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Rite Map Pack: City by the Sea
Publisher: Rite Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 07/02/2014 04:16:26
AN Endzeitgeist.com review

This map pack depicts a City by the Sea on 16 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, leaving 14 pages for the maps, so let's take a look!





The first map depicts a massive, walled city by the sea, with streets connecting organically gates with the area around the harbor and one section of the city on a hill. It should be noted that unlike Port Shaw, Freeport etc., there is no huge harbor here, but rather the harbor can be considered just one part of the city, not one of its defining, center features.



The second page also has the city, this time depicted horizontal - with a truly jarring white box of text on the parchment-like header and a similarly jarring list of important buildings. Layout-wise, these white, angular boxes on a background of parchment are a total disaster that thankfully only mars this one rendition of the map - until you click on it, when the white box disappears. Printing it out, the boxes disappeared, but for those of you aiming to use this incarnation of the map online or via tablets should be aware of that.

EDIT: I've been made aware by two sources that I seem to be the only one stuck with this weird glitch - probably due to some personalizer issue or something like that. So ignore that portion.



6 pages each, both in b/w and full color, depict the city in a larger version.



Conclusion:

Tommi Salama is a glorious cartographer, and he obviously is just as at home with city maps as with battle maps - and this one comes beautiful indeed - craftmanship-wise, there's nothing to complain. A minor downside would be the lack of bookmarks to e.g. the b/w-version -while a marginal gripe, it still would have been nice to see. The pdf is also accompanied by an array of 4 cool high-res jpegs with and without labels. Internal logic-wise, I also have a minor gripe - for a city constructed so all roads lead towards the harbor, said harbor is VERY small when compared to the size of the city. My final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Rite Map Pack: City by the Sea
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The Genius Guide to More Barbarian Talents
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 07/01/2014 10:36:30
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The expansion for the superb talented barbarian clocks in at 10 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page credits, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



A total of 4 new edges are provided - one to make an animal whisperer (wild empathy, then non-magical charm effect -wrap your head around that!), one to further improve cleaving, one for a mule-style barbarian with more carrying capacity/better str-checks and one to grant immunity versus compulsions, but with the caveat of including a higher-HD-by-4-caveat similarly to how sneak attack versus those tentatively immune to flanking is handled.



A total of 24 talents are also part of the deal, covering wild empathy, being able to appraise non-magical objects/getting a kind of pidgin means of communicating simple concepts, speaking with animals of her form while skinwalking at will, one that lets you treat a very select array of weapons as a lighter category, improvise objects, becoming harder to get by failing respective saves and gaining bonuses while under negative conditions. The latter is a problem, at least a minor one - while I get the design intent here, the reality of the game will see more than one barbarian with this talent asking his/her compatriots to inflict e.g. bleed damage on them to get the melee damage boost (hey, +2 to damage ain't that shabby...) - too metagamey in the way it will be (mis-)used for my tastes. Kind of weird would be head smash - unarmed attacks with the head, executable sans AoO and even when grappled or pinned, but deals half damage to the barbarian. Again, I like the idea, but the execution would probably not see me ever take it unless I had a DM who used super-grappler foes all the time. On the other end, half damage from all falls and never landing prone when falling AND +2 to CMD versus trips? Yeah, can see that one.



Rather disappointing for me was also the way in which blood oaths are portrayed herein - when below half max hp (Hello, 4th edition design!), a barbarian may once per day choose one of 4 bonuses - none of which are too strong and require line of sight with the target of the oath and a relatively short duration, but still. Kind of anticlimactic and not like an epic blood oath of vengeance, more like a minor revenge theme. Better bracer-fighting and a talent that nets bonus hp when not wearing armor and the like, on the other hand, help quite a bit with some character concepts. One of the 4 greater talents allows you to execute two combat maneuvers at once as a standard action and -2 to either. A complex one here...on the one hand, there is nothing per se wrong with this one per se thanks to the action-economy-caveat, it is still one that somewhat leaves me with a bit of hesitation, especially with the grand talent that 1/round allows the barbarian to add yet another maneuver to a combat maneuver or attack - and since there's no other caveat, that means potentially three combat maneuvers in one attack - and I *know* there are some creature/build combos that can do very nasty things with combos like that... Getting a final attack when being downed or killed on the other hand is a rather neat one.



We also get 7 new rage powers and they are interesting - more CMD and more importantly, an AoO if a maneuver fails against the raging barbarian (even if otherwise not provoking one from the barbarian) -yeah, these I can see. Draw Aggression deserves special mention - when a foe the barbarian threatens targets a foe other than the barbarian with a spell, ability or attack, the barbarian gets an AoO - add reach, have fun. Seriously, nice way of making the aggression drawing work. Getting a free round of rage for being critted, on the other hand, at least theoretically fails the kitten test in a very minor way - while theoretically, the rage could be infinitely prolonged by crits of declawed kittens, in practice, it'll be hard to maintain. Still, not particularly elegant design in my book. Getting a shaken-inducing defense versus mind-inföluencing effects on the other hand - yeah, neato! Ditto for inciting minor, detrimental rages and a fast intimidate (swift or immediate action) upon entering a rage.



The pdf concludes with a list of the edges, talents etc. by theme - nice to have!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice significant glitches. Layout adheres to Rogue Genius Games' 2-column portrait standard with thematically fitting color stock art. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience.



Hmm...this one left me with mixed feelings. On the one hand, the further exploration of skinwalking/animal-whisperer-style tricks is cool - as is the fact that some of the abilities herein make vambraces more viable and help unarmored barbarians. The thing is - they, at least in my book, don't do enough to offset the downside of not using armor in the long run - some further talents/edges to improve this conceptual path would have been more than cool. After all, unarmored barbarians, frothing at the mouth while charging those pansies in their shining mail are a staple of fantasy art - a step further in that direction would have been awesome. Usually, the "More X Talents"-series has provided some of the more iconic, cool talents, unique options etc. - and this one does so as well...but also uses quite a bunch of rules-solutions that are slightly less elegant than what I've come to expect from the series. Overall, a few of the talents herein left me either shrugging or simply not sold on their viability. Now don't get me wrong - chances are, you'll find at least some cool tidbits to use herein, but compared to previous installments, this one's mechanics felt a tad bit less streamlined to me, with some reflexive abilities tied to negative conditions and the like. While the wording is water-tight enough to prevent copious abuse, some minor metagamey moments might well arise from this one. All in all, I can bring myself to rating this higher than 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3 for the purpose of this platform, with the caveat that talented barbarian-fans should probably still take a look, but carefully check with their DM regarding the talents herein.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The Genius Guide to More Barbarian Talents
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The Genius Guide to the Talented Barbarian
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/24/2014 02:44:52
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The first of the much-applauded "Talented"-treatments under Owen K.C. Stephens' new Rogue Genius Games clocks in at an impressive 38 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 35 (!!!) pages of content, so let's take a look!



So let's take a look at the class, shall we? talented Barbarians must be of non-lawful alignment, get d12, 4+Int skills, full BAB-progression, good fort-saves and proficiency with all simple and martial weapons and light armors. They also get a so-called edge at first level, 2nd level and then at 5th level and every 6 levels after that. Barbarians also get a so-called talent at 1st level and every level except 5th, 11th and 17th. Starting at 10th level, advanced talents become available and starting at 20th level, so-called grand talents are there as capstones. So far, so good - that's essentially what you had expected after the previous installments of the series.



