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Deniable Asset
Publisher: Random Encounters
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/14/2013 09:00:54
Cross-posted from Modus Operandi: http://www.modus-operandi.co.uk/generic/deniable-asset/

Introduction
Deniable Asset is an espionage roleplaying game with a heavy narrative bent written by Eric D. Sack and Brent Spivey and published by Random Encounters. It is currently available as a 47 page PDF from DriveThruRPG/RPGNow (purchase link at the bottom of the review).

Content
Aside from semi-coloured back and front cover (which cleverly wraps around if you print it yourself), the PDF is a black and white, two-column affair. The text is spaced out with large margins and it doesn't take long to read through all the rules. Spaced throughout are various "quotes" (some of which I'm sure I should recognise) but there is not internal artwork.

Character creation is described in a single page and could easily be completed by complete beginners with just that information in the first 10 or 15 minutes of a game at a convention.

This is followed by 8 pages that contain the actual rules. These are relatively straightforward although a little indexing (or bookmarking) of the PDF would have been useful.

Mission creation is covered over 3 pages and then there are single page sections for Refresh scenes (a roleplaying scene where the agents get a chance to recover damage), chase scenes, obstacles, and Espionage Points (which allow extra dice to be rolled at important moments).

Character advancement is next along with advancing both gear and support team members (3 pages) before a single page on "Special FX Budget" which basically states that the game uses a "gritty" budget but doesn't explain any additional levels that may be used.

Finally we have 5 pages aimed purely at running the game with advice for those in the GM hot seat.

System
Mechanically, Deniable Asset uses a d12 dice pool system which it calls the "Power of 12". A number of d12 are rolled based on the attribute (here called Modus Operandi) and each roll of 7 or more is counted as a success. There are four attributes (Blunt Instrument, Infiltrator, Investigator, and Technician) and you assign a number of points to each as you see fit (6 to your best area, 5 next, then 4 and finally 3). In order to attempt a task, you pick the attribute you'd like use and narrate how you'd use it. This is where I find the rules breaking down a little. One of the examples is "[u]sing a gun" and, in it, it explains how you could use any of the attributes to fire the weapon (rather than just the obvious choice of Blunt Instrument) as long as the narrative backs it up. This means that, in essence, and with a bit of clever thinking, you could always use your best attribute to complete tasks. Indeed, this is highlighted but then hand waved with a "this is a role playing game" response (twice in fact) before stating that, actually, you might want to use a weaker attribute in order to protect your stronger ones against damage. In regards to damage, similar to the PDQ System, the attribute used in a losing conflict is reduced by one. This is regardless of the total number of successes which seems a little strange as the rules state that the greater the number of successes the more, well, successful the attempt - this obviously doesn't translate directly into damage. Once a character's attributes are all reduced to zero then they are dead - except they aren't. Instead the player or the GM can choose to take/give a Flaw (which is a small phrase relating to the "death"). Anytime it is deemed appropriate, the Flaw can be enacted and a single d12 is taken away from the attribute roll. Similar to Flaws are Perks which add a single d12 to an attribute roll.

Conclusion
As previously mentioned, Deniable Asset is heavily based on the narrative with the group, as a whole, working towards creating an interesting and dynamic story. As such, the rules are on the light side. This isn't my normal sort of game though so I found it a bit jarring. However, amongst the burgeoning "Indie" community, I can see this game working well.

Rating: 7/10

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deniable Asset
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Pirates: The Fountain Of Youth -- Adventure C7
Publisher: New Dimension Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/20/2012 10:43:47
Absolutely the worst scenario I have ever bought. Completely unusable in it's current form unless your players love being led by the nose through (almost every since "part" has a variation on the following sentence: "Run them one and all and and in the order they are present."). No free will allowed at all.

Additionally, there are things included but never explained - the PCs are all suffering from a curse that gets worse throughout the adventure but there is no indication as to why they are cursed (although it is intimated that it is purely because they are undertaking the adventure!) or how to remove it (presumably stop the adventure).

