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Mythic Minis 63: Planetouched Feats II
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/20/2015 03:17:20
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Airy Step: +4 to saves versus air/electricity spells and effects; ignore the first 30 ft. of falling;Spend 1 mythic power as an immediate action for 1 round of air walk.



-Aquatic Ancestry: +20 ft. swim speed; double darkvision range while underwater. If you have deepsight, instead increase darkvision by +60 ft. Spend 1 mythic power to double your swim speed for one round.



-Cloud Gazer: See through fog, mist and clouds sans penalty. Spend 1 mythic power as a standard action to grant non-mythic Cloud Gazer to an adjacent ally for mythic tier rounds; spend 2 mythic power to grant it to all adjacent allies. Cool one!



-Hydraulic Maneuver: +1/2 tier to CMB with hydraulic push. Spend one mythic power to detract Dex and dodge bonuses from your target's CMD.



-Inner Breath: +2 to saves vs. inhaled poisons. Spend 1 mythic power as a full-round action that provokes AoO to end all effects of poisons, clouds, etc. affecting you or an adjacent ally. If within the area of such an effect, instead you can disperse 10-ft. cube of such an area per 2 mythic tiers you have, minimum 1. I do like this one, though I wished it would specify whether damage-dealing clouds etc. like volcanic bursts qualified.



-Steam Caster: Don't increase casting time and use it in conjunction with SPs and SUs. The resulting obscuring mist lasts for 1 round, + tier rounds for mythic power. When expending mythic power, your steam also deals spell level fire damage to all creatures entering or beginning their turn in the area, save vs. the spell's DC (or as though it had a DC) negates.



-Triton Portal: Use hydraulic push to cast lesser planar ally or dimension door, but you can only do so while immersed in water; the destination must also be submerged; At 6th tier, spend 2 mythic power to instead shadow walk, but instead use the elemental plane of water, requiring the ability to breathe water while transitioning. +1 use per day powered by mythic power. Generally solid, though in some campaigns, significant differences between plane of water and material plane may be problematic; unlike the plane of shadow, it is not generally considered to resemble the prime material plane. A minor nitpick, but something GMs should be aware of.



-Water Skinned: Extinguish 5 ft of fire as a swift or move action. Extinguish a 5-ft cube as a standard action; a 10 ft-cube or a 4-ft-cube of magical fire for mythic power, as a dispel based on level + tier. Interesting



-Wings of Air: +10 ft fly speed; +10 ft more per tier. If you are affected by an air/electricity effect, spend mythic power to temporarily gain SR 15 + tier versus such effects. Okay.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jeff Lee and Jonathan H. Keith deliver a solid array of mythic feats, with some being pretty unique - more so than I expected them to be. While there are some minor quibbles I could field and some fringe-cases wherein a slightly increased precision would have helped, all in all, this is a cool, solid array of options that actually extends the options available rather than just going for numerical escalation, thus being well worth of a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 63: Planetouched Feats II
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Mythic Minis 60: Legendary Item Abilities
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/19/2015 04:33:12
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Inestimable Beauty: The item gains impervious (enhancement bonus equal to 1/2 tier) and allows you to use distraction or fascinate as a bardic performance (level = tier), at skill ranks equal to 2 times the tier. Expend legendary power to enthrall or hypnotic pattern at CL = HD+tier; two uses instead provide the mythic versions of the spells. Nice one!



-Mighty Servant: Transform the weapon as a standard action into a small construct, medium construct (one use of legendary power) or large construct (2 uses) that acts as an animated object that is considered mythic and can overcome DR/epic, with build points equal to half your tier, full tier if you expend mythic power, double tier for 2 mythic power. The item must be a minor or major artifact. AWESOME.



-Resonant Regalia: If you're at least 3rd tier, you may split this item's power with another bonding both and granting both this quality. You also select a resonant power, an additional legendary ability that only works when both are used in conjunction. Wielders may utilize legendary power and mythic power to utilize mythic versions of e.g. spells granted and are treated as one item for the purpose of legendary power, though they increase the uses by one if used together. If separated, the uses are split between the items evenly. While wielding both, you increase surge die size and at 6th tier, you may add a 3rd item, further increasing the benefits and allowing for do-it-yourself regalia construction - GLORIOUS!



-Soul Drinker: Always adds death knell to attacks that reduce a creature to 0 hp, but you gain teh effects thankfully only on a kitten-proof basis. When slaying a creature with it, you may rest eternal it, as the creature's soul is drawn into the weapon, with only the broken condition suppressing the effect. For each day thus bound, the soul receives a negative level until it is completely devoured, making resurrection impossible by all but the most powerful of magics.



-Soul Safe: Makes your weapon essentially a phylactery that respawns your body in 30 ft. Also allows for the use of legendary power to negate energy drain or death effects, with scaling costs. Nice!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jason Nelson delivers in this pdf - with an array of all killer, no filler awesome item qualities that resonate with the glorious concepts and traditions of our game, this pdf can be seen as a great nod towards some of the most iconic item concepts, making them perfectly usable via mythic rules sans breaking the game - an effort worth easy 5 stars + seal of approval.



Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 60: Legendary Item Abilities
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Mythic Minis 62: Feats of the Sharpshooter
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/19/2015 04:32:16
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Arc Slinger: Reduces range penalties with sling or sling staff by tier; Point Blank Shot bonuses extend to 50 ft. (80 ft. for sling staff); +5 ft. per tier. No penalty to atk or damage when using non-sling-bullet ammunition as long as size fits. 1 use of mythic power = +1/2 tier to damage for tier rounds.



-Casterbane Shot: Penalize concentration of targets hit by 1/2 tier for one round. Further increase concentration difficulty when readying an action or Snap Shooting casters, with mythic power expenditure to further increase the DC-increase.



-Charging Hurler: +1/2 tier to atk with ranged charge attacks; exchange the atk-bonus for a damage boost in a 1 for 2-ratio. Mythic power negates the penalty to AC and increases the size of the projectile by 2 sizes.



-Improved Charging Hurler: When the target is within 30 ft., add tier to damage. If you hit, expend mythic power to bull rush the target, with +5 per 10 points of damage you dealt. Love it!



-Clustered Shots: When shooting at the same target as a full-round action (or via another ability that allows you to execute multiple shots versus the target), add damage equal to the number attacks that hit the target. Additionally, you treat all as one type of attack for the purpose of overcoming DR or death from massive damage (if you're playing with the latter in mythic, you're more masochistic than I am...). Also gain +2 to atk versus an opponent you've hit in a given round. Urgh. The bonus itself is not that bad - the DR-overcoming is nasty, though. Why? Shuriken. OUCH.



-Impact Critical Shot: Adds stagger to the effects of the maneuvers of the base feat.



-Opening Volley: Render foes flat-footed to your melee attacks that you hit with a ranged weapon. This is extremely strong for the right build. Not gonna happen in my game.



-Prone Shooter: While under the benefits of the feat, 1/round negate an attack by moving 5 feet. Per se cool - but is this a 5-foot-"crawl"? Does the movement provoke AoOs? I think it doesn't but if it does and an enemy keeps you fixed, does the attack you sought to avoid still hit? No idea. Needs clarification.



-Prone Slinger: Creatures are flat-footed to the first ranged attack you make each round. Not gonna happen in my game. Imho broken.



-Redirected Shot: Use the feat after the results of your ally's attack have been made known. Additionally, if cover from you and your ally to the target differs, use the lower of the two. Nice one!



