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The New Argonauts
 
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The New Argonauts
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The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by James A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/03/2016 14:33:23

MYTHIC!!!! I housemates and I decided to do an Ancient Greek setting in Pathfinder. I started doing research, reskinning Golarion's top 20 gods to Greek, looking up tips for running Greek games–THEN STOPPED WHEN I FOUND THIS BOOK! It's got all the info you need for running an Ancient Greed d20 game. It was well written and a great read too. I think it's written for D&D 3.0. Instead I'll be using mosters out of the Bestiarys and Pathfinder's Mythic Adventures.

Sean's concepts and philosophies are faulking awesome. We are going to go with a magic-medium campaign rather than his low-magic idea. This book should have been updated for Pathfinder alongside the release of Mythic Adventures.

I rate this 10/10 for getting your Ancient Greek d20 camaign up and running fast!

Thanks Sean!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/15/2015 00:04:45

I thought the idea of picking a rules system to write a game was to pick something that really fits. Instead most of the book is a list of parts of the d20 system that you can't use. He should have tried using Savage Worlds, Runequest or Entropic's systems instead, as they would fit this to a T.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Adam K. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/06/2011 11:58:10

Severly disappointed with this supplement. The HUGE limitations it encompasses on the players are unsurmountable in my opinion. Basically the only option to play is a human fighter, and that's not what I'm playing fantasy games for (this being made for 3.5 edition, it's even lamer in comparison).

You know what I like about the 4th edition's design philosophy? "You don't tell your players what they can't do, you tell them what they can do". This book is about as far from this philosophy as it gets. All the parts focused on gameplay are telling you of limitations you can impose on your players as a DM or, if you're a player, of stuff you can't do. "This amazing stuff about greek mythology? Nah, can't play that." "This? No, neither this." "And this? No, no, no way. Low magic, remember?" I don't call the setting author made "low magic". I'm calling it "low creativity" and an entirely wrong design philosophy. Such a pity. If only someone made a setting BASED on Greek mythology, as opposed to cramming the actual Greece into bounds of D&D, that'd be awesome. This? Very much no.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by James J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/03/2011 10:23:30

I was pretty disappointed. Free is free, of course, and considering the respectable effort put into organizing this supplement there are certainly things you can glean from it. But even though the author disclaims at the beginning that he is not trying to be historically accurate, he seems more interested in fitting the game to mythic Greece, instead of the other way around.

That's a real shame, because a few small tweaks allow the inclusions of so many more options. You must be a human when satyrs and centaurs could easily be made an option. But the class restrictions are even worse. Even though Orpheus was so good at song that he charmed Hades, Bard is not an acceptable class option. Even though gods frequently bestowed their priests and priestesses with supernatural powers, cleric is not an option. Even though there are multiple studied magic users in Greek mythology, wizard is not an option. Even though there are scores of wild creatures and wild magics in Greek myth, druids are not allowed. Many of these classes need little more than a name change (Bard doesn't even need that) to be compatible in a setting like this. The new class, Hellenic Sorceress, is pretty cool, and really is its own class with its own magic. Other than that, though, your only option is to hit stuff. In a setting where gods walk around freely, think of the fun potential of playing a Priestess of Athena or an Acolyte of Zeus. Sorry, not an option. You're playing a fighter.

I credit this supplement for its detail into culture and geography. Where it's easy to Westernize the setting, the author defends against that by detailing many of the ways that people lived differently in ancient Greece. However, again, he is too rigid. No one wants to play a female character that, while respected, is still supposed to stay in the home.