Likewise, there is a handout that can be found reasonably early that is in some sort of code. It is never referred to again and the GM isn't told what it means (and, even, if it has any bearing on the adventure).

On the plus side, there are a couple of good ideas (and good one illustration) but for a product of this size that's too much missing and nowhere near enough hitting and nothing I couldn't have come up with myself.

Sorry, but the worst £1.88 I have ever spent.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Pirates: The Fountain Of Youth -- Adventure C7
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Dark Oak
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/21/2011 09:42:31
Dark Oak is the sort of excellent scenario I've come to expect from Creighton Broadhurst. It is presented in a clear and precise way and comes complete with some outstanding art and maps. Indeed, the art and maps could be considered to be worth the price alone!

The scenario itself has been written in such a way as to allow it to be slotted into any home campaign with minimal fuss and is designed to be played through in a standard session. The encounters are creatively thought out with the, potential, combatants having their own tactics and, as well as the obvious threats, there are also environmental hazards to contend with.

Included in the PDF are 6 pre-generated characters that allow for a GM to offer this up as a one-off break from another campaign if needed - perhaps as an introduction to Pathfinder itself.

Overall, as I stated earlier, this is an excellent scenario and I look forward to seeing more from Creighton and Raging Swan Press.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dark Oak
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Thrilling Tales 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds)
Publisher: Adamant Entertainment
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/27/2010 11:52:57
Originally posted on UK Role Players: http://www.ukroleplayers.com/reviews/thrilling-tales/

Thrilling Tales is a 256 page, 8.5"x5.5" paperback, pulp supplement for Savage Worlds published by Adamant Entertainment. It is available in both print ($24.95/£14.99 from Cubicle 7) and PDF ($14.95/£9.67 from DriveThruRPG and other PDF stores). This review is of the print version.

OVERVIEW
The front and back covers are full-colour with evocative artwork of the genre, while the interior is black and white. Each page has a background that makes the pages appear to be from a dog-eared book, matching the cover (which hass fake creases and rips printed on the edges) and the layout is, for the most part, double-columned. The interior art comprises a mixture of, what looks to be, newly commissioned art, original art from the era, and photographs. It is all appropriate and adds to the general pulp feel very well. The content is split up into eleven chapters: Pulp Adventure; A Timeline of the 1930s; Characters; Equipment; Pulp Gaming Rules; Pulp Villains; Pulp Villains - The Nazis; Pulp Villains - The Thugee; Pulp Villains - Perils of the Orient; Adventure Generator; and The Crimson Emperor (a "Plot Point" campaign).

The Pulp Adventure chapter takes up 11 pages and starts with a short piece of fiction before delving into a brief history of pulp and the different genres within it.

A Timeline of the 1930s covers, over 5 pages, brief bullet-points of major events occurring in that decade. Any one of these could easily be used as the backdrop to an adventure - or even part of the adventure itself and serves as a good starting point for further research should the reader require it.

In the Characters chapter, comprising 47 pages, we are provided with 18 archetypes that players may wish to follow when creating their characters (ranging from Ace Reporter, through G-Man and Mad Scientist, to Trusted Sidekick). Each contains a short piece of fiction fitting the archetype as well as suggested skills, edges, and hindrances. While it appears that these are aimed at players, GMs will find them useful as well when it comes to creating their villainous NPCs (indeed, some of the archetypes aren't ones that players (as heroes) are likely to follow anyway (such as Mastermind and Mobster). Character creation rules follow this, although as this is a licenced Savage Worlds product, this is limited to stating that they follow the rules written in the Savage Worlds Explorer's Edition except for starting rank - Thrilling Tales characters start, at the minimum, at Seasoned rank and may be higher depending on the number of players and the type of game being run. As you would expect, there are some new Hindrances and Edges that fit the setting (such as Glass Jaw (which gives you a penalty to soak rolls) and Deus Ex Machina (which allows you to spend a Bennie to escape death - in keeping with the cliffhangers from the serials of old)).

