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Vampire: The Requiem
 
$19.99
Average Rating:4.2 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
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Vampire: The Requiem
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Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Joey N. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/15/2013 22:06:58
This book is a fantastic example of White Wolf's amazing writing and artwork. I always look forward to bringing this one out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Paul H. D. B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/25/2013 12:20:49
The art of the front and inlay covers, as well as various digital pieces throughout have suffered from overt compression, as one of my fellow reviewers has mentioned. This is a pity, because the drawings and graphics of White Wolf have always been very appealing and the ones in this volume are inventively designed. White Wolf should have used the weaker compression method that they used for their future products.

However, the text and original artwork survives and makes the Requiem worth these unfortunate glitches. The information contained in this remake of Vampire reinvents the wheel impressively. The five clans and five covenants add new ideas, as well as reinstate original ones with great flare for the dramatic and intrigue. The Masquerade was more complex and much time is needed to absorb its many concepts, but the Requiem admirably takes the best it had to offer, reduce the overall content and added new organizations and names, to very pleasing effect.

The covenants are a thoughtful invention and help better unify the Vampire Clans. A reduction in the number of clans and bloodlines leads to a slightly narrower focus, which allows readers and writers alike to let the information soak in a little better. The writers preserve the Gothic mysticism and personality of the vampire well and introduce thoughtful new features, such as the Ordo Dracul, created by the legendary Count Dracula and maps of two select venues to place a Vampire chronicle.

Anything done with the intent of bettering a genre, and, or presenting new forms and ways for a society, group, or even an individual is a noteworthy deed. The Requiem writers did both and give the Vampire a new lease on life. Buy this book if you wish to explore new ways the Vampire takes to further his existence and those of his fellow kindred.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 02/13/2013 21:53:45
A while back White Wolf rebooted everything. They redid all their game lines, edited the rules and gave us a new World of Darkness. On the plus side Vampire the Requiem has much more cleaned up rules. They were similar to the old rules, but just better in most respects. The meta-rules or how the vampires are played though felt worse. Not worse really, but off to me.
Basically you can play the same kind of game you did in V:tM, though if you had a favorite clan in the old game it might not be here, or be changed in subtle ways. Still though this is a great game with less overhead than old World of Darkness. If you are choosing between this game and Vampire: The Masquerade then this might be the easier choice, even if it is less "classic" choice.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Marco C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/30/2013 09:38:52
Great content but very poor PDF quality... Come on WW, this could be a 5 stars product!!! ;-)

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Jose B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/04/2012 07:32:19
Excellent and worth every penny you dish out. Vampire (both the Masquerade and now the Requiem) have not only revolutionized the roleplaying game industry (the first game where you could play the "monster"), but has become a hallmark of quality production and has won major gaming awards. In order to play this RPG game you also need the Core Mechanics rulebook World of Darkness. Vampire (and subsequently Werewolf and Mage) are the core supernatural games of White Wolf (they are now releasing one time splats such as Promethean and Changeling: the Lost). Definitely of a mature nature, these games will offer you the opportunity to adopt the role of one of the undead.

You get to belong to one of five Great Clans (that define your powers) and join one of five great Covenants (that establish your role in the world of the undead). This is a vast improvement to the 27 clans from Masquerade that were never clearly indistinguishable from each other. The Clans take the iconic archetype of the vampire and make them into playable templates. You can be a sensual Daeva or a lordly Ventrue, a hideous Nosferatu, animalistic Gangrel or a mystical Mekhet. This new game is a must for any who want to experience X-files type investigative horror or tell stories in the World of Darkness. Many currently published supplements further allow you to personalize and add unique traits through the innovative use of "bloodlines" which are variations on the 5 clans. This is not a game of global conspiracies, it is all about personal horror, so dont expect contrived *Meta plot* elements from the Masquerade version. This game has thankfully eliminated those.

Again, this is a game of Gothic Horror, where you experience personal themes, the focus of the story is on what happens to the characters in their own city or domain, not wide and far reaching global conspiracies.

This game is followed by Werewolf the Forsaken and Mage the Awakening. Of the three Vampire the Requiem is considered the flagship game of White Wolf - CCP. It lends itself best for small intimate groups of 2-6 players due to the personal horror aspects of the characters. It also, due to vast improvements in the rules from pervious editions, allows for much better integration and cross over playability with the other supernatural monsters (prometheans, changelings, mages and werewolves). This game is a gem, beautifully illustrated and with highly evocative full color art. Even if you are not a roleplayer it is a unique exploration of the Vampire myth.