Now where things get really interesting is with the new level 1 ability Primal Reserve. A barbarian starts play with 4+con-mod points of Primal Reserve and adds +2 points. Primal reserve can be used to automatically stabilize. All core-resources that would increase rage rounds instead net primal reserve points. These, as you can imagine, make for the basic resource of the talented barbarian.



Generally, a certain type of ability-tree can be gleaned herein -while primal reserve powers all the rage-like edges (rage, cod fury, berserker and also savagery), only one can be chosen - savagery allowing btw. the barbarian to add +1d6 to ability/skill-checks based on two chosen attributes other than Int for a more canny/versatile adversary. Additionally, rage powers and the like can be used by barbarians with this edge even when not in rage. This makes for an interesting inherent design-decision, also by adding additional benefits according to the rage chosen - berserkers getting e.g. free proficiencies and the like. Skinwalking and the oracle-mystery-wildering totems also are part of the deal -and before you get out your power-gaming utensils - skinwalking/totems have a caveat that helps them not stack at the lower levels, but which still makes it possible to combine them, should you wish to. Skinwalking? Yep, essentially wild-shaping fuelled by primal reserve, opening a vast array of new character concepts. And before you ask - the ability is balanced re animal modes of movement and attacks, requiring higher levels to turn into predators and the like - nice! It should also be noted that barbarians are explicitly allowed to wilder in the rogue's talent selection via a specific edge, increasing your potential arsenal even further.



Among the talents, armored swiftness, using improvised weapons, longer non-combat wild-shape, crowd control (with a caveat that addresses the problematic wording of the origin ability!), ignoring bad weather - rather awesome, very extensive selection, though personally, I had hoped the Titan Mauler's ability to wield oversized weapons and one-hand two-handed weapons and all the confusion surrounding it had been cleaned up in a similar manner as aforementioned crowd control. Oh well, guess you can't have everything. And before you ask - yes, rage power is now a talent as well, allowing you access to the list of rage-powers, which still apply their potential additional prerequisites. Have I mentioned the ability to use foes grappled as weapons to bludgeon others while in rage? What about rerolls of failed saves versus conditions upon drinking alcohol? Of course, totem rage powers are also included herein - with the totem edge (which may be taken multiple times) offering potentially access to multiple rage totem powers. Beyond the alignment-based/obvious beast totem powers, the fans of Midgard will surely enjoy the world-serpent totem powers or the hive totem, the latter of which is a godsend if your DM's just as evil as yours truly and loves throwing deadly swarms at the poor melee characters after the AoE-spells of the casters are drained...



We also get an index that groups the respective content according to theme. Very interesting indeed - beyond the by now traditional advice on how to handle synergy between talented classes, we get essentially a suggestion called heroic warrior, who is a synergy of fighter, barbarian and cavalier for those who wish to play in all toolboxes sans breaking the game -really like that one, though a full-blown table for the class would probably have been nice.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I didn't notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to RGG's printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes with thematically-fitting stock art and is EXTENSIVELY bookmarked with nested bookmarks for each edge, talent and rage power. It also comes hyperlinked to d20pfsrd.com, though not with the perfect bookmarks, but rather the automated ones - I doubt that customers require "GM" to be hyperlinked and more than once, I clicked by accident on a hyperlink, in the end printing this out to avoid just that. Oh well, at least the hyperlinks per se aren't obtrusive.



Back to a more positive topic - the content. This takes the slobbering, wrath-filled barbarian and, as the intro suggests, separates it from the savage warrior, essentially allowing for non-raging barbarians from less urbanized cultures to civilized people who need anger management classes to shamanistic warriors that may slip in and out of animal skins - the barbarian as reimagined herein is much more versatile than the base class it inspired, offering much, much more in the variety of character concepts it supports - and that, ladies and gentleman, is why this one, much like the other talented classes before, now is the standard at my table. f problems can be found herein, they are minor at the very best and not the result of the class, but of the base archetype-abilities the framework took and adapted. And, let me emphasize this, even these minor hick-ups do not detract from the usefulness of this class in the slightest - final verdict: 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Genius Guide to the Talented Barbarian
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Real Scroll 1: Fireball (Pathfinder RPG)
Publisher: Kobold Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/20/2014 03:35:43
An Endzeitgeist.com review

And now for something completely different - today I'll take a look at Kobold Press' Real Scroll-series, which portrays one spell per installment in a lavish, hand-crafted calligraphy.



Each of these pdf is 4 pages long - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD/editorial, 1 page regular text of the spell and 1 page for the real scroll calligraphy version of the spell.



These reviews are not about content - they are about aesthetics and as such, much more so than my regular reviews, I invite you, the reader, to take these as just that - my personal preference and opinion regarding these. Got that?



Great! It should be noted, that the scrolls don't contain arcane gibberish, strange runes or glyphs or the like - they contain the spell's description and rules, rendered in lavish calligraphy - and that's it. whether these are worth it for you as a customer depends very much on how excited you can get about beautiful calligraphy, here rendered by Kathy Barker.

#1 is all about the iconic fireball, with massive Initials, wonderful ligatures and the text superimposed over the awesome rendition of a fireball, with the scroll itself having a somewhat scorched, parchment-like look and a caveat on the proper storage of these scrolls at the end - glorious 5 star + seal of approval material in my book.

Now If you enjoy artfully crafted calligraphy or have tried your hand with it yourself, if you're an aesthete, then these will be worth the asking price indeed. If you're just out there for the crunch, then you might want to skip these. Personally, I hope the series continues - for I'm convinced that RPGs ARE art and crossovers/crosspollinations of different types of artistry tend to result in favorites of mine. I know I'm looking forward to when I can hand out a scroll of fireball to my players and watch their astonished faces!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Real Scroll 1: Fireball (Pathfinder RPG)
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Real Scroll 3: Fire Under the Tongue (Pathfinder RPG)
Publisher: Kobold Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/20/2014 03:33:03
An Endzeitgeist.com review

And now for something completely different - today I'll take a look at Kobold Press' Real Scroll-series, which portrays one spell per installment in a lavish, hand-crafted calligraphy.



Each of these pdf is 4 pages long - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD/editorial, 1 page regular text of the spell and 1 page for the real scroll calligraphy version of the spell.



These reviews are not about content - they are about aesthetics and as such, much more so than my regular reviews, I invite you, the reader, to take these as just that - my personal preference and opinion regarding these. Got that?



Great! It should be noted, that the scrolls don't contain arcane gibberish, strange runes or glyphs or the like - they contain the spell's description and rules, rendered in lavish calligraphy - and that's it. whether these are worth it for you as a customer depends very much on how excited you can get about beautiful calligraphy, here rendered by Kathy Barker.

#3 portrays Fire Under the Tongue, with somewhat organic/leaf (or flame)-like embroideries to the side of the spell. As an awesome touch, several of the letters feature flame-like extensions and the penultimate "f" of fire in the line that includes the mythic and augmentation options rounds perfectly the space of the page. The scroll comes with a fitting, red border and, as with the previous installments, the ligatures deserve special mentioning for their aesthetic value. Instead of one-letter initials, we have bolded letters in this case and personally, I prefer lavish initials over the (comparatively) common bolding of first words in a paragraph. 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5.