Equipment provides 17 pages of statistics and information on a range of 1930s weapons and vehicles (including a zeppelin and U-Boat!) - the vast majority of which are accompanied by photographs depicting the actual items.

The Pulp Gaming Rules chapter provides in 6 pages, rules additions and amendments to better fit a pulp adventure. These include changes to the way incapacitation works, introducing stunts (whereby the player can make things, voluntarily, more difficult for their character in exchange for the chance to gain more Bennies) and story declarations (whereby players can spend a Benny to try and declare certain thins about the setting and story), adding in two more layers of NPC (Henchmen (who are Extras but with a Wild Die) and Mooks (who are Extras but without edges or hindrances and who always go "down" after being successfully damaged - no Shaken for them!), and, my personal favourite, Gloating (whereby the villain, once he has captured the players, must make a check or blurt out his entire plan).

The Pulp Villains chapter, and the following three chapters, covers the type of opposition you can throw at players in a pulp game. The first chapter provides four different villains with suitable adventure hooks for each. The following chapters go into greater detail about the quintessential pulp villains: Nazis; the Thugee; and the Orient. The real world history of each group is provided with enough detail to enable GMs to use them in their games whilst also providing sample NPCs (from Mook level and up) and interesting adventure hooks.

In the Adventure Generator chapter you will find 15 pages that provide an easy to use generator for adventures - for just that time when you're asked to run a game at short notice.

Finally, we have The Crimson Emperor, the "Plot Point" campaign. Unfortunately, it's not a Plot Point campaign in the same sense as those found in the likes of 50 Fathoms, but five linked scenarios which are nicely put together and will provide for quite a few nights entertainment.

THOUGHTS
So, that's the overview of the book, but how good is it?

Thrilling Tales is a very good genre book for Savage Worlds. There are some minor typos and editing errors (the most noticable of which is a hangover from it's d20 origins) but these do not detract from the content. Indeed, if I had to say something negative about the book, the only thing I can find is that the naming of The Crimson Emperor as a Plot Point campaign. This is just me nit-picking though and I really like Thrilling Tales. It's size is a big plus and I've found myself wishing more companies would print books at this size.

The game mechanics additions are balanced and complement the gaming style aimed for perfectly, while the pictures of the vast majority of equipment make it easy to visualise things. Likewise, the historical information on the various villain groups presented helps to ground things in reality - even if you do decide to add in weird science later ;)

My favourite part of Thrilling Tales though is the Adventure Generator. It's something so simple, yet so detailed. Throw a few options together, add five minutes of thinking and you have an adventure for a session or two. Perfect.

Overall, Thrilling Tales is one of the best Savage Worlds settings I've read so far and I'm looking forward to being able to use it in the future.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Thrilling Tales 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds)
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Expanded Character Sheet (PFRPG)
Publisher: LPJ Design
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/30/2009 12:24:07
Pretty disappointed by this to be honest. It's billed as a 19-page expanded character sheet but it's not really. The character sheet itself is only 6 pages long (these are the 6 pages you see in the preview). I thought that the 9 pages that aren't shown in the preview would contact the spell listings for the cleric, bard, etc. No. You see those little boxes on the 3rd page of the preview? That's the class-specific elements of the spell listing! Except that it's badly named. A better name would be "small space to write basic details". Even worse is that it's repeated for every magic using class when, in most cases, one would be enough (with slight word changes) to cover them all. The detail of the spell listing is on page 4 of the preview - yes, that's right, a page where you write in the spells yourself. Maybe I'm expecting too much, but the words "Spell Listing" imply to me that I'll be getting a listing of spells, not a blank space to list them myself.

What about the Campaign Notes and Session Events sections? Quarter page each. That must be a short campaign I'm expected to play in if a quarter page is all I need for campaign notes!