There are many game supplements out for this game, however, all you need to play the game is this book and the World of Darkness blue book.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Robert S. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 02/21/2012 06:18:37
Vampire the Requiem is the current version of the Vampire role-playing game, released by White Wolf Publishing. It is hard cover, 300 pages long and provides rules for playing monsters, specifically for running vampires as characters in a role-playing game and retails for about $40.

Starting in 1991 White Wolf changed gaming with the publication of Vampire the Masquerade. Previously Dungeons and Dragons, in its narrow Sword and Sorcerer groove, dominated the RPG market – in that game the player characters may be violent mercenaries, but they usually kill vampires. The Call of Cthulhu deemphasized violence, emphasized social interaction and going bugfuck crazy. Science fiction games ran the gamut between D&D and CoC, only with a science fiction set dressing, costumes and props. Masquerade changed things by letting the players run outright monsters. D&D and CoC were, to some degree, about becoming heroes by battling monsters to preserve society. Masquerade rattled the market because the monsters the PCs battled were themselves and the entire vampire society in which the PCs operate at best had the moral and ethical integrity of an inoperable malignant tumor.

Questions are dangerous things. D&D usually, depending on your interpretations, asks no questions. CoC asks about what disturbs you to the point of madness. Masquerade asked a number of questions, such as how far down the proverbial ladder would you go? Why do you do what do you? At least in theory that is what Vampire, as a game, does at its best. However, even the best of games can turn into a fart comedy at an individual the table.

The old vampire game ran its course and during 2003 and 2004 White Wolf Publishing ended the original game and released a new one. The new game is Vampire the Requiem and it asks all the same questions as the original.

There are no classes in Vampire. Masquerade originally offered seven kinds of vampires too choose from and only a single political affiliation, though as that game line expanded it came to offer more than 13 types of vampires and several political affiliation. The new version offers five types of vampires – called clans in the game – and five political groups – called covenants - from which to choose.

It is a game about social conflict and drama comes from tension. The game runs on the interaction of the five clans and the five covenants, like spinning gears grinding against each other without meshing. There are few dungeons, few horrors in the game the party can simply plunder and kill - mostly the PC vampires have to learn to survive and be able to live with themselves.

The first few chapters of the Requiem book lays out character creation, presents the clans, covenants and covers similar issues. The five clans available present, more or less, five types of temperament and personal disposition, from observant introvert to self-aggrandizing extrovert and on. By comparison, the five covenants present, again more or less, five moral and political philosophies to pursue, from bloody-minded neo-pagans to high bound political conservatives and on. Character creation in this system is one of the most in depth available, in terms of psychology, philosophy and morally. Some of this comes in terms of the game’s version of alignment, namely vices, virtues and humanity. The list of vices and virtues are biblical and the humanity score is the character’s relative morality, which can erode depending on the character’s actions – I will discuss the morality of the game later, during the World of Darkness review.

The first portion of the book also presents the world, the titular World of Darkness, a place where Nightmare on Elm Street is probably a documentary. It is also largely an urban game – vampires are predators and like predictors they stay where the food is located.

This new run of books divides presentation of rules mechanics – the basic rules appear in the World of Darkness book, which I will cover in a separate review. Each of the core books for the main lines adheres to these basic rules and only presents new rules to cover the needed specifics of the creature. In Requiem, the rules for the various vampire powers appear in the middle of the book.

The final chapters provide discussion of how to run the game for game masters – here called storytellers. It also provides adversaries for the PCs. Vampires live a long time, are hard to kill and easily bored. They play sadistic social games to occupy their time and they have lots of time to occupy. However, it is not all-social bickering in the game as there are opportunities for actual combat and a theatrical use of a grab bag of special vampire powers. The PCs might be barracudas, but there are lots of sharks, eels, squids and worse in those same dark waters. This was true in during the Masquerade, though it is more pronounced in Requiem.

In terms of presentation, it is an attractive book. The corollary is that for 20 years, White Wolf has never failed to use 100-words where 40 or 50 words would actually suffice. This makes the pages of text appear dark, dense and thus potentially intimidating. There is less art in the books than there could be, if the writers exercised more restraint and the editors were more proactive. What art does appear in the book is good and personal favorites among the artists include Samuel Araya, Brom and long-time White Wolf go-to-artist Joshua Gabriel Timbrook.

Unfortunately, chapter headings, drop quotes, text at the beginning of the book and at the start of the chapters are stylized and elaborate - too much so, as it can be difficult to read.

All the World of Darkness game lines employ the same mechanic, based on rolling 10-sided dice. Rolls of 8, 9 and 10 are successes and that is too high. 7 is a better place to start as not everything should so difficult as getting an 8 on a 10-sided dice roll. This springs from the basic mechanical system, but it is worth mentioning here.