Now If you enjoy artfully crafted calligraphy or have tried your hand with it yourself, if you're an aesthete, then these will be worth the asking price indeed. If you're just out there for the crunch, then you might want to skip these. Personally, I hope the series continues - for I'm convinced that RPGs ARE art and crossovers/crosspollinations of different types of artistry tend to result in favorites of mine. I know I'm looking forward to when I can hand out a scroll of fireball to my players and watch their astonished faces!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Real Scroll 3: Fire Under the Tongue (Pathfinder RPG)
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Real Scroll 2: Battleward (Pathfinder RPG)
Publisher: Kobold Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/20/2014 03:30:22
An Endzeitgeist.com review

And now for something completely different - today I'll take a look at Kobold Press' Real Scroll-series, which portrays one spell per installment in a lavish, hand-crafted calligraphy.



Each of these pdf is 4 pages long - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD/editorial, 1 page regular text of the spell and 1 page for the real scroll calligraphy version of the spell.



These reviews are not about content - they are about aesthetics and as such, much more so than my regular reviews, I invite you, the reader, to take these as just that - my personal preference and opinion regarding these. Got that?



Great! It should be noted, that the scrolls don't contain arcane gibberish, strange runes or glyphs or the like - they contain the spell's description and rules, rendered in lavish calligraphy - and that's it. whether these are worth it for you as a customer depends very much on how excited you can get about beautiful calligraphy, here rendered by Kathy Barker.

#2 depicts battleward and is more light -with two small heraldic crests depicting a portcullis and a sword-like icon superimposes on a sun-light background flanking the spell's name, ethereal blueish wisps stretch towards the middle of the text from the upper right corner - per se very elegant, but I miss the custom background, this scroll having only a stark white background and the scroll has too pronounced white borders for my tastes. The two lavishly rendered, beautiful initials of the text deserve mentioning, though. 4 stars.

Now If you enjoy artfully crafted calligraphy or have tried your hand with it yourself, if you're an aesthete, then these will be worth the asking price indeed. If you're just out there for the crunch, then you might want to skip these. Personally, I hope the series continues - for I'm convinced that RPGs ARE art and crossovers/crosspollinations of different types of artistry tend to result in favorites of mine. I know I'm looking forward to when I can hand out a scroll of fireball to my players and watch their astonished faces!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Real Scroll 2: Battleward (Pathfinder RPG)
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Real Scroll 4: Gear Barrage (Pathfinder RPG)
Publisher: Kobold Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/20/2014 03:28:31
An Endzeitgeist.com review

And now for something completely different - today I'll take a look at Kobold Press' Real Scroll-series, which portrays one spell per installment in a lavish, hand-crafted calligraphy.



Each of these pdf is 4 pages long - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD/editorial, 1 page regular text of the spell and 1 page for the real scroll calligraphy version of the spell.



These reviews are not about content - they are about aesthetics and as such, much more so than my regular reviews, I invite you, the reader, to take these as just that - my personal preference and opinion regarding these. Got that?



Great! It should be noted, that the scrolls don't contain arcane gibberish, strange runes or glyphs or the like - they contain the spell's description and rules, rendered in lavish calligraphy - and that's it. whether these are worth it for you as a customer depends very much on how excited you can get about beautiful calligraphy, here rendered by Kathy Barker.

#4 is all about Gear Barrage, with a lot of swirly, brown lines at the top and bottom of the spell, each of the brown lines ending in a turquoise dot and spirals adhering to a similar schematic denoting the respective lines of the mechanical information for the spell.. The spell's title is the star here - with turquoise letters and brown borders of said letters, the title is just a beauty to look at. The borders of the scroll this time around are brown. While the embroideries and spirals of the text this time around rank among the best I've seen in the series, this scroll also suffers from there just not being that much text - the scroll features significantly large borders, with the text being not perfectly centered and more left-aligned, lending to an impression of the scroll being simply not that well-used - larger letters, more pronounced embroideries, something like that could have made this one truly stand out. 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4.



Now If you enjoy artfully crafted calligraphy or have tried your hand with it yourself, if you're an aesthete, then these will be worth the asking price indeed. If you're just out there for the crunch, then you might want to skip these. Personally, I hope the series continues - for I'm convinced that RPGs ARE art and crossovers/crosspollinations of different types of artistry tend to result in favorites of mine. I know I'm looking forward to when I can hand out a scroll of fireball to my players and watch their astonished faces!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Real Scroll 4: Gear Barrage (Pathfinder RPG)
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Path of War: The Warder
Publisher: Dreamscarred Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/17/2014 03:36:29
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Path of War-series is 45 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page of SRD, leaving us with 42 pages of content, so let's take a look!



Okay, one thing out of the way - I assume at this point that you're familiar with the terminology of PoW, that you are aware that now per-encounter abilities have a precisely in-game defined time-frame and that PoW does NOT represent standard Pathfinder-balance - the aim of this series is to add power to martial characters, with special martial-arts style maneuvers and new classes. This means that balance, by design, is different from what you'd get in regular PFRPG. I'm not going to criticize the increased power of these characters, since that's the design-goal. Relevant for DMs would be the fact that with these guys around, war of attrition no longer works - since maneuvers can be (with some actions required to regain them) performed ad infinitum, resource-depletion as a strategy akin to dealing with spellcasters no longer works with PoW - or at least, is significantly less effective. This caveat out of the way, If you're interested in the basics, check out my previous PoW-reviews.



That out of the way, let's take a look at the difficult concept of a defensive warrior, herein exemplified by the new warder base-class. Warders get d12, 4+Int skills per level, good fort and will-saves, full BAB-progression, proficiency with all armors and all shields and start game with 5 maneuvers known, 3 readied and 1 known stance. Over the 10 levels, these expand to 16 maneuvers known, 10 readied and 6 stances. Maneuvers expended can also be regained by this class in a unique way, by entering the so-called defensive focus. First, there is a passive benefit - warders get the combat reflexes feat and use int-mod instead of dex-mod to determine AoOs per round. Recovering maneuvers as a full-round action, the warder gets an interesting ability - he sets up a defensive perimeter, threatening an additional 5 ft., + another 5ft. per 5 initiator levels (not sure whether that's intended and shouldn't be CLASS levels instead - multiclassing warder/warlord/stalker and having this one grow at full force seems excessive to me). Until the beginning of the warder's next turn, he may make AoOs against targets provoking them in this increased perimeter. The warder may still move as part of these AoO, but only up to his speed - this feels a bit powerful when compared to similar defensive builds, but I guess that's intended. Finally, the warder imposes a penalty equal to class level + int-mod to acrobatics-checks made to prevent AoOs from the warder. At 10th level, this becomes worse - the warder's threatened area becomes difficult terrain for foes and his own movements don't provoke AoOs anymore when in defensive focus.



Not provoking any AoOs by moving anymore can break A LOT of builds - which doesn't seem so bad. Want to see these get truly scary? Reach weapon + creature with reach + size-increase (the latter especially for PCs) - deadly. I'm seriously not sure whether +25 ft. reach IN ADDITION to all the reach-increasing tricks out there isn't...well...insane.



