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3 Generations After The End
Publisher: Gamer Assembly
by Blake C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/16/2012 12:02:09
It's a good effort, but ultimately, not what was advertised. It's not system agnostic. It's compatible with the ones listed, and virtually incompatible with nearly everything else.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
3 Generations After The End
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Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
Publisher: Triple Ace Games
by Blake C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/14/2012 11:57:31
Leagues of Adventures is a very rule-light, story-driven game. While there are some limitations to the system, overall it's very fun to run campaigns in this. Depsite it's simple approach, it is still able to handle a lot of complexity.

Organisation (8/10): The book for the most part has everything laid out in order. It could use a decent index, but I used the .pdf version, and was able to search through for anything I needed. There's niice tables for the longer portions too, such as skills and feats, to use as quick references.

Character Creation (9/10): This is a point-buy system, so can be a bit overwhelming for new players, or players not used to point-buy. The learning curve is not steep, however, and most were able to create characters without assistance.You purchase your primary abilities which filter down to secondary abilities; Initiative, for instance, combine Dexterity and Intelligence. There's no rounding down, or complex maths, it's just simple addition. After abilities are determined, skills are purchased. Skills are fairly broad based, each containing several more focused areas, called Specialisations. You can opt to improve the skill as a whole, or, for a reduced cost, you can purchase specialisations, which improve only that focus area. Feats are purchasable as well, and there's nothing too weird here, each feat has pre-requisites, and costs a set amount of points. Character creation can take as little as 5 minutes once the system is learned.

World Creation (5/10): While the system itself seems able to handle any genre, the setting in the book is very limited. If you want to go outside of it's boundaries for any reason, you're going to have to make house rules for things. We decided that we wanted computers to exist, and none of the skills really seemed to fit it, so we had to make a new Computer skill. Still, the setting that's provided is fairly well fleshed out.

Gameplay (8/10): Both I and my players enjoyed trying this setting out. There are very few interruptions in play to need to look something up (these normally happened in combat when they happened at all), which is a real relief after having played things like DnD (3.5, PF and 4e) which are overly pedantic in their rules at times. Success or failure depends on rolling successes. Unlike other games though, any type of die may be used. Even numbers are successes; odd numbers are failures. This makes for easy check resolution and, let's face it, everyone likes rolling a lot of dice sometimes. Thankfully though, you don't have to actually tally up the result, just check for evens and odds. In a rather welcome and unexpected addition, the system has what it terms chance dice. These give the players an ability to possibly accomplish things that they could not normally do. If a player had to make, for example, a climbing check, with a difficulty of 5 (needing 5 successes), and his rank was only 3, he normally would not be able to make the check (rolling 5 successes on 3 dice is slightly problematic). However, using chance dice, he has the possibility of success. A player may add two dice to his pool at the expense of the difficulty going up by one, and he may use a maximum of 10 extra dice. Therefore, in the example, the player could roll up to 13 dice, and the difficulty would rise to 10. The odds are still against him, but now it's possible.

Art (7/10): I generally don't care about art when I'm judging a system, but since I'm reviewing the book, I'll include it. The art fits the setting, and while it's a bit amateurish in places, it doesn't detract from the book at all. It is true steampunk art, and not as you see in many places, drawn by people who have no real idea what steampunk is other than Victorian.

Overall (8/10): While it's clear that the book is done at a smaller publisher, and the polish isn't quite all there, it's a solid game, a good system, and I'll definately be keeping my eye open for more Ubiquity books.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
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