There is more on the SRD-page:

-Slayer's Knack: Increase critical multiplier from up to x6. Numerical escalation of multipliers. Just what mythic gameplay needs. */sarcasm*



-Sling Flail: Add ranged attack as an immediate action to your melee attack executed with a sling. This attack does not provoke an AoO from the target.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jonathan H. Keith, Jason Nelson and Robert Brookes have crafted a diverse array of sharpshooting feats and some indeed are diverse and utterly intriguing in their tactical options. Alas, if ranged combat did not need one thing, much less so in mythic gameplay, then that would be even more damage output -which some of these feats frankly provide. The easy access to guaranteed flat-footed conditions, even when applied to otherwise not so-great base feats also overshoot their goal by quite a bit and end up being just exceedingly nasty. In the end, I considered this mythic mini a mixed bag and thus will settle on a final verdict of 3 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 62: Feats of the Sharpshooter
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FT 2 - The Portsmouth Mermaid
Publisher: Purple Duck Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/18/2015 02:40:31
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 44 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, leaving us with a massive 42 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



This being a review of a module, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion. You do NOT want to spoil this module, believe me.

...

..

.

All right, only judges remaining? Great! We begin this module in the aftermath of the superb first two DCC-modules in the series, 15 miles south of the Grimmswood wherein the PCs had ample challenges of the most peculiar and interesting kind. If you haven't read the first two modules, let me recommend them wholeheartedly.



So, Yuletide is upon the less-than-subtle named town of Portsmouth and the adventure takes place during the 12 days of celebration in town - the problem here being that things are not simple. In fact, the town, once known for the rich seafood that could be wrestled from the waves had seen a plunge of efficiency only rectified in the relatively recent history - unbeknown to the PCs, there is a power struggle going on between servants of Dagon and his esoteric order and Cthulhu cultists - but that only serves as a kind of backdrop and variant on the theme, for essentially, this is an adaptation most twisted of the Little Mermaid: Prince Manxus was saved from certain death by her and while she had lost her voice due to the deal with the Sea Witch and while every step on land hurts horribly, the mermaid has managed to capture Manxus' heart. Until the Dagonites intervened with the tantalizing hybrid Orne and a magical orb, seeking to seize control over the town. The timer is ticking and the fate of the town is at stake - as is the mermaid's very soul.



And yes, the tl;dr version would probably be "The Little Mermaid" in Innsmouth. Now, admittedly, this type of reductionist summary would not do the module justice. Why? Because this can be considered pretty much an impressive sandbox that presents the town in lavish detail, while also preventing a time-driven time-line of events that feature read-aloud text and the like. With rumors and signs of the hybrid-inbreeding associated with the very theme of Innsmouth, we have a significant level of detail an atmosphere, against which a judge can craft a tale most harrowing: The contrast of cthulhoid horror and the gothic horror elicited by the original fairy tale can be considered a truly stunning experience if handled with proper care.



Much like in the previous modules of the series, I find myself often wondering how to adequately portray the module, mostly due to one simple fact: This one lives by the details. The disparate themes are crafted together in a concise way that very much lives from the details, which ultimately also can be used to govern the investigation towards its conclusion. What level of detail? Well, what about mapped tunnels below the town? Street names? Aforementioned tables? Now don't get me wrong - this *is* a sandbox and as such, it does require some investment on behalf of the DM to properly pull off. At the same time, though, it does generate a compelling and unique atmosphere that deviates significantly from the goal one would assume a module featuring the theme of degeneration. Oh, and in which other module does it actually make sense to ally yourself with cultists of cthulhu on a mission of love? Yeah, pretty awesome. The conclusion of this investigation, though, ultimately will see its fair share of confrontation, so yes, if you're itching to roll some bones and kick some Dagonite ass in the name of love, that's part of the deal as well.



It should be noted that the beautiful full-color maps comes with player-friendly versions and even as high-res jpgs - nice!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant issues. Layout adheres to an elegant, old-school 2-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Furthermore, the module sports numerous gorgeous original b/w-artworks and the maps, as mentioned before, in player-friendly and high-res versions - kudos for going above and beyond.



Daniel J. Bishop has a wonderful style - he can write creepy, disturbing sword and sorcery material with a great pulpy old-school flair, yes. But the unique characteristic of his writing and what makes me actually run his modules, is that he can blend this with a subdued whimsy and a feeling for the mythological that is grounded in well-researched tasks and a broad basis of knowledge of topics that resound.

Arguably, the themes of this module should not work with one another, but their synthesis is so well-crafted and so compelling, it ends up actually working. That being said, this is not only a module - in fact, you could easily enjoy this module as a sourcebook of an interesting, disturbing town, providing a truly captivating look at yet another glorious facet of the world he's weaving. With optional tie ins and information on the repercussions of the first two modules, in case they have been played, this one becomes yet another triumphant installment in the series and further cements Daniel J. Bishop as an excellent writer whose adventures I very much anticipate with a baited breath.



My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
FT 2 - The Portsmouth Mermaid
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Urban Dressing: Trade Town
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/18/2015 02:37:49
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of what I'd tentatively call the "new" Urban Dressing-series clocks in at 12 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let's take a look!



The trade town is a trope that is used due to the vast potential inherent in the set-up - the merging of cultures and tropes that is the by-product of such a place ultimately provides a vast panorama of different options for GMs to explore. While unique, the result thus could be inspired, but also lose a distinct identity. With barrels that house hundreds of rats, non-voluntary offering boxes of temples, baying donkeys and town criers and street urchins, over all, we have a significant array of different sights and sounds in the 100-entry strong table.



The second table, with 50 entries, provides 50 businesses, from washer's guilds to preservative specialists and disease control, the businesses thankfully go quite a bit above and beyond what one would expect from the default of such towns, providing excellent fluff from slave blocks to traffic guides. The third table also provide 50 entries covering different folks that run the whole gamut of different alignments and professions -from good half-orcs to everyday evil and selfish persons to more pure or villainous characters.



Finally, this pdf also sports an array of hooks and complications - more of them than in the previous installment, with no less than 20 entries providing ample material for GMs to kick off modules, encounters and story-quests - why is the manically-laughing man throwing gold coins into a crowd of people? Is he mad or just emulating Egill Skallagrímsson? All up for you to decide! And yes, I urge anyone to read this classic!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press' 2-column b/w-standard and the artwork is thematically fitting b/w-stock. The pdf comes fully bookmarked and in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use.



Josh Vogt's reinvented Urban Dressing-series has become more or less a guarantee for exceedingly high-quality fluff, an inspiring array of options and ultimately, a fun series of supplements. Even in a pdf that suffers from a source-material with a hard-to-grasp identity, he captures the essentials and delivers a concise amount of dressing in the pages of this pdf - and yes, this *IS* a fun, versatile installment that achieves just that - well worth 5 stars + seal of approval!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Urban Dressing: Trade Town
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Mythic Minis 61: Planetouched Feats I
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/18/2015 02:35:33
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Blazing Aura: When using Scorching Weapons, generate an aura that deals 2d6 fire damage to adjacent foes. Foes striking you in melee have their weapons take 2d6 fire damage that ignores hardness. Unarmed foes risk catching fire on a failed save.



-Blistering Feint: +4 to feinting when wielding weapons that deal fire damage. Add fire damage + tier damage to foes feinted and have it risk catching fire. Foes that start burning can be targeted as an immediate action at your highest BAB. Interesting option and nice imagery!



-Dwarf-Blooded: +2 to saves vs. poison, spells and spell-like abilities, +4 to CMD vs. Bull Rush and Trip while on the ground. Okay, I guess.



-Echoes of Stone: +6 to Performance while udnerground and to Survival to avoid becoming lost there. Also, gain tremorsense 10 ft. as long as you don't move Also: One mythic power for stone tell as a spell, with your character level being the caster level. that should probably be an SP and movement needs to be defined - after moving, for example, one stands still. Tremorsense? Yes or no? I assume, this requires a round of no movement, but not sure.



-Elemental jaunt: Share planar adjustment as its mass variant when you plane shift. Cool!



-Firesight: See invisible creatures within 10 ft. of a flame. Cool!



-Inner Flame: Bonus to saves vs. fire and light descriptor'd spells and effects increases to +6. Also adds scorching weapon damage to grapples and makes you potentially ignite foes.