Warders also increase their ally's defenses by mere proximity, granting a +1 morale bonus to AC and will-saves to all allies within 10 ft., scaling up to +5 at 17th level and increasing range to up to 30 ft. Nothing to complain about the defensive aura here. At 2nd level, the Warder also gets an ability called Armiger's Mark -usable 1/2 class level + int-mod times per day, and no more often simultaneously than against 3+int-mod targets, as a free action, warders damaging foes may mark them to force them to attack the warder for warder's int-mod rounds at -4 (scaling up to -8) to atk and with a spell failure chance increased by 10% +1% per 2 levels. No save. Which brings me to an issue here - I GET the idea of this ability - it's intended to force a target to attack the warder (and not the healing-spamming cleric/druid/oracle). I actually applaud that! What I don't like is that there's no scaling, no success/failure-dichotomy here - personally, I think the ability would be more rewarding (and exciting and balanced), if the target got a save to negate the penalties imposed by the mark BUT NOT the ability's crux, i.e. still have to attack the target. Now at 9th level, a warder can expend two uses of this ability to impose the penalty to all creatures within 30 ft. on a failed will-save for int-mod rounds. While being limited by a save and being language-dependant (meaning unlike the mark, it does not work against animals etc.), I still think that this debuff as a free action is a bit excessive. At 16th level, warders may regain maneuvers by dropping marked foes to 0 hp.



The class also receives a bonus combat (or teamwork) feat at 3rd level and every 5th level thereafter. At fourth level, warders may use int instead of dex to calculate their ref-saves and initiative (making them essentially a 3 good save-class - which is excessive). In contrast, reducing armor check penalty by 2 over the whole class feels not that impressive. Personally, I'd nerf the former ability and improve the latter - also to allow for slightly more varied char-builds - i.e. dexterous warders instead of strong warders.



Extended defense unfortunately doesn't work - 1/day (+1/day every 3 levels) as an immediate action, warders may designate a counter readied, which the warder may then execute as a free action at will until the start of his next turn. The thing is - free actions can't be RAW performed when it's not your turn. So we have a conundrum here - also regarding the counter itself; It *could* be spammed infinitely since there is no caveat there - if one presumes a free action to work also on another's turn (which it doesn't), action economy gets all jumbled for the counters (not to start with implications for other free action tricks of other classes...). A more elegant solution would have imho be to simply allow the ability to let the warder execute the counter at will as a substitute to regular AoOs provoked by his opponents - simple, elegant and sans this action economy labyrinth the ability opens.



At 7th level, warders can expend one use of their mark to expend int-mod readied maneuvers and replace them with an equal amount of known maneuvers as a full-round action. At 15th level, a warder may make fort-saves against the atk that would reduce him to 0 hp or below and instead have an item absorb the damage, potentially getting the broken condition...per se cool. The problem is, what happens to indestructible armor/artifacts etc.? Seriously, a warder with these is a force to be reckoned with... while not 100% foolproof, at 15th level, the ability comes late enough to make me still consider okay. In direct comparison, gaining +int-mod to AC versus crit-confirmation rolls at 19th level feels rather anticlimactic. The capstone again is rather epic though, allowing the maintaining of defensive focus as a move action, while also netting aegis bonuses, immunities and preventing death from hit point damage - he is "unable to die from hit point damage" - each round consumes aegis marks, though, and at the end of this ability, he's exhausted, which can only be cured by rest. per se cool...but: The warder's immortal via hit point damage - so far, so good. Does that mean that a 200 hp dragon-flame blast hitting the warder simply does no damage or that he can't die from it if his hp are down to 49? What after the blast? Assuming the warder would die at -16 hp, would he be at -15 hp and unconscious (meaning the ability would cease immediately?)? Would said warder be stable or die the next round on a failed check? Or is the warder locked at 0 hp and staggered? Or is the warder's hp locked at 1hp for the duration of the ability? Some clarification would help make this cool capstone really awesome...



All right, next up would once again be the short primer on the Knowledge (martial) skill (still sans info which non-PoW-classes should get it as a class skill...) and new (and old) feats from the PoW. So let's see how these fare! General feats to specialize on disciplines, learning more maneuvers etc. and letting other classes wilder among the maneuvers presented as well as offering the finesse etc. feats already known from the previous installments. The feats also include one that doubles the duration of the aegis mark ability. One feat. Doubled duration. Even within PoW, this is BROKEN. Extra marks is okay - as is the option to make foes demoralized and marked flee from you (which is probably smart - two massive debuffs don't make for a good melee...) and finally, the feat that nets temporary hp in exchange for a penalty with full attacks is back; While not broken, it's also not particularly awesome - it's essentially a free array of temp hit points as long as full attacks are performed, which makes for a very strange in-game logic indeed...



Next up would be the maneuvers - Golden Lion and Primal Fury you'll know from the Warlord (covered in my review there), Broken Blade from the Stalker (ditto) - but there's also a new discipline, namely Iron Tortoise. I will ONLY cover Iron Tortoise in this review.

Iron Tortoise's associated skill is Bluff and it requires proficiency with shields. This discipline is defensive in nature - which I applaud. I also enjoy that NONE of the maneuvers uses a skill check for attack-mechanic! Yeah! One of the most powerful counters allows the initiator to make an opposed attack roll + shield bonus versus the incoming attack as an immediate action - success negates the incoming attack, while failure still nets you a DR of 50/- against it. Yeah. Ouch - but the true joke is - not that much better than the level 6 version, which does essentially the same, but "only" nets DR 20/- on a failure.

Remember that this ability can be refreshed relatively easily. See what I meant in the beginning with PoW adhering to a different power level than standard Pathfinder? Still, within PoW's frame. Another boost of the discipline allows the initiator to heap cumulative penalties against targets other than you upon foes for each successful attack you hit them with. What's fundamentally broken is burnished shell - which renders all spells requiring attacks utterly useless - by succeeding an attack against CASTER LEVEL (lol, 5? 10? Even for 20 - The discipline cannot possibly fail this one!), the maneuver negates the targeted spell. Disintegrate? Pfff! The check is the same for all spell levels! Its DC is ridiculously low at ANY level range! Oh, the maneuver is LEVEL 3. Seriously? Even in PoW's increased power-level, this is utterly, completely INSANE. Not all maneuvers have problems, though - whirlwind shield-bashing foes? Yeah - works and is cool. I also LOVE that there's a maneuver that lets you add shield-bonus to fort and ref-saves against specific attacks- simply because that's one of the iconic things that shields ought to be able to do: Fireball incoming: Hiding behind the shield may save you from being burnt to a crisp! Yeah, that one works neat! Another high-level attack I like can attack multiple foes with one shield bash and massive bonus damage, knocking foes back! an opposing attack roll including movement to negate attacks on allies also works rather neatly! In contrast the shield bash attack to negate incoming non-spell/power attack-level 1 counter once again somewhat rubs me the wrong way, though here mainly because of the d20 vs. d20 fluctuation. This is a matter of personal preference, though, and unlike the skill vs. attack complaining I did (which does have massive issues), attack vs. attack will not cause me to rate this pdf down.



I do like the stance that makes your armor count as one step lighter, shield throwing and yes, the inevitable defensive position-style stance. Overall, I have surprisingly few issues with the whole discipline and consider it perhaps the best one so far...if you can deal with one concept.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I didn't notice significant glitches, though here and there ambiguities have slipped past rules-editing. Layout adheres to DSP's two-column standard and artworks are mostly thematically-fitting stock-art. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



Chris Bennett's growth as an author is quite interesting to observe - the warder feels more concise than the previous classes and makes for a very interesting take on the defensive fighter, with a lot of interesting abilities and some rather cool ideas. That being said, while it doesn't fail the kitten-test this time around, there are some rough edges in this class as well, though decidedly less than before.