These issues aside, the game is solid, engaging and good. It is a thoroughly sandbox game, like the first incarnation of Vampire the Masquerade before the old game became a victim of its own successful growth. In Requiem, the in-game structure of the clans and covenants does little to determine the nature of the player characters – those decisions remain in the hands of the players. The world they in which they find themselves might have all the jaw-dropping grandeur of a coral reef at night right after some jackass just chummed the waters, but the characters and players are responsible for making the best of it.

The fact the game questions morality, social conventions and its focus is on perceived outsiders is probably part of its appeal to women, members of the LGBTQ community and other groups.

In any event, those persistent questions the game asks does much else to turn people off from the Vampire as a game. It can be rewarding experience, but simply put, it is not for everyone.

Vampire the Requiem gets a 20 on a d20 roll, though with a special warning of buyer beware.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Ryan S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/03/2011 21:54:18
Lacks in bloodlines and similar things (such as paths) that were present in the OWOD Vampire the Masquerade rulebook, but overall an impressive book, some of the disciplines actually feel balanced now

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Andrew J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/14/2010 23:18:29
Vampire: The Requiem

Vampire: The Requiem begins with forty pages of printed fan service to the kind of Vampire player who was too insecure to simply walk into a bar and have fun. The Requiem itself is described at great length as being little more than schemes and social interactions that “all” Vampires they must indulge in. This core focus of the game is thankfully contradicted around 150 pages later.

The text becomes really dry in between this description of the Requiem and the end of the Rules chapter. Much of this is essential reading, so maybe it's appropriate that these sections have all the life and vigor of a textbook. Then again, this is also a game. Games should be fun.

The last pages of the Special Rules and Systems chapter begin to paint a broader picture of different character goals. Now the book starts getting good.

At this point, it is important to stop and point out that White Wolf's staff have taken great care to relate Derangements to real world mental illness. In the days of Second Edition, it was not uncommon to troll White Wolf's own forum and read a frightening number of posts about “A Malkavian who thinks he is a […]”. The staff was no doubt reading their own forums as well.

Beginning with the Third Edition of Vampire, the writers tried to make absolutely clear that mental illness is anything except humorous or cartoonish. They have absolutely outdone themselves with care and responsibility toward the subject in Requiem.

The following section on Travel is laced with a great deal of welcome humor.

Then comes one of the best Storytelling sections they have written. I am a goal oriented person and find the same happiness in role playing games. I also tend to find myself on both ends of the GM's screen. If you can't find a good game from someone else, make your own! The Storyteller section goes so far as to describe the creation of a story, character, and “drama” oriented game with clear ideas and goals for the budding Storyteller. It's the best of both worlds.

Later text goes so far as to suggest that “A good plot needs focus” and that coteries aren't groups of socialites who meet to henpeck each other in bars. Thank you, White Wolf.

Bloodlines provide a mix of interesting new ideas, or new twists on familiar faces from the past. After new bloodline specific Disciplines are detailed, the book focuses on designing new Bloodlines and their disciplines. As much as I love world building, this was a little bit tricky. New bloodlines using existing Disciplines could be amazing. Creating new rules entirely for new Disciplines is a frightening prospect. Playtesting is important when creating new rules, and no amount of advice will ever take the place of testing those rules in a real game situation.

Overall, I am happy with how far this book goes to veer away from some of the worst trappings of their game. Player characters are not super heroes with fangs. Nor do they commit murder without regard for the consequences (and see the next night, anyway). Nor are they content socialites looking to hen-peck each other into or out of status. The game-crushing Meta Plot is almost completely thrown away, except to give flavor and purpose to bloodlines. All of these can be elements to create a fun game, where any one to the exclusion of others is a bland and lifeless experience. This book pushes for a balance of characterization requiring goals, goals requiring actions, and actions requiring reactions again from the characters all to create a consensual and enjoyable story.

Players of prior editions lacked this balance, and I gave up looking for any Vampire group years ago. Hopefully much of the new advice will be taken to heart.

Technically, The PDF file was obviously compressed for ease of downloading. Many images in the book suffer from harsh compression, creating very noticeable artifacts in the artwork. The Table of Contents might have also been moved to a better position than page twelve, but this is readily countered by an even more detailed set of Bookmarks built into the document itself.