The author of this supplement was clearly a student and lover of Greek culture. Unfortunately that love seems to overshadow a love for RPGs, and since this is an RPG supplement, that should take the higher priority.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Nathan O. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/08/2009 00:52:43

A cool look at the argonauts for d20 3.5 for your D&D game ya and it's free so have fun with it. :]



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Anton S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/08/2007 13:08:26

Great setting to run a nice low magic setting. Well, low magic compared to most D&D type settings, more like classic Jason and the Argonauts or Clash of the Titans. Goes great with the counter set from Fiery Dragon.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/20/2006 00:00:00

By the gods! The New Argonauts is the first product from Sean K Reynolds Games, it is a deliberately low magic campaign setting that builds off of the classical Greek myths and Greek history. The design aim is to adapt D&D/d20 to playing the ancient myths as they have come down to us, in other words to do a campaign based of the adventures of a group of Greek heroes restricted by that culture and those mythological rule. It is an attempt to adapt the d20 rules to a setting with much lower magic and lacking many of the things that are taken for granted in the normal D&D game (such as magic healing, crossbows and plate mail).

The PDF has a striking color cover by Gerald Lee, clean interior organization with a additional color art culled from classical sources to illustrate the various points, the two maps are clean and easily readable and the charts of the family of Greek gods is very well done. A Grecian pattern runs along the bottom of each page providing visual unity to the whole work. The graphic work is very strong and professional.

The heroes of the New Argonauts are human, rarely use magic and do not wear heavy armor. In other words, very different from the usual D&D campaign. The only spellcasting class is the Hellenic Sorceress which is a low powered spellcaster who is primarily designed to be used for villains (remember Circe) or if a spellcaster is needed without upsetting the balance of the campaign.

While human, the heroes may be a scion of a divine bloodline, the literal descendants of the gods, as many of the Greek heroes of legend were. The bloodlines have three strengths, minor, lesser and greater. The minor bloodline, for lower powered games, gives skill bonuses. Lesser bloodline, the suggested one to use, gives a +2 bonus to a single ability score associated with the attributes of the parent god. While a greater bloodline give the same bonus as the lesser bloodline plus the choice of one of two spell-like abilities (for example, Artemis grants true strike or a daze monster effect after striking a target with a weapon, and the Titian provides their bloodline with bear?s endurance [self only] or bull?s strength [self only]) most are which are usable once a day.

New feats are included to reinforce the theme of the setting, such as Field Surgeon (which allows the non-magical treatment of wounds), Monster Hunter (a hero who has specialized in the slaying of the monster that stalk the Hellenic world) or Scholar (for those that wish to be philosopher-heroes). The standard feats and skills are adjusted for the setting, for example, Knowledge (the planes) is virtually useless in the setting and the DM should discourage her player from taking points in that skill.

Suggestion for minor changes to the rules to take into account the lower level magic run through the book. Equipment lists are modified to account for the Bronze Age technology of the Greek heroic period. Magic items are highly restricted as they are only made by the gods or from parts collected from legendary creatures.

A nice overview of Greek mythology, the gods and the interplay between the Olympians in provided (even if it overlooks Tyche, the goddess of luck, a favorite of mine). The rules for calling on help from the gods in exchange for a later sacrifice are excellent, perfect for the setting, well balanced and fun (anything that encouraged a character to call out, ?Aid me now Zeus and I will sacrifice a white bull for you on my return!? cannot be all bad).

A complete campaign outline in provided for the New Argonauts. A selection of monsters (and a few human foes) from the myths are provided, with over twenty five monsters, some unique, described which gives most of the foes needed to run the included campaign.

A superb offering from a SKR and company. However, it is focussed on a very particular, low magic setting and therefore may not be to everyone?s taste. While most of the new feats, items and monsters here can be broken out to be used in any campaign to some extent all of them are embedded in the setting limiting their usefulness. But if you are interested in what can be done with myth and low fantasy in the D&D system, take a look at this book.<br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: The theme and setting.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: Narrow focus, but that is entirely understandable. It should have a narrow focus.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Very Good<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Brent S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/14/2006 00:00:00

I had long searched for a good Greek campaign setting. Most of what I saw was either too historical (no magic, no monsters, just pure history) or just straight fantasy with funny outfits (normal D&D classes, no attempt to reconcile the spell list with Greek mythology, etc.)