The same can be said about Iron Tortoise - gone from this discipline are the 3.X-relics, all vanished in favor of more PFRPG-oriented mechanics. While personally, I'm not a fan of opposed attack rolls (why not resolve it versus opponent's CMD?), I can live with attack versus attack since they adhere to the same scaling mechanism and thus can be balanced against each other. The vast majority of the discipline works rather well and while there are some components which can use some balance-tweaking, overall, within the increased power-level of PoW, I can see it working well.



This pdf is the so far most refined Path of War installment. That being said, as written, one can create a terror-inducing tank indeed - I could hand this to one of my players and get a strong, but balanced character. Much like the other PoW-books, I could also hand this to one of my number-wizards (get it? spellcaster-analogue...Okay, I'll hit myself now and put 2 bucks in the bad-pun-jar) and they'd utterly break balance with the other classes.



So overall...Yes, there's some filing off of rough edges to still be done here - though less than before. Another note I feel I should mention would be the concept of aggro - many abilities herein force foes to attack certain targets and reward/penalize certain actions on behalf of the warder's foes. While personally, I don't necessarily mind the concept (though I'd penalize the hell out of a player not properly rping WHY s/he draws the foe's ire/how s/he interposes her/himself into attacks!), I can imagine certain DMs being annoyed by this - I'm mentioning this primarily because two of my playtesters were exceedingly annoyed by this. It should also be noted that this class is VERY linear; Not much choices class-option-wise.



How to rate this, then? I actually like the class abilities (and, even if the class isn't revised/further streamlined, will scavenge the hell out of it!), but some of them as written, require some finetuning. The same goes for the new maneuvers, some of which vastly outclass others in power/usefulness. The good news here is that these glitches, unlike previous complaints I had in the series, can be VERY EASILY fixed - they require no incision into central mechanics or the like and boil down to minor fixes, though the amount does accumulate. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3 -with the caveat that if you mind neither the glitches I noted, nor the strength or the aggro-drawing concept, you should DEFINITELY round up to 4 stars instead. A moderately talented DM can smoothen the rough edges him/herself.



One final promise - I *will* revisit ALL maneuvers in the final, inevitable compilation and once again see whether this series manages to become the legendary book it sets out to be or whether the minor rough edges remain.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Path of War: The Warder
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CLASSifieds: Centaurian (Cavalier Archetype)
Publisher: Fat Goblin Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/14/2014 04:28:44
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the CLASSifieds-series is 6 pages long, 1 page front cover/SRD, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 4 pages of content, so what is this about?



The centaurian archetype replaces ride with knowledge (nature) and does not gain proficiency with heavy armor. Instead of challenge, the centaurian receives the so-called Tauric Shape - essentially a wild-shape variant, choosing a lower torso of a quadruped one size larger than the character. This increases size category by one step, but avoids the weapon-size debacle by simply also granting the undersized weapons creature ability of the centaur. The cavalier also gets a +2 bonus to Str and a +10 ft enhancement to base land speed. Equipment worn on lower torso and feet melds with the form or shows up in pouches, ready to be used. While in this form, cavaliers may wield lances one-handed and deal double damage with lances when charging as if mounted. This is a polymorph effect that lasts 1 minute per level (probably should be class level). At 3rd level and every 3 levels after that, the centaurian can assume this form an additional time per day. While personally, I just would have made it possible to shapechange in increments of 1 minute, but nothing wrong here.



In lieu of a mount, centaurians may 3+cha-mod times per day, as a swift action command allies to grant them a +2 morale bonus to attack rolls against ALL foes the centaurian can perceive. Yeah...this one's too strong. No range? This is arguably better than bardic performance and since the only limit is being able to perceive foes, makes the cavalier very strong in open warfare. Not strong enough to make me yell broken, but too far on the power-scale for my tastes. This increases to also providing +2 to damage and a +1 dodge bonus to AC at 4th level...so yeah.



At 3rd level, instead of cavalier's charge, the centaurian is treated as if having the mounted combat feat and gains the benefits of aforementioned ability while in tauric form. At 5th level, centaurians may, as a swift action con-mod times per day, gain the benefits of a haste-spell for 1 round per 2 levels (which, again, should be CLASS levels) - as an extraordinary ability. No suppression. After the burst of speed, a centaurian takes a -1 penalty to atk and AC and a -10 ft penalty to speed. However, I should note that this ability is NOT restricted to tauric shape as written...not sure whether that's intentional.



At 12th level, the centaurian's bonus to str in tauric shape increases a further +2 and they may initiate an overrun attempt sans AoO at +2 when hitting a target as part of a charge. Weird here - I *assume* this only works in tauric shape, but as written, a base-form centaurian could overrun smaller creatures with this just as well when not transformed. At 14th level, merely initiating a charge may make enemies that fail their save shaken. This extends to all enemies that can perceive you (again: very powerful in open warfare); More interesting - the ability fails to note that it is a fear-inducing effect, which becomes relevant for paladins et al.



We also are introduced to a new cavalier order, the order of the centaur (good, since the centaurian doesn't get the challenge of other orders)...ähhh...wait. This order also provides a challenge. Whenever using a move action when moving 10 feet or more, the cavalier gets a +1 dodge bonus to AC against the target of the challenge for one round. The bonus scales. Okay, though you have to bear in mind that the centaurian doesn't get this challenge! The order also reduces the AC-penalty when charging. At 8th level, 1/day when hit by an attack, the cavalier may make an acrobatics-check to negate the damage - NOT a fan of skill versus incoming attack. I've discussed in length before why I consider skill versus atk-roll problematic and I don't like repeating myself over and over, so yeah.



We also are introduced to 4 new feats:

-Tauric Mount: Carry allies into battle as if a mount, use tactician to grant them temporarily mounted combat or archery.



-Improved Tauric Mount: Allies may make full attacks after a charge while riding you. See, this becomes problematic - I assume the player character riding can only make one attack after charging sans this feat if s/he's delayed/readied an action, but I'm not sure. The feat's text could be read to imply that the rider gets the full attack in addition to the one they could potentially execute after your charge in their initiative order. Usually, the mount in mounted combat is subsumed under the rider and relegated to mostly moving/minor attacks. Here, with one player taking control of the mount and the other being the rider, things get more complex since a mount usually acts at a rider's initiative score. This problem also extends to the regular tauric mount feat, but becomes more pronounced here.



-Tauric Weapons: These gain you 2 primary natural weapons at 1d4 bludgeoning or slashing while in tauric form.



-Tauric Pounce: Make a full attack at the end of a charge, but only with your natural weapons. Urgh. Pounce is evil. The restriction keeps this somewhat in check, but I'm positive, that this can hurt in the hands of the right player.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good; while I've noticed some minor glitches in the rules-language, nothing too serious did crop up. Layout adheres to Fat Goblin Games' elegant 2-column greyish/brown-standard and is a joy to behold. The color cover artwork is nice to see as well. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Tyler Beck's Centaurian is a cool archetype indeed, allowing you to play a centaur without the size-issues/ladder-climbing etc. - and its mechanical execution is mostly solid. Regarding the archetype, my mayor complaints boil down to the lack of range limitations regarding their buffing capability and another issue: Weight. Does the centaurian's size-increase also increase weight? If so, by how much? I *assume* standard guidelines here, but I'm not sure and when traversing brittle bridges or galloping over a recently frozen river, that becomes relevant. Another issue I have would be with carrying capacity -quadrupeds can carry A LOT more than bipeds, so doe carrying capacity increase while in tauric shape?