-Murmurs of Earth: Gain your tremorsense as a swift action. Use mythic power to expend its range to 30 ft and increase the duration by +1 round per 3 tiers you have - no minimum, btw..



-Oread Burrower: Gain full burrow speed through sand, gravel, etc. Use mythic power to make a tunnel, which collapses behind you after 1 round per tier. Alternatively, when expending mythic power, burrow at 1/3 your speed and make a tunnel last. Nice, but I wished the tunnel's collapse referred to the collapse/buried alive rules. I also wished this allowed for control of when temporary tunnels collapse - as provided, higher tiers may make hunting down the burrower easier.



-Oread Earth Glider: Earth glide at base speed + 5 ft per every two tiers, min + 5 ft. Burrow through stone at your base speed.



-Scorching Weapons: Bonus to saves vs. light/fire spells and effects increases to +4; weapons remain heated for mythic tier rounds; Also, spend one mythic power to temporarily grant the flaming weapon ability for 1/2 mythic tier rounds.



-Stony Step: Move through +5 ft. of stone/earth-based difficult terrain per round as though it were normal terrain. Use mythic power to execute a charge and ignore all such terrain between you and your target and charge through creatures of the earth subtype. Also grants +2 to atk and +1/2 tier in damage to charges if you and the target are touching earth or stone. Solid one!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jeff Lee and Jonathan H. Keith deliver an array of interesting Planetouched Feats that provide interesting extensions of the concepts of the base feats, often allowing for additional, cool tricks not available for the base feats. While not always perfect, the feats generally are a cool selection and thus, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 61: Planetouched Feats I
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Microsized Adventures
Publisher: Everyman Gaming, LLC
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/17/2015 02:52:51
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This supplement clocks in at 30 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 27 pages of content, so let's dive in!



Microsized characters have been a staple in the movies of my childhood, when I learned that perspective is a crucial factor in determining what is creepy or dangerous and what isn't. And indeed, in earlier editions of the game, there have been quite a few modules that utilized this concept to some gain - one of which would be Ravenloft's "The Created" - a great module in the hands of a capable GM and utterly disturbing.



Now if you endeavor to run such a scenario in your own game, you'll quickly run into a brick wall, as you realize that the interconnected rules frameworks of 3.X and its follow-ups like Pathfinder do not lend themselves well to the very concept - of course, one could go the easy way out and hand-wave scaling, but in the end, that does not work well - as anyone who's tried it can attest. So, we necessarily begin with the very basics that need addressing.



5-foot steps are replaced with shifting steps - the range of these steps depends on the size of the creature attempting them and the size of the square used on the grid - essentially, the relation of the two - if that sounds complicated, well, it's not - one glance at the table and you're good to go. The second issue immediately crops up regarding attacks of opportunity and relative size: In an imho more feasible rule, creatures using this book can threaten any creature in its space as long as the creature is no more than four size categories larger or smaller than the threatening creature. Creatures with a reach of 0 feet can provide flanking within a creature's space and 2 or more such creatures can flank if they enter a creature's space. This generally means that tiny and smaller opponents become an increased threat against regularly-sized PCs.



A total and utter cluster-F*** in PFRPG, perhaps one of the worst rules-components of it, in my opinion would be weapon-size rules for over/under-sized weaponry - convoluted and utterly messy. In a supplement that deals with radical changes of sizes and huge discrepancies between them, this could break the neck of the supplement - so how does microsized adventures tackle this? Simple: By making damage increase and decrease based on the size of the opponent in relation to your own. I am aware that this changes radically the dynamics of combat against bigger foes, but that's a significant appeal, at least to me - why? Because I was always bothered by the scenes where adventurers poke giants to death- it just makes more sense to me. This is btw. handled with a simple array of additional hit points that is equal to the special size modifier times the number of creatures sizes smaller than the creature. This math is easy, quick and, supported by the tables, can be done on the fly if your multiplication skills aren't rusty.



On can definitely see Alexander Augunas' teaching experience at work in the way in which the pdf is organized in that it concisely presents the respective steps in an easy to grasp manner. We begin size category alteration and go, step by step, through skills from Fly to Intimidate and Stealth onwards to Strength etc. - all supported by tables that present the necessary information at the blink of an eye. Step 2 would thereafter be the recalculation of special size modifiers that thankfully not only mentions minimum damage, but also the interaction with spells, supernatural and spell-like abilities. The carrying capacity and its modification are also addressed, including an object's respective new weight, including when objects do not alter size - inappropriately sized gear and shields, weapons and shields - all covered via concise AC and weight-multipliers. Oh, and for convenience's sake and didactic reasons, we receive analogues for sample weights to better picture the result and ground it in reality.



Now this would not cover everything, obviously - want to simply make an ordinarily-sized creature a different size? Go for it, step by step - including CR-step-by-step adjustments and advice on handling massive CR-escalation due to size changes. How do swarms work? Well, you will be happy to know that rules for both regular-sized swarms versus diminished characters and diminished swarms are covered - oh and, if you require stats for regular pets, quick and dirty substitution suggestions will spare you the effort of looking them up.



Now as for the scale of the grid in which movement happens, that essentially remains the same - only the scale changes, which is pretty elegant - and the same can be said about the range-calculations for ranged weapons of varying sizes, spells and area effects. Now if you're like me, the first monster subtype you'll run through this would be the kaiju (obviously) due to its non-standard size-rules...and because kaiju are AWESOME. Suffice to say, this book covers even this fringe creature type.



Okay, so far, so good. Want to know where true awesomeness begins? With rules that have been in place in my home-game for ages, once again, seemingly plucked from my mind - with two new combat maneuvers: Crush and Scale. Crush is obviously used to flatten those tiny insects, whereas scale is a requirement in my games to deal damage to anything huge+? Why? Because, as mentioned before, I loathe the idea of PCs poking giants to death by ramming teeny-tiny weapons into their feet. And yes, the latter actually has a downright ingenious rules-interaction with the Climb-skill - once again, one I've been using in my games for this type of maneuver as well. If you're even halfway into good, thoughtful video-games: Yes, these are your basic tools to play Shadow of the Colossus-type boss fights.



If you've played that game, you're probably buying this right now. For the rest of you, my dear readers: Yes, the mobile suit golems and mechas recently pioneered by Rite Publishing and Rogue Genius Games (Kaiju Codex and Construct Companion, if you didn't know) make actually more sense - because puny medium creatures may end up being too small to damage a kaiju or elder dragon... Yes, finally a reason to crank out those siege engines, Berserk-like huge swords and similar fun tricks.



Now if you think this book is a dry read, you'd be sorely mistaken - interspersed throughout the book are the (mis-)adventures of Alexander Augunas' signature Kitsune Kyr'shin - oh, and GMs can actually look forward to a concise advice section that helps planning a microsized adventure properly - from the catalyst to questions of terrain and exploration up to sample hooks that run the gamut from traditional to far-out. I mentioned terrain - yes, even a table on wind effects and their severity and rules for minuscule siege weapons can be found within these pages - oh, and two sample artifacts for the GM or the player's perusal to easily move into the microsized worlds are provided.



Beyond that, the pdf does not leave players in the dark either - with new rage powers that let barbarians feel a bit like berserk ants (or crush foes) and an archetype that make break improvised weapons for additional potency, a gunslinger archetype that is a thrown weapons expert (since gunslingers can't well get the materials for their expensive weaponry in dust mote size...) to investigators that use their eidetic memory to foil monsters and finally, rogues that are scaling specialists or born scrappers, the crunch here is just as solid. But that's not all - with two new combat maneuvers, it should come as no surprise that this book also features a plethora of feats that deal with them - and these go beyond the simple standard-improved-greater-chain and extends to even teamwork feats. The second focus here would be on the necessity of properly using improvised weapons, so yeah - awesome as well.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good - apart from minor glitches like a typo "if" that should read "of" and the like, I have found no glaring ones, and none that would compromise the reading experience unduly. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience as well as with several pieces of neat original full-color art by Jacob Blackmon.