The New Argonauts seems to strike the right balance - magic exists, but it's rare and special (and usually in the hands of an enemy sorceress.) The rules have been made to fit the mythology, which is exactly what I was looking for.<br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: The book is well-written and interesting; it's obvious that the author did some research for this setting. The bloodline rules are a particular favorite: they let you be the descendant of a deity without completely unbalancing the whole game. <br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: My only criticism is that I wish the cover artist did more of the interior art! (Not that I don't like pictures of actual Greek art, mind you.) Some additional topographic details on the map would also have been nice. The only real hole is in ships and such: as the Greeks were (and are) a seafaring culture, I would have liked to have seen a little more on this aspect of the game (ships, statistics, naval combat, etc.)
All my critiques are pretty minor though - overall, I really liked this book. :)<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Dennis K. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/02/2006 00:00:00

Probably the best D20 treatment that I've seen yet for mythical Greece. Good application of low magic with mythical epic. This book has something for non-magic players/DMs to mythic-hero players/DMs.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Bobby J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/21/2005 00:00:00

Highly thoughtful product. I was expecting Jason and the Argonauts meets the DnD, but what I got was great Mytho thrown in with tidbits of DnD for flavor. Great setting usage and great writeups.

Its Greek action hour. Its got great ideas for using sorcery. Sorry no magic users. I love making many of the monsters one of a kind critters. Much like it is in Greek Mythology. There aren't harpies in every sea-side cave. But only a handful.

Highly recommended for those people who enjoy classical Greek adventures(as a setting and a style).<br><br><b>LIKED</b>: Character creation. Down to two choices. Fighters and Rogues. No extra races. All human, except for those of Godly birth. Adventuring in the Age of Heroes.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: More.

While the product is represented by Mr. Reynolds on his website with a few freebies. I would like more. More information on "how to run" the game. More npc's or encounters. But other than that. It's a solid product for the price.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Patrick T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/11/2005 00:00:00

A neat product. Sean K. Reynolds writes good stuff, and this is no exception. One could easily run a mini-campaign or even a full campaign in the Hellenic world, just as a change of pace. <br><br><b>LIKED</b>: Well written and thought out. A good deal for the money.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: No negative thoughts.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Matthew J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/12/2005 00:00:00

The New Argonauts provides a historic fantasy setting that is well laid out and easy to follow. The low-magic setting fits more of my style and as always Sean K Reynolds provides a high quality suppliment for the D20 system.<br><br><b>LIKED</b>: I liked how this book brought out childhood fantasies of "Clash of the Titans" to even more modern "Troy"-like movies. The ancient greek mythology and creatures we're a pleasant suprise.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: I would have liked to have seen more fantasy/ancient greek artwork. But this means little on the content of the book.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Stephen W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/02/2005 00:00:00

Before I learned of D&D and role-playing when I was in the sixth grade, I was an avid reader of books on mythology: Greek, Aztec, Norse, Amerindian and whatever else the school library held. The stories were grand and exciting and were fodder for the imagination.

Once of the first characters I created when I cracked open the D&D Basic set was called Theseus, and I lamented the absence of minotaurs.

I bought <b>The New Argonauts</b> on the strength of the author's reputation as much as my interest in the subject matter. Sean K. Reynolds wrote the fine <b>Beyond Science: A Guide to F/X</b> sourcebook for the <b>Alternity</b> game line, and I was curious to see what he could do when he struck out on his own.

My curiosity was only heightened when I read the mission statement on his site, where he said he wanted to demonstrate how the d20 system could be made to work in a balanced manner. As is typical in the gaming industry, RPG systems suffer from an arms race as each sourcebook that is released has to have more firepower than the ones that came before. After all, how else can you attract the attention of the gaming public and encourage them to spend their dollars?