Now let's be honest, these points are essentially nitpicks, but with the supplemental information, things get a bit...ugly. The new order is fine, if nothing special...but why not create an order specifically for centaurs/centaurians? The archetype eats challenge and similar abilities all up, so some customization would have been nice here, especially for the poor cavalier who already the shortest possible end of that stick. Now where things turn ugly is with the feats to carry allies into battle. Sounds easy, right? Well... it's not. Mounted combat is already not too simple with the mount doing the move actions and the rider acting. When taking two players AND providing feats that mix up the action economy, the wording better be extremely precise. here, it's not -as written, they just don't work...at all.



So, how to rate this, then? All in all, we get a neat archetype with nice ideas and Tyler beck once again shows that he is a promising designer. But on the downside, this could have used an expert rules-editing to make the feat work, a clearer distinction re class/character levels for many abilities etc. This does not make this pdf bad, but it precludes it from reaching the higher echelons of my ratings. Hence, I'll settle for a final verdict of 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
CLASSifieds: Centaurian (Cavalier Archetype)
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Rite Map Pack: River Rapids
Publisher: Rite Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/14/2014 04:25:46
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This map-pack is 35 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 16 pages of full-color map and 16 of the same as b/w.



So this would be a new gorgeous full color map with a gorgeous grid - so what is on this map? We get a river, full of dynamic-looking foam and different depths, with several large rocks jutting out of it and a short section of sands on both sides - at least up to the beaver dam that can be found in the upper third of the river - the river making its way through two massive breaches in the dam.



The maps come with a grid.



Conclusion:

Water is hard to get right on maps and Tommi Salama creates water that is gorgeous - whether the dam, the jutting rocks - this map is beautiful indeed and the pdf comes fully bookmarked, which is a definite plus. This map-pack is gorgeous - Tommi Salama can be considered the heir apparent of map legend Jonathan Roberts if this pdf is any indicator. Now, personally, I think a version sans grids (or with hex-grids) would have been nice to have, but all in all, that's not enough to rate this down a whole star - hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rite Map Pack: River Rapids
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Gossamer Worlds: The Nightmare Kingdom (Diceless)
Publisher: Rite Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/13/2014 03:34:13
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The third in Rite Publishing's series showcasing the infinite worlds of the Grand Stair, this one clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, leaving 9 pages of content, so let's take a look!



So what is the Nightmare Kingdom? Well, the nightmare kingdom is, as the in-character narrative postulates...strange. Even for the Grand Stair. There is a theory postulated (which may or may not be true) that the Nightmare Kingdom can actually reach places without using the Grand Stair, drifting through shadows and luring unsuspecting beings in. Touching the infinite worlds via closets and subverting doors, the hellish conglomerate of the fears of a thousand times thousand worlds is a domain, yes, but it is also a curse that may actually claim characters as its master...though the current master/slave of the realm, the entity known as the Ghoul, might not take kindly to such an intrusion. Fears made flesh, the boogeymen, which can include anything from the legendary man with red hands to cthonic horrors, the slender man or just about any other dreadful creature you can concieve, populate this deadly place and hence, 3 different takes on handling horror in LoGaS are provided herein for a given group to use.



And yes, tinseltown Hollywood, a Stephen King-inspired small town in Maine and the dark, dark cousin of NYC are provided as sample places that exist physically in the Nightmare Kingdom. Have I mentioned that in this world, psychic sustenance actually may nourish you, heal wounds and even change reality via the shaping of fears?



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to LoGaS' 2-column full color standard and the artworks by Trung Ta Ha, Liew, Henry Toogood, Malcolm McClinton and Vince Ptitvine are glorious - I have seen neither before and think at least the cover is original - in any way, they are GLORIOUS and drive home the creepy atmosphere of this world.



Matt Banach's Nightmare Kingdom, indebted to Ravenloft in concept and flourish, makes for a great, terrible place to introduce to one's campaign and offers infinite potential for deadly horror of all shapes and forms in your LoGaS-game - combined with the great mechanics and writing, I'll settle for a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gossamer Worlds: The Nightmare Kingdom (Diceless)
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Monsters of Porphyra
Publisher: Purple Duck Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/31/2014 04:21:37
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive bestiary clocks in at 199 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages ToC, 6 pages of SRD, 2 pages blank, 1 page back cover, leaving us with an impressive 186 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We kick off this bestiary with an interesting introduction, one, in fact I feel the need to mention: The genesis of this book is uncommon. Once upon a time, Purple Duck Games released small monster pdfs, where patrons could choose old-school monsters to be updated to PFRPG - alas, the small pdfs didn't catch and so, instead, this massive book became a flicker in the eyes of the creators. As you probably can imagine, a monster book ranks among the most expensive things you can do as a publisher, with artworks clocking in among the most expensive components in any rpg-product. Thus, this one went on the back-burner and PDG slowly, but steadily, acquired the funds (all sans kickstarter, mind you!) and crafted this massive tome. Since then, some of the artworks commissioned have been sold to other 3pps for use, so here and there, avid readers of 3pp-material may stumble across a piece of artwork already known - well, this book is where they were supposed to show up in the first place.



As always with monster books of this size, I will not do the math for each and every statblock - instead taking a broader look, checking here and there and looking for obvious glitches, flawed formatting or those that impede the game - like badly worded signature abilities, non-sense types and the kind. Got that? Neato - It should also be mentioned that the monsters all come with a small paragraph that tells us about their role on the world of Porphyra.



Now the first creature herein would be looking like a bird - the Alaihar, a small CR 10 avian creature with majestic, iridescent wings - that actually is a dragon! No, seriously - including breath weapon, interesting spellcasting (both sorc and cle-lists), this sacred bird makes for an interesting ally for good PCs and a cool twist of the holy bird-trope. Now if the gods of good are angered, their wrath is all too often downplayed - enter the alticorns of Idumea, gargantuan, equine beasts of righteous wrath, these beings can crash castles - 1/turn dealing x10 damage to objects and structures makes them fearsome bringers of ruin indeed - especially since they also are rather adept at sundering objects... OUCH!



Speaking of ouch - yes, there is a concise table to create amalgam creatures, with types being determined by awesome ranks - which reads more fun and insincere than the concise template should - for actually making ooze/outsider-combinations and the like, the template is nice, though *personally* I would have preferred a slightly more stream-lined, simpler template here or a more complex one, but either way, that's a personal preference and will not influence my final verdict.



Now if a certain anubis-headed race has been missing from your game ever since Arcana Evolved, you'll notice that there also are a bunch of humanoid races in here, one of which, the Anpur can be considered the heirs to the Sibeccai. Races like the yeti-like Ithn' Ya'roo, the four-armed sabertooth feline Knük or the ogrillons - the races in here tend to fit some classic niches and should make some of the readers positively nostalgic.