I have to give this product four stars for being above average, and even outdoing prior editions in many ways. The first definitions of the Requiem, the long dry spell in the first half of the book, and the sketchy advice on creating Disciplines stood in the way of that fifth star. Overall, this still a really good product at a more than reasonable price.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by sebastien d. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/30/2009 09:37:14
Really good book for Vampire adept, making the basic less complicated and making it easier to create expansion.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/23/2009 12:35:52
If you played Vampire: The Masquerade forget everything you know about vampires!

Why? All the traditions and organisations, just about everything you are familiar with has either gone altogether or has been changed enough that you'll have to relearn about them anyway. In many ways, this is an improvement - often it seemed that things were being tacked on, added in as they were thought of, while this version gives a coherent basis on which subsequent books can be produced expanding different parts of the whole.

There is an immense amount of atmosphere in this book. It's beautifully presented, with an appropriate preponderance of deep blood red as the only colour on the pages. It begins with a series of snippets written by various vampires commenting on their Embrace, their current activities, their unlives... giving a clear feeling of what it's like to be one of this new breed of vampire.

We then move on to a general discussion of vampire society and how it works. The origins of vampires are lost even those who study them (from within or without), with the oldest surviving vampires a bit hazy on the early nights so there's no point in hunting down a vampire who has been around since Roman days and asking him. As before, there is emphasis on a vampire's clan - which is that of his Sire, the vampire who embraced him (i.e. turned him into a vampire), but a new concept, that of the Covenant, has also been introduced. While the vampire has no choice over clan (although, of course, the player probably does), the vampire is able to choose a Covenant, which is an organisation or loose association of vampires who share a similar outlook on matters such as religion and the way in which vampire society ought to be run. There's enough detail on both the clans and the covenants to give an overview... and of course, plenty of scope for a string of supplements which are already beginning to appear!

Once the scene is set, the book moves on to more 'game-related' material, beginning with character generation. To begin with, now you need to own the core rulebook as well as this one. Using the rules therein, create the character BEFORE he became a vampire, and then you use the vampire-specific rules here to apply the changes caused by his new state. This of course opens up the possibility of having the process of becoming a vampire be part of the game, rather than something that happened to your character before you start play. The chosen clan (and covenant if you pick one during character generation rather than in play) give you additional abilities, and as a young vampire is taught certain Disciplines by his Sire, you also get to pick a few of those. There is even provision for those wishing to play a character who has been a vampire for a while to increase their vampiric abilities (or indeed mundane skills) over and above the starting levels by assigning a set number of experience points based on how old the vampire is to be. Additional Merits available to vampires include Haven (a safe place to hide in daylight), Herd (availability of nice blood-filled humans to feed on) and Status (how other vampires regard you). There is also a full run-down of the 'Disciplines' - akin to magic in their effect - that a vampire can learn, as well as the actual sorcery practised by some vampire covenants. Many people - vampires AND their players - see all these advantages, and forget the curse under which every vampire labours. Overall, the route to get there may be a bit different in this version, but the resulting character is certainly familiar in style, if not in detail, to the one you played in Vampire: The Masquerade.

Once the character has been created, of course, that's just the beginning. There are extensive notes on how to go about translating the numbers on the character sheet into the person you're going to play in the alternate reality of the game. This bit is well worth reading and considering even if you don't intend to play Vampire: The Requiem right now - haul it out every time you create a new character for any system you play, and you'll find it helps.

The third chapter looks at the various strange things that affect a vampire. Things like how a vampire's blood is different from that of an ordinary live human, and what happens to a vampire depending on the source of the blood he drinks. What happens when one vampire meets another (think alley cats bristling at each other). How do vampires sustain injury, and heal. And did you know that they can suffer mental illness and derangement? And that they may have a spiritual side and seek enlightenment - Golconda, as it is known to vampires - just as mortals do? All the rules you need to make vampires special, not just people with fangs and a taste for blood, are here.

Now two-thirds of the way through the book, and the next chapter announces boldly that they are done with rules. Aimed mainly at the Storyteller (GM) it also is worthwhile reading for the more interested player, looking at the underlying concepts of designing the Chronicle (campaign) and how to choose themes that will suit what the players want to do, and how to design characters which will fit in with those themes. It sets the scene for a very collaborative approach to Chronicle and adventure design. The comments on using the characters' backgrounds in setting the broad backdrop to the whole Chronicle make sense, as does the discussion as to why virtually all Vampire Chronicles need to have an urban setting. Unlike wine, the undead really, really don't travel well!

The underlying theme, whatever is going on, is that of moral choices and their consequences. Do vampires have a different 'take' on right and wrong, or is it just that their nature leads them into areas that the rest of us do not have to contemplate? Is a vampire who seeks personal power and dominion over other vampires less moral than another who pursues knowledge and arcane secrets? In the best Chronicles there are no answers, just questions which each character must face up to and find their own solution.