It is my firm conviction that you have to play this book to truly by able to judge it. When I got this, I though "Looks all nice and shiny, but so did your idea of size-changing scenarios..." -so I went and playtested this book's material. Size-changes affect a lot of variables and color me surprised when I noted how well this book manages to transport the respective mechanics. In fact, analysis made me appreciate that even more, because the math behind this system is surprisingly beautiful - I know, I know - but believe me when I say that I can definitely appreciate that.



So, the system works - but how well? That is a task I struggled with to properly convey - see, Alexander Augunas is not by accident a regular face among my Top Ten-lists. In the hands of a lesser designer, this system would be a mess of numbers, tiring to read and hard to comprehend. The excessive use of examples, the concise step-by-step guidelines and didactically sound presentation conspire to make a complex rules-operation feel simple. Best of all, if you're a GM not afraid of diving into the grit of numbers, you can easily modify all or even only parts of the system. Why? Because it is surprisingly modular. Crush and Scale can enrich any game; Particularly epic games with a focus on cinematic combat may want to further increase the hit point buffer against smaller weapons and attacks - or even move the spaces around where attacks become ineffective.



An internally closed system, whether mathematically or rhetoric, is an impressive and powerful beast to behold - if you require proof of that, just try to argue against some prevailing psychological theories without hard science to back you up. A system that is modular, that can be modified, scavenged and mutated to fit one's individual needs, though, that is the one that ultimately will receive the broadest traction, the system that has the highest potential for growth. Microsized adventure can act as a closed system and as a modular system - you *can* appreciate and run this as presented, yes - it'll work perfectly. But we're gamers and we have very strong opinions of how things should be, right? We all have pet-peeves and particular likes and dislikes. The genius of this system is its robust framework, which allows for *skilled* GMs to modify it according to their preferences.



A book as beginner-friendly as possible that has a maximum of user-friendly expert-customization options - that's hard to find. Harder and rarer even is the book that blends this with a sincere, total sense of jamais-vu - I have literally never seen a d20-based book that tackles this concept, much less one that actually does it with such a deceptive ease and panache. This book is, for size-change/discrepancy-style stories what Cerulean Seas was for underwater adventuring, what Companions of the Firmament is for flying - whether against impossibly large adversaries, shrunken battles versus house cats or anything in between and beyond, this book is an inspired gem that belongs into the library of any GM, a book that needs sequels and or a print-on-demand-version...or a 300+ page AP + hardcover...



If the above was not ample clue for you - this is the type of book I review for. If I can get even one person out there to give this a shot, I'm happy. It's that good. This book is an apex-level, innovative, awesome supplement and receives 5 stars + seal of approval, unsurprising status as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015 and the EZG Essential-tag. Why the latter? Because in my games, the really big monsters should scare the living hell out of players and because, ultimately, I love the huge cosmos of options this unlocks. Perfect score and synergy with other publications to boot - I couldn't complain about this wonderful pdf for the life of me. Have I mentioned the low 5-buck-price-tag? This is a steal if there ever was one! Do yourself a favor and get this NOW!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Microsized Adventures
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Animal Races: Clan of the Raptor
Publisher: Eric Morton Presents
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/17/2015 02:49:23
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Animal Races-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We begin this installment of the Animal Races-series with a compelling piece of prose describing one of the ritualistic dances the members of the Raptor Clan perform before diving right into the usual physical appearance, age, height and weight tables etc. Members of the Raptor Clans are humanoid with the shapechanger and Garuda-subtype and may be either medium (+2 Dex , -2 Str) or Small (same attributes + size bonuses), regular base speed (30 ft. medium, 20 ft. small), low-light vision, a primary bite attack at 1d4 (1d3 for small raptors) and natural AC +1, scaling up to +2 at 1oth level. Additionally, members of the raptor-clan can assume the form of a bird of your size as a supernatural polymorph effect. This eliminates all but appropriate natural attacks and can be maintained 1 minute per character level. Changing shape is a standard action and does not provoke AoOs. Now, as you all know: Unassisted flight at 1st level is usually a big no-go for me (and a bunch of DMs out there), mainly due to modules usually not being written for this kind of power. That being said, the daily cap as such renders this a more viable option here and over all, I'm inclined to allow it in my less low-powered games.



As always, there are further customizations for the clan presented, subtypes, if you will. This time around, we have a selection of 4 subtypes: Eagle Clan members get +2 to Cha and treat all instances of lawful good in the paladin's class description as "chaotic good" - they may also select the heritage feat as a mercy. I get what this tries to do - make chaotic good paladins. Alas, if it were that simple, there wouldn't be so many different takes on the trope. Let's begin with detects, smites etc. - shouldn't e.g. smite apply to lawful evil instead? The concept is certainly not new and I get its appeal, but that does NOT work via a one-word substitution. Ideology, code of conduct etc. - a LOT changes and quite frankly, I believe that these humble, well-intentioned lines open a HUGE can of worms of issues for any GM who thinks that's all there is to the concept of a non-LG paladin. Highly problematic.



Hawks get +2 Wis and may select the heritage feat in lieu of an inquisitor's teamwork feat - but not retrain/change it. Nice mechanical pitfall avoided there! Owl clan members also get +2 Wis and may use Wis instead of Cha as governing attribute for oracle class abilities as well as take the heritage feat instead of a revelation. This is a teeny tiny bit stronger than the default since Wis governs Will, but I can live with it; concept-wise it makes sense to me. They also have their own Heritage feat.



Finally, vultures get +2 to Int and +4 to saves versus diseases, but reduce their fly speed granted by their bird shape by 10 feet. They also have their own heritage feat, which can be taken in lieu of hexes.



The racial heritage feats allow the respective raptors to increase their bite attacks to 1d6 (1d4 if small), gain scent (only vultures), +20 ft. fly speed, two primary natural weapons, talons, at 1d4 (1d3 for small raptors). Owls can also select to be treated as having concealment when flying, even when faced with creatures who have darkvision/low-light vision, provided the lighting is appropriately dim/dark. The traits available for all three also sport avid shapechanger, which increases the duration of the alternate shape to an hour per character level each time and makes the ability usable 3/day. Personally, I think this ought to be available later - the unassisted flight at low levels is strong enough; taking the limits away to this extent is imho too soon and should be relegated to the lower mid-levels. This holds true for all subtypes of raptors.



The subtypes vary in which additional racial traits are unlocked: While all may select the true shapechanger that makes the shapechanges at-will and unlimited, owls and raptors, for example, can take raptor's dive: Deal double damage on a charge if you began it at least 10 feet above your foe. Vultures may not select the flight-enhancers, but instead can select scavenger, which renders immune to all ingested poisons...and ingested diseases. While usually, diseases are not classified as ingested, inhaled, etc., I actually like this deviation since it provides more clarity than the default. Apart from avid shapechanger being available too soon, I have nothing to complain here.



As always in this series, pure crunch mechanics is not all we get - instead, we are introduced to the genealogy of the raptor clans and their stance on several established monsters and creatures, firmly anchoring the clan in the lore of a given world - while I usually remain pretty silent regarding these sections, I felt a need to emphasize for once that they are an integral part of making the race feel concise.



The deity presented would be a CN take on Horus, which feels a bit odd since Horus is usually depicted as pretty much an epitome of LG or LN virtues, but all right. As always with the series, we are introduced to the heraldry of the clans, which also double as race traits that go a bit beyond what one could get from regular traits - but at the cost of a minor drawback. No complaints here!



Now here is where this pdf pulls out all the big guns, as it provides an array of immensely flavorful ritual dances - beyond being simple, yet awesomely flavorful cultural tidbits, they also double as a kind of unique, complex skill challenge that render the culture and interaction with the raptors so much cooler - I LOVE this section and, to me, it made the final section of this book so much more compelling. I really hope we'll see more of the like!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to the series' elegant, printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard with thematically-fitting stock art. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for you convenience.