Now if you prefer some more apocalyptic creatures, this is the book for you: Whether it's truly apocalyptic creatures (via the new template), remnants of a by-gone age can also be created via another template - for two truly dastardly killer-creatures indeed. Have I mentioned that Fenrir is in here as well? If you want to go Giger/need beings from the cold expanses of space, the void-creature template should cover that itch. The pseudonatural creatures have also been updated, but changed dramatically from previous incarnations - no longer true strikes, but instead a changing of shapes. Paragon creatures also make a return - with optional mythic rules! Neat! Better yet, the sample paragon flumph gets up to CR 7/MR 3 and also comes with a full-blown origin story - which is rather awesome! Speaking of old favorites - a template-based version of creating beast lords can be found herein as well. Vampiric dragons and vampire thralls are back - though the dragon's former treasure-hoard dependency is gone. Also: The stake-weakness doesn't make much sense to me in the case of vampiric dragons, so overall, this template could have used some more specific divergences to help drive home the uniqueness of the undead apex predators. Not sold on that one. Magical constructs and even transformer-style constructs can be created via the material herein as well.



Beyond templates like this, we also get quite an array of fey - like the regal fey, the Njuzu, the new imperial jade dragon or the magi dragon - the apex predators also have a selection of dragon-hybrids and lesser versions like dragonnels, scorpion/dragon hybrids and similar classics you might know from previous editions - with respective, new, unique rules-representations.



If you wanted the eye-beasts to return - they are back in these pages as well - as are the crystalline horrors, gem golems and beholder related beasts that can somewhat fill the void of these ip-closed critters. It should also be noted that a new devilish archdevil-level creature can be found herein as well. Ioun remnants ( are also in here as an example of a cool, unique adversary) are also in here - and, fans of the Iron Kingdoms should take heed - the legendary Ironclad Lich gets the Pathfinder treatment herein - finally, one of the most iconic 3.X monsters back in the game!



Strange creatures and beasts like the devil dogs, burrow-mawts and the like are back again as well - though personally, I would have preferred a more deadly rules-representation of the devil dog's throat rip than making resurrection harder. Fans of Asian critters can also rejoice - fukuranbou, komori ninja and Rokurobi, for example can be found in these pages - and some of the creatures, like the earth-gliding rognak burrowers, even come with Ultimate Psionics-compatible psionics. Haters of psionics should know, though, that the pdf is not centered on these, though. What about the rather deadly stirge swarm, the memory-stealing, decapitating, disturbing and perpetually silent stillfiends?



The monstrous lycanthrope template also deserves special mentioning - creating e.g. were-stirges or were-otyughs is just awesome! And yes, there also are interesting undead herein and while the barrow wight is rather bland, zombie rats, corpse orgies and similar disturbing adversaries like a hound with a cluster of maggot-like tendrils for a head also mean that aficionados of the macabre get enough food for their campaigns herein.



The book also comes with a list of making monsters, simple templates, advice for monsters as PCs, a table of monster-stats by CR, universal monster rules, lists of creature types and subtypes, monster cohorts and animal companions, monsters by type, by CR and even by roles - awesome and extremely handy for getting the right creature in a pinch - kudos for making the book that user-friendly.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, especially for a massive book of this size. Layout adheres to a neat, easy to print two-column full-color standard with one for artwork for each and every creature - even for the sample creatures of templates more often than not! The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



The design team of Mark Gedak, Perry Fehr and Stefen Styrsky deliver one massive, impressive bestiary with the art of Tamas Baranya, Jacob Blackmon, Gary Dupuis, Mark Hyzer, Matt Morrow and Tim Tyler delivering solid representations in gorgeous full color. Purple Duck Games has these spontaneous inspirations, where sometimes, their pdfs come out of left field and blow your mind - and this book does reach this level of brilliance in quite a bunch of the entries. It should be noted, though, that not all of the critters reach this level of creativity and awesomeness -some of the adversaries could have used an additional signature ability or two - mainly, this is due to being creatures converted from previous editions, when it does show up - so essentially, complaining about that goes against the design intent. Still, personally, I did tend to gravitate to the creatures where PDG went all out, went utterly original. Some of the templates and creatures herein had me grin from ear to ear - and taking the extremely fair price-point into account, this bestiary is indeed a superb purchase with a great bang for buck ratio.



However, one should also mention that by now, my expectations for bestiaries are extremely high -Alluria publishing's underwater bestiary Beasts of the Boundless Blue raised the bar regarding artwork, whereas Legendary Games' shorter bestiaries have done the same for unique signature abilities - and while the production values of this book are great, personally, I would have loved to see a bit more in the latter department - more truly unique abilities. Still, it should be noted that this remains me complaining at a high level: The respective creatures more often than not come with at least cool combinations of abilities and unique fluff, even in the case of creatures sans unique signature abilities - and hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars, omitting my seal of approval by a margin.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Monsters of Porphyra
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Prestigious Roles: Toxicologist (PFRPG)
Publisher: Amora Game
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/31/2014 04:19:00
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf is 6 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 3 pages of content for the new PrC, so let's take a look, shall we?



The Toxicologist needs to be non-good and have 5 ranks in Craft (alchemy), sleight of hand and stealth, 3 in heal and need to have poisoned an unsuspecting victim and made friendly contact with a poison-selling apothecary. Got that? Okay, then you qualify for a PrC that nets you d8, 6+Int-mod skills, proficiency with light armor and blow guns, 3/4 BAB-progression and 1/2 fort- and ref-save progression. Toxicologists never risk poisoning themselves, create poisons at half the time and may apply them as a move action (later even as a swift action). They may even change the delivery method of poisons and make e.g. ingested poisons contact poisons - which may be problematic, since method of delivery more often than not makes for a balancing factor in a given poison's potency. The pdf mentions the Craft (poison)-skill, here, though - which does not exist. This ought to be Craft (alchemy).



The toxicologist is also great at blending in in crowds (making for great assassins from the stands!) with bonuses to disguise in crowds - just a pity that the ability does not extend to stealth - sniping unnoticed from the crowds would have been cool - as written, the Toxicologist gets one shot and then is exposed. They also learn to increase the DC of their poisons, can purchase them at less cost and delay their onset as well as negate them via int/level-checks. The PrC also gets sneak attack progression (+4d6 over 10 levels). At first level and every 3 after that, the class learns a specialty, which include poisons that last longer than one hit etc. Special mention deserves the theory of opposites - allowing them to make poisons into buffing items instead - but still risky to imbibe. While potentially rather powerful, abusable and a bit wonky in wording, I do enjoy this idea - especially due to negative conditions balancing the effects in the aftermath. Toxicologists may also learn to extract organs, preserve them and distill poison from them or lace alchemical items with poisons - the latter imho requiring a caveat to not work with some class features of the alchemist-base-class...



At high levels, toxicologists may blend poisons and true masters may, as a capstone, generate lethal poisons from their own body.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting formally are good, though some of the rules-languages could have used a tighter wording. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



The toxicologist-PrC is on the one hand a great little PrC to make poison-use more viable, but it does suffer from some hick-ups in the rules-language - while none of them are particularly nasty, they do accumulate. Author Christie Hollie has delivered a nice PrC and indeed shows some talent here - with minor modifications, this PrC can make for a neat addition to one's campaign. Oh, and it's just 1 buck. For the very fair price and the nice concepts herein, I believe that, in spite of its flaws, I can still round this up from my final verdict of 3.5 stars to 4.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Prestigious Roles: Toxicologist (PFRPG)
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Convergent Paths: Clerics of the Cloth (PFRPG)
Publisher: Rite Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/28/2014 03:17:13
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of RiP's Convergent Paths-series is 14 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 11 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We kick off the pdf with a simple archetype - unarmored clerics. These guys don't get the proficiencies with armors or shields, but when not heavily encumbered and unarmed, they get wis-mod to AC and CMD, also applying the bonus when flat-footed and against touch attacks. When under fear-related conditions or confused, these bonuses are negated and they don't stack with other wis-to-AC-abilities. Generally nice, if a bit weak - especially at medium to high levels, an additional benefit could help.