One bonus was the inclusion of condition cards although one of the most commonly used (at least in my games) is missing (Stunned).

Overall though, I'm not impressed. Yes, it's only $1/60p but it's not worth it.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Expanded Character Sheet (PFRPG)
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Barbarians of Lemuria (Legendary Edition)
Publisher: Beyond Belief Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/13/2009 09:28:31
This review was written for UK Role Players (http://www.ukroleplayers.com)

Artwork:
(5/10) There was some.

Apart from the bright cover the rest of the art work is all black and white.
I didn't like most of the artwork but its easily ignored.


Layout:
(7/10) A couple of issues.

Layout was 2 columns across the page much like a newspaper with each of the chapters/sections well headed and easy to find. I had a couple of issues with the layout but its more pickness than show stoppers.

Overall the logical layout could have been better but its saved by the fact the rules are light enough to be easily memorized.



Content:
(9/10) Much better than expected!

INTRODUCTION - Good genre fit however it was dull.
It was almost as though the author wanted to get to a point in the worlds
time line so he used the *Insert generic back-story here* trick. Thankfully
at 3 pages it was fairly short.

ROLE PLAYING - After reading the introduction I wasn't greatly impressed however
once I hit the role playing section I found that my interest grew. Barbarians
gives a good overview of what's expected of a rp game and its players. The
section also does a really good job of creating the feel for game. At the end of
this section is the rule for the core mechanic of Barbarians. I found this an odd
and distracting place to introduce the rule.

CREATING A HERO - It soon becomes very clear in Barbarians that character creation
and rules in general are light, quick and easy to pick up.

HEROIC CAREERS - I just love this idea! There are no specific skills in Barbarians.
Instead there is a fantastic (and I really mean fantastic) mechanic for dealing with
skill checks. They are called careers; careers give you a high level overview of what
your character is expected to be good at. For example if you had pirate as a career
you will receive a bonus when making sailing skill check. Also as a pirate its pretty
safe to assume you would have been involved with gambling so if you find yourself in
a gambling situation you could use your pirate career to receive a bonus. The book sets
out which careers you are allowed to take and its a pretty comprehensive and decent list.
However for all you out there that like to add your own stuff there is certainly room
for this.

HEROIC BEGINNINGS - Another good section that adds to the feel of the system. Depending
on where your hero (character) is from it is assumed you will be good at certain activities
or you will have certain ways/mannerisms. For example if I had a character/hero from Satarla
(a city of high culture and sophistication) you would assume I'm wealthy and arrogant.

But hold on! I hear you cry...this just offends my sense of variety. How can all Pirates
be good at sailing or gambling? Why are all the people from Satarla arrogant? Its a simple
answer which barbarians explains all the way through. The characters/heroes/villans are
all very stereotypical. Its meant that way so heroes are indeed heroes, Villians are vile
and pirates are...well...very piratey! Its a game of heroic sagas afterall.

PLAYING THE GAME - The first thing you come across in the 'playing the game section' is
the core mechanic for the game. Which has already been covered in the 'role playing' section
earlier in the book. Strange because it really isn't that hard to get a grasp of. Combat is
also covered in this section; and its not bad. Its light, fast paced and doesn't require mini's.
Following combat is rewards and advancements. Barbarian sagas are spilt into adventures and at
the end of each saga the hero's receive these rewards and advancement. The rewards are suppose to be ludicrously huge. The heroes should receive mountains of gold, baskets full of gems and chests overflowing with silver coins. And then if they wish to gain advancement they have to describe exactly how they spend (blow) the lot! I love it!!!

TRAPPINGS OF HEROES - In this section it has some details of weapons and armour the players
could find themselves using. In theme with the rest of the game the rules are light and
thankfully encumbrance does not rear its ugly head.

