the Night is not only one of the best Ravenloft adventures, but one of the best second edition adventures regardless of campaign setting. It’s extremely versatile and can be adapted to just about any campaign world (except Planescape). Best of all. Howls in the Night offers four different ways for the GM to run the adventure (One for each possible main antagonist) which gives the adventure an amazing amount of replay value, a fact that is all the more amazing when you remember that most adventures written in this time period (regardless of system) were extremely linear and inflexible.

Howls in the Night takes us to the domain of Mordent. It’s an analogue for Scotland and you’ll recognize that almost immediately. From the lush rolling meadows to the dark ominous moors where much of the adventure takes place, the DM should feel more than free to use their best (worst?) Scottish accent to give the NPCs of Mordent some personality. It’s a great setting and one made all the better by the fact the Darklord of the domain never shows up in the adventure. You can generally tell whether a Ravenloft adventure is good or bad by whether or not the goal is to kill a Darklord or not. If it is, put it back and look for a different adventure.

Howls in the Night is a little bit The Hound of the Baskervillies, a little bit of the Black Shuck from British folklore and a lot of Ravenloft twists thrown in. The adventure is for four to six players between 3rd and 5th Level, meaning that the characters have some experience under their belts, but not enough that they can shrug off a pounding. Indeed, much of the adventure is running from or circumventing the almost limitless bog hounds at the disposal of one of the antagonists. As well, the core monster plaguing the town of Mordentshire can’t be defeated unless very specific circumstances are encountered, meaning that Howls in the Night plays a little more like a Call of Cthulhu adventure and far less of a hack and slash dungeon crawl.

I absolutely love the story here. You have a doomed force love affair, the effects of which still curse the village, the surrounding countryside and the principal players a century after it occurred. You have a wonderful curse, as odd as that phrasing may sound, which breathes a lot of life into the adventure, makes it exceptionally spooky and also highlights how well Ravenloft used the concept of curses, especially curses made during one’s death throws. I always found the whole “Bestow/Remove” curse spells from D&D to be implemented horribly and both PCs and DMs would use the spell without any style or forethought. Ravenloft is the one exception to that and a curse made here is extremely hard to get rid of and generally has long ranging dramatic results.

As the principal protagonists in this adventures, Players are hired to exterminate the ever growing problem of what appears to be extremely aggressive wild dogs. Just as the moors slowly extend their reach every year, so too do does this pack of wild canines grow ever bolder and closer to the town of Mordentshire. Of course, players will instantly assume that the dogs aren’t actually dogs. They’re right, but not in the way they think and the end result generally has overconfident players who were relying on player knowledge rather than character knowledge, getting freaked out and humbled by their actual foe. It’s wonderful as a DM to see how players handle their first encounter with the bog hounds and the slow realization that nothing in Ravenloft is ever straightforward.

Besides dealing with the hounds, Howls in the Night has several other nasty surprises for the players. At least one character will probably having to roll for their lives against quicksand. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a playthrough of this adventure where one character meets their end at the hands of a mundane natural occurrence. It’s wonderful as it keeps players really invested in where they are placing their feet and their immediate surroundings. Players will really quickly learn to think on their feet (literally and figuratively) from this adventure. Most of all though, players will be brought into the conflict that occurs between the two main NPCs of this adventure. They are the root of the curse plaguing the village and much of the fun of the adventure comes from the players trying to decide who is wearing the black hat and who is wearing the white hat. Again, the adventure has four different playthrough possibilities, so you can design the adventure to where BOTH are evil or both are victims of the curse rather than deserved recipients. I tend to find the adventure is more fun for everyone involved when you have both NPCs either be truly evil dicks or good people caught up in a bad situation. Regardless, all of the four storylines are extremely fun to play through and no matter which one you choose, your PCs will talk about this adventure for a long time to come.

I can’t end this review without really plugging the artwork it contains. The cover for Howls in the Night by Paul Jaquays is especially spooky and sets the tone for things to come quite nicely. The interior artwork by Mark Nelson has me missing the days when I could regularly see his art in Vampire: The Masquerade, Ravenloft and Shadowrun publications. He also did a wonderful job with the Hellraiser comics back in the day. Both Wizards and Catalyst Game Labs need to hire him back for regular work ASAP! Nelson is one of my favorite RPG artists and it’s easy to see why after you’ve flipped through this adventure.

So yes, Howls in the Night is a truly brilliant adventure from beginning to end. It’s an extremely easy adventure for a DM to run, and it’s hard not to have fun with this. With a price tag of only four dollars, it’s practically begging you to buy it. Howls of the Night is one of my favorite adventures from 2nd Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons as it is creepy, boasts a wonderful cast of characters, a very intricate plot and it highlights just how well D&D works as a horror game instead of a hack and slash dungeon crawl experience. Seriously, pick this up today.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Howls in the Night (2e)
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