Eric Morton's raptors are a significantly more fun array of races of races than I expected - the base race is more diverse and better balanced than I anticipated and the decision to make flight limited is a good one. That being said, I think the expansion of the alternate shape's duration should be delayed to a higher level to maintain the unassisted flight-cap implicit in the rules. On the other nitpicky side, the CG paladin concept obviously does not work as suggested - AT ALL - so be aware of that. On the plus-side, the culture and the dances make the clans herein rank among the most unique and compelling in the whole series - which somewhat offsets these minor concerns. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Animal Races: Clan of the Raptor
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13th Age Bestiary
Publisher: Pelgrane Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/14/2015 04:59:12
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive book clocks in at 240 pages. I have received the color hardcover version of this book for the purpose of providing an unbiased, critical review.



A task that has been harder than I thought at first. Why? Because it's a "first bestiary/monster manual"-type of book. I mean, come on, how many ways can you say: "This book contains orcs, ogres, etc." To me, as a reviewer, there is NOTHING more boring than the first bestiary, ESPECIALLY since the advent of 3.X.



Let me ramble for a second: When I began playing, bestiaries were actually that - they were fashioned after the medieval catalogues of fantastic creatures and thus provides stats, yes, but more importantly, they provided information on society, habitat, tactics. Flair. Things that set my mind ablaze with ideas. Then 3.X hit and as much as I like the mechanical complexity and wealth of options PFRPG et al. provide, as much do I loathe what this has done to monsters. Instead of receiving a fully-fleshed out creature with a place in the world, a modus operandi etc., we get some dry numbers, two lines of fluff and that's it.



In 3.X and its inheritors, monsters felt like machines, less like living, breathing creatures to me. Pathfinder has inherited this issue, though thankfully, a broad array of templates and unique signature abilities has somewhat mitigated the process of making monsters just HP-exchange units. Now granted, I can very much appreciate (and continue to do so!) well-crafted creature-mechanics, but I still catch myself wishing for a simpler time once in a while - or for a time when monsters still had story, still had a place.



What does this have to do with 13th Age? Well, in my original review of the core book, I called 13th Age somewhat schizoid in some design-decisions. In none is that more apparent than in the stance on monsters. Personally, I HATE the fixed damage-values monsters usually deal in 13th Age. However, the nastier specials, which provide upgrade-abilities for harder games or to showcase elite adversaries, are downright inspired. While the core book's monsters have fallen into the blander than bland routine for the most part, with no significant lore-upgrade to their roles, 13 True Ways provided pretty much a personal El Dorado for me - a vast array of utterly unique backgrounds for devilkind to choose from, each more inspiring than the last? Yes, please! Gimme more!



Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but I very much assume that you are not that interested in my rambling on and on about 13th Age's ogres versus that of other d20-based games or this book's version of a critter or absence/presence herein. What I do assume you to be interested in is quite frankly the consequence of monster-design for 13th Age being ridiculously easy and streamlined - namely, whether to buy this book or not. After all, it is a first bestiary - not too much uniqueness in here, right? I know I wouldn't have purchased this book based on its premise alone.



Well, you would be right on one hand - and, like me, dead wrong.



The first thing I feel obliged to mention is that each monster-entry herein not only comes with one simple statblock - instead, the respective beasts come with multiple ones, providing upgrades and often, utterly unique abilities beyond the what the base creature has to offer - if you're coming from a pathfinder bakcground, think of it as the difference between a regular critter and its mythic counterpart; if you're coming from an old-school gaming background, think of it as the difference between a skeleton and a skeletal champion. Yes, this pronounced.



Furthermore, the respective creatures actually get their place to shine - where PFRPG's bestiaries are not read for inspiration (that's something I draw from the creature-themed campaign supplements), this book does provide that in spades. With nomenclature where applicable, advice for building battles, in-character quotes, relationships with icons and yes, copious adventure hooks, this bestiary delivers in spades. Want an example? Well, take the chimera - these creatures actually come with a built-in template for each of the iconics, all providing different bonuses and flaws that serve tor ender the creature distinct for each iconic - oh, and yes, these are based on the PC's relationships with their iconics. What about symbiote magical items made from chuul? (Who needs Ankheg armor, anyways?)



Different approaches and philosophies within certain races and odd quirks that are downright inspired can be found in almost every entry - for example, did you know that couatl consider themselves to be the true heroes of the world? Were you aware that ettercaps make excellent info-brokers? What about the myriad creatures that make up the fungal kingdom, including a race potentially suitable to be played? Why should cubes have all the fun - unleash gelatinous dodecahedrons upon your PCs - and roll an appropriate die to see what the creature does instinctively! Whichever lore you prefer regarding ghoul bites, you're covered and inspiration for outbreak-scenarios can be found in the respective entry.



Of course, some creatures receive brand new takes - at the court of the lich king, for example, being a lich may just show that you're another sycophantic poser and manticore bards immediately conjured up scenes of Groteschi the Red, one of the more unique creatures from Catherynne M. Valente's Orphan's Tales. Now note that from the Crusader's Saved (which may be a fate worse than damnation) to the clockwork Zorigami that may constitute the heart of the world and the sentient countdown for the end of the age or even the world, there are quite a few unique creatures in here as well.



Why should you care, even if you're not playing 13th Age? Well, if the huge wealth of exceedingly glorious fluff, hooks and ideas is not enough to sway you, what about sheer design-ingenuity?



Wait.



What? Yes. 13th Age does not lend itself well to making interesting adversaries that have thousands of combos and options at their beck and call. However, in the case of this book, this limitation proved to be a blessing in disguise. From modifications of escalation or relationship dice to truly unique options, some of the abilities herein are, no hyperbole, GENIUS. Take the redcap. Tried and true delightfully evil fey - we all know and love the iron-shodded menaces. Well, herein, they have taboo-words - even if you *think* them, they get power from it and may teleport et al., gaining potentially a nasty array of additional actions. Now how is this represented? When a PLAYER says the taboo word, the ability kicks in. Yes. This is pretty much brilliant and can provide quite a mind-blowing experience when handled with care. This is just ONE example out of a bunch of them. This book's abilities OOZE creativity and will enrich ANY d20-based game I run for years to come.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant issues. Layout adheres to a nice 2-column full-color standard and the book sports a lot of unique artworks for the critters, which adheres to a uniform style and can be generally considered to be situated in the upper echelon of quality, though not yet at the top. My hardbound copy is sturdy, pretty to look and easy to use, with nice, glossy, thick paper.



Rob Heinsoo, Ryven Cedrylle, Kenneth Hite, Kevin Kulp, Ash Law, Cal Moore, Steve Townshend, Rob Watkins, Rob Wieland - congratulations. You have actually managed to craft the first "Bestiary I" since the days of second edition I liked to *read*, the first that inspired me. This book manages what neither monster manuals of 3rd or 4th edition or PFRPG's bestiary-line has succeeded in doing - actually inspire me to use creatures, to craft adventures around them, to use them to make the world feel more alive. While a rare few 3pp bestiaries over the years manage this sense of wonder, it usually stems from clever mechanics or uncommon concepts, only rarely from actual narrative potential. Ultimately, this book, in spite of its "1st bestiary"-handicap, did all of that and more and makes me giddy with anticipation and hopeful we'll see more far-out creatures in the level of detail as provided herein.



The 13th Age Bestiary is a superb, inspiring book, which may not be on an artistic or aesthetic level with the big ones, but is infinitely more inspiring - and for me, I'll take content over bling any day. My final verdict will clock in at a well-deserved 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
13th Age Bestiary
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Mini-Dungeon #017: Shadows of Madness
Publisher: AAW Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/14/2015 04:55:05
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked to d20pfsrd.com's shop and thus, absent from the pdf.



Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!



This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.



Still here?

All right!