MAGIC,Etc. - I found the rules for magic quite heavy going. There is too much going on for
my liking and if completely honest I find it doesn't fit the game well at all. If it were
me I would probably drop 90% of the magic section. Eleven and half pages on magic...about
nine and half pages too much is the conclusion.

GAZETTEER OF LEMURIA - This section gives the reader/GM a detailed look at the geography
of Lemuria, what the cultures are like in each of the different places and a look at the races
who inhabit the lands as well as just about anything you'd want to know about the world.
All in all a detailed section which adds to the feel of the game. Its a section I would
browse through but I wouldn't run sagas just based on the information here.

THE SAGAS - This section helps the GM build sagas and even has a number of pre-made sagas
so you dive right into Barbarians.


Overall Value:
(8.5/10) You would be hard pressed to spend $10 on a better RPG.

When I started reading Barbarians I can't say it grabbed me. The introduction was dull and uninspiring. Some introductions by themselves make you want to jump up and run the game already. Barbarians didn't do this and if there is one change I could make it would be with this.

However I made it through the intro. and found to my absolute pleasure the rest of the book was great. The rules are light and unobtrusive and the character creation helps put the players in the spotlight and makes them feel truly awesome. The career, rewards and advancement rules really hit all the right buttons and I did a leap of joy when reading them!

Trad. or Indie for $10 from DriveThruRPG.com there is no excuse why you shouldn't buy it. And indeed I plan on adding this to my already busy 'to run' schedule.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Barbarians of Lemuria (Legendary Edition)
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Publisher Reply:
Thanks for the review Dave. Just for info, Dave's review was of the original version of Barbarians of Lemuria. Since this review, the pdf has undergone a transformation, with new (and significantly better) artwork and improved layout.
The Cabin Boy's Pocket Pirate Handbook
Publisher: Healing Fireball
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/22/2008 14:02:31
Everyone knows how to roleplay a pirate don't they? Or do they? Well, if their information is a little lacking, this PDF will soon correct that. It comes in two books (the "in character" one and the "out of character" one) as well as two styles (bookfold (print) and on-screen). The bookfold version will be very handy in allowing me to have a few of the in character books on the gaming table during a session while the on-screen version allows me to read it on the laptop without having to manually try and find the pages ;)

I'm very impressed. Normally I'm a little wary of buying something from a new publisher (especially something that hasn't been reviewed before) but $4 seemed like a fair gamble and I'm glad I did it. I'll happily look at other things Healing Fireball have for sale and I recommend you do too.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Cabin Boy's Pocket Pirate Handbook
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Pirates II Set
Publisher: Arion Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/08/2007 16:04:33
Another excellent set of paper figures from Arion Games. I wasn't sure I needed another set of pirates as their Pirates I set has served me well for a while now, but the low cost (especially in comparison with his competitors) and my renewed interest in a more supernatural pirates campaign led me to take the plunge. It's a decision I've not regretted. The additional figures are an excellent addition and those that I specifically bought this product for are just what I needed. Thanks :)

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pirates II Set
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Buccaneers & Bokor, Issue Seven
Publisher: Adamant Entertainment
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/22/2006 00:00:00
I'm writing this review with a heavy heart to be honest. I'm a big fan of Skull & Bones and the previous six issues of Buccaneers & Bokor (just ask Adamant Entertainment how many times I've hassled them about details on when the next issue is coming out). However, this issue sees the e-zine expand into fantasy pirates - something that I have no interest in whatsoever. I'm not stupid though and I hope that this expansion proves worthwhile to Adamant Entertainment, even if I won't be along for the ride anymore.

Onto this issue itself. It's not a bad one, consisting of three sections. The first Nautical Fantasy article (taking up 11 pages), the final part of the Governor's Prize series (taking up 23 pages), and the Sea-Witch prestige class (taking up 4 pages).