The Devout Exemplar archetype loses armor and shield proficiencies and only gets one domain. Instead, they get the ability to blink to the deity's plane for 3+Wis-mod rounds per day, phasing rapidly between the deity's plane and the prime material. In the after math, the exemplar is fatigued for 2 rounds per round spent phasing. While phasing, the exemplar has a 50% miss chance and even this chance to be missed by targeted spells. They also have a 20% chance to miss themselves, which extends to their own spells. While phasing back and forth, they take only half damage from AoE-effects, falling etc. and they may even interact with potential creatures on that plane. Blind Fight doesn't help against phasing, but dimensionally locking the exemplar does. At high levels, the exemplar may stay on the deity's plane. Starting at first level, they also choose one of 3 training regimens - strength, speed or stamina. This supersedes the usual praying for spells and additionally an ability at 2nd level and every 4 levels thereafter. Beyond the general benefit of the regiment (like using class level for CMB regarding one maneuver chosen per day), these include lessened penalties for age, wis-mod to CMB 1/day/creature, vastly increased thrown weapon range (but lost str-bonus beyond increment 5), better climbing or more carrying capacity, to name a few.

Exemplars devoted to speed can tumble via acrobatics at full speed at half the penalty, get better reflexes or no penalties when in tight conditions etc, while stamina training helps with armor check penalties, can lessen fatigue incurred by their blinking (or rage!) and also gets a recovery trance that lets them reroll fort-saves at +2, potentially even negating the initial failed save. The latter is a tad bit too strong for my tastes since it retcons the initial effects and has no limitation apart from one roll per condition per 24 hours. Each regiment also provides a +2 capstone-bonus to the attribute of their regime at 20th level as long as they maintain training. Finally, they get a +1 dodge bonus to AC while wearing no armor/shield, scaling up to +5.



Next up would be the Missionary Priest, who also get wis-mod to AC/CMD (with same caveats) and a studied creature type (somewhat favored enemy style), but with more focused on social/knowledge skills. These races also determine when the missionary's special abilities kick in - these are linear and offer no selection, allowing for additional AC-bonuses, 5-foot-steps, use aid another vs. AC 20 to negate AoOs and finally, faster coup-de-gracing. I like the idea here, but the execution feels a bit too linear and could have used a bit more variety.



The next archetype would be the Sacerdos (plural Sacerdotes). These also get the AC/CMD-bonus in lieu of armor/shield proficiency and at 2nd level and every 4 levels thereafter, these guys and gals learn a sacred rite, which can perform as a full-round action that incurs an AoO - unlike regular channeling. Each rite allows the Sacerdos to replace a set amount of channel dice with another effect, which lasts for one round unless otherwise mentioned. Only one rite may be used to modify one channel attempt (unless you take the new Augment Rite-feat), though the rite can replace all channel dice, thus cancelling the standard (or variant) channeling effect the act would usually result in. The channel effects can improve/hinder critical hit-confirmation, render foes blind/dazzled, grant energy resistance and a whole slew of other cool, tactical options. All in all, one damn cool archetype, though I wished it had much, much more rites available - for more versatile builds. This one's definitely a candidate for a full-blown pdf of its own - perhaps with divine channeler-synergy?.



The new feats allow the respective archetypes to e.g. wilder in other training regimes, get more rites, target creatures excluded with selective channeling with other effects, partial access to (sub-) domains etc. - some coolness in here, especially if you wanted more synergy with variant channeling - all the metamagic fun etc. is in here - at times balanced by e.g. staggering you or in the case of maximizing the effect, limiting the channel to you. One feat hit a pet-peeve of mine - as a swift action, it buffs your weapon and makes it aligned, which is very strong - especially since the feat has NO LIMITS. Some generous, but existing limits or the alignment effect coming it at higher levels would be very much prudent in my book.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good - I noticed next to no glitches and those I found were typos and didn't impede my ability to understand the content. Layout adheres to RiP's old two-column full-color standard. Artwork, as far as I could tell, is thematically-fitting stock art and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



Thomas LeBlanc is a talented designer - when I read this, I expected yet another slew of uninspired cleric/monk rip-offs, but instead, he delivers! The Divine Exemplar's blinking, the Sacerdotes and their rites - I love those two to death (they could imho carry their own books each - and would deserve more fodder!) and the channel-themed feats are also nice additions to the game. I was quite disappointed by the missionary, and I do consider some minor pieces of crunch to be somewhat problematic - these remain the absolute minority, though. In the end, this pdf misses the 5 stars only by a margin, resulting in a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 due to the low, fair price and the nice fluff that kicks off each feat, each archetype. Now when do the exemplar and sacerdotes get more tools?

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convergent Paths: Clerics of the Cloth (PFRPG)
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Psionic Bestiary: Part 9
Publisher: Dreamscarred Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/28/2014 03:15:15
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The 9th part of the Psionic Bestiary is 10 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We kick off this mini-bestiary with a new CR 5, tentacle-mouthed monstrous humanoid with emergent brain lobes, the Brataurus, who can emit wis-damage dealing screams and worse, they actually feed on said damage, healing themselves. Cool!



The CR 3 Dedrakon, a scaled predator that adds crystal shackles to their prey via their attacks, which increase in movement-hampering potency the more creatures are shackled with them - oh, and they can emit roars to paralyze shackled foes on a failed save - throw these in groups, add some hit and run-tactics/feats and watch them squirm. And yes, the base creature is inspiring enough for me to actually do that.



At CR2, the 3-eyes lizard-like Dulah-humanoids have a nice ability - they can barf their treasure at foes! Since my version of the dire beaver barfed splinters at foes, yes, I do like that one!



At CR 6 and 8 respectively, the Ensnared Earth Elementals and their Greater cousins are glorious - part elemental, part plant, they may strike through stone and ground those nasty fliers with psionically chargeable pulses of gravity! Awesome!



At CR 2, the somewhat ferret/cat-like Ferax have some nice minor psi-like abilities and can emit bolstering hums. Finally, at CR 3, the bat-like, winged, one-eyed Reva can manipulate objects, target foes with force damage and are superb spies indeed that can detect sentient, sapient life-forms. Nice spies for the BBeG - or your PCs, for these "builder bats" are actually LN and rather intelligent!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, though I did notice minor typo-level glitches, nothing rules-problematic. The pdf adheres to DSP's 2-column full-color layout, with bookmarks being there, but broken (and unnecessary at this length) and the artworks for the creatures, all in full-color, being simply WEIRD and awesome. Add to that the lack of glaring glitches in the math - and we also get in that department, one damn impressive little bestiary!



Authors Jeremy Smith, Andreas Rönnqvist, Dale McCoy Jr. (commander in chief of Jon Brazer Enterprises) and Jade Ripley deliver a bunch of psionic creatures that are just fun - each one coming with at least one cool signature ability and production values to supplement their unique abilities as well as with the more than fair price point, this bestiary can be considered 5 star material indeed - which also reflects my final verdict, omitting my seal only by a margin.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Psionic Bestiary: Part 9
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