Wizards strive as wizards are wont to do, for knowledge - and much like dwarves digging too deep, they are prone to being destroyed by this thirst for knowledge. Exactly that has, alas, happened to a wizard names Tibor - and now the PCs have found a stair amid the rubble of his former tower.



In this small dungeon, the PCs will find strange notes and fight disturbing, shadow-templated foes and ultimately, save a medium -who was kidnapped by shadow-infused bugbears to facilitate the planned retribution of said aforementioned wizard -who now, driven mad by soulslivers, constitutes the boss of this dungeon.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players. The basics of the stats are presented when they deviate from the hyperlinked statblock - as provided, they should be enough to run all creatures but the boss sans consulting them.



Michael Smith delivers a nice mini-dungeon here - with a neat theme, relatively diverse combat challenges and even a bit of talking and a trap + a dangerous item, the mini-dungeon provides essentially what one can expect from the format - a relatively fun, short romp. While falling slightly short of the conceptual brilliance of some installments in the series, I still feel justified in rating this 4.5 stars, rounded up by a margin due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #017: Shadows of Madness
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Mythic Minis 59: Feats of Brutality
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/14/2015 04:52:59
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Cleaving Finish: Adds second attack at -5 to the cleaving finish. Essentially an escalation.



-Improved Cleaving Finish: Adds a third attack to Cleaving Finish at -10.



-Close-Quarters Thrower: When you hit a foe with a thrown weapon while threatened, make a melee attack at a foe at your highest atk as a swift action. Solid for ninjas etc.



-Deadly Finish: When killing a target in melee or with ranged weapons, use clean blade path ability as a free action versus either a single foe within 30 ft. or all targets adjacent to the killed creature. Mythic power makes returning the creature from the dead more difficult. Damn cool idea of combining the path ability with the feat!



-Death or Glory: Automatically makes your attack used with this feat a threat if it hits. If the target is a mythic creature, its attack also automatically is a critical threat. If your target expends one mythic power, it can still make this retaliatory attack even if you kill or incapacitate it or if does not have an immediate action available. Per se cool, but what if the attack would be a critical threat anyways? As written, there's no benefit, which is a kind of lost opportunity. It should be noted that this is a nitpick.



-Devastating Strike: Add damage to creatures adjacent to the target of your vital strikes, with fort to negate. On a nitpicky side, I would have preferred the mythic feat to spell out that the damage is bonus weapon damage, but that is a nitpick in a feat with AWESOME imagery. Love it!



-Improved Devastating Strike: Forego bonus damage in favor of 2 points of attribute damage to a physical attribute of your choice, with a fort-save to negate/halve, depending on whether the target is mythic or not. Cool: The Vital Strike feat-tree increases the damage caused. Nice synergy!



-Furious Finish: No longer be fatigued when using the feat to end your rage. Okay.



-Hammer the Gap: Knock back foes 5 foot for each successful, consecutive attack in a full attack. Non-mythic foes can also be knocked prone. I'm not a fan of the inability to resist the knock back, but I get why it works this way.



-Impaling Critical: When removing your weapon, foes take damage equal to the weapon's base damage dice for mythic tier rounds. per se cool, but is that rolled or is it 1 point per die?



-Improved Impaling Critical: Add combat maneuver when criting a foe to immobilize the target - simple concept, hard to execute with rules and the rules-text gets it right -kudos!



-Raging Brutality: Double bonus damage on a critical hit. Use one mythic power when you activate Power Attack to double the damage bonus of Raging Brutality.



There are 3 more feats on the SRD-page:



-Raging Deathblow: +1/2 tier extra rounds of rage from Raging Deathblow. Extra rounds are lost upon renewing rage rounds. Solid.



-Raging Hurler: Add trip to hits with ranged thrown two-handed weapons. Not a fan of this. Hurlers already are nasty builds, even nastier with mythic tricks. Then again: Breadth over depth - so yeah, like it.



-Raging Throw: Bull rush opponents subject to Raging Throw, potentially causing damage and making chain reactions of foes bull rushed. I have the same minor basic issue here, though the imagery, again, is cool.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Robert Brookes and Jason Nelson deliver a solid array of mythic feats that feel visceral and deadly. While I am not a fan of the damage-escalation behind some feats, I very much enjoy the general design paradigm of adding versatility via these feats as opposed to just escalating damage/effects. From a design-perspective, I usually am not a fan of blending feats and path abilities, but here, the idea works rather well and organically. Ultimately, this is a good collection of mythic feats - well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 only because some feats herein felt a bit less awesome than others and sport some very minor ambiguities. However, since I *really* love some of the feats herein, I still award this my seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 59: Feats of Brutality
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Emergency Villain Collection
Publisher: Run Amok Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/13/2015 02:56:56
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 43 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with a massive 39 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



We've all been there, at least I know I am - you just can't crank out *YET ANOTHER* villain statblock, lavishly crafted, only to have the poor sop being curb-stomped by the PCs - whether by dumb luck, by exceedingly strong PCs or by a combination of factors. Enter this collection of NPCs, ready to drop into your campaign, so what exactly do we get?



Well, first of all let me explain the basics - some villains herein work best in certain environments and thus, the best suited terrain etc. is summed up in the beginning. The pdf does sport information on villain motivation, advice on using the NPC, henchmen if appropriate as well as suggestions for ramping up the difficulty of the respective adversaries, advice I know I need for my players... It should also be noted that you should not consider the characters herein as nameless statblocks - while their respective write-ups sport generic monikers, the entries themselves do sport significant and well-written background stories including names etc. - so yes, this collection is not an NPC Codex-like accumulation of nameless statblocks, but rather a collection of NPCs that deserve the "character" C.



But what villains do we find herein? The first would be the Verminous Brawler - a worm-that-walks come pit fighter who is NOT actually evil, despite his monstrous appearance. This villain is designed story-wise to put a beating on PCs, but not a lethal one, offering a built-in mystery and quite an impressive adventure in the making. With 2 brothers as henchmen, the write-up is fun and compelling.



Grammy Knuckles can be considered the product of adventurer-murder-hobos: When her tribe was slain, the goblin bard/witch turned midwife and her nasty goblin runts began campaigns of pillaging and theft, rendering this an interesting moral conundrum - add a unique vehicle to the fray and we have a nice low-level investigation with a twist in the making here. Most doppelgangers are narcissists and schemers, yes - but few are as nasty as Dax, who gives psychopaths a bad name, using his powers to frame the PCs - let's hope they'll play their cards right or they'll end up in jail...or worse.



Lady Viedda Warborn is not a villain - the half-elven maid is actually a hero in the traditional sense - unfortunately for the PCs, the same cannot be said about her nasty squires, compulsive liars and manipulators dandasukas who are doing their best to taint the hero and misguide her towards a seemingly inevitable downfall... Even the nastiest of fey do have a sense of what is proper and when a lurker in light vivisectionist particularly fascinated by fungi and biological warfare was exiled from her own, you know you have a nasty, nasty adversary at your end -even before her cadre of nasty fungal blindheims.



A story of exotic tragedy, the yuki-onna samurai Matsuya is hunting the grating and honorless drifter that proved to be her undoing - alongside yeti ninjas (!!) as footsoldiers serving their winter demon queen. Pirates that encounters unspeakable horrors, driven mad, haunt the coastal stretches - and finding the ruined home-town left in the wake of cosmic horrors may not only pit the PCs against the maddened captain and his crew, but also against the all-consuming threat that broke the mortal's spirits.