Of these articles, the final part of the Governor's prize is my favourite but, to be honest, that's no surprise as it's the reason for my anticipation for the issues (and I've not even been able to run them yet!). The Sea-Witch prestige class is reasonable, but I'm not keen on adding in magic to my campaign (outside of that already provided in Skull & Bones) so I doubt I'll use it. As for the Nautical Fantasy article, well... sorry, but I haven't read it yet. It's just not something I'm interested in.




LIKED: The climax to the Governor's Prize series of scenarios

DISLIKED: The Nautical Fantasy article. I'm just not into fantasy pirates.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied

[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Buccaneers & Bokor, Issue Seven
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ERG001: Portrait Package - Full rights
Publisher: Eastern Raider Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/18/2006 00:00:00
Very nice pictures. Now I just need the chance to use them ;)

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
ERG001: Portrait Package - Full rights
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Publisher Reply:
Thank you, I am glad you like my images.
Native Americans Set
Publisher: Arion Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/18/2006 00:00:00
These are another excellent set of paper figures :)

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Native Americans Set
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Cowboys II Set
Publisher: Arion Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/18/2006 00:00:00
These are another excellent set of paper figures :)

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cowboys II Set
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Cowboy Set
Publisher: Arion Games
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/18/2006 00:00:00
These are another excellent set of paper figures :)

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cowboy Set
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Gunslingers and Gamblers
Publisher: FJ Gaming
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/10/2006 00:00:00
Over the last year, or so, I've picked up almost every, in-print, Wild West/Cowboy roleplaying game. Each one had something I was looking for, but not the whole package. Until I bought Gunslingers and Gamblers that is. This is the first one that has everything I'm looking for. So? What is it I was looking for?

* An interesting, but ultimately simple, rules system.
* Captures the feel of the Wild West.
* Excellent background information.

Gunslingers and Gamblers gets big ticks for each aspect.

* The use of poker dice is a masterstroke. Yes, if you look deeply enough there's a feel of Yahtzee to the main game mechanic, but tying it in with poker dice means that it feels just right. Basically, the idea is that you try to get the best hand you can with 5 poker dice. Depending on the level of your ability (called a trait here), you might get the chance to re-roll some, or all, of the dice (much like discarding and gaining new cards in a real poker game).

* The artwork used throughout the PDF is appropriate without being over-used, while each chapter header includes a real-world quote from the time. Additionally, throughout the rules, the feel of the Wild West oozes out.

* Not only is there a wide listing of the different stereotypical people in the West, but a large portion of the download is devoted to providing excellent background information for both the novice and experienced Western GM.

This is, without a doubt, the best Western/Cowboy roleplaying game I've purchased (and, as I've already said, I've got nearly all of the ones currently in print!) I would whole-heartedly, and unreservedly, recommend it to anyone looking to run their own game or campaign.


LIKED: The rules. Some people might be put off by the Yahtzee comparison I've made above, but don't be. Combining it with poker dice means that it really works in this game and, in fact, actually adds to the general flavour.

The, premade, Harris County. Perfect for a GM that is either new to Western/Cowboy roleplaying games, or the GM who's a little stuck for time and needs a county in a hurry.

DISLIKED: Honestly? Nothing.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gunslingers and Gamblers
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Publisher Reply:
Thanks Dave, much appreciated and I'm glad you like it :)
Buccaneers & Bokor, Issue Six
Publisher: Adamant Entertainment
by Dave M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/26/2006 00:00:00
Yet again, Adamant Entertainment have put together an excellent issue of Buccaneers & Bokor. Every article has value with the highlights being the continuation of the Governor's Prize series of scenarios and the, long-awaited, Settlements of the Spanish Main article.

My only complaint is that I now have to wait for the next issue for more excellent Skull & Bones material.




LIKED: The Settlements of the Spanish Main article pips it just ahead of the Governor's Prize continuation.

DISLIKED: Nothing! What's not to like? 47 pages for $5 - it's a steal!

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied

[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Buccaneers & Bokor, Issue Six
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