This leads into a discussion, mainly aimed at the Storyteller, of various concepts such as designing core NPCs, and how to start off the campaign by exploring how characters were Embraced and/or how they came together to form a Coterie. This invokes further discussion: vampires are classically solitary beasts, and treachery and betrayal are endemic amongst them - but do your players actually wish to have their characters interact in such a way or would they prefer to be atypically loyal to each other, and keep their treachery for other vampires? Each group needs to decide for themselves, of course, but here are the sort of questions they ought to be considering to make their game a truly enjoyable experience. Moving on, this chapter next looks at how to blend plots and adventures into your overarching campaign idea - useful advice whatever game system you are planning to run, even if it is aimed at a vampire Chronicle in the specific details. There's a lot of detail about actually presenting the game once you are seated round the table, too - how to evoke the correct atmosphere by description, when to go into detail and when a simple 'out of character' account will suffice. There are some sample 'Antagonists' - animals and NPCs - and an exploration of the use of experience points to ensure that characters grow at an appropriate rate for the chronicle you are running to round the chapter out.

Next comes Appendix 1: Bloodlines and Unique Disciplines. While every vampire belongs to one of the five clans of this incarnation of the game, within each there are 'bloodlines' which introduce wider variety of abilities and specialties that each vampire is able to have. A character's bloodline traces back through not ancestry but by Embrace, it is your sire's bloodline that you are a part of. It's a way in which you can customise your game and create your own style of vampire seen nowhere else. As well as giving advice on how to invent your own, there are five bloodlines and two disciplines to start you off. Interestingly, several names that formed full-blown clans in Vampire: The Masquerade turn up as example bloodlines here - so if you are particularly attached to one, you can generate a character with that bloodline or even speculate that it will develop into a clan over the course of time.

Appendix 2 is entitled 'New Orleans' and is a description of that city as it might appear in the World of Darkness. Or, sadly, as it would have done pre-hurricane. While not making light of real-world events, one does begin to wonder how such a natural disaster would affect the Kindred in the affected area. Leaving this aside, here is a good overview of the city - which is further detailed in a supplement of its own - which sets the scene for using it as the hometown of your chronicle... or provides ideas for the way in which to detail your chosen city for that use. There's a lot of material about the leading lights of vampire society in the city, showing how interweaving patterns of allegiances and hostility virtually writes at least some storylines for you.

Finally, a few more atmospheric story excerpts from the same voices that opened the book, and a character sheet.

Overall, the system has matured and is more coherent than its forerunners. However, the entirety of vampire history and tradition built up in over a decade of published material for Vampire: The Masquerade has been swept away. It's not just the rules which have changed: so has the whole World of Darkness, so what you thought you knew is of use no longer. After reading the book, I�m all ready and eager to go write a Chronicle! It's full of ideas and hints and inspiration.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Marcus G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/14/2008 10:07:49
This is not the sequel to Masquerade so stop right where you are!
_br_
There are lots of things about this setting and system that are like the Masquerade. This is NOT, however, the new "edition". This is an entirely seperate game.
_br_
That said, this is a terrific game. It is a "toolbox" game, meaning it presents all of the pieces you need without telling you how you should put it together.
_br_
Cons:_br_
For the love of GOD WW!!! Would you PLEASE let someone review the organization of the book before you print it?!?!?! PLEASE! For all of the work these guys do to make a wonderful product they rank dead last in the trait of organization.
_br_
I purchased the PDF so that I could actually find something when I'm looking for it. I'm glad that I purchased the hard copy as I like having my books. But, honestly, I will never purchase another White Wolf book in hard copy. There is just no point. The organization is so bad, the index is not existant, that it doesn't really even serve a purpose.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Christian S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/19/2008 15:26:39
this book is of excellent quality. Full text search and good bookmarks making the navigation excellent.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by James C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/04/2008 13:06:41
Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Enrique F. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/11/2006 11:43:41
I've been a player of Vampire: The Masquerade for some time and I was reluctant to try this new version. I finally decided to buy this book and have a close look at it and it's pretty good. The game has changed but it also has some nice points. Specially good if you didn't like the vampire origins in the original version or if think that the rules of generation restricted you, now you can be powerful without commiting diablerie.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem
Publisher: White Wolf
by Andrew W.
Date Added: 08/27/2005 23:53:04
This book awesome. WW fixed alot of the problems with the old system, like making combat faster. You can play a TT charactor in LARp and they are the same character. So those afraid of change, get over it, Requiem is around to stay.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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