I am a big fan of lovecraftiana and the subtle themes in the influence of the denizens of Leng in various APs makes me hope for a payoff of these subdued themes in some future AP - until then, a denizen of Leng assassin with hounds of tindalos as hunting dogs should not only make for an uncommon, but also highly lethal build to challenge those meddling PCs. Finally, a treant consumed by rage and his satyr entourage provide a nice and deadly encounter in the end. The CRs herein range from CR 1/4 to CR 13, as listed in the index by CR at the end of the pdf.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Run Amok Games' printer-friendly b/w two-column standard. The pdf comes with ample of original pieces of b/w-artworks for the adversaries and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



Ron Lundeen's builds herein are interesting in that they go beyond the requirements of the format - they not only provide compelling builds, their use of uncommon template combinations and interesting base creatures render these builds more than basic throwaway creatures. Indeed, the NPCs herein breathe thanks to the combination of interesting build choices and the compelling prose - granted, you can ignore the prose, but the sheer inspiration that suffuses some of them and covers a wide breadth of scenarios etc. can be considered the true star here - when a write-up and presentation inspires to craft a module (or at least an encounter) around these villains, one can definitely call a pdf a well-rounded offering. My only gripe here is that I have been terribly spoiled by the builds in Faces of the Tarnished Souk and Scions of Evil - this would be my reference, were it not for these two books. That being said, this still ranks among the best villain-collections out there and deserves a final verdict of 5 stars +seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Emergency Villain Collection
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Mythic Minis 58: Mythic Slotless Items
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/13/2015 02:55:39
All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Book of the Banned: These books can create secret pages 1/day; furthermore, mythic wizards may inscribe spells of their opposition school on said pages by expending 1 mythic power per level level, 1 for cantrips. Thereafter, the wizard can prepare the spell as though it didn't belong to the opposition school. Solid!



-Bullroarer's Bugle: Horn of pursuit with dual bless/bane effect. Halflings get higher bonuses and the user may opt to penalize only one type of humanoid, who then receives a more significant drawback. the formatting glitch that shows a strike-through box instead of a minus-sign is here, but that's a cosmetic glitch. In the hands of a mythic character, longstrider or, for halflings, expeditious retreat is applied as well. The sounder of the horn may also expend mythic power to instead bestow the mythic versions of horn of pursuit/bless/bane or power additional uses per day via mythic power. Per se pretty cool, but can the narrowing of the bane effect to one humanoid and the subsequent penalty increase also be applied to the mythic version of the bane-effect? I'm honestly not clear on the interaction of abilities within the horn's text, so clarification would help here.



-Midnight Beacon: An intelligent item with full proper senses that may cast detect undead, desecrate and animate dead while also granting death ward to the wielder. The lantern may also generate darkness in conical spreads, deeper darkness for mythic users. In the hands of a mythic wielder, the lantern can emit a pulse that draws undead nearer and puts them under the user's command. Nasty!



-Orb of the Seventh Star: Dancing Lights, detect magic, + detect thoughts, though the latter only 1/day for arcane casters. Also, shoot up to seven sparkling stars, like magic missiles, either on their own or in conjunction with other magic missiles, in which case the action economy for adding additional missiles is more favorable. Mythic arcane casters may tap into the stars of the orb to prepare additional spell levels/spell slots, none of which may exceed 3rd level, though this uses the same resource as the missiles. Mythic upgrade is also possible. Now I like this item pretty much, but shouldn't the max level of the spell level/ slot level scale up to 3 instead of being capped there? Not a bad glitch, mind you, but one where I can construct a cornercase that could be deemed slightly problematic - though admittedly, said case would hinge on gross violations of WBL-suggestions.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches apart from the hiccup mentioned. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jason Nelson's slotless items provide his trademark blending of high-concept style and complex mechanics and generally, this pdf's items breathe this sense of the magical I like. However, at the same time, they do feel, at least partially, a bit heavy on the number-modification side and ultimately, slightly less awesome than some of the glorious pieces he has crafted in the past. To me, this is pretty much a good pdf - certainly not bad, but also not mindblowing. My final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 58: Mythic Slotless Items
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Mythic Minis 57: Teamwork Feats
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/13/2015 02:53:33
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Back to Back: Numerical escalation plus enemies provoke AoOs when flanking you when you're with an ally who has this feat.



-Improved Back to Back: Better AC-bonus for each ally with the feat for 1 mythic power. Pretty weak, imho, despite its stacking potential.



-Cavalry Formation: Allows for overlap of squares of others for both rider and mount when charging. Also nets you a bonus when attacking a creature that was subjected to the charge of an ally with this feat. nice.



-Combat Medic: No AoO when using Heal while threatened, even if the aided creature does hnot have the feat. Also, use mythic power for more daily uses of treat deadly wounds. If the target also has the feat, you can treat them faster and at increased efficiency. Nice!



-Coordinated Charge: Charge with allies as an immediate action and move through ally squares and difficult terrain while doing so. For one mythic power, charge a foe who is twice your movement rate away from you.



-Enfilading Fire: +1/2 mythic tier to ranged attacks granted by Enfilading Fire. On a crit, expend mythic power for bonus damage based not only on your tier, but also that of your allies. Mechanically interesting one!



-Escape Route: Receive scaling AC bonuses when escaping through spaces or threatened areas of allies, with rank/tier as a cap. Alternatively, forfeit that bonus for better Acrobatics or overrun checks. Great - this increases the breadth of options significantly. Two thumbs up!



-Feint Partner: Extends flat-footed duration for one round, during which feinting is only a swift action.



-Improved Feint Partner: Provides AoOs as feint follow-ups, with damage bonus based on tier and static critical threat range that is easier to confirm.



-Seize the Moment: +tier damage, +1 threat range for the AoO, also better crit-confirming. A bit more overlap with improved feint partner than I would have liked, though it's more general.



-Shake it Off: Bonus applies even if ally does not have this teamwork feat. Each ally with the feat provides a scaling bonus, which has a flexible cap based on 5 + tier. Nice.



On the SRD-page, there are 3 more feats:



-Tandem Trip: +1/2 tier to CMB to trip when tandem tripping; If the creature provokes an AoO from you, you geta bonus.



-Target of Opportunity: +1/2 tier to atk and damage. Bland.



-Team Pickpocketing: When you could Team Pickpocket, spend mythic power to Sleight of Hand and pickpocket EVERY CREATURE IN REACH. This is awesome! Simple, humble, cool.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Robert Brookes and Jonathan H. Keith deliver an interesting mythic mini here - one that oscillates between truly interesting and awesome and somewhat bland. Mind you, there is nothing bad in this little pdf, though some options arguably are weaker than others. On a design-aesthetic perspective, several feats utilize very interesting and mechanically feasible cap-mechanics and, moreover, there are some in here that are stars - they expand options in breadth and add much needed flexibility to some options herein. So yes, overall, his is a good file, bordering on the very good, but short of true brilliance with some feats herein that fall on the filler side. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 57: Teamwork Feats
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Akashic Mysteries: Daevic
Publisher: Dreamscarred Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/12/2015 09:35:09
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The third installment of the Akashic Mysteries-series clocks in at 33 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 29 pages of content, so let's take a look!



So, as you may have gleaned from my various reviews and designs, I really enjoy classes with a lot of moving parts that manage to get the math right - the first two akashic classes are prime examples of how extremely compelling characters like this can be - instead of twiddling one's thumbs while waiting for the next turn, there are A LOT of things to consider - move essence or not, burn essence or not? The vizier pretty much plays a bit like a caster, being defined mostly by interaction with veils, while the guru turned out to be a pretty much more versatile and complex support character who can stand at the front lines, while also handling unique things. Mechanically, the guru was defined more by class features and the interaction of veils with them - though both have in common that variations in class themes via e.g. philosophies result in radically different playing experiences, while also putting player agenda on an extremely high pedestal. Suffice to say, I have extremely high hopes for the final book to be one for the records - so can the Daevic maintain this level of quality?



And more importantly, what's his niche? Well, you've read the above rant - and perhaps, you sat there and thought: "That's not at all what I'm looking for in a class!" Many small choices and tactical options, handling a lot of moving parts - that's not everyone's cup of tea, and this is exactly where the daevic comes in as a simpler, but in no means bland akashic class.