<b>The New Argonauts</b> is a fine example of craft as much as it is of creation. Reynolds outlines the story requirements of the setting ? in this case, the Greece of myth and epic ? and shows how the adjustments to the rules are necessary. This goes beyond simply saying "No elves, no plate mail, no sorcerers" by providing mechanical alternatives to the functions provided by those game elements. There aren't any sorcerers, but characters have new rules for crafting their own magic items; there are no clerics wandering around with a bandolier of healing potions, but there are combat feats designed to help characters avoid damage; and while there's no plate mail, there are skills and feats that emphasize excellence with the armour of the day, which accomplishes the same ends.

For players who want their characters to have a little more epic quality to them, Reynolds provides rules for bloodlines. Greek myth is littered with the bastard offspring of wayward deities, Zeus especially, and the heroes are often of Olympian descent. This gives them a little unwanted attention from the enemies of their forebears, but also a few extra resources while adventuring.

On the other hand, if you want your characters to participate in the Olympics instead of chasing after golden fleeces, the rules are provided.

<b>The New Argonauts</b> is a PDF production and is nearly impeccably laid out. Only a dropped sentence about the pentathlon in the Olympics section stands out.

The sidebars, which explain the differences in the rules and the adaptation of typical fantasy tropes to suit the truths of Greek history and myth are especially welcome: an explanation of what made Sparta different from the bulk of the city-states, and working with female PCs in a male-dominated culture are the highlights.

All in all, an excellent campaign setting for players who want more swords and less sorcery.<br><br><b>LIKED</b>: Designers notes and call-outs. Good advice on gaming.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the great review! FYI, the "dropped sentence" is actually there, just obscured by the art on that page ... you can still select the text it with the text tool. We've fixed the problem and by the end of the month we'll have the nev version up, with errata, and those who bought the current version can download the errata'd version from RPGnow for free (if you've signed up to receive email updates from RPGnow about products you've downloaded you will receive an email when the new file is ready).
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Steve M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/25/2005 00:00:00

This is a nicely detailed and flavored adaptation of the D20 system to the world of Greek legend and myth. Mr. Reynolds appropriately trims the number of classes and races to fit the subject matter?-so there are no dwarven clerics or half-elf arcane archers running amok in Athens and Sparta! He does add one interesting new class, the Greek Sorceress, as a nod to the rare magic user in Greek legend?-most notably, Circe and Medea.

The game book provides plenty of background material, a good description of a sample campaign, and some well thought out Greek monsters. This would be an excellent choice for someone looking for an introductory D&D campaign; and for true beginners, it could probably be used with the Basic D&D rules without having to refer to the Player?s Handbook. <br><br><b>LIKED</b>: A well conceived adaptation of the D20 system to the subject matter.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: Would have been nice to have some stats for the original Argonauts.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Stats on the original Argonauts, eh? That sounds like a very good idea for a web enhancement, actually. When I'm caught up with my current deadline I'll see about doing that. Thanks!
The New Argonauts
Publisher: Sean K Reynolds Games
by Remi F. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/30/2004 00:00:00

The New Argonauts is a most unique low-magic adventure setting. Firstly, the detailed Greek mythology servers as excellent background flavor for the overall game. Most importantly though, is the authentic feel of playing Greek heroes with all the benefits and limitation attributed to the classic heroes of Greek mythology. The feats and magic items are very balanced for a low-magic campaign, especially the healing feats (Field Surgeon, Hellenic Priest) available to several character classes due to the absence of classic d20 clerics. ;)<br><br><b>LIKED</b>: The Bloodline powers are a great way to add heroic powers gifted to mortals by the gods (as narrated in many Greek legends). I strongly recommend this book for fans of low-magic games, but warn those who love playing spellcasters that The New Argonauts may seem restrictive in terms of character class options.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: Spellcasters are very scarce in the game, and those that do exist, such as the Hellenic Sorceress are suggested for female characters (from examples in the book), since most of the other heroes are presumed to be male. This is not a compulsory rule, but in keeping with the classic Greek myths, this makes sense. The restriction on other classes such as paladins also makes sense, since paladins are more medieval era than ancient era heroes, but some players may not like such restrictions.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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