Let's take a look at the frame: Daevics gain d10, 4+Int skills per level, proficiency with simple and martial weapons, all armors and shields (but not tower shields), full BAB-progression and good fort- and ref-saves. The veilweaving here is different from the previous two classes, but there are similarities - the DCs, if appropriate, is DC 10 + 2 per essence invested +cha-mod (making Char the governing attribute here), but there is a crucial difference to default veilweaving - the veils granted at 1sr, 4th, 9th and 15th level must be associated with the chosen passion, whereas the other veils gained operate like standard veils, meaning the progression is from 0+1 to 4+4 over the 20 levels of the class. Essence is gained at 2nd level and scales up to 10, chakra binds also begin at this level and scale up to 6, with progression being Feet, Hands, Wrists, Shoulders, Belt, Neck, Chest. On the minor engine-tweaks, 5th level nets +1 to saves versus enchantments, which scales up by +1 every 3 levels thereafter.



Now I noted the existence of passions - these are chosen at first level. When a daevic invests essence into a veil of a passion (called passion veils), it counts as being invested in all passion veils, meaning that the very scarce essence pool makes investing points here more efficient. However, at the same time, power escalation is prevented by an explicit rule that forbids synergy with veil-specific feats or effects. or catalysts, though you CAN also bind them as normal veils and circumvent these restrictions, adding a further dimension to these veils. Three sample passions are provided, and all modify the list of available passion veils to choose from, the class skill list and all ultimately change how the class plays, so what are they?



The first passion would be desire - which allows 3rd level daevics to use Cha for Appraise and may replace both Dex and Int as prereqs with Cha for the purpose of feat-prerequisites, offsetting some, but not all strain that would otherwise be burdened MAD-wise on a full BAB character. The in-game rationale for this, while not perfect, at least is sufficient for me - why do I mention this? Because I get pimples from the default "I'm so good-looking I hit foes"-rationale employed by some abilities out there. So kudos! Bonus-feat-wise, they focus on thrown weapons. An interesting option - at 6th level, a passion mutates into one of 2 choices - here, this would be love or avarice. Love provides an NPC-companion that is pretty powerful - but it does not stack with Leadership. Daevics that follow the passion of avarice add the returning and called abilities if within the daevic's possession for more than 24 hours - however, the abilities are lost again upon willingly giving them to another creature. On the nitpicky side, there are some minor formal glitches here. At 12th and 18th level, this ability improves regarding action economy and effects like a miniature bloodline.



The second passion to choose would be dominion, which focuses on two-hand fighting with a shield - yeah, interesting! The 6th level change allows for the choice of benevolence or tyranny, with the former providing a scaling teamwork-granting ability, while the latter provides demoralize support as swift actions with scaling bonuses. The wrath passion has some nasty tricks: Whenever the daevic bull rushes or overruns a foe, he may execute an AoO against the foe, though this powerful effect is somewhat countered by the lack of gained bonus feat. And yes, this also can provide vast amounts of damage. Wrath may transform into justice or vengeance at 6th level, with justice providing access to the vital strike feat-chain...and the option to execute AoOs with Vital Strikes added. And yes, this may not sound like too much, but oh boy can a proper set-up blow damage per round into ridiculous high levels. Still, I can live with this, though GMs should beware - large PC-races + reach weapon + this will be a MASSACRE. As for vengeance:1/round full-attack against a target when succeeding a bull rush or overrun, but only with natural weapons. This ultimately boils down to a true meat-grinder -only shreds and gooey bits remain in the path of such a daevic. At 9th and 15th level, the essence capacity of the passion increases by a further +1.



The Blood Bind ability's write-up fails to mention that it's gained at 12th level - and it's interesting: It provides essentially an additional slot, into which the daevic can bind neck, head, headband and body slot veils, but whenever he does that with a non-blood veil, he takes twice the essence invested damage each round, getting even reassignment abuses out of the way. Nice! The capstone is a boring outsider-apotheosis (native, I assume?) and can reassign veils via 1-hour meditation. Odd - the daevic gains the body-slot at 20th level - so does that mean a daevic can only bind body slot veils to the blood slot before 20th level or is body-slot veil binding only unlocked for the blood slot at 20th level? This needs some clarification.



The feats-chapter does sport some overlap with the already published books, though there is some new content to be found herein - unlocking chakras for classes as well as a significant array of feats to allow for gestalting/multiclass-builds, including support for psionics, ultimately render the whole framework superior in that regard to the predecessor-system Incarnum's take on the concept. Enhanced Capacity is a feat you WILL want as a daevic, though unlike Life Bond's interaction with the guru, I saw no balance-issues cropping up from combining the class with previously established content. (Though said feats and its associates still need a retooling.) One feat deserves special mention: Essence Focus. You can invest an essence into the feat to regain your psionic focus, with a 3-round cooldown preventing the constant spamming of the awesome combos available via this feat's modification of action economy. Even more interesting, the feat allows you to make psionic focus work to activate two abilities that require the expenditure of the focus while essence is invested in the feat. This is pretty much a genius way of providing truly distinct combos - powerful, yes, but oh so awesome. That Extra Essence pretty much is a no-brainer for Daevics with their limited essence pool should not come as a surprise. Over all, the selection here feels pretty refined.



The veils, obviously, do sport some overlap with the other akashic classes, though especially bull rush/overrun specialists will definitely enjoy the option to avoid the feat-tax and adding damage as insult to the injury. Interesting would also be that you can find veils herein that have no effect unless imbued with essence and/or bound to chakras, providing e.g. significant synergy with vital strikes, which becomes very relevant regarding the new builds available for AoO-Vital Strikes - size-increase is the name of the game here. While there are minor rules-language presentation hiccups herein ("Fortitude 1/2" instead of Fortitude halves, for example), there are also some rather versatile veils herein that not only provide different effects depending on the essence invested/chakras bound, but rather providing different options within those choices as well - and yes, we do get exclusives for the daevic's unique blood slot - like duplicating unnatural lust or gaining blood that causes both fire and acid damage to the creature attacking the daevic...and binding it to work as AoE via chakra-bind. Imagine my surprise, by the way, when I saw a classic, German slot introduced - "Wrathful Claws" are bound exclusively to the "Hans"-slot - definitely the funniest typo I've seen in a while. ;)



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting do show that this is still WiP -while in no means bad and pretty functional, this pdf does sport numerous italicization glitches, typos and the like. The rules-language is more precise than in previous Akashic Mystery-pdfs, though. Layout adheres to Dreamscarred Press' beautiful 2-cpolumn full-color standard and the pdf does sport a mix of nice original art and some I have seen before, all in full color. The pdf comes with a more printer-friendly version as well. The pdf has no bookmarks, which constitutes a comfort-detriment.



As before, all the gushing about the base system and its mechanics that I have indulged in previous reviews of the series hold true still here. Michael Sayre does provide an actual compelling, tactical full-BAB-class with a plethora of options and things to do - and, coincidentally, the akashic class that does not require constant tinkering: Indeed, the daevic does require the least constant pondering, unlocking the system for players less intrigued about constant complex modifications - while it *does* support this playstyle as well, it can be played more like a prepare and forget type of class, which is ultimately the design-intent here. The daevic is a glorious class, though GMs heavily using DR should take not that the options of the class pretty much waltz all over the DR, making the daevic a powerful shredder if build properly. Ultimately, I adore this class and enjoy its unique slot and the options provided within; more often than not, one can see the growth of designer Michael Sayre that denotes him as one author to definitely watch!



Now I do have to somewhat bash on the pdf due to the editing glitches that can be found herein and minor wording issues that can use streamlining, but once these are cleaned up (and if Michael doesn't drop the ball in the supplemental content-pdf), Akashic Mysteries may become one of my absolute favorite new system - it has all the potential and makings of an EZG Essential. My final verdict for the daevic as presented, for now, will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform...and for now. I really, really hope Dreamscarred Press makes the final book live up to the vast potential!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Akashic Mysteries: